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Encyclopedia > The Guardian

Typical Guardian front page
Type Daily newspaper
Format Berliner

Owner Guardian Media Group
Editor Alan Rusbridger
Founded 1821
Political allegiance Centre-left
Language English
Price £0.80 (Monday-Friday)
£1.50 (Saturday)
Headquarters 119 Farringdon Road, London
Circulation 355,750 (August 2007)

Website: Guardian Unlimited

The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. It is published Monday to Saturday in the Berliner format. Until 1959 it was called The Manchester Guardian, which reflected its origins; the paper is rarely still referred to by this name – except in North America, where the old name is sometimes used (to distinguish it from other newspapers with similar names). The newspaper's main offices and printing centres are located in London and Manchester. Several newspapers go by the name of Guardian: The Guardian, a British newspaper founded in 1821 as the Manchester Guardian, which took its current title in 1959. ... Image File history File links Summary The logo of The Guardian Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links The Guardians refreshing new Berliner front page. ... Newspapers with the Berliner format. ... Guardian Media Group plc is a company of the United Kingdom owning various mass media operations including The Guardian, The Observer and the Manchester Evening News. ... Alan Rusbridger (born December 29, 1953) has been editor of The Guardian since 1995. ... In politics, the term centre-left is commonly used to describe and denote political parties or organisations that stretch from the centre to the left or are moderately left-wing, as opposed to extreme left wing beliefs such as communism. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... GBP redirects here. ... GBP redirects here. ... Farringdon Road is a road in Central London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Guardian Media Group plc is a company of the United Kingdom owning various mass media operations including The Guardian, The Observer and the Manchester Evening News. ... Newspapers with the Berliner format. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Several newspapers go by the name of Guardian: The Guardian, a British newspaper founded in 1821 as the Manchester Guardian, which took its current title in 1959. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ...


The Guardian Weekly, which circulates worldwide, provides a compact digest of four newspapers. It contains articles from The Guardian and its Sunday paper, The Observer, as well as reports, features and book reviews from The Washington Post and articles translated from France's Le Monde. The Guardian Weekly is a weekly newspaper published by the Guardian Media Group, and is one of the worlds oldest international newspapers. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... For the song by the Thievery Corporation, see Le Monde (song). ...

Contents

Stance

Editorial articles in The Guardian are generally in sympathy with the middle-ground liberal to left-wing end of the political spectrum. This is reflected in the paper's readership: a MORI Poll taken between April and June 2000 showed that 80% of Guardian readers were Labour Party voters (cited in International Socialism Spring 2003, ISBN 1-898876-97-5); according to another MORI poll taken in 2004, 44% of Guardian readers vote Labour and 37% vote Liberal Democrat[1]. Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... International Socialism (ISJ) is a quarterly journal of socialist theory published by the Socialist Workers Party (Britain) and currently edited by Chris Harman. ... Mori (森) is a Japanese family name. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ...


Whilst in the British political context the Guardian is considered centre-left, from a US political perspective it is frequently described as "left-wing" [2] [3]. This is in keeping with the way in which the centre-of-gravity of the US political spectrum is substantially further to the right than in Europe. In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition...


Format

Today The Guardian is the only British national newspaper to publish in full colour (although the edition printed in Northern Ireland still has much black-and-white content [4]); it was also the first newspaper in the UK to be printed on the Berliner size. The Guardian had a certified average daily circulation of 355,750 copies as of August 2007 - a drop of 5.94% on the first month of the year; as compared to sales of 887,664 for the Daily Telegraph, 638,820 for The Times, and 239,834 for The Independent[5]. Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Newspapers with the Berliner format. ... A newspapers circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day, although circulation rates are decreasing. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ...


Awards

It has been awarded the National Newspaper of the Year in 1999 and 2006 by the British Press Awards, as well as being co-winner of the World's Best-designed Newspaper as awarded by the Society for News Design (2006). The Guardian Unlimited website won the Best Newspaper category two years running in the 2005 and 2006 Webby Awards, beating (in 2005) the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal and Variety[6]. It has been the winner for six years in a row of the British Press Awards for Best Electronic Daily Newspaper.[7] The site won an Eppy award from the US-based magazine Editor & Publisher in 2000 for the best-designed newspaper online service [8]. The website is known for its commentary on sporting events, particularly its over-by-over cricket commentary. The British Press Awards is an annual ceremony that celebrates the best of British journalism. ... The Society for News Design (SND) is an international organization for professionals working in the news sector of the media industry. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Presented by The International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, the Webby Awards are a set of awards presented to the worlds best websites. The awards have been given out since 1996. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... The British Press Awards is an annual ceremony that celebrates the best of British journalism. ... E&P redirects here. ... E&P redirects here. ...


In 2007 it was ranked first in a study on transparency which analysed 25 mainstream English-language media vehicles, and which was conducted by the prestigious International Center for Media and the Public Agenda of the University of Maryland. It got a nearly perfect score. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... University of Maryland, College Park The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public coeducational university situated in suburban College Park, Maryland just outside Washington, D.C. The flagship institution of the University System of Maryland, the university is most often referred to...


Ownership

The Guardian is part of the GMG Guardian Media Group of newspapers, radio stations, and print media including The Observer Sunday newspaper, the Manchester Evening News, Money Observer financial magazine, The Guardian Weekly International newspaper, Guardian Monthly magazine, and new media - Guardian Abroad website, and Guardian Unlimited, one of the most popular online news resources on the Internet[citation needed]. All the aforementioned are owned by The Scott Trust, a charitable foundation which aims to ensure the newspaper's editorial independence in perpetuity, maintaining its financial health to ensure it does not become vulnerable to take over by for-profit media groups, and the serious compromise of editorial independence that this often brings. Guardian Media Group plc is a company of the United Kingdom owning various mass media operations including The Guardian, The Observer and the Manchester Evening News. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Manchester Evening News is an English daily newspaper published each week day evening and on Saturdays. ... Money Observer is a monthly personal finance and investment magazine published by Guardian Media Group. ... The Guardian Weekly is a weekly newspaper published by the Guardian Media Group, and is one of the worlds oldest international newspapers. ... Guardian Monthly is a glossy magazine published by Guardian Media Group for readers around the world. ... Guardian Abroad is a website from The Guardian Weekly, part of Guardian Media Group. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... The Scott Trust is a British organisation which owns Guardian Media Group and thus The Guardian and The Observer as well as various local newspapers, Jazz FM and other radio stations, and various other media businesses in the UK. The Trust was established in 1936 by John Scott, owner of... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ...


The Guardian has been consistently loss-making. The National Newspaper division of GMG, which also includes The Observer, reported operating losses of £49.9m in 2006, up from £18.6m in 2005.[9] The paper is therefore heavily dependent on cross-subsidisation from profitable companies within the group, including Auto Trader and the Manchester Evening News. For the independent US based company, see AutoTrader. ...


The Guardian's ownership by the Scott Trust is likely a factor in it being the only British national daily to conduct (since 2003) an annual social, ethical and environmental audit in which it examines, under the scrutiny of an independent external auditor, its own behaviour as a company.[10] It is also the only British daily national newspaper to employ an internal ombudsman (called the ‘readers' editor’) to handle complaints and corrections. For other uses, see Audit (disambiguation). ...


