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Encyclopedia > The Hill School
The Hill School
Whatsoever things are true.
Established 1851
School type Co-ed, Private, Boarding
Religious affiliation None (Founded on Judeo-Christian traditions)
Headmaster David R. Dougherty
Location Pottstown, PA, USA
Campus 300 acres (1.21 square km)
Enrollment 493
Faculty 89
Average class size 12
Student:teacher
ratio
7:1
Average SAT
scores (2005)
Middle 50% range Verbal: 560-680
Math: 580-690
Athletics 28 Interscholastic
The Hill School - Athletics
Color(s) Confederate Gray, Union Blue
Mascot Ram

homepage = TheHill.org The Hill School (founded 1926) is a private school for kindergarten through grade eight located in Middleburg, Virginia. ... Image File history File links The_Hill_School. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-paying school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... Pottstown is a borough in Montgomery County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ...

The Hill School (a.k.a. The Hill) is an American preparatory boarding school for boys and girls in grades nine through twelve. Founded in 1851, The Hill is located in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, about forty-five minutes north-west of Philadelphia. A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-paying school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Pottstown is a borough in Montgomery County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


The Hill is part of an organization known as The Ten Schools Admissions Organization. This organization was founded more than forty years ago on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. Member schools include The Hill, Choate Rosemary Hall, Deerfield Academy, The Lawrenceville School, The Taft School, The Hotchkiss School, St. Paul's School, Loomis Chaffee, Phillips Exeter Academy, and Phillips Academy Andover. The Ten Schools Admissions Organization is a group formed more than forty years ago by prep schools in New England and the Mid-Atlantic on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. ... Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall (commonly referred to as Choate) is a New England preparatory school for students (who call themselves Choaties) in grades 9-12, known as the third through sixth forms at the school. ... Deerfield Academy is a private, coeducational prep school located in Deerfield, Massachusetts. ... The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. ... The Taft School is a private coeducational prep school located in Watertown, Connecticut, USA. The School was founded by Horace Dutton Taft in 1890. ... The Hotchkiss School is an independent, American college preparatory boarding school located in Lakeville, Connecticut. ... St. ... The Loomis Chaffee School is a college preparatory school for grades 9 through 12 located in Windsor, Connecticut, USA. It has a total enrollment of 720, 400 boarding and 320 day students, and 150 faculty members. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ...


In 2006, The Hill's endowment totaled at $141,000,000. Endowment may refer to many things: Finance Financial endowment; relating to funds or property donated to institutions or individuals. ...

Contents

History

The Hill School was founded in 1851 by the Revered Matthew Meigs as "The Family Boarding School." At the conclusion of the American Civil War in 1865, The Hill adopted school colors of Blue and Grey to symbolize the re-unification of the United States. School alumni fought on both sides of the conflict. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


For nearly its entire history The Hill has maintained 500 students per year from which the school song "A Thousand Hands" is drawn. The Hill was an all-boys institution until 1998. As of 2005, the ratio between boys and girls at the school is 3:2. Legacy students make up roughly one-third of the student body. Single-sex education is the practice of conducting education where male and female students attend separate classes or in separate buildings or schools. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ...


Owing to its age, The Hill has a campus rich with historic architecture. The Hill's all wood-paneled Dining Hall houses a valuable collection of paintings by the famous American illustrator N.C. Wyeth, father of the notable American painter Andrew Wyeth. These paintings were a gift from former director of athletics, Michael F. Sweeney. A photo of the Dining Hall interior, taken in 1967 and picturing members of the class of 1971 in the foreground, is the cover of Tobias Wolff's novel, Old School. Newell Convers Wyeth (October 22, 1882 - October 19, 1945) was an American artist and illustrator. ... Long Limb, Tempera, 1999, by Andrew Wyeth Andrew Newell Wyeth (born July 12, 1917) is an American realist painter, one of the best-known of the 20th century and sometimes referred to as the Painter of the People due to his popularity with the American public. ... Tobias Jonathan Ansell Wolff (born June 19, 1945, in Birmingham, Alabama) is a writer of fiction and nonfiction. ... Old School is a novel by Tobias Wolff. ...


School motto

The School's motto is, "Whatsoever things are true," taken from Philippians 4:8. "Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things."


