FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > The House of the Rising Sun

"The House of the Rising Sun" is a folk song from the United States. Also called "House of the Rising Sun" or occasionally "Rising Sun Blues", it tells of a life gone wrong in New Orleans. Depending on the version, the song may be sung from the perspective of a woman or a man. The best-known rendition of the song is by the English group The Animals in 1964, which was a number one hit in both the United States and United Kingdom. [The] House of the Rising Sun may refer to: The House of the Rising Sun , a. ... Folk song redirects here. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ...

Contents

Origin and early versions

Like many classic folk ballads, the authorship of "The House of the Rising Sun" is uncertain. Folklorist Alan Lomax, author of the seminal 1941 songbook Our Singing Country, wrote that the melody was taken from a traditional English ballad and the lyrics written by a pair of Kentuckians named Georgia Turner and Bert Martin. Other scholars have proposed different explanations, although Lomax's is generally considered most plausible[citation needed]. The phrase "House of the Rising Sun" is a euphemism for a brothel, but it is not known whether or not the house described in the lyrics was an actual or fictitious place. Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ... Authorship is the act of creating a work, idea or theory. ... Lomax playing guitar on stage at the Mountain Music Festival, Asheville, North Carolina, sometime between 1939 and 1950. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Euphemism is the substitution of an agreeable or inoffensive expression for one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant to the listener; or in the case of doublespeak, to make it less troublesome for the speaker. ... A brothel, also known as a bordello or whorehouse, is an establishment specifically dedicated to prostitution, providing the prostitutes a place to meet and to have sex with the clients. ...


The oldest known existing recording is by versatile entertainer Clarence "Tom" Ashley and Gwen Foster and was released in 1934 . Ashley said he had learned it from his grandfather, Enoch Ashley. Texas Alexander's "The Risin' Sun", which was recorded in 1928, is sometimes mentioned as the first recording, but this is a completely different song. Roy Acuff, who recorded the song commercially on November 3, 1938, may have learned this number from such neighboring Smoky Mountain artists as Clarence Ashley or the Callahan Brothers, an influential duet team of the '30s and '40s. In 1941, Woody Guthrie recorded a version. In late 1948 Lead Belly recorded a version called "In New Orleans" in the sessions that later became the album Lead Belly's Last Sessions (1994, Smithsonian Folkways). In 1957 Glenn Yarbrough recorded the song for Elektra Records. Clarence Tom Ashley (September 29 1895 (or 1885?) - June 2 1967) was a 20th-century American clawhammer banjo player and singer. ... Roy Acuff on the cover of The Great Roy Acuff (1964) Roy Claxton Acuff (15 September 1903 – 23 November 1992) was an American country musician. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachian Mountain system The Great Smoky Mountains are a major mountain range in the southern part of the Appalachian Mountains, the second ridge line forming a north-south running mountain chain from the Eastern United States and bordering the... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... For the film, see Leadbelly (film). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Folkways Records is a record label founded by Moses Asch. ... Glenn Yarbrough (January 12, 1930—) is an American folk singer. ... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ...