The Guardian and its parent groups participate in Project Syndicate,[11] established by George Soros, and intervened in 1995 to save the Mail & Guardian in South Africa, but Guardian Media Group sold the majority of its shares in the Mail & Guardian in 2002. Project Syndicate is an international not-for-profit newspaper syndicate and association of newspapers. ... Soros redirects here. ... The Mail & Guardian is a South African newspaper that was started by a group of journalists in 1985 after the closures of the two leading liberal newspapers, the Rand Daily Mail and Sunday Express. ...


History

Political alignment and controversies

The Guardian's Newsroom visitor centre and archive (No 60), with an old sign with the name The Manchester Guardian
The Guardian's Newsroom visitor centre and archive (No 60), with an old sign with the name The Manchester Guardian

The Manchester Guardian was founded in Manchester in 1821 by a group of non-conformist businessmen headed by John Edward Taylor. The prospectus announcing the new publication proclaimed that "it will zealously enforce the principles of civil and religious Liberty … it will warmly advocate the cause of Reform; it will endeavour to assist in the diffusion of just principles of Political Economy; and to support, without reference to the party from which they emanate, all serviceable measures." Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 452 KB)The Guardians Newsroom visitor centre and archive in London, 2004-08-27. ... Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 452 KB)The Guardians Newsroom visitor centre and archive in London, 2004-08-27. ... In English history, a non-conformist is any member of a Protestant congregation not affiliated with the Church of England. ... John Edward Taylor (September 11, 1791 - January 6, 1844) was the founder of the Manchester Guardian newspaper, later to become The Guardian. ...


Its most famous editor, C P Scott, made the Manchester Guardian into a nationally famous newspaper. He was editor for 57 years from 1872, and became its owner when he bought the paper from the estate of Taylor's son in 1907. Under Scott the paper's moderate editorial line became more radical, supporting Gladstone when the Liberals split in 1886, and opposing the Second Boer War against popular opinion. Charles Prestwich Scott (October 26, 1846 _ January 1, 1932) was a British journalist, publisher and politician. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians...


Scott's friendship with Chaim Weizmann played a role in the Balfour Declaration, and in 1948 the Guardian was a supporter of the State of Israel. Daphna Baram tells the story of the Guardian's relationship with the zionist movement and Israel in the book "Disenchantment: The Guardian and Israel".[12] Chaim Azriel Weizmann (Hebrew: חיים עזריאל ויצמן) November 27, 1874 – November 9, 1952) was a chemist, statesman, President of the World Zionist Organization, first President of Israel (elected February 1, 1949, served 1949 - 1952) and founder of a research institute in Israel that eventually became the Weizmann Institute of Science. ... The Balfour Declaration was a letter dated November 2, 1917 from the British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour, to Lord Rothschild (Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild), a leader of the British Jewish community, for transmission to the Zionist Federation, a private Zionist organization. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ...


In June 1936 ownership of the paper passed to the Scott Trust (named after the last owner, John Russell Scott, who was the first chairman of the Trust). This move ensured the paper's independence, and it was then noted for its eccentric style, its moralising and its detached attitude to its finances. The Scott Trust is a British organisation which owns Guardian Media Group and thus The Guardian and The Observer as well as various local newspapers, Jazz FM and other radio stations, and various other media businesses in the UK. The Trust was established in 1936 by John Scott, owner of...


Traditionally affiliated with the centrist Liberal Party, and with a northern, non-conformist circulation base, the paper earned a national reputation and the respect of the left during the Spanish Civil War. With the pro-Liberal News Chronicle, the Labour-supporting Daily Herald, the Communist Party's Daily Worker and several Sunday and weekly papers, it supported the 'Republican' government against General Francisco Franco's insurgent 'nationalists'. Consistent in its anti-establishment stance, the Guardian also provided one of the few probing and dissenting voices during the 1956 Suez Crisis. This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... In English history, a non-conformist is any member of a Protestant congregation not affiliated with the Church of England. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The News Chronicle was a British Liberal newspaper which closed in 1960, being absorbed into the right-wing Daily Mail. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Daily Herald was a London newspaper. ... The Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) was the largest communist party in the United Kingdom. ... The Daily Worker was a newspaper published by the Communist Party USA, a Comintern affiliated organization in New York, beginning in 1924. ... “Franco” redirects here. ... Nationalism is an ideology that creates and sustains a nation as a concept of a common identity for groups of humans. ... Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1...


After 1959

In 1983 the paper was at the centre of a controversy surrounding documents regarding the stationing of cruise missiles in Britain that were leaked to the Guardian by civil servant Sarah Tisdall. The Guardian eventually complied with a court order to hand over the documents to the authorities, which resulted in a prison sentence for Tisdall. A Tomahawk cruise missile A cruise missile is a guided missile which uses a lifting wing and most often a jet propulsion system to allow sustained flight. ... Sarah Tisdall was the Foreign and Commonwealth Office clerical officer who in 1983 gave the Guardian documents detailing when American cruise missile nuclear weapons would be arriving in the United Kingdom. ...


In 1995, both the Granada Television programme World In Action and The Grauniad were sued for libel by the then cabinet minister Jonathan Aitken, for their allegation that the Saudi Prince Mohammed bin Fahd had paid for Aitken and his wife to stay at the Hôtel Ritz in Paris, which would have amounted to accepting a bribe on Aitken's part. Aitken publicly stated he would fight with "the simple sword of truth and the trusty shield of British fair play".[13] The court case proceeded, and in 1997 The Guardian produced evidence that Aitken's claim of his wife paying for the hotel stay was untrue.[14] In 1999, Aitken was jailed for perjury and perverting the course of justice.[15] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... World in Action was an investigative current affairs series produced by Granada Television in the United Kingdom from 1963 to 1998. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... This article is about the former British politician. ... Prince Muhammad bin Fahd bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud (born c. ... Hôtel Ritz at Place Vendôme The Hôtel Ritz is a hotel located at 15 Place Vendôme, in the heart of Paris, France. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ... In British law, perversion of the course of justice is a criminal offence in which someone acts in a manner that in some way prevents justice being served on themselves or other parties. ...


In the early 2000s the newspaper challenged the Act of Settlement 1701 and the Treason Felony Act 1848. [16][17] Act of Settlement The Electress Sophia of Hanover The Act of Settlement (12 & 13 Wm 3 c. ... The Treason Felony Act 1848, which remains unrepealed into the 21st century, is law in the United Kingdom apparently protecting the Queen and the The Crown. ...


During the Afghanistan and Iraq wars The Guardian attracted a significant proportion of anti-war readers as one of the mass-media outlets most critical of UK and USA military initiatives.