School traditions

  • Unlike many other boarding schools, The Hill continues to maintain its "jacket and tie" dress-code for students, requires all students to attend twice-weekly nondenominational chapel services, and participate in seated family-style meals with faculty in the dining hall.
  • Unlike other schools where students use grade terminology such as "Freshman" or "Sophomore", The Hill uses the traditional English term "forms":
    • Third Form = 9th Grade / Freshman
    • Fourth Form = 10th Grade / Sophomore
    • Fifth Form = 11th Grade / Junior
    • Sixth Form = 12th Grade / Senior
  • Students at the school enjoy competing in J-Ball, short for "Javelin Ball." J-Ball was created in 1955 by Sidney Wood, a future Wimbledon champion. Similar to baseball, J-Ball is played with a tennis ball and racquet, but only one player on the fielding team is allowed to use a glove. J-Ball is typically played on the Quad during the second list of the Spring Term.
  • After receiving their diplomas at graduation, Sixth Formers jump into The Dell and swim out to the center fountain; this is the most attended part of the graduation ceremonies. The Dell is a small pond located near the old ice hockey rink and outside of the Center for the Arts where the ceremony takes place.

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sidney Wood (November 1, 1911) was an American male tennis player. ... The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ... This article is about the sport. ... A diploma (from Greek diploma) is a document issued by an educational institution, such as a university, that is one of the following: A certificate testifying that the recipient has successfully completed a particular course of study, A deed conferring an academic degree. ... Academic procession during the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ...

Athletics

The Hill competes in the Mid-Atlantic Prep League. The Hill's football teams are called the "Rams". All other sports are called the "Blues". The Hill's arch-rival is The Lawrenceville School of Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The rivalry is celebrated annually on the first or second weekend of November. The festivities alternate between the two schools each year, and it is the 5th oldest school rivalry,and 3rd oldest high-school rivalry, in the nation. The Mid-Atlantic Prep League is a sports league with participating institutions from prep schools in the New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania area. ... The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. ... Map of Lawrenceville CDP in Mercer County Lawrenceville is a census-designated place and unincorporated area located within Lawrence Township in Mercer County, New Jersey. ... Pairs of schools, especially when they are close to each other either geographically or in their areas of specialization, establish a school rivalry with each other over the years. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of high school football rivalries (less than 100 years old). ...


Besides Hill and Lawrenceville, other schools in the league are Hun School of Princeton in Princeton, New Jersey, Mercersburg Academy of Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, Peddie School in Hightstown, New Jersey, and Blair Academy in Blairstown, New Jersey. The Hun School of Princeton is a private, coeducational, secondary boarding school located in Princeton Township, New Jersey, in the United States. ... Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... Mercersburg Academy is an independent, coeducational boarding school for grades 9-12 located in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Mercersburg is a borough located in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, 73 miles (117 km) southwest of Harrisburg. ... Peddie School is an American private coeducational high school located on a 280‑acre (1. ... Hightstown highlighted in Mercer County. ... Blair Academy is a private, coeducational, secondary Boarding high school with an enrollment of about 430 students for grades nine through twelve. ... Blairstown Township is a township located in Warren County, New Jersey. ...


Some of the schools that The Hill also competes against include St. Andrew's School in Middletown, Delaware, Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Virginia, The Taft School in Watertown, Connecticut, Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut, Deerfield Academy in Deerfield, Massachusetts, Governor Dummer Academy in Byfield, Mass; Westminster School in Simsbury, Connecticut, and Wyoming Seminary College Prep, in Kingston, Pa. St. ... Middletown is a town in New Castle County, Delaware, United States. ... Aerial photograph of Episcopal High School. ... Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Founded 1718 Government  - Mayor William D. Euille Area  - City  15. ... The Taft School is a private coeducational prep school located in Watertown, Connecticut, USA. The School was founded by Horace Dutton Taft in 1890. ... Watertown is a town located in Litchfield County, Connecticut. ... The Hotchkiss School is an independent, American college preparatory boarding school located in Lakeville, Connecticut. ... Lakeville, Connecticut is a village in Salisbury in Litchfield County, Connecticut, on Lake Wononskopomuc. ... Deerfield Academy is a private, coeducational prep school located in Deerfield, Massachusetts. ... Deerfield is a town located in Franklin County, Massachusetts. ... Governor Dummer Academy was established in 1763, and is located on 450 acres in Byfield, Massachusetts, 25 miles north of Boston. ... Simsbury is a town located in Hartford County, Connecticut. ...