In an interview by Martin Scorsese in his Dylan biopic No Direction Home, folksinger Dave Van Ronk recounted that he had originally worked out the arrangement for his coffee house act. Dylan then "borrowed" the arrangement for his first album, 1962's Bob Dylan, without Van Ronk's permission, and recorded it before Van Ronk had got around to recording it himself. Van Ronk was also displeased because he thought that Dylan had butchered the song.[1] Van Ronk was subsequently upset when people referred to his version as a cover of Dylan's song. The inspiration for The Animals' arrangement is sometimes said to come from Dylan's recording, and other times said to be from Josh White or Nina Simone. Regardless, they enjoyed a huge hit with the song, much to Dylan's chagrin when his version was referred to as a cover of The Animals' version - the irony of which was not lost on Van Ronk. Dave Van Ronk went on record as saying that the whole issue was a "tempest in a teapot", and that Dylan stopped playing the song after The Animals' hit because fans accused Dylan of plagiarizing Price's version. Bob Dylan has said he first heard The Animals' version on his automobile radio and "jumped out of his car seat" because he liked it so much. An interview with Eric Burdon revealed that the Animals heard Josh White perform "House" in Europe in the early 1960s, and decided to cover it.[citation needed] Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... A biographical film or biopic is a film about a particular person or group of people, based on events that actually happened. ... For other uses, see No direction home (disambiguation). ... Dave Van Ronk (June 30, 1936 – February 10, 2002) was a folk singer born in Brooklyn, New York, who settled in Greenwich Village, New York City, and was nicknamed the Mayor of MacDougal Street. ... A Street Cafe, Jerusalem, Henry Fenn (1838- ): steel engraving in Picturesque Palestine, ca 1875 A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or caf shares some of the characteristics of a bar, and some of the characteristics of a restaurant. ... Bob Dylan is the eponymous debut album from American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Joshua Daniel White (February 11, 1914–-September 5, 1969),[1] best known as Josh White, was a legendary American singer, guitarist, songwriter, actor, and civil rights activist. ... Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known by her stage name Nina Simone (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger and civil rights activist. ... Joshua Daniel White (February 11, 1914–-September 5, 1969),[1] best known as Josh White, was a legendary American singer, guitarist, songwriter, actor, and civil rights activist. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The Animals version

"The House of the Rising Sun"
"The House of the Rising Sun" cover
Single by The Animals
B-side "Talkin' 'Bout You" (R. Charles)
Released June 1964 (UK)
August 1964 (U.S.)
Format 7" single
Recorded 18 May 1964
Genre Rock
Length 4:29 (full - UK)
2:58 (edited - U.S. original)
Label Columbia Graphophone DB7301 (UK)
MGM Records 13264 (U.S.)
Writer Trad., arranged Alan Price
Producer Mickie Most
The Animals singles chronology
"Baby Let Me Take You Home"
(1964)
"House of the Rising Sun"
(1964)
"I'm Crying"
(1964)

Regardless of its sources of inspiration, The Animals' take on "The House of the Rising Sun" sounded wholly new: writer Dave Marsh described it as "the first folk-rock hit," sounding "as if they'd connected the ancient tune to a live wire,"[2] while writer Ralph McLean of the BBC agreed that "it was arguably the first folk rock tune," calling it "a revolutionary single" after which "the face of modern music was changed forever."[3] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... “B-Sides” redirects here. ... For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... In music, a single is a short (usually ten minutes or less) record, usually featuring one or two tracks as A-sides, often accompanied by several B-sides—usually remixes or other songs. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Columbia Records is the oldest continually used brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888. ... MGM Records was a record label started by the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer movie studio in 1946. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... Alan Price (born April 19, 1941 in Fairfield, Washington, Tyne and Wear, England) is a musician, songwriter, and actor. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Mickie Most, born Michael Peter Hayes (20 June1938–30 May2003), was a successful English record producer, notably with a string of Number One hit singles with his own RAK Recordsand acts such as The Animals, Hermans Hermits, Donovan, and Suzi Quatro. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Dave Marsh (born 1950) is an American music critic. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


The Animals' version transposes the narrative of the song from the point of view of a woman led into a life of degradation, to that of a male, whose father was now a gambler and drunkard, as opposed to the sweetheart in earlier versions.