Despite its early support for the Zionist movement, in recent decades The Guardian has often been perceived as critical of Israeli government policy. In December 2003 journalist Julie Burchill left the paper for The Times, citing this as one of the reasons for her move.[18]she later accused The Guardian of being anti semitic.[19] In a recent controversy, the paper has been accused by Harvard lawyer Alan Dershowitz of bias and an unwillngness to correct what he deemed a mis-statement of fact.[20] This allegation was denied by the Guardian's foreign editor, Harriet Sherwood, who says the paper aims to cover all viewpoints in the Israel-Palestine conflict.[21] On 6 June 2007 the paper commemorated the 40th anniversary of the Six Day War by giving equal space to the Israeli and Palestinian prime ministers to explain their views on the conflict and its legacy. [22][23] In August 2004, for the US presidential election, the daily G2 supplement launched an experimental letter-writing campaign in Clark County, Ohio, a small county in a swing state. G2 editor Ian Katz bought a voter list from the county for $25 and asked readers to write to people listed as undecided in the election and, giving them an impression of the international view and the importance of making the correct decision. There was something of a backlash to this campaign. The paper scrapped Operation Clark County on 21 October 2004 after first publishing a column of vituperation under the headline 'Dear Limey assholes'.[3] Julie Burchill (born July 3, 1959 in Frenchay, Bristol) is an English writer, renowned for her invective and often contentious prose. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Alan Morton Dershowitz (born September 1, 1938) is an American lawyer and criminal law professor known for his extensive published works, career as an attorney in several high-profile law cases, and commentary on the Arab-Israeli conflict. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Clark County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the US political term. ... Backlash has meaning in both socio-political and engineering contexts. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In October 2004 The Guardian published a humour column by Charlie Brooker in its entertainment guide, which appeared to call for the assassination of US President George W. Bush.[24] This caused some controversy and the paper was forced to issue an apology and remove the article from its website.[25] Charlie (Charlton) Brooker (born 3 March 1971) is a British comedy writer, cartoonist, reviewer and television presenter. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Following the 7 July 2005 London bombings, The Guardian published an article on its comment pages by Dilpazier Aslam, a 27 year old British Muslim journalism trainee from Yorkshire.[26] Aslam was a member of Hizb ut-Tahrir, an Islamist group, and had published a number of articles on their website. According to the paper, it did not know that Aslam was a member of Hizb ut-Tahrir when he applied to become a trainee, though several staff members were informed of this once he started at the paper.[27] The Home Office has claimed the group's "ultimate aim is the establishment of an Islamic state (Caliphate), according to Hizb ut-Tahrir via non-violent means". The Guardian asked Aslam to resign his membership of the group and, when he did not do so, terminated his employment.[28] The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... Dilpazier Aslam is a 27-year-old British Muslim from Yorkshire and former trainee journalist with The Guardian, who lost his position with the newspaper in July 2005 when it discovered he was a member of Hizb ut-Tahrir. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England. ... Hizb ut-Tahrir (Arabic: حزب التحرير; English: Party of Liberation) is an international, Sunni, pan-Islamist vanguard[2] political party whose goal is to unite all Muslim countries in a unitary Islamic state or caliphate, ruled by Islamic law and headed by an elected head of state (caliph). ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( ▶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ...


On January 8th of 2007, an article in The Guardian read: "Romania's first gift to the European Union, a caucus of neo-fascists and Holocaust deniers", alluding to the fact that Romania and Bulgaria's joining of the European Union would allow for the formation of a far-right faction in the European Parliament. As Robin Shepherd, an expert on global integration and GMF political analyst, pointed out, many frowned upon the tone with which the English press wrote about Europe's newcomers. He asked: "...what is a high-level, pro-European Union newspaper playing at in headlining a report on the rise of hard-line nationalism with language that could itself be construed as pandering to xenophobia?"[29]


The paper's comment and opinion pages, though dominated by centre-left writers and academics like Polly Toynbee, allow some space for right of centre voices such as Simon Jenkins. Polly Toynbee (born Mary Louisa Toynbee on December 27, 1946) is a journalist and writer in the United Kingdom, and has been a columnist for The Guardian newspaper since 1998. ... Sir Simon Jenkins (born June 10, 1943) is a British newspaper columnist currently associated with The Guardian after fifteen years with News International titles. ...


Format and distribution

The first edition was published on May 5, 1821,[30] at which time the Guardian was a weekly, published on Saturdays and costing 7d.; the stamp duty on newspapers (4d. per sheet) forced the price up so high that it was uneconomic to publish more frequently. When the stamp duty was cut in 1836 the Guardian added a Wednesday edition; with the abolition of the tax in 1855 it became a daily paper costing 2d. is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the NBA basketball player with the nickname see Penny Hardaway A variety of low value coins, including an Irish 2p piece and many U.S. pennies. ... Stamp duty is a form of tax that is levied on documents. ... For the NBA basketball player with the nickname see Penny Hardaway A variety of low value coins, including an Irish 2p piece and many U.S. pennies. ...


In 1952 the paper took the step of printing news on the front page, replacing the adverts that had hitherto filled that space. Then-editor A. P. Wadsworth wrote: "It is not a thing I like myself, but it seems to be accepted by all the newspaper pundits that it is preferable to be in fashion."

The Guardian's offices in London
The Guardian's offices in London

In 1959 the paper dropped "Manchester" from its title, becoming simply The Guardian, and in 1964 it moved to London, losing some of its regional agenda but continuing to be heavily subsidised by sales of the less intellectual but much more profitable Manchester Evening News. The financial position remained extremely poor into the 1970s; at one time it was in merger talks with The Times. The paper consolidated its centre-left stance during the 1970s and 1980s but was both shocked and revitalised by the launch of The Independent in 1986 which competed for a similar readership and provoked the entire broadsheet industry into a fight for circulation. Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 398 KB)The Guardians headquarter in London, 2004-08-27. ... Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 398 KB)The Guardians headquarter in London, 2004-08-27. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Manchester Evening News is an English daily newspaper published each week day evening and on Saturdays. ... In politics, the term centre-left is commonly used to describe and denote political parties or organisations that stretch from the centre to the left or are moderately left-wing, as opposed to extreme left wing beliefs such as communism. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ...


On 12 February 1988 The Guardian had a significant redesign; as well as improving the quality of its printers' ink, it also changed its masthead to the now familiar juxtaposition of an italic Garamond "The", with a bold Helvetica "Guardian", which remained in use until the 2005 redesign. is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Various examples of Garamond There are several typefaces called Garamond. ... This article is about the typeface Helvetica. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1992 it relaunched its features section as G2, a tabloid-format supplement. This innovation was widely copied by the other "quality" broadsheets, and ultimately led to the rise of "compact" papers and The Guardian's move to the Berliner format. In 1993 the paper declined to participate in the broadsheet 'price war' started by Rupert Murdoch's The Times. In June 1993, The Guardian bought The Observer from Lonrho, thus gaining a serious Sunday newspaper partner with similar political views. Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Lonrho plc was incorporated in the United Kingdom on 13 May 1909 as the London and Rhodesian Mining Company Limited. ...


