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Encyclopedia > The Hound of the Baskervilles
The Hound of the Baskervilles
First edition book cover
First edition book cover, 1902
Author Arthur Conan Doyle
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Series Sherlock Holmes
Genre(s) Detective, Crime, Mystery, Novel
Publisher George Newnes
Publication date 1901 to 1902 serial (1902 in book form)
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback) and Audio book
Pages 243
ISBN NA
OCLC 718214

The Hound of the Baskervilles is a crime novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, originally serialized in the Strand Magazine in 1901 and 1902, which is set largely on Dartmoor in 1889. At the time of researching the novel, Conan Doyle was a General Practitioner in Plymouth[citation needed], and thus was able to explore the moor and accurately capture its mood and feel. In the novel, the detective Sherlock Holmes and his assistant Dr. Watson are called to investigate a curse which is alleged to hang over the house of the Baskervilles. Image File history File links ArthurConanDoyle_HoundOfTheBaskervilles. ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish born author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... In political geography and international politics, a country is a political division of a geographical entity, a sovereign territory, most commonly associated with the notions of state or nation and government. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Sir George Newnes (1851-1910) was a publisher and editor in Britain. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Cassette recording of Patrick OBrians The Mauritius Command An audio book is a recording of the contents of a book read aloud. ... ISBN-13 represented as EAN-13 bar code (in this case ISBN 978-3-16-148410-0) The International Standard Book Number, ISBN, is a unique[1] commercial book identifier barcode. ... OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish born author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... The Strand Magazine was a monthly fiction magazine founded by George Newnes. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... High Willhays, the highest point on Dartmoor and southern England at 621 m (2037 ft) above sea level, with Yes Tor beyond. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... , Plymouth (Cornish: ) is a city of 243,795 inhabitants (2001 census) in the south-west of England, or alternatively the West Country, and is situated within the traditional and ceremonial county of Devon at the mouths of the rivers Plym and Tamar and at the head of one of the... Moorland in the Pennines (England); Coarse grasses and bracken tend to dominate especially in high rainfall areas. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ... Dr. John H. Watson is a fictional character, the sidekick of Sherlock Holmes, the fictional 19th century detective created by Arthur Conan Doyle. ...

Contents

Inspiration for the story

Sidney Paget's illustration of the Hound
Sidney Paget's illustration of the Hound

The marsh around Fox Tor Mires was almost certainly the inspiration for the book's 'Grimpen Mire'. Baskerville Hall may be either Hayford Hall or Brook Manor, which are both near Buckfastleigh. Baskerville Hall in Clyro also claims to be inspiration for the building in the story, going so far as to have Holmes' silhouette on stationery and brochures. Image File history File links TheHoundOftheBaskervilles(Paget). ... Image File history File links TheHoundOftheBaskervilles(Paget). ... A Paget illustration of Sherlock Holmes (right) and Dr. Watson. ... Buckfastleigh is a small town in Devon, England, partly within Dartmoor National Park, and on the A38. ...


It is thought that Conan Doyle, who once lived in Birmingham, may have borrowed the name from Birmingham printer John Baskerville. The ideas of journalist and writer Bertram Fletcher Robinson were important in the inception of the book, and he received credit in early publications, although the extent of his contributions are unknown. The Hound of the Baskervilles is considered to be one of Conan Doyle's best works as an author for its fantastic descriptive writing. Birmingham (pron. ... The word printer is used to describe a company that provides commercial printing services, involving typesetting, printing and book-binding. ... John Baskerville (January 28, 1706 - January 8, 1775) was a printer in Birmingham, a member of the Royal Society of Arts, and an associate of some of the members of the Lunar Society. ...


