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Encyclopedia > The Guns of Navarone (film)
The Guns of Navarone
Directed by J. Lee Thompson
Peter Yates (Ass't)
Produced by Carl Foreman
Written by Alistair MacLean (novel)
Carl Foreman
Starring Gregory Peck
David Niven
Anthony Quinn
Music by Dimitri Tiomkin
Cinematography Oswald Morris
Editing by Alan Osbiston
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date(s) June 22, 1961
Running time 158 min.
Language English
Budget $6,000,000 (est)
IMDb profile

This article is about the film, for the novel see The Guns of Navarone (novel) Image File history File links This is a copyrighted poster. ... John Lee-Thompson, known as J. Lee Thompson (1 August 1914 - 30 August 2002) was a film director, active in both British films and Hollywood. ... Peter Yates (born 24 July 1929 in Aldershot, Hampshire) is an English film director and producer. ... Carl Foreman Carl Foreman (July 23, 1914 – June 26, 1984) was an American screenwriter and film producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... Alistair Stuart MacLean (April 28, 1922 - February 2, 1987) was a Scottish novelist who wrote successful thrillers or adventure stories, the best known of which are perhaps The Guns of Navarone and Where Eagles Dare. ... Carl Foreman Carl Foreman (July 23, 1914 – June 26, 1984) was an American screenwriter and film producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Oscar-winning American film actor. ... David Niven (March 1, 1910 – July 29, 1983) was an Academy Award-winning British actor. ... Anthony Quinn (April 21, 1915 Chihuahua, Mexico – June 3, 2001 Boston, Massachusetts) was a two-time Academy Award-winning Mexican-American actor, as well as a painter and writer. ... Dimitri Zinovievich Tiomkin (Russian: , Dmitrij Zinovevič Tëmkin, somtimes translated as Dmitri Tiomkin) (May 10, 1894 – November 11, 1979) was a film composer and conductor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory[1], the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... For other uses, see The Guns of Navarone. ...


The Guns of Navarone is a 1961 film based on a well-known 1957 novel about World War II by Scottish thriller writer Alistair MacLean. It starred Gregory Peck, David Niven and Anthony Quinn. The book and the film share the same basic plot: the efforts of an Allied commando team to destroy a seemingly impregnable German fortress that threatens Allied naval ships in the Aegean Sea, and prevents 2,000 isolated British troops from being rescued. See also: 1960 in film 1961 1962 in film 1960s in film years in film film Events Last Year at Marienbad (Lannée dernière à Marienbad) released Top grossing films North America The Guns of Navarone Exodus The Parent Trap The Absent-Minded Professor The Alamo Swiss Family Robinson... See also: 1956 in literature, other events of 1957, 1958 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television that includes numerous, often-overlapping sub-genres. ... Alistair Stuart MacLean (April 28, 1922 - February 2, 1987) was a Scottish novelist who wrote successful thrillers or adventure stories, the best known of which are perhaps The Guns of Navarone and Where Eagles Dare. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Oscar-winning American film actor. ... David Niven (March 1, 1910 – July 29, 1983) was an Academy Award-winning British actor. ... Anthony Quinn (April 21, 1915 Chihuahua, Mexico – June 3, 2001 Boston, Massachusetts) was a two-time Academy Award-winning Mexican-American actor, as well as a painter and writer. ... Look up ally in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In military science, the term commando can refer to an individual, a military unit or a raiding style of military operation. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