Its international weekly edition is now titled The Guardian Weekly, though it retained the title Manchester Guardian Weekly for some years after the home edition had moved to London. It includes sections from a number of other internationally significant newspapers of a somewhat left-of-centre inclination, including Le Monde. The Guardian Weekly is also linked to a website for expatriates Guardian Abroad. The Guardian Weekly is a weekly newspaper published by the Guardian Media Group, and is one of the worlds oldest international newspapers. ... For the song by the Thievery Corporation, see Le Monde (song). ... Guardian Abroad is a website from The Guardian Weekly, part of Guardian Media Group. ...


g24 is a constantly-updated electronic newspaper available free of charge. [4] It is downloadable as a PDF file. The contents come from The Guardian and its Sunday sibling The Observer. “PDF” redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Moving to the Berliner paper format

In 2004, The Guardian announced plans to change to a "Berliner" or "midi" format similar to that used by the Berliner Zeitung and Le Monde in France and many other European papers; at 470×315 mm, this is slightly larger than a traditional tabloid. Planned for the autumn of 2005, this change was either a response to, or has the same cause as, the moves by The Times and The Independent to start publishing in tabloid (or compact) format. On Thursday 1 September 2005 The Guardian announced that it would launch the new format on Monday 12 September 2005.[31] Sister Sunday newspaper The Observer went over to the same format on 8 January 2006. Newspapers with the Berliner format. ... Berliner, or midi, is a newspaper format with pages normally measuring about 470×315 mm, i. ... The Berliner Zeitung, founded in 1945, is an East German center-left daily newspaper based in Berlin. ... For the song by the Thievery Corporation, see Le Monde (song). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The advantage that The Guardian saw in the Berliner format was that though it is only a little wider than a tabloid, and is thus equally easy to read on public transport, its greater height gives more flexibility in page design. The new presses mean that printing can go right across the 'gutter', the strip down the middle of the centre page, allowing the paper to print striking double page pictures. The new presses also made the paper the first UK national able to print in full colour on every page. Mass transit redirects here. ...


The format switch was accompanied by a comprehensive redesign of the paper's look. On Friday 9 September 2005 the newspaper unveiled its new look front page, which débuted on Monday 12 September 2005. Designed by Mark Porter, the new look includes a new masthead for the newspaper, its first since 1988. A typeface family called Guardian Egyptian, designed by Paul Barnes and Christian Schwartz, was created for the new design. No other typeface is used anywhere in the paper - all stylistic variations are based on various forms of Guardian Egyptian. is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Porter (born 1960, Aberdeen, Scotland) is a British publication designer and art director, and creative director of The Guardian. ... A masthead is a list, usually found on the editorial page of a newspaper, of the members of the newspapers editorial board. ... Paul Barnes (born 1970, Harlow, England) is generally considered to one of the most enigimatic figures of modern graphic design. ... This article needs to be wikified. ...


The switch cost Guardian Newspapers £80 million and involved setting up new printing presses in east London and Manchester. This was because prior to the Guardian's move, no printing presses in the UK could produce newspapers in the Berliner format. There were additional complications as one of the Guardian's presses was part-owned by Telegraph Newspapers and Express Newspapers, and it was contracted to use the plant until 2009. Another press was shared with the Guardian Media Group's north western tabloid local papers, which did not wish to switch to the Berliner format. This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The Daily Express is a British newspaper, currently tabloid, and it is owned by Richard Desmond. ... Guardian Media Group plc is a company of the United Kingdom owning various mass media operations including The Guardian, The Observer and the Manchester Evening News. ...


The new format was generally well received by Guardian readers, who were encouraged to provide feedback on the changes. The only controversy was over the dropping of the Doonesbury cartoon strip. The Guardian reported thousands of calls and emails complaining about its loss and within 24 hours, the decision was reversed and the strip was reinstated the following week. G2 section editor Ian Katz, who was responsible for dropping it, apologised in the editors' blog saying, "I'm sorry, once again, that I made you - and the hundreds of fellow fans who have called our helpline or mailed our comments' address - so cross"[32] Some readers are however dissatisfied as the earlier deadline needed for the all-colour sports section has meant that coverage of late-finishing evening football matches is less satisfactory than before the redesign in the editions supplied to some parts of the country. Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world. ...


The investment was rewarded with a circulation rise. In December 2005, the average daily sale stood at 380,693, nearly 6% higher than the figure for December 2004.[33] In 2006, the US-based Society for News Design chose The Guardian and Polish daily Rzeczpospolita as the world's best-designed newspapers – from among 389 entries from 44 countries.[34] The Society for News Design (SND) is an international organization for professionals working in the news sector of the media industry. ... A cover of Rzeczpospolita Rzeczpospolita ( ) is one of Polands large nationwide daily newspapers, with a circulation of 260-270,000 and an estimated readership of 1. ...


Supplements and features

The Saturday edition of The Guardian includes some sections of varying sizes.
The Saturday edition of The Guardian includes some sections of varying sizes.
The Guardian from the 21 January 2007 including the G2 supplement
The Guardian from the 21 January 2007 including the G2 supplement

On each weekday The Guardian comes with the G2 supplement containing feature articles, columns, television and radio listings, and the quick crossword. Since the change to the Berliner format, there is a separate daily Sport section. Other regular supplements during the week include: (Hon) Jackie Ashley (born September 10, 1954), is a British journalist and broadcaster. ... Nancy Banks-Smith is a British television critic; she began writing for The Guardian in 1969. ... Marcel Berlins is a legal commentator who is best known for his weekly column in the Guardiannewspaper. ... Charlie (Charlton) Brooker (born 3 March 1971) is a British comedy writer, cartoonist, reviewer and television presenter. ... Guy Browning (born 1964) is a humorist and after-dinner speaker. ... Madeleine Bunting is a British journalist and writer who is an Associate Editor and columnist on The Guardian. ... Alexander Chancellor is a British journalist. ... Gavyn Davies Gavyn Davies (born 27 November 1950) was the chairman of the BBC from 2001 until 2004, a former Goldman Sachs banker and a former economic advisor to the British Government. ... Larry Elliott is a British journalist and author focusing on economic issues. ... Image:Jonathanfreedland. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, humourist, novelist, columnist, filmmaker and television personality. ... Timothy Garton Ash (born 12 July 1955) is the British author of eight books of political writing or ‘history of the present’ which have charted the transformation of Europe over the last quarter-century. ... Ben Goldacres humourous byline photo Ben Goldacre is an London-based British journalist and doctor. ... Roy Sydney George Hattersley, Baron Hattersley, PC (born December 28, 1932) is a British Labour Party politician, published author and journalist from Sheffield, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Marina Hyde (née Marina Dudley-Williams) is a columnist for the British newspaper The Guardian, where she writes on celebrity. ... Sir Simon Jenkins (born June 10, 1943) is a British newspaper columnist currently associated with The Guardian after fifteen years with News International titles. ... Victor Keegan is a British journalist and author focusing on economics and technology issues. ... Martin Kelner is a journalist, author, and radio presenter, born in Prestwich, Bury, and educated at Stand Grammar School, in nearby Whitefield, the alma mater of Clive of India, although he attended at a different time. ... Martin Kettle is a British journalist and author focusing on British political issues. ... Mark Lawson (born April 11, 1962) is a British journalist, broadcaster and author. ... Maureen Lipman CBE (born Hull, 10 May 1946), is a British film, theatre and television actress, columnist, and comedienne. ... David McKie (born 1935) is a British journalist and historian. ... George Monbiot. ... Peter Preston is a British journalist and author. ... Jon Ronson Jon Ronson (born 10 May 1967) is a Cardiff born Jewish journalist, author, documentary filmmaker and radio presenter. ... John Sutherland (born 1983) is an English lecturer, emeritus professor, newspaper columnist and author. ... Polly Toynbee (born Mary Louisa Toynbee on December 27, 1946) is a journalist and writer in the United Kingdom, and has been a columnist for The Guardian newspaper since 1998. ... Xinran Xue is a British-Chinese journalist and broadcaster, born in Beijing (Peking) in 1958. ... Gary Younge is a British journalist and author. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 439 KB) Summary The Guardian, 2005-10-01, showing all the sections of the Saturday edition of the paper. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 439 KB) Summary The Guardian, 2005-10-01, showing all the sections of the Saturday edition of the paper. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (818 × 1225 pixel, file size: 195 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Guardian newspaper from the 21st January 2007 Taken by User:Gingerblokey on the 10th March 2007 This image is of a scan of a newspaper... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (818 × 1225 pixel, file size: 195 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Guardian newspaper from the 21st January 2007 Taken by User:Gingerblokey on the 10th March 2007 This image is of a scan of a newspaper... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Monday 
MediaGuardian, Office Hours
Tuesday 
EducationGuardian
Wednesday 
SocietyGuardian (covers the British public sector and related issues)
Thursday 
TechnologyGuardian
Friday 
Film & Music
Saturday 
The Guide (a weekly listings magazine), Weekend (the colour supplement), Review (covers literature), Money, Work, Graduate, Travel and Family.