The Animals had begun featuring their arrangement of "House of the Rising Sun" during a joint concert tour with Chuck Berry, using it as their closing number to differentiate themselves from acts which always closed with straight rockers.[4] It got a tremendous reaction from the audience, convincing initially reluctant producer Mickie Most that it had hit potential[4], and between tour stops the group went to a small recording studio on Kingsway in London[4] to capture it. A concert comprises a performance, usually involving some degree of formality, and particularly a performance featuring music. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Mickie Most, born Michael Peter Hayes (20 June1938–30 May2003), was a successful English record producer, notably with a string of Number One hit singles with his own RAK Recordsand acts such as The Animals, Hermans Hermits, Donovan, and Suzi Quatro. ... ==Individual Studio== A recording studio is a facility for sound recording. ... Kingsway is a major road in central London in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Recorded in just one take on 18 May 1964,[5] it started with a famous electric guitar A minor chord arpeggio by Hilton Valentine, which inspired countless beginning guitarists.[6][3][7] The performance took off with Eric Burdon's lead vocal, which has been variously described as "howling",[2] "soulful",[8] and "deep and gravelly as the north-east English coal town of Newcastle that spawned him."[7] Finally, Alan Price's pulsating organ part completed the sound. Burdon later said, "We were looking for a song that would grab people's attention,"[9] and they succeeded: "House of the Rising Sun" was a true trans-Atlantic hit, topping both the UK pop singles chart (in July of 1964) and the U.S. pop singles chart (in September, when it became the first British Invasion number one unconnected with The Beatles[10]); it was the group's breakthrough hit in both countries and became their signature song.[11]. The song was also a hit in a number of other countries. is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... An electric guitar An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... Generally speaking, a minor chord is any chord which has a minor third above its root, as opposed to a major chord which has a major third. ... Various arpeggios as seen on a staff Notation of a chord in arpeggio In music, an arpeggio is a broken chord where the notes are played or sung in succession rather than simultaneously. ... Hilton Valentine (born Hilton Stuart Patterson Valentine, on 21 May 1943) in North Shields, Northumberland, England, is a British musician who was the original guitarist in the band The Animals. ... A singer is a musician who uses his or her voice to produce music. ... Alan Price (born April 19, 1941 in Fairfield, Washington, Tyne and Wear, England) is a musician, songwriter, and actor. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... “British Hit Singles” redirects here. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... A signature song is the one song (or, in some cases, one of a few songs) that a popular and well-established singer, or band, is most closely identified with, even if they have had success with a variety of songs. ...


The Animals' rendition of the song is recognized as one of the classic outputs of the British Invasion. Writer Lester Bangs labelled it "a brilliant rearrangement" and "a new standard rendition of an old standard composition."[12] It ranked number 122 on Rolling Stone magazine's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list. It is also one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. The RIAA placed it as number 240 on their Songs of the Century list. In 1999 it received a Grammy Hall of Fame Award. And besides critical acclaim, it has long since become a staple of oldies and classic rock radio formats. A 2005 Channel Five poll ranked it as Britons' fourth favourite number one song of all time.[5] For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... Lester Bangs during an interview Leslie Conway Bangs (December 14, 1948 – April 30, 1982) was an American music journalist, author and musician. ... This article is about the magazine. ... ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fames 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll is based on the permanent exhibit of the same name. ... The RIAA Logo. ... The Songs of the Century list is part of an education project by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the National Endowment for the Arts, and Scholastic Inc. ... See also: Grammy Grammy Hall of Fame Award List of Grammy Hall of Fame Award recipients A-D List of Grammy Hall of Fame Award recipients J-P List of Grammy Hall of Fame Award recipients Q-Z Alphabetical listing by title: Categories: Lists | Grammy Hall of Fame Awards ... Oldies is a generic term commonly used to describe a radio format that usually concentrates on Top 40 music from the 50s, 60s and 70s. ... For the magazine, see Classic Rock (magazine). ... A radio format or programming format describes the overall content broadcast on a radio station. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...


As recorded, "House of the Rising Sun" ran four and a half minutes, regarded as far too long for a pop single at the time.[5] Producer Most, who otherwise minimized his role on this occasion — "Everything was in the right place ... It only took 15 minutes to make so I can't take much credit for the production"[13] — nonetheless was now a believer and declared it as a single at its full length, saying "We're in a microgroove world now, we will release it."[13]


In the United States, though, the original single (MGM 13264) was an edited 2:58 version. The MGM Golden Circle reissue (KGC 179) featured the unedited 4:29 version, although the label shows the edited playing time of 2:58. The edited version was included on the group's 1964 U.S. debut album The Animals, while the full version was later included on their best-selling 1966 U.S. greatest hits album The Best of The Animals. The Animals is the self-titled American debut album from the British invasion group, The Animals. ... The Best of The Animals was The Animals first greatest hits collection. ...