All students are required to participate at some level of athletics, whether it be at the varsity or intramural level. Interscholastic sports include cross country, football, field hockey, soccer, tennis, squash, water polo, swimming, basketball, ice hockey, wrestling, baseball, softball, lacrosse, track, and golf. A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ... The word varsity can refer to several things. ... The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports within a school. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Water polo is a team water sport combining some elements of swimming and handball. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... This article is about the sport. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... This article is about the sport. ...


Notable alumni

“Stanford” redirects here. ... James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930), American politician and diplomat, was Chief of Staff in the President Ronald Reagans first administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush and as United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Pinckney Benedict (b. ... Raj Peter Bhakta (born December 7, 1975 in Philadelphia) is a former contestant on the second season of the reality show The Apprentice and was the Republican Partys nominee for the United States House of Representatives in Pennsylvanias 13th congressional district. ... This article is about the US version, for the UK season, see The Apprentice (UK Series Two). ... Josiah Bunting III Lieutenant General Josiah Bunting III (Ret. ... The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. ... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States. ... Chris Collingwood, born in 1968 in Pennsylvania, is a founding member of the power pop band Fountains of Wayne. ... Fountains of Wayne is an American power pop/rock band, formed in 1995. ... James Oliver Cromwell (born January 27, 1940), sometimes credited as Jamie Cromwell, is an Academy Award-nominated American television and film actor. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Briggs Swift Cunningham II (1907 - 2003) was a racecar constructor, racing team owner, and racecar driver—often described as a renowned racecar enthusiast—an American automobile manufacturer and collector, as well as, being a victorious America Cup sailor (skipper of the Columbia in 1958), and inventor. ... This article is about the yachting competition. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Clash of the Titans is a 1981 fantasy movie based on the myth of the Perseus. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dick Harter is an assistant coach for the Philadelphia 76ers and former head coach for the Charlotte Hornets. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Enterprise Community Partners, formerly The Enterprise Foundation, is a Columbia, Maryland based non-for-profit organization with seventeen offices nationwide. ... Samuel Roger Horchow (born July 3, 1928, in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a catalog entrepreneur and Broadway producer. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Clark Hoyt is an American journalist who is currently the public editor of the New York Times, serving as the readers representative. He is the newspapers third public editor, or ombudsman, after Daniel Okrent and Byron Calame. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Partial list of newspapers The following is a partial list of newspapers owned by Knight Ridder: Contra Costa Times Detroit Free Press Kansas City Star The Miami Herald Philadelphia Inquirer Saint Paul Pioneer Press San Jose Mercury News The State External link Knight Ridder corporate website Categories: Companies traded on... Lamar Hunt (August 2, 1932 – December 13, 2006) was a promoter of American football, soccer, tennis, basketball, and ice hockey in the United States and an inductee of the first three sports halls of fame. ... City Kansas City, Missouri Team colors Red, white and gold Head Coach Herman Edwards Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt, chairman)[1] General manager Carl Peterson Mascot K.C. Wolf (1989-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League... The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ... Lewis E. Lew Lehrman is a former executive of Rite Aid and conservative activist. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932) served as the Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ... Rand McNally & Company is the preeminent American publisher of maps, atlases, and globes for travel, reference, commercial, and educational uses. ... Norman Pearlstine (born October 4, 1942 in Philadelphia) the former editor-in-chief of TIME inc. ... This article is about the American athlete. ... Edward William Proxmire (November 11, 1915 – December 15, 2005) was a member of the Democratic Party who served in the United States Senate for the state of Wisconsin from 1957 to 1989. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to 92° 53′ W Population  Ranked... An Emmy Award. ... Walt Disney Imagineering was formed by entertainment mogul Walt Disney on December 16, 1952 as WED Enterprises (WED: Walter Elias Disney) to develop plans for a theme park and to manage Disneys personal assets. ... Jon Shirley is the former president of Microsoft and currently one of its directors. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... William Oliver Stone (born September 15, 1946), known simply as Oliver Stone, is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director and screenwriter. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Don Thompson (Jan 18, 1940 - ) is a Canadian jazz pianist and bass player with Rob McConnells Boss Brass. ... The Fantasticks original Off Broadway CD cover The Fantasticks is a 1960 musical comedy with music by Harvey Schmidt and lyrics by Tom Jones. ... tool ... Trippe, Time, 1933 Juan Terry Trippe (June 27, 1899 – April 3, 1981) was an airline entrepreneur and pioneer. ... Pan American World Airways (Pan Am) was the United States principal international airline from the 1930s until its collapse in 1991, and was credited with many innovations that shaped the international airline industry. ... Donald John Trump, Jr. ... Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946 in Queens, New York, New York) is an American business executive, entrepreneur, television personality and author. ... Eric Trump (born on January 6th, 1984), is the younger son (He is 23 years older than Baron William Trump) of an American business executive, entrepreneur and author Donald Trump and Ivana Trump. ... Douglas Sandy Warner (born June 9, 1946 as Douglas Alexander Warner III but widely known as Sandy) is a American banker who joined Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York out of college in 1968 as an officers assistant and rose through the ranks to become chairman of the... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. ... Harry Elkins Widener (January 3, 1885 – April 15, 1912) was a book collector from the United States. ... George D. Widener George Dunton Widener (June 10, 1861 - April 15, 1912) was an American businessman who died in the sinking of the Titanic. ...