History

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The film version of The Guns of Navarone was part of a cycle of big-budget World War II adventures that included The Longest Day (1962) and The Great Escape (1963). The screenplay, adapted by producer Carl Foreman, made significant changes in virtually all of the major characters from the novel. A new character, Major Franklin, initially leads the expedition; Dusty Miller, in the book a tough rough-edged Anglo-American/Polish explosives expert, becomes a dapper Professor of Chemistry, Casey Brown, a Scottish engineer and communications expert becomes a bearded knife-wielding killer and Lt. Stevens, a Greek-speaking navigation expert vanishes from the team. (In the book, Stevens falls from the cliff as they are climbing it, breaks his leg, and eventually dies; in the film it is Franklin who falls and breaks his leg, but he survives.) The character of Mallory, originally a New Zealander, is played by American actor Gregory Peck and his nationality is left in the dark. At one point he remarks about his "stupid Anglo-Saxon decency", though later Miller tells him to "think of England and pull the trigger". The Longest Day is a 3-hour-long 1962 war film with a very large cast, based on the 1959 book The Longest Day by Cornelius Ryan, about D-Day, the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944, during World War II. // Background The movie was adapted by Romain Gary... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... The Great Escape, written by James Clavell, W.R. Burnett, and Walter Newman (uncredited), and directed by John Sturges is a popular 1963 World War II film, based on a true story about Allied prisoners of war with a record for escaping from German prisoner-of-war camps. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Carl Foreman Carl Foreman (July 23, 1914 – June 26, 1984) was an American screenwriter and film producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ...


The film also introduced romance and a subplot that radically altered the relationship between Mallory and Andrea.


The identity of the traitor is also changed in the film, and the two women who appear in the film do not appear in the book.


The film was directed by J. Lee Thompson after original director Alexander Mackendrick (best-known for the quirky comedies he directed for Ealing Studios) was fired by Carl Foreman due to "creative differences". The Greek island of Rhodes provided locations, and Quinn was so taken with the area that he bought land there in an area still called Anthony Quinn Bay. John Lee-Thompson, known as J. Lee Thompson (1 August 1914 - 30 August 2002) was a film director, active in both British films and Hollywood. ... Alexander Mackendrick (September 8, 1912 - December 22, 1993) was a Scottish-American film director. ... Ealing Studios, a television and film production company and facilities provider at Ealing Green in West London, claims to be the oldest film studio in the world. ... Location map of Rhodes Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος (pron. ...


The film was a major box office success and the top grossing film of 1961. As a result, MacLean reunited Mallory, Miller, and Andrea in the best-seller Force 10 From Navarone, the only sequel of his long writing career, in 1968. That was in turn filmed as the significantly different Force 10 from Navarone in 1978 by British director Guy Hamilton, a veteran of several James Bond films. Despite a cast that included Robert Shaw, Edward Fox, and Harrison Ford, it was a critical and commercial failure. The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... Force 10 from Navarone is a 1968 World War II novel by Alistair MacLean. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Force 10 From Navarone Force 10 from Navarone is a 1978 war film very loosely based on upon Alistair MacLeans 1968 novel Force 10 From Navarone. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Guy Hamilton (born September 16, 1922, Paris, France) was a noted film director. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Robert Shaw may mean: Robert Shaw (footballer) Robert Shaw (actor) This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Edward Fox as M in Never Say Never Again Edward Fox, OBE (born 13 April 1937) is an English stage, film and television actor. ... Harrison Ford (born July 13, 1942) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ...


Synopsis

The film opens with an aerial view of the Greek Islands, and a narrator (James Robertson Justice), setting the scene. The year is 1943, and 2000 British soldiers are holed up on the island of Kheros in the Aegean near Turkey. Rescue by the Royal Navy is impossible because of massive guns on the nearby island of Navarone. Time is short, because the Germans are expected to launch an assault on the British forces, to draw Turkey into the war on the Axis' side.


Efforts to blast the guns by air have proven fruitless, so a team has been hastily assembled to sail to Navarone and dynamite the guns. Led by Major Roy Franklin (Anthony Quayle), they are Capt. Keith Mallory (Gregory Peck), Andrea Stavros (Anthony Quinn), a Colonel in the defeated Greek army, Corporal Miller (David Niven), an explosives expert, Greek-American street tough Spyros Pappadimos (James Darren) and "Butcher" Brown (Stanley Baker), an engineer and expert knife fighter. A reissue of two early James Darren albums. ... For the Technical Symposium of NITK Surathkal Engineer , see Engineer (Technical Fest). ...