"House of the Rising Sun" was not included on any of the group's British albums. Rather, it was reissued as a single twice in subsequent decades, charting both times: to number 25 in 1972, and to number 11 in 1982.


However, the arranging credit went only to Alan Price, and not to the whole band as many have felt was deserved. Thus only Price received songwriter's royalties for the hit, a fact that has caused bitterness ever since, especially with Valentine.[3]


Frijid Pink version

"House of the Rising Sun"
"House of the Rising Sun" cover
Single by Frijid Pink
B-side "Drivin' Blues" (U.S.)
"God Gave Me You" (UK)
Released January 1970
Format 7" single
Genre Hard rock
Length 4:44
Label Parrot Records (U.S.)
London Records (UK)
Writer Trad.
Producer Michael Valvano

The only rendition other than The Animals' to become a hit came in early 1970, when Detroit-based Frijid Pink released their take on the song. Sometimes described as done in psychedelic music style, Pink's rendition is actually more aligned with the proto-metal/proto-punk sound of fellow contemporaneous Detroit acts MC5 and The Stooges.[14] The performance was driven by Gary Ray Thompson's distorted guitar[15] with fuzz and wah wah effects, set against frenetic drumming from Richard Stevers. Lead singer Kelly Green's vocal phrasing almost exactly matched Eric Burdon's, and indeed the overall length and organization of the record was such that writer Lester Bangs later said The Animals' arrangement "was later imitated almost note for note with similar worldwide success by a troupe of Michigan no-talents called Frijid Pink."[12] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... “B-Sides” redirects here. ... In music, a single is a short (usually ten minutes or less) record, usually featuring one or two tracks as A-sides, often accompanied by several B-sides—usually remixes or other songs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Parrot Records was the name of at least two record labels, both are now defunct. ... London Records is a record label headquartered in the United Kingdom, originally marketing records in the United States, Canada and Latin America from 1947 through the 1980s. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Psychedelia in music (or also psychedelic music, less formally) is a term that refers to a broad set of popular music styles, genres and scenes, that may include psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, psychedelic techno, and others. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... MC5 (short for Motor City Five) was a hard rock band formed in Detroit, Michigan, USA in 1964 and active until 1972. ... This article is about the rock band. ... In the world of guitar music and guitar amplification, distortion is actively sought, evaluated, and appreciatively discussed in its endless flavors. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wah-wah is an imitative word for the sound of bending or altering musical notes to improve expressiveness, sounding much like a human voice saying the syllable wah for each note. ... Drumming may refer to: the act of playing the drums or other percussion instruments Drumming, a musical composition written by Steve Reich in 1971 for percussion ensemble This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Lester Bangs during an interview Leslie Conway Bangs (December 14, 1948 – April 30, 1982) was an American music journalist, author and musician. ...


Regardless of its merits, the recording was indeed again a trans-Atlantic success, reaching number 7 on the U.S. pop singles chart and number 4 on the UK Singles Chart. It was awarded gold record status in the U.S. in May 1970 for selling a million copies.[16] It also hit number one in a number of European countries, including West Germany and Norway. It would be Frijid Pink's only hit. “Hot 100” redirects here. ... “British Hit Singles” redirects here. ... The description Gold Album is applied to recorded music albums that have sold a minimum number of copies (in the US, currently 500,000 sales). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Later versions

Other artists have covered the song, and it has been a standard cover for at least four decades by bar bands and major recording artists alike. It has also been recorded, in Spanish as “La casa del sol naciente,” by the group Los Cinco Latinos. One of the best known new versions is played by Muse[citation needed]. // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... For other uses, see Muse (disambiguation). ...