Years not listed

  • John Backus Computer scientist; inventor of the FORTRAN computer language.[1]
  • Nelson Bunker Hunt Scion of the Hunt Oil Company family. Did not graduate. Donated the costs to renovate his namesake building on campus.
  • Wolcott Gibbs, writer for The New Yorker, class of '20 but did not graduate.
  • Alfred Glancy III. Current Director of Detroit Energy Company, director and chairman of Unico Invesents, former chairman and CEO of MCN Energy Group Inc.
  • Lane Smith Attended in 1955, did not graduate. Character Actor
  • Edmund Wilson Writer.
  • Tobias Wolff Writer. Did not graduate.
  • Sidney Wood Creator of Hill School tradition, J-Ball, Wimbledon Men's Singles Champion 1931, Davis Cup finalist of 1934.

John Backus (born December 3, 1924) is an American computer scientist, notable as the inventor of the first high-level programming language (FORTRAN), the Backus-Naur form (BNF, the almost universally used notation to define formal language syntax), and the concept of Function-level programming. ... Fortran (previously FORTRAN[1]) is a general-purpose[2], procedural,[3] imperative programming language that is especially suited to numeric computation and scientific computing. ... Nelson Bunker Hunt (born February 22, 1926, in El Dorado, Arkansas) is an American businessman. ... Oliver Wolcott Gibbs (March 15, 1902 - August 16, 1958) was an editor, humorist, parodist, drama critic, and short story writer for The New Yorker magazine from 1927 until his death. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... Lane Smith, full name Walter Lane Smith (April 29, 1936 – June 13, 2005) was a U.S. character actor. ... Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ... Tobias Jonathan Ansell Wolff (born June 19, 1945, in Birmingham, Alabama) is a writer of fiction and nonfiction. ... Sidney Wood (November 1, 1911) was an American male tennis player. ... The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ... The great Australians Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall with the Cup in 1953 The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in mens tennis. ...

Headmasters

  • David R. Dougherty, 1993-
  • Charles C. Watson, 1973-1993
  • Archibald R. Montgomery, 1968-1973
  • Edward (Ned) T. Hall, 1952-1968
  • James I. Wendell, 1928-1952
  • Boyd Edwards, 1922-1928
  • Dwight R. Meigs, 1914-1922
  • Alfred G. Rolfe, 1911-1914
  • John Meigs, 1876-1911
  • Matthew Meigs, 1851-1876

References

is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


The Ten Schools Admissions Organization

Choate Rosemary Hall - Deerfield Academy - The Hill School - The Hotchkiss School - The Lawrenceville School
Loomis Chaffee - Phillips Academy Andover - Phillips Exeter Academy - St. Paul's School - The Taft School The Ten Schools Admissions Organization is a group formed more than forty years ago by prep schools in New England and the Mid-Atlantic on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. ... Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall (commonly referred to as Choate) is a New England preparatory school for students (who call themselves Choaties) in grades 9-12, known as the third through sixth forms at the school. ... Deerfield Academy is a private, coeducational prep school located in Deerfield, Massachusetts. ... The Hotchkiss School is an independent, American college preparatory boarding school located in Lakeville, Connecticut. ... The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. ... The Loomis Chaffee School is a college preparatory school for grades 9 through 12 located in Windsor, Connecticut, USA. It has a total enrollment of 720, 400 boarding and 320 day students, and 150 faculty members. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... St. ... The Taft School is a private coeducational prep school located in Watertown, Connecticut, USA. The School was founded by Horace Dutton Taft in 1890. ...


 
 

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