The story is inspired by regional mythology of the British Isles concerning hell-hounds. (See Barghest and Black Shuck) The latter is of East Anglian origin, and Conan Doyle and Fletcher Robinson spent time at the Norfolk resort of Cromer. The old Cromer Hall nearby which was in the Gothic style is also said to have matched the description of Baskerville Hall. [1] and there was also links between the Cromer and Devon through the Cabell family (said to be an inspiration for the cursed family). The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from mythologein to relate myths, from mythos, meaning a narrative, and logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and... The British Isles in relation to mainland Europe The British Isles (French: , Irish: [1] or Oileáin Iarthair Eorpa,[2] Manx: Ellanyn Goaldagh, Scottish Gaelic: , Welsh: ), are a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ... Barghest, Bargtjest, Bo-guest or Bargest is the name given in the north of England, especially in Yorkshire, to a mythical monstrous black dog with huge teeth and claws. ... Black Shuck is the name given to a ghostly black dog which is said to roam the Norfolk and Suffolk coastline. ... Norfolk and Suffolk, the core area of East Anglia. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Cromer is a seaside town and civil parish on the north coast of the English county of Norfolk. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Conan Doyle, who wished to concentrate on his historical novels, chose to bring back Sherlock Holmes for the story despite having previously stated that he had become tired of the character. The decision was probably prompted both by the need for a powerful protagonist and by the astronomical commercial success of Sherlock Holmes at the time, especially in America. However, the events of this story were placed before those of The Final Problem and thus there was no necessity (as yet) to explain away Holmes' "death". The Adventure of the Final Problem is a short story by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his detective character Sherlock Holmes. ...


The story was first published in The Strand as "The Hound of the Baskervilles—Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes" in a series of monthly parts, from August 1901 to April 1902.


Plot summary

Dartmoor landscape.
Dartmoor landscape.

Holmes and Watson receive a visit from Dr. James Mortimer, who wishes to consult them before meeting Sir Henry Baskerville, the last of the Baskervilles, and heir to the Baskerville estate in Dartmoor. Dr. Mortimer tells them he is uneasy about letting Sir Henry go to Baskerville Hall, owing to a supposed family curse. He narrates the legend of the Hound of the Baskervilles, a demonic dog that first killed Sir Hugo Baskerville several hundred years ago, and is believed to kill all Baskervilles in the region of Dartmoor. When Holmes dismisses it as a fairy tale, Mortimer narrates the events of the recent death of Sir Charles Baskerville, Henry's uncle. Although he was found dead in his garden without any trace of physical damage, his face was distorted as if he died in utter terror. Dr. Mortimer then reveals something that he had not mentioned at the official inquest. He alone had noticed footmarks at some distance from the body when it was found; the footmarks of a gigantic hound. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 399 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Blick auf zwei Dartmoor Tors: Bell Tor im Vordergrund und dahinter Bonehill. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 399 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Blick auf zwei Dartmoor Tors: Bell Tor im Vordergrund und dahinter Bonehill. ...


After some clever deception by Holmes (this is one of the few cases where he cannot come up with any kind of solution, much less solve it, until late in the story), and the assistance of the Scotland Yard detective Lestrade, it is revealed that the true criminal is a local naturalist called Stapleton, who was revealed to be a long lost cousin of the Baskervilles. His intention was to send a half-starved, vicious dog as his murderous agent, which would attack the first living thing it encountered. This dog is a mixed breed of bloodhound and English mastiff, purchased from the distributor Ross and Mangles. In order to make it seem diabolical, Stapleton daubes its coat with a luminous, phosphorus-based ointment. However, when the hound is finally sent to kill Sir Henry Baskerville, Holmes, Watson, and Lestrade are waiting for it. They shoot the hound multiple times, proving it is not a ghost(as they had once thought), and killing it. Stapleton flees and is assumed to have drowned when crossing the Grimpen mire in the fog. Inspector Lestrade arresting a suspect, by Sidney Paget Inspector Lestrade in the Granada television series Inspector Lestrade is a Scotland Yard detective appearing in several of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. ...


Chronology

The date '1888' is disputed, Baring-Gould places the date to be September 25th 1888, but later revised to 1899 (which is agreed with by John Hall) Zeisler puts the date at 25th September 1900 and Brad Keefauver (of Sherlockpeoria.net) places the date at 1st October 1889, Leslie S. Klinger also places HOUND in 1889. Other dates include 1886 (Bell), 1899 (Brend), 1897 (Christ) and 1900 (Dakin and Zeisler) John Hall may refer to (reverse chronological): John Douglas Hall, North Carolina politician, c. ...