Though the main news section was in the large broadsheet format, the supplements were all in the half-sized tabloid format, with the exception of the glossy Weekend section which was a 290×245mm magazine and The Guide which was in a small 225×145mm format. < [[[[math>Insert formula here</math>The public sector is that part of economic and administrative life that deals with the delivery of goods and services by and for the [[government </math></math></math></math> Direct administration funded through taxation; the delivering organisation generally has no specific requirement to meet commercial... A listings magazine is a magazine which contains information about the upcoming weeks events such as TV Listings, Music, Clubs, Theatre and Film information, examples include Time Out magazine in the UK. These are normally published either with a Saturday or Sunday newspaper or are published weekly to give information... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


With the change of the main section to the Berliner format, the specialist sections are now printed as Berliner, as is a now-daily Sports section, but G2 has moved to a "magazine-sized" demi-Berliner format. A Thursday Technology section and daily science coverage in the news section replaced Life and Online. Weekend and The Guide are still in the same small formats as before the change.


On Monday to Thursday, the supplements carry substantial quantities of recruitment advertising as well as editorial on their specialised topics.


Regular columns

  • Country Diary (natural history)
  • Notes & Queries
  • Whatever happened to ... (following up a "forgotten news story" based on reader suggestions)
  • The Digested Read, in which John Crace writes a 500-word satirical synopsis of a recently published book.
  • Ask Hadley - fashion advice from Hadley Freeman
  • Two wheels, a column about cycling written by Matt Seaton

Country Diary is a daily natural history column in the English newspaper The Guardian, first published in Novermber 1906. ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... This article is about the newspaper column Notes & Queries. ... John Crace is a British journalist writing for The Guardian. ...

Regular cartoon strips

Editorial cartoonists Martin Rowson and Steve Bell get frequent hate mail for their treatment of controversial topics. [35]. This refers to the comic, for other uses see If. ... Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world. ... Perry Bible Fellowship (PBF for short) is a webcomic by Nicholas Gurewitch. ... A Softer World is a weekly webcomic by Canadians Joey Comeau and Emily Horne. ... Steven Appleby is a British cartoonist. ... Clare in the Community is a British comic strip in The Guardian newspaper, written by Harry Venning. ... Modern Toss is a British series of cartoon booklets and books aimed at adults, and a television series based on them. ... An editorial cartoonist, also known as a political cartoonist, is an artist who draws cartoons that contain some level of political or social commentary. ... Martin Rowson (born 15 February 1959) is a British cartoonist. ... Steve Bell at Dundee University Steve Bell (born February 26, 1951) is an English political cartoonist, whose work appears in The Guardian and other places. ...


Online media

Main article: Guardian Unlimited

The Guardian and its Sunday sibling, The Observer publish all their news online, with free access both to current news and an archive of three million stories. A third of the site's hits are for items over a month old[36]. The website also offers a free printable A4 format PDF 24-hour newspaper, G24[37] – made up of the top stories – and, for a monthly subscription, the complete newspaper in PDF format. It is the most widely read UK newspaper site[38] with more than 14.5 million users a month, compared with the second-placed The Times's 9 million users a month. This has been put down to its free, unrestricted access. Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ...


The Guardian also has a number of talkboards that are noted for their mix of political discussion and whimsy. They were spoofed in the Guardian's own regular humorous Chatroom column in G2. The spoof column purported to be excerpts from a chatroom on permachat.co.uk, a real URL which points to The Guardian's talkboards. Front page of Guardian Unlimited Talk from August 16, 2005 showing folders and recent threads Guardian Unlimited Talk is the forum on Guardian Unlimited, the network of news and information-related websites owned by the British-based Guardian Media Group. ...


In the 'Comment is Free' section the public is invited to join in rigorous and sometimes bad-tempered debates about political issues. The section is comprised of Guardian columns and online pieces by other contributors, many of whom end up facing heavy criticism from readers. Comment is free, often abbreviated as CiF, is a comment and political opinion site from Guardian Unlimited. ...


The Guardian has also launched a dating website, Soulmates[39], and is experimenting with new media, offering a free twelve part weekly Podcast series by Ricky Gervais[40]. In January 2006 Gervais' show topped the iTunes podcast chart having been downloaded by two million listeners worldwide[41], and is scheduled to be listed in the 2007 Guinness Book of Records as the most downloaded Podcast[42]. A podcast is a digital media file, or a series of such files, that is distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and personal computers. ... Ricky Dene Gervais (IPA: ; born June 25, 1961) is an Emmy-, Golden Globe- and BAFTA award-winning English comic writer and performer from Reading, Berkshire. ... This article is about the iTunes application. ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ...


The Guardian in popular culture

The nickname The Grauniad for the paper originated with the satirical magazine Private Eye. It came about because of its reputation for frequent and sometimes unintentionally amusing typographical errors, hence the popular myth that the paper once misspelled its own name on the page one masthead as The Gaurdian, though many recall the more inventive The Grauniad. The very first issue of the newspaper contained a number of errors, perhaps the most notable being a notification that there would soon be some goods sold at atction instead of auction.[citation needed] There are fewer typographical errors in the paper since the end of hot-metal typesetting[citation needed] – to maintain a tradition, the daily 'Corrections and clarifications' column lists even the smallest mistakes. Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... It has been suggested that Fat finger be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Until the founding of the Independent, the Guardian was Britain's only 'serious' national daily newspaper to support centrist or centre-left politics. The term "Guardian reader" has been used pejoratively by those who do not agree with the paper – and self-deprecatingly by those who do. There are many stereotypes, but perhaps the most prominent is that of the Labour-voting middle-class Guardian reader with centre-left/left-wing politics rooted in the 1960s, working in the public sector or academia, sometimes eating lentils and muesli, living in north London (especially Camden and Islington), wearing sandals, sometimes believing in alternative medicine and natural medicine though more often atheistic or non-religious and rational. It has been shown that the majority of university students in the UK read the Guardian.[citation needed] This might be illustrated by Labour MP Kevin Hughes's largely rhetorical question in the House of Commons on November 19, 2001: Lens culinaris. ... Muesli (originally Birchermüesli or Müesli [myə̯sli] in Swiss German, Müsli in standard German) is a popular breakfast dish (breakfast cereal) based on uncooked rolled oats and fruit. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The London Borough of Camden is a borough of London, England, which forms part of Inner London. ... For other uses, see Islington (disambiguation). ... Modern multi-colored Sandalette Yoga sandals In some parts of the United States, this type of sandal is referred to in slang as the mandal in that it is worn primarily by men. ... Alternative medicine has been described as any of various systems of healing or treating disease (as chiropractic, homeopathy, or faith healing) not included in the traditional medical curricula taught in the United States and Britain.[1] Alternative medicine practices are often based in belief systems not derived from modern science. ... Natural medicine is the practice of using any form of medicine that is in its natural form. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Kevin Michael Hughes (15 December 1952 – July 16, 2006) was a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

"Does my right hon. Friend find it bizarre — as I do — that the yoghurt- and muesli-eating, Guardian-reading fraternity are only too happy to protect the human rights of people engaged in terrorist acts, but never once do they talk about the human rights of those who are affected by them?"[43] Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Terrorist redirects here. ...