The real house

Various places in New Orleans, Louisiana have been proposed as the inspiration for the song, with varying plausibility. Only two candidates have historical documentation as using the name "Rising Sun", both having listings in old period city directories. The first was a small short-lived hotel on Conti Street in the French Quarter in the 1820s. An excavation and document search in early 2005 found evidence supporting this claim, including an advertisement with language that may have euphemistically indicated prostitution. The second was a late 19th century "Rising Sun Hall" on the riverfront of the uptown Carrollton neighborhood, which seems to have been a building owned and used for meetings of a Social Aid & Pleasure Club, commonly rented out for dances and functions. Definite links to gambling or prostitution, if any, are undocumented for either of these buildings, neither of which still exists. Another claim is that The House of the Rising Sun actually existed between 1862 and about 1874 and was run by a Madam Marianne LeSoleil Levant whose name translates from French as such. Offbeat New Orleans, a guide book on New Orleans, asserts that the real house was at 826-830 St. Louis Street between 1862 and 1874 and was purportedly named for its madam, Marianne LeSoleil Levant. [citation needed] NOLA redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hotel (disambiguation). ... French Quarter: upper Chartres street looking down towards Jackson Square and the spires of St. ... Nationalistic independence helped reshape the world during this decade: Greece gains independence from the Ottoman Empire in the Greek War of Independence (1821-1827). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Carrollton is a neighborhood of uptown New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. It is the part of uptown New Orleans furthest up river from the French Quarter. ...


It is possible that the "House of the Rising Sun" is a metaphor for either the slave pens of the plantation, the plantation house, or the plantation itself, which were the subjects and themes of many traditional blues songs. Dave van Ronk claimed in his autobiography that he had seen pictures of the old New Orleans Prison for Women, the entrance to which was decorated with a rising sun design. He considered this proof that the House of the Rising Sun had been a nickname for the prison. Fundamentally, a plantation is usually a large farm or estate, especially in a tropical or semitropical country, on which cotton, tobacco, coffee, sugar cane, or trees and the like is cultivated, usually by resident laborers. ...


The gender of the singer is flexible. Earlier versions of the song are often sung from the female perspective, a woman who followed a drunk or a gambler to New Orleans and became a prostitute in the House of the Rising Sun (or, depending on one's interpretation, an inmate in a prison of the same name), such as in Joan Baez's version on her self-titled 1960 debut album. The Animals version was sung from a perspective of a male, warning about gambling and drinking. Bob Dylan's 1962 version and Shawn Mullins' recent covered version on his album "9th Ward Pickin' Parlor" is sung from the female perspective. Gender in common usage refers to the sexual distinction between male and female. ... Gambling (or betting) is any behavior involving the risk of money or valuables on the outcome of a game, contest, or other event in which the outcome of that activity is partially or totally dependent upon chance. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... The 9th ward is a highly distinctive region in New Orleans, Louisiana that is located in the eastern downriver portion of the city. ...


Lyrics

The traditional version, as written by Georgia Turner and Bert Martin, is as follows[17]:

 There is a house in New Orleans. They call the Rising Sun. It's been the ruin of many a poor girl. And me, Oh Lord! was one. My mother was a tailor, She sewed them new blue jeans. My lover he was a gambler, Oh Lord, Gambled down in New Orleans. My lover, he was a gambling man. He went from town to town; And the only time he was satisfied. Was when he drank his liquor down. Now the only thing a gambling man needs. Is a suitcase and a trunk; And the only time he's ever satisfied. Is when he's on a drunk. If I only list'nd when my dear mother said: Beware, my child, when you roam, Keep away from drunkards and all those gambling men, It's best by far to come home. Go and tell my baby sister. Never do like I have done, But to shun that house in New Orleans. That they call the Rising Sun. With one foot on the platform, And one foot on the train. I'm goin' back to New Orleans. To wear the ball and chain. I'm going back to New Orleans. My race is almost run; I'm going back to spend the rest of my life. Beneath that Rising Sun. 