Film, TV or theatrical adaptations

As of 2006, there are at least 24 film versions of the Hound of the Baskervilles. Some remain very close to the text of the original book, while others are notable for differences in plot or execution. Among these are some pastiches and one parody. For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Year Title Country Director Holmes Watson
1914 Der Hund von Baskerville, 1. Teil Flag of Germany Rudolf Meinert Alwin Neuß None
1914 Der Hund von Baskerville, 2. Teil - Das einsame Haus
1914 Der Hund von Baskerville, 3. Teil - Das unheimliche Zimmer Richard Oswald
1915 Der Hund von Baskerville, 4. Teil
1920 Das dunkle Schloß Flag of Germany Willy Zeyn Eugen Burg None
1920 Das Haus ohne Fenster Erich Kaiser-Tietz
1920 Dr. MacDonalds Sanatorium
1920 The Hound of the Baskervilles Flag of United Kingdom Maurice Elvey Eille Nowood Hubert Willis
1929 Der Hund von Baskerville Flag of Germany Richard Oswald Carlyle Blackwell George Seroff
1932 The Hound of the Baskervilles Flag of United Kingdom Gareth Gundrey Robert Rendel Frederick Lloyd
1936 Der Hund von Baskerville Flag of Germany Carl Lamac Bruno Güttner Fritz Odemar
1939 The Hound of the Baskervilles (1939 film) Flag of United States Sidney Lanfield Basil Rathbone Nigel Bruce
1955 Der Hund von Baskerville Flag of Germany Fritz Umgelter Wolf Ackva Arnulf Schröder
1959 The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959 film) Flag of United Kingdom Terence Fisher Peter Cushing André Morell
1968 The Hound of the Baskervilles Flag of United Kingdom Graham Evans Peter Cushing Nigel Stock
1972 The Hound of the Baskervilles Flag of United States Barry Crane Stewart Granger Bernard Fox
1978 The Hound of the Baskervilles (1978 film) Flag of United Kingdom Paul Morrissey Peter Cook Dudley Moore
1981 The Hound of the Baskervilles (1981 film) (Собака Баскервилей) Flag of Soviet Union Igor Maslennikov Vasilij Livanov Vitali Solomin
1982 The Hound of the Baskervilles Flag of United Kingdom Peter Duguid Tom Baker Terence Rigby
1983 The Hound of the Baskervilles Flag of United Kingdom Douglas Hickox Ian Richardson Donald Churchill
1983 Sherlock Holmes and the Baskerville Curse Flag of Australia Ian McKenzie & Alex Nicholas Peter O'Toole unknown
1988 The Hound of the Baskervilles Flag of United Kingdom Brian Mills Jeremy Brett Edward Hardwicke
2000 The Hound of the Baskervilles Flag of Canada Rodney Gibbons Matt Frewer Kenneth Welsh
2002 The Hound of the Baskervilles (2002 film) Flag of United Kingdom David Attwood Richard Roxburgh Ian Hart