The Guardian's cartoon strips by Posy Simmonds during the 1980s satirised the paper's stereotype reader, relating events in the life of, among others, former nurse Wendy Weber and her polytechnic sociology lecturer husband George. The cover to Gemma Bovery Rosemary Elizabeth Posy Simmonds (born 9 August 1945) is a British newspaper cartoonist and writer and illustrator of childrens books. ...


The Guardian's science coverage is extensive. The paper also appears to have moved away from covering alternative therapies. Its Weekend supplement featured a column by Emma Mitchell, a natural health therapist, until August 2006 and G2 was, until the relaunch, home to Edzard Ernst's weekly column on complementary medicine (Ernst is professor of complementary medicine at the Plymouth, Devon-based Peninsula Medical School, [44]), the paper carries the debunking Bad Science column[45] by Ben Goldacre and a quizzical column in G2 called The Sceptic,[46] which looks at the evidence for popular treatments and remedies (and Ernst took an evidence-based approach to appraisal of alternative therapies in his column). As alternative and complementary medicine has become more widely accepted most of the quality dailies now feature at least one column or writer devoted to the subject. A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Note: This article does not cite sources and displays bias. ... Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, and Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... In the United Kingdom, medical school generally refers to a department within a university which is involved in the education of future medical practitioners. ... Ben Goldacres humourous byline photo Ben Goldacre is an London-based British journalist and doctor. ... Evidence-based medicine (EBM) or scientific medicine is an attempt to apply more uniformly the standards of evidence gained from the scientific method to certain aspects of medical practice. ... Complementary medicine refers to a group of therapeutic and diagnostic disciplines that exist largely outside the institutions where conventional health care is taught and provided. ...


The stereotype of the Guardian reader is, however, a persistent feature of British political discourse. Doctors have used the "doctor slang" acronym GROLIES (Guardian Reader Of Low Intelligence in Ethnic Skirt) on patient notes.[47] It must be noted, however, that Guardian readers are usually portrayed as being highly intelligent but detached and alienated from noumenal concerns. For other uses, see Stereotype (disambiguation). ... In the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, a noumenon or thing in itself (German Ding an sich) is an unknowable, indescribable reality that, in some way, lies behind observed phenomena. ...


The Guardian, along with other British news outlets, has a tradition of spoof articles on April Fool's Day, sometimes contributed by regular advertisers such as BMW. The most elaborate of these was a travel supplement on San Serriffe, whilst an article in the Guardian dated April 1, 2006 written by one Olaf Priol suggested that Chris Martin of Coldplay would be supporting the Conservatives at the next General Election and had already written a campaign song for them. Olaf Priol is an anagram of April Fool. In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see BMW (disambiguation). ... San Serriffe is a fictional island nation created for April Fools Day. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Coldplay musician. ... Coldplay are an English rock band. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are up for election. ... For the game, see Anagrams. ...


References in fiction

  • In the play Hobson's Choice Henry Horatio Hobson worries that his reputation will be in tatters after 'trespassing'. He comments that if the news were to be intercepted by the Manchester Guardian then everyone would know.
  • The 1984 Christmas special of Yes Minister shows a number of newspapers tipping Jim Hacker as the next Prime Minister including The Guardian. In Episode 6 a group of pro-badger protesters tell Jim Hacker that the Guardian told them the area they are fighting to save has been inhabitated by badgers for generations. In fact Hacker points out jokingly the "bodgers" have lived there for "generators", satirising the Guardian's reputation for spelling errors.
  • In Episode 4 of the second series of Yes, Prime Minister, Jim Hacker says:
"I know exactly who reads the papers: The Daily Mirror is read by people who think they run the country; The Guardian is read by people who think they ought to run the country; The Times is read by people who actually do run the country; The Daily Mail is read by the wives of the people who run the country; The Financial Times is read by people who own the country; The Morning Star is read by people who think the country ought to be run by another country; and The Daily Telegraph is read by people who think it is."
Sir Humphrey: "Prime Minister, what about the people who read The Sun?"
Bernard Woolley: "Sun readers don't care who runs the country, as long as she's got big tits."

The above "Yes Minister" script excerpt borrows heavily from a joke in wide circulation during the early 1970s (probably from a story told in one of Dave Allen's television series). For other uses, see Hobsons choice (disambiguation). ... In law, trespass can be: the criminal act of going into somebody else&#8217;s land or property without permission; it is also a civil law tort that may be a valid cause of action to seek judicial relief and possibly damages through a lawsuit. ... Yes Minister is a satirical British sitcom written by Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn that was first transmitted by BBC television and radio between 1980 and 1984, split over three seven-episode series. ... Genera  Arctonyx  Melogale  Meles  Mellivora  Taxidea For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... Information Occupation Minister/Prime Minister Title The Right Honourable Relationships Anne Annie Hacker Children Lucy Hacker Portrayed by Paul Eddington The Right Honourable James (Jim) George Hacker, Baron Hacker of Islington KG PC, BSc (Lond. ... Yes Minister is a satirical British sitcom written by Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn that was first transmitted by BBC television and radio between 1980 and 1984, split over three seven-episode series. ... Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister are British sitcoms about the struggle between (Dr) James Jim Hacker (played by Paul Eddington), the government minister of the (fictional) Department of Administrative Affairs (and later as Prime Minister) and his civil servants and ministerial colleagues. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a British tabloid daily newspaper. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... The Daily Mail and its Sunday edition the Mail on Sunday are British newspapers, first published in 1896. ... The Financial Times building The Financial Times (FT) is an international business newspaper printed on distinctive salmon pink broadsheet paper. ... For other uses, see Morning Star. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... Sir Humphrey Appleby, on the left, giving directions to the Minister as usual Sir Humphrey Appleby, GCB (April 5, 1929 – December 26, 2001)[1] is one of the three main characters of the 1980s British sitcom Yes, Minister and its sequel, Yes, Prime Minister. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... Bernard Woolley in Yes, Prime Minister Bernard Woolley (born September 2, 1937) is one of the three main characters of the 1980s British sitcom Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister. ... David Tynan OMahoney (July 6, 1936–March 10, 2005), better known as Dave Allen, was an Irish comedian, popular in the United Kingdom and Australia in the 1960s and 1970s. ...