Disguised as Greek fishermen on a decrepit boat, they sail across the Aegean Sea. They are intercepted by a German boat and boarded. On Mallory's signal, they attack and kill all the Germans and blow up the patrol boat. Afterwards, Mallory confides to Miller that Stavros has sworn to kill him after the war, because he was inadvertently responsible for the deaths of Stavros' wife and children. Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Their landing on the coast that night is hampered by a violent storm. The ship is wrecked and they lose part of their equipment, most notably the food and medical supplies. Franklin is badly injured while scaling the cliff. They find that the cliff is in fact guarded after all. Miller, a friend of Franklin, suggests that they leave Franklin to be "well cared for" by the enemy. Mallory, who assumes command of the mission, feels that Franklin would be forced to reveal their plans, so he orders two men to carry the injured man on a stretcher. ambulancers using a stretcher (profile) ambulancers using a stretcher (front) Soldiers using a simple stretcher A stretcher is a device used in medical professions to carry casualties or an incapacitated person from one place to another. ...


After Franklin tries to commit suicide, Mallory lies to him, saying that their mission has been "scrubbed" and that a major naval attack will be mounted on Navarone. Attacked by German soldiers, they split up, leaving Andrea behind with his sniper rifle, while they move on to their next rendezvous point. They contact local resistance workers, Spyros's sister Maria (Irene Papas) and her friend Anna (Gia Scala). Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life. ... Irene Papas (Greek Ειρήνη Παππά, born September 3, 1926 in Corinth) is a Greek-born actress who has starred in over seventy films in a career spanning more than fifty years. ...


The mission is continually dogged by Germans - clearly there is a major intelligence leak - but they make their way across the rugged countryside. They are captured when they try to find a doctor for Franklin. They escape by donning German uniforms, but leave Franklin behind, so he can get medical attention. Franklin is injected with the truth drug scopolamine and gives up the false "information", as Mallory had hoped. As a result, German units are deployed away from the guns and in the direction of the supposed "invasion" route. Scopolamine, also known as hyoscine, is a tropane alkaloid drug obtained from plants of the family Solanaceae (nightshades), such as henbane or jimson weed (Datura species). ...


While making final preparations for the destruction of the guns, Miller discovers that most of his explosives have been sabotaged. Miller deduces that Anna is the saboteur. She pleads that she was coerced by the Germans into treachery, but while Mallory and Miller argue over her fate, complicated by Mallory's seduction by Anna the night before, Maria shoots her.


Mallory and Miller find a way into the heavily fortified gun emplacements; the others cause a diversion and steal a motorboat for their getaway. Locking the main entrance behind them, Mallory and Miller set obvious explosives on the guns and hide more below the elevator leading to the guns. The Germans finally cut through the thick emplacement doors, but Mallory and Miller make their escape by diving into the sea. Despite Miller's inability to swim, they make it to the stolen boat, but learn that Pappadimos and Brown have been killed. Stavros is wounded and has difficulty swimming, but Mallory manages to pull him in.


The destroyers appear on schedule. The Germans remove the explosives planted on the guns and fire. The first salvo falls short. The next barely misses the lead ship, but then, just as they are about to fire again, the elevator descends and triggers the hidden explosives. The guns and fortifications are destroyed in a spectacular explosion.


Stavros chooses to return to Navarone with Maria and shakes hands with Mallory, seemingly having given up his plan to kill him. Mallory and Miller are taken on board the destroyer.

Spoilers end here.