In 2007, the Peepolykus company toured the UK with a theatrical pastiche [1] to good reviews. This was quite faithful to the story but overlaid it with comedy which broke the fourth wall. Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Carlyle Blackwell (January 20, 1884 - June 17, 1955) was an American silent film actor and a minor director and producer. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles is a 1939 mystery film based on the novel of the same name by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and is directed by Sidney Lanfield and produced by 20th Century Fox. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Sidney Lanfield (April 20, 1898-June 20, 1972) was a film director known for directing comedy films and later television programs. ... Basil Rathbone (13 June 1892 – 21 July 1967),Military Cross, was a British actor most famous for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes and of suave villains in such swashbuckler films as The Mark of Zorro, Captain Blood, and The Adventures of Robin Hood. ... Nigel Bruce (left) with Basil Rathbone in a promotional photo for their Sherlock Holmes film series William Nigel Ernle Bruce (September 4, 1895 – October 8, 1953), usually credited as Nigel Bruce, was a British character actor, best known as Dr. Watson in a series of films and a radioseries starring... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles is a 1959 mystery movie produced by Hammer Studios and is directed by Terence Fisher. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Terence Fisher (February 23, 1904 - June 18, 1980), was a film director who worked for Hammer Films. ... Peter Cushing OBE Cushing (left) in the television adaptation of Nineteen Eighty-Four in the winter of 1954 on BBC Television. ... André Morell as Professor Bernard Quatermass in the BBC Television serial Quatermass and the Pit (1958-59). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Peter Cushing OBE Cushing (left) in the television adaptation of Nineteen Eighty-Four in the winter of 1954 on BBC Television. ... Nigel Stock (actor) Nigel Stock was a veteran British actor of stage, screen, radio and TV, known as a character actor in particular. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Stewart Granger (May 6, 1913 – August 16, 1993) was an English film actor, mainly associated with heroic and romantic leading roles. ... Bernard M. Fox (born 11 May 1927) is a Welsh-born British film and television actor. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles was a 1978 comedy film spoofing The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Paul Morrissey (born on February 23, 1938 in New York City) is a film director. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dudley Stuart John Moore, CBE (April 19, 1935 – March 27, 2002), was an Academy-Award nominated British comedian, actor and musician. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles (Russian: ) is a 1981 Soviet film adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyles novel of the same name. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Soviet_Union. ... The photograph of Livanov as Sherlock Holmes is said to be the largest of those gracing the walls of the Sherlock Holmes Museum in Baker Street. ... Vitaly Mefodievich Solomin (Russian: ) (12 December 1941 – 27 May 2002) was a Russian (and former Soviet) actor, director and scenario. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... For other persons named Tom Baker, see Tom Baker (disambiguation). ... Terence Rigby (born 2 January 1937 in Birmingham, England) is an actor with a number of film and television credits to his name. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Douglas Hickox (January 10, 1929 – July 25, 1988) was an English film director. ... Ian William Richardson CBE (7 April 1934 – 9 February 2007) was a Scottish actor best known for playing the Machiavellian politician Francis Urquhart in the House of Cards trilogy for the BBC. // Born in Edinburgh, Richardson was educated at Balgreen Primary School and Tynecastle High School in the city,[1... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932 as Peter James OToole) is an Irish actor. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Brian Mills is a British television director, mainly for Granada TV. His credits (as director) include Strangers, Bulman and Coronation Street. ... Peter Jeremy William Huggins (November 3, 1933 – September 12, 1995), better known as Jeremy Brett, was an English actor famous for his portrayal of the detective Sherlock Holmes in the British television series The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. ... Edward Hardwicke (born August 7, 1932; sometimes credited as Edward Hardwick) is a British actor, the son of Sir Cedric Hardwicke and actress Helena Pickard. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Matt Frewer (b. ... Kenneth Welsh (born 1942, Edmonton, Alberta) is a Canadian actor. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles is a 2002 television adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyles novel of the same name. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Richard Roxburgh (born January 1, 1962) is an Australian actor, who has starred in many Australian films and has appeared in prominent supporting roles in a number of Hollywood productions, usually as villains. ... Ian Hart (born 8 October 1964) is an English actor. ...


Other works

In 1997, Spike Milligan satirised the novel in his book, The Hound of the Baskervilles According to Spike Milligan, combining elements of the original novel with the Basil Rathbone serials. Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... Terence Alan Milligan, KBE, (16 April 1918–27 February 2002), known as Spike Milligan, was an Irish writer, artist, musician, humanitarian, comedian, and poet. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles According to Spike Milligan is a book written by Spike Milligan as part of his According to Spike Milligan series. ... Basil Rathbone (13 June 1892 – 21 July 1967),Military Cross, was a British actor most famous for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes and of suave villains in such swashbuckler films as The Mark of Zorro, Captain Blood, and The Adventures of Robin Hood. ...


See also

External links

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
The Hound of the Baskervilles

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.peepolykus.com/pages/baskervilles.htm

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Hound of the Baskervilles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1355 words)
The Hound of the Baskervilles is a crime novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, originally serialised in the Strand Magazine in 1901 and 1902, which is set largely on Dartmoor 1889.
Baskerville Hall in Clyro also claims to be inspiration for the building in the story, going so far as to have Holmes' silhouette on stationery and brochures.
He narrates the legend of the Hound of the Baskervilles, a demonic dog that first killed Sir Hugo Baskerville several hundred years ago, and is believed to kill all Baskervilles in the region of Dartmoor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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