  • In the Young Ones episode "Boring," Rick eagerly notes that The Guardian has an article on how to get an increased student grant. Unfortunately the paper has totally mangled the spelling of a key part of it, leaving Rick with no idea how to get the increased grant. Worse still, the misspelling happens to sound the same as a Satanic chant, so that when Neil repeats what Rick read out loud he accidentally summons a demon who tries to kill everyone there.
  • In the Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, an entire planet goes into hibernation to wait out a galactic recession, only reviving themselves when the stock market reaches a satisfactorily high level for their needs. "Arthur [Dent], a regular Guardian reader, was deeply shocked by this."
  • In the Sandy Duncan episode in the first season of The Muppet Show, Statler demonstrates his extreme age by not using the post-1959 name:
Waldorf: Statler, do you 'get' the banana sketch?
Statler: No, I get The New York Times and The Manchester Guardian.
  • In the 2006 film American Dreamz, the US president played by Dennis Quaid is known for not reading the papers, until he starts reading the Guardian.
  • In the film, The Bourne Ultimatum, Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is mentioned in an article published in The Guardian and a reporter working for the newspaper itself plays a key role in the film.

The Young Ones was a popular British sitcom, first seen in 1982, which aired on BBC2. ... The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... Sandra Kay Sandy Duncan (born February 20, 1946) is an American singer and actress of stage and television. ... The Muppet Show was a television program featuring a cast of Muppets (diverse hand-operated puppets, typically with oversized eyes and large moving mouths) produced by Jim Henson and his team from 1976 to 1981. ... The name Statler has several meanings Statler & Waldorf are Muppets Statler Hotel is a chain of luxury hotels Ellsworth Milton Statler was a hotelier who founded the Statler Hotel chain. ... Waldorf (left) and Statler Statler & Waldorf are the names of a pair of muppet characters. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... American Dreamz is a 2006 comedy film that satirizes both American politics and popular entertainment. ... For the 2007 film starring Matt Damon , see The Bourne Ultimatum (film). ...

Literary and media awards

The Guardian is the sponsor of two major literary awards: The Guardian First Book Award, established in 1999 as a successor to the Guardian Fiction Award which had run since 1965, and the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize, founded in 1967. In recent years it has also sponsored the Hay Festival in Hay-on-Wye. Guardian First Book Award issued before 1999 as Guardian Fiction Prize or Guardian Fiction Award is awarded to new writing in fiction and non-fiction. ... Guardian First Book Award issued before 1999 as Guardian Fiction Prize or Guardian Fiction Award is awarded to new writing in fiction and non-fiction. ... The Guardian Childrens Fiction Prize or Guardian Award is a prominent award for works of childrens literature by British or Commonwealth authors, published in the UK during the preceding year. ... The Hay Festival of Literature & Arts is an annual literature festival held in Hay-on-Wye, Wales for ten days from May to June. ... Second-hand bookshop at Hay-on-Wye Hay-on-Wye (Welsh: Y Gelli Gandryll or Y Gelli), often described as the town of books, is a market town in Brecknockshire, Wales, very close to the border with England, within the Brecon Beacons National Park. ...


The annual Guardian Student Media Awards, founded in 1999, recognise excellence in journalism and design of British university and college student newspapers, magazines and websites. The Guardian Student Media Awards are an annual UK-wide student journalism competition run by The Guardian newspaper. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... A student newspaper is a newspaper run by university or high or middle school students that covers local and in particular school/university news. ...


In memory of Paul Foot, who died in 2004, The Guardian and Private Eye jointly set up the "Paul Foot Award", with an annual £10,000 prize fund, for investigative/campaigning journalism.[48] John Sweeney of the Daily Mail won the first prize of £5,000 in 2005, and David Harrison picked up the 2006 award for his investigation into sex trafficking in Eastern Europe published in The Sunday Telegraph. Paul Foot, campaigning journalist Paul Mackintosh Foot (8 November 1937 in Palestine – 18 July 2004 at Stansted Airport) was a British investigative journalist, political campaigner, author, and long-time member of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP). ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... John Sweeney is an award-winning journalist and author, currently working as an investigative journalist for the BBCs Panorama series. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ...


From a "long list" of 17 entries for the 2007 award, the seven judges – Brian McArthur (Chair), Ian Hislop, Alan Rusbridger, Bill Hagerty, Clare Fermont, Jeremy Dear and Richard Ingramsshortlisted seven nominations: Ian Hislop (born 13 July 1960) is the editor of British satirical magazine Private Eye, a team captain on the popular satirical current affairs quiz Have I Got News for You and a comedy scriptwriter. ... Alan Rusbridger (born December 29, 1953) has been editor of The Guardian since 1995. ... Jeremy Dear is the General Secretary of the National Union of Journalists in Great Britain and Ireland. ... Richard Ingrams (born August 19, 1937) was the second editor of British satirical magazine, Private Eye, taking over from Christopher Booker in 1963. ... A short list is a list of candidates for a job, prize, award, political position, etc. ...

  1. Phil Baty, The Times Higher Education Supplement
  2. Paul Keilthy, Camden New Journal
  3. David Leigh and Rob Evans, The Guardian
  4. Rob Waugh, Yorkshire Post
  5. The Salford Star
  6. Richard Brooks, Private Eye and
  7. Deborah Wain, Doncaster Free Press[49]

The 2007 "Paul Foot Award" was announced at the Media and Spin Bar, Millbank Tower on Monday, 15 October 2007. The top prize of £5,000 was shared by Deborah Wain, Doncaster Free Press and by David Leigh and Rob Evans, The Guardian. The remaining five nominees – Phil Baty, Richard Brooks, Paul Keilthy, Rob Waugh and free magazine, The Salford Star – were each awarded a £1,000 prize.[50] The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... The Camden New Journal is a free, independent newspaper that covers the London Borough of Camden. ... The Yorkshire Post was founded in 1754, as the Leedes Intelligencer, making it one of Britains first daily newspapers. ... The Star is an English language newspaper in Malaysia. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... The Doncaster Free Press a weekly newspaper in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ... Millbank Tower, from the north Millbank Tower from the south, taken from Vauxhall bridge. ... The Doncaster Free Press a weekly newspaper in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ...


Editors

John Edward Taylor (September 11, 1791 - January 6, 1844) was the founder of the Manchester Guardian newspaper, later to become The Guardian. ... John Edward Taylor (September 11, 1791 - January 6, 1844) was the founder of the Manchester Guardian newspaper, later to become The Guardian. ... Charles Prestwich Scott (October 26, 1846 _ January 1, 1932) was a British journalist, publisher and politician. ... Edward Taylor Ted Scott (1883 - April 22, 1932) was a British journalist, who was editor and briefly co-owner of the Manchester Guardian, and the younger son of its legendary editor-owner C. P. Scott. ... William Percival Crozier (1 August 1879 – 16 April 1944) was a British journalist. ... Hector Alastair Hetherington (born 31 October 1919, died 3 October 1999) was a journalist, newspaper editor and academic. ... Peter Preston is a British journalist and author. ... Alan Rusbridger (born December 29, 1953) has been editor of The Guardian since 1995. ...