Principal cast

Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Oscar-winning American film actor. ... David Niven (March 1, 1910 – July 29, 1983) was an Academy Award-winning British actor. ... Anthony Quinn (April 21, 1915 Chihuahua, Mexico – June 3, 2001 Boston, Massachusetts) was a two-time Academy Award-winning Mexican-American actor, as well as a painter and writer. ... Sir Stanley Baker (February 8, 1927 - June 28, 1976) was a Welsh actor. ... Anthony Quayle Sir John Anthony Quayle (7 September 1913 – 20 October 1989) was an English actor and director. ... A reissue of two early James Darren albums. ... Irene Papas (Greek Ειρήνη Παππά, born September 3, 1926 in Corinth) is a Greek-born actress who has starred in over seventy films in a career spanning more than fifty years. ... Gia Scala Gia Scala (March 3, 1934 – April 30, 1972) was an actress. ... James Robertson Justice (15 June 1907 - 2 July 1975) was a popular character actor in British films of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. ... Richard Harris as Marcus Aurelius in Gladiator. ... A Squadron Leaders sleeve/shoulder insignia Squadron Leader is a commissioned rank in some air forces. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the air force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ...

Music

Dimitri Tiomkin's acclaimed score for the film blended Greek melodies with his usual retinue of sweeping musical themes. A number of musicians have subsequently borrowed from the score, including: Dimitri Zinovievich Tiomkin (Russian: , Dmitrij Zinovevič Tëmkin, somtimes translated as Dmitri Tiomkin) (May 10, 1894 – November 11, 1979) was a film composer and conductor. ...

  • Jag Panzer's "The Mission (1943)" is based on the book and movie.
  • The Skatalites' instrumental "The Guns of Navarone" (1964) is based on the film's main theme, which can be heard during the opening titles. The song has also been performed by the Finnish ska group Jazzgangsters and 80s British ska group The Specials.
  • The guitar riff from Big Country's "Fields of Fire" was lifted from "The Guns of Navarone" theme. [1]

Jag Panzer is a North American power metal band. ... The Skatalites is a Jamaican music group that played a major role in popularising ska, the first truly Jamaican music created by fusing boogie-woogie blues, rhythm and blues, jazz, mento, calypso, and African rhythms. ... The Specials were an English 2 Tone band formed in 1977 in Coventry. ... For other uses, see Big Country (disambiguation). ...

Awards

Award wins

Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Drama has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Dimitri Zinovievich Tiomkin (Russian: , Dmitrij Zinovevič Tëmkin, somtimes translated as Dmitri Tiomkin) (May 10, 1894 – November 11, 1979) was a film composer and conductor. ... The Academy Award for Visual Effects is an Oscar given to one film each year that shows highest achievement in visual effects. ...

Award nominations

// The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Directing is an accolade given to the person that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences feels was best director of the past year. ... John Lee-Thompson, known as J. Lee Thompson (1 August 1914 - 30 August 2002) was a film director, active in both British films and Hollywood. ... DGA Headquarters in Hollywood, California Directors Guild of America (DGA) is the labor union which represents the interests of film and television directors in the United States motion picture industry. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... From Rule Sixteen of the Special Rules for The Music Awards Original Score: An original score is a substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... Dimitri Zinovievich Tiomkin (Russian: , Dmitrij Zinovevič Tëmkin, somtimes translated as Dmitri Tiomkin) (May 10, 1894 – November 11, 1979) was a film composer and conductor. ... The Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack Album for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media has been awarded since 1960. ... The Academy Award for Sound Mixing is an Academy Award that recognizes the finest or most aesthetic sound mixing or recording, and is generally awarded to the production sound mixers and re-recording mixers of the winning film. ... John Cox is: a player in the National Basketball Association, and uncle of Kobe Bryant the birth name of American actor John Howard a British bird artist an Australian ornithologist, after whom the shorebird Coxs Sandpiper was named ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ... Carl Foreman Carl Foreman (July 23, 1914 – June 26, 1984) was an American screenwriter and film producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.trouserpress.com/entry.php?a=big_country

External links

  • Movie review at Alistairmaclean.de (German)
  • Lyrics from the opening song

 
 

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