Other recorded versions vary (for example the version recorded by The Animals), often changing or omitting verses, or adding new verses.


Cultural references

  • The song "The Devil Went Down to Georgia" written by Charlie Daniels Band makes a reference to this song in the lyric "the devil's in the house of the rising sun".
  • This song is played in Supernatural's episode "Roadkill" when a ghost named Greely appears
  • This song is played in the season two finale of the show My Name Is Earl when Earl is put in jail.
  • In the 1995 film Casino, Martin Scorsese chose to use this song when Robert De Niro's character Sam "Ace" Rothstein narrates the climactic downfall of everyone around him.
  • Professional wrestler Jimmy Rave uses The Animals' version of "The House of the Rising Sun" featuring an audio clip from the film Interview With The Vampire as an intro for his entrance theme.
  • When U2 and Green Day performed at the Superdome in 2006, their cover of The Skids' "The Saints Are Coming" opened with Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day singing the first stanza of "The House of the Rising Sun". When performed live the name "Rising Sun" was changed to "Superdome", but the original lyrics were used in a later studio recording of the song that was released on U2's album U218 Singles.
  • An episode on the television series Lost was entitled "House of the Rising Sun"
  • The introduction to this song is heard several times throughout the anime Excel Saga; the first time it can be heard is during a conversation between Excel and Pedro. On the Excel Saga soundtrack, this song is called "You Did Not Tell Me It Would Be This Tragic." The song matches the overall style of the Animals' performance, with twangy guitar arpeggios and organ melody.
  • This song is played during the third episode of the 1993 miniseries Wild Palms in the scene where Chickie Levitt is rescued from the "Fathers", but subsequently dies on the beach.
  • Especially in New Orleans, the tune is sometimes applied to the verses of "Amazing Grace".
  • Hilton Valentine's famous electric guitar A minor chord arpeggio was played during the beginning of the "Ironman" Gatorade advertisement.
Preceded by
"It's Over" by Roy Orbison
UK number one single
(The Animals version)

July 9, 1964 (1 week)
Succeeded by
"It's All Over Now" by The Rolling Stones
Preceded by
"Where Did Our Love Go" by The Supremes
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
(The Animals version)

September 5, 1964 (3 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Oh, Pretty Woman" by Roy Orbison

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The Devil Went Down to Georgia is a country song written and performed by the Charlie Daniels Band and released on their 1979 [1] album Million Mile Reflections. ... Charles Edward Charlie Daniels (born October 28, 1936 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is an American musician famous for his contributions to country and southern rock music. ... This is an overview of the Devil. ... This article is about the US TV series. ... My Name Is Earl is an Emmy Award-winning American sitcom created by Greg Garcia. ... Casino is a 1995 film directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book of the same name by Nicholas Pileggi and Larry Shandling. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... Robert Mario De Niro, Jr. ... James Guffey (born December 8, 1982) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name Jimmy Rave. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... This article is about the band Green Day. ... The Skids The Skids were an art-punk/punk rock and new wave band from Dunfermline, Scotland, founded in 1977 by Stuart Adamson (1958 - 2001, guitars / vocals / keyboards), Richard Jobson (vocals / guitar), Thomas Kellichan (drums) and William Simpson (bass guitar / vocals). ... The Saints Are Coming is a rock song by the Scottish punk rock band The Skids, off their debut album Scared to Dance from 1978. ... U218 Singles (originally titled U218) is a compilation by the Irish rock band U2. ... LOST redirects here. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... Serialized in Young King OURs Original run April 1997 – Present Volumes 18 (Ongoing) TV anime Director Shinichi Watanabe Studio J.C. Staff Licensor ADV Films Network TV Tokyo Original run 7 October 1999 – 30 March 2000 Episodes 26 (total) Excel Saga ) is a comedy manga series by Koushi Rikudou,[1... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Wild Palms is a six hour mini-series, which first aired in 1993 on the ABC Network in the United States. ... For other uses, see Amazing Grace (disambiguation). ... Hilton Valentine (born Hilton Stuart Patterson Valentine, on 21 May 1943) in North Shields, Northumberland, England, is a British musician who was the original guitarist in the band The Animals. ... Gatoradeis a non-carbonated sports drink marketed by the Quaker Oats Company, a division of PepsiCo. ... Its Over is an American song composed by Roy Orbison and Bill Dees and sung by Orbison. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... This is a list of the number one singles on the UK Singles Chart, during the 1960s. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Its All Over Now is a song by Bobby Womack and Shirley Womack. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Where Did Our Love Go is a 1964 hit song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label. ... For other uses, see Supremes (disambiguation). ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... This is a list of number-one hits in the United States by year from the Billboard Hot 100. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Oh, Pretty Woman is a song which was a worldwide hit for Roy Orbison. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Sounes, Howard. Down the Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan. Doubleday 2001. p136 ISBN 0-552-99929-6
  2. ^ a b Dave Marsh, The Heart of Rock & Soul: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made, NAL, 1989. Entry #91.
  3. ^ a b c Ralph McLean, "Stories Behind the Song: 'House of the Rising Sun'", BBC, undated. Accessed May 4, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c Eric Burdon, I Used To Be An Animal, But I'm All Right Now, Faber and Faber, 1986, pp. 60-62.
  5. ^ a b c Ray Marshall, "The rise of supergroup", Newcastle Evening Chronicle, August 17, 2005. Accessed May 5, 2007.
  6. ^ T.J. McGrath, "Hilton Valentine: The Sun Also Rises", Dirty Linen, June/July 2006. Accessed May 4, 2007.
  7. ^ a b Barry York, "House of Worship", The Age, July 9, 2004. Accessed May 4, 2007.
  8. ^ Gina Vivinetto, "More animal magnetism", St. Petersburg Times, January 15, 2004. Accessed May 4, 2007.
  9. ^ "House of the Rising Sun", Rolling Stone, posted December 9, 2004. Accessed May 4, 2007.
  10. ^ "The Animals", Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, 1994. Accessed May 4, 2007.
  11. ^ Muze article, "Best Of The Animals (Abkco)", Tower Records. Accessed May 4, 2007.
  12. ^ a b Lester Bangs, "The British Invasion", in The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock & Roll, 1980, p. 176.
  13. ^ a b Jon Kutner, Spencer Leigh, 1000 UK Number One Hits, Omnibus Press, 2005.
  14. ^ Frigid Pink entry, Discographicus. Accessed May 19, 2007.
  15. ^ Frijid Pink entry, All Music Guide. Accessed May 19, 2007.
  16. ^ RIAA searchable database
  17. ^ What's the Animals' "House of the Rising Sun" all about?, Straight Dope, March 27, 2001. Accessed June 11, 2007.

Dave Marsh (born 1950) is an American music critic. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Eric Victor Burdon (born 11 May 1941, in Walker, Newcastle upon Tyne) was the lead singer of The Animals and later of War. ... The Evening Chronicle is a daily, evening newspaper produced in Newcastle upon Tyne, covering Tyne and Wear, southern Northumberland and northern County Durham. ... Dirty Linen is a bi-monthly magazine of folk and world music based in Baltimore, Maryland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Logo of the St. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Muze is a provider of digital media management tools that connect people to art, education, and entertainment. ... Tower Records is a retail music chain based in Sacramento, California, USA. It currently exists as an international franchise and an online music store. ... Lester Bangs during an interview Leslie Conway Bangs (December 14, 1948 – April 30, 1982) was an American music journalist, author and musician. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... The Straight Dope is a popular question and answer newspaper column published in the Chicago Reader (an alternative weekly), syndicated in thirty newspapers in the United States and Canada, and available online. ...

External links


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m