Notable regular contributors (past and present)

Columnists

Cartoonists David Aaronovitch (born July 8, 1954) is a British journalist, broadcaster, and author. ... Ian Aitken is a British journalist and political commentator. ... Brian Wilson Aldiss, OBE, (born August 18, 1925 in East Dereham, Norfolk) is a prolific English author of both general fiction and science fiction. ... Reverend John Galbraith Graham MBE (born February 16, 1921) is a British crossword compiler, best known as Araucaria of The Guardian. ... Leslie Thomas John Arlott (February 25, 1914 - December 14, 1991) (known as John Arlott) was an English sports commentator for Test Match Special. ... Dilpazier Aslam is a 27-year-old British Muslim from Yorkshire and former trainee journalist with The Guardian, who lost his position with the newspaper in July 2005 when it discovered he was a member of Hizb ut-Tahrir. ... Nancy Banks-Smith is a British television critic; she began writing for The Guardian in 1969. ... Leonard William Barden is an English chess columnist and promoter. ... Patrick Barkham is a journalist working for the Guardian newspaper in the United Kingdom. ... Catherine Bennett is a British journalist working for The Guardian, where she writes columns on politics and culture. ... Marcel Berlins is a legal commentator who is best known for his weekly column in the Guardiannewspaper. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Fat Duck. ... Sidney Blumenthal was born in Chicago in 1948 and educated at Brandeis University(BA in Sociology in 1969). ... Boutros Boutros-Ghali (Arabic: بطرس بطرس غالي Coptic: BOYTPOC BOYTPOC ΓΑΛΗ) (born November 14, 1922) is an Egyptian diplomat who was the sixth Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1992 to December 1996. ... Russell Edward Brand [1] (born June 4, 1975 in Grays, Essex)[2] is an English radio and television personality, comedian, actor, and newspaper columnist. ... Emma Brockes (born 1975) is a British Jewish journalist for The Guardian newspaper, working principally as a profile writer. ... Charlie (Charlton) Brooker (born 3 March 1971) is a British comedy writer, cartoonist, reviewer and television presenter. ... Alex Brummer (born 25 May 1949) is a British journalist, editor, and author. ... Inayat Bunglawala is media secretary of the Muslim Council of Britain. ... Julie Burchill (born July 3, 1959 in Frenchay, Bristol) is an English writer, renowned for her invective and often contentious prose. ... For the Canadian ice hockey player, see Dave Cameron. ... James Cameron (1911-1985) was a prominent British journalist, in whose memory the annual James Cameron Memorial Lecture is given. ... Duncan Campbell is a correspondent for The Guardian. ... Sir Neville Cardus (2 April 1889 - 27 February 1975) was a celebrated British journalist. ... Alexander Chancellor is a British journalist. ... Mark Cocker is a British journalist, ornithologist and author. ... Alistair Cooke should not be confused with Alastair Cook, English cricketer. ... George Douglas Howard Cole (September 25, 1889 - January 14, 1959) was an English journalist and economist, closely associated with the development of Fabianism. ... John Cole may refer to the following people: John Cole (bobsleigh), who competed for the United States. ... Gavyn Davies Gavyn Davies (born 27 November 1950) was the chairman of the BBC from 2001 until 2004, a former Goldman Sachs banker and a former economic advisor to the British Government. ... Beth Ditto (born 19 February 1981) is the vocalist of American band Gossip. ... Terry Eagleton (born in Salford, Lancashire (now Greater Manchester), England, on February 22, 1943) is a British literary critic and philosopher. ... Larry Elliott is a British journalist and author focusing on economic issues. ... Matthew Engel is a writer and editor who began his career in 1979. ... Note: This article does not cite sources and displays bias. ... Harold Evans Sir Harold Matthew Evans (born June 28 1928) is a British-born journalist and writer who was editor of The Sunday Times from 1967 to 1981. ... Paul Foot, campaigning journalist Paul Mackintosh Foot (8 November 1937 in Palestine – 18 July 2004 at Stansted Airport) was a British investigative journalist, political campaigner, author, and long-time member of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP). ... Dame Elizabeth Liz Anne Lucy Forgan, DBE (born 1944) is a British journalist and television executive who was educated at St Hughs College, Oxford. ... Brian J. Ford (born 1939 in Corsham, Wiltshire) is an English independent scientist, prolific author and popular interpreter of scientific issues for the general populace, whose scientific papers and numerous books have been published internationally. ... Michael Frayn (born 8 September 1933) is an English playwright and novelist. ... Image:Jonathanfreedland. ... Victor Gollancz (April 9, 1893–February 8, 1967) was a British publisher, socialist, and humanitarian. ... Richard Willoughby Gott (born 28 October 1938 Aston Tirrold, England) is a British journalist and historian, who has written extensively on Latin America. ... Roy Greenslade is Professor of Journalism at London’s City University and has been a media commentator since 1992, most notably for The Guardian. ... Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian-born writer, broadcaster and retired academic, widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century. ... Arthur Harry Griffin (15th January 1911 to 9th July 2004 - usually known in print as A. Harry Griffin) was a British journalist and mountaineer. ... Ben Hammersley (born April 3, 1976), in Leicester, England) is a British writer, journalist, and photographer, currently based in Florence, Italy. ... Cover art of Harpers 1978 Class War Comix Clifford Harper (born July 13, 1949) is an artist who describes himself as a committed anarchist and cartoonist. ... Patrick Haseldine at N°10 Downing Street in July 1994 Patrick Haseldine (born July 11, 1942) is a former British diplomat who was dismissed by the then foreign secretary, John Major, in August 1989. ... Sir Max Hastings (born December 28, 1945) is a British journalist, editor, historian and author. ... Roy Sydney George Hattersley, Baron Hattersley, PC (born December 28, 1932) is a British Labour Party politician, published author and journalist from Sheffield, England. ... Isabel Hilton (born Aberdeen, 1949) is a Scottish journalist and broadcaster based in London. ... Leonard Trelawny Hobhouse (September 8, 1864 - June 21, 1929) was a British liberal politician, one of the theorists of new liberalism. ... John A. Hobson, (1858&#8211;1940) was an English economist and imperial critic, widely popular as a lecturer and writer. ... Tom Hodgkinson is a British writer and editor of The Idler. ... Will Hodgkinson is a journalist and author from London, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Clare Hollingworth (born October 10, 1911) is famed for getting one of the greatest scoops of modern times when she was the first to report on the outbreak of the Second World War. ... Marina Hyde (née Marina Dudley-Williams) is a columnist for the British newspaper The Guardian, where she writes on celebrity. ... Waldemar Januszczak (born January 12, 1954) is a British art critic. ... Sir Simon Jenkins (born June 10, 1943) is a British newspaper columnist currently associated with The Guardian after fifteen years with News International titles. ... Stanley Johnson Stanley Patrick Johnson (born 18 August 1940 in Cornwall) is a British politician including being a Conservative MEP from 1979 to 1984, noted advocate of population control, and father of Boris Johnson. ... Alex Kapranos (born Alexander Paul Kapranos Huntley, March 20, 1972) is an English musician of part Greek descent. ... Arthur Koestler (September 5, 1905, Budapest – March 3, 1983, London) was a Hungarian polymath who became a naturalized British subject. ... This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Rod Liddle (born 1960) is a controversial British journalist best known for his term as editor of BBC Radio 4s Today programme. ... Sue Limb (born 1946, Hitchin, Hertfordshire) is a British writer and broadcaster. ... Maureen Lipman CBE (born Hull, 10 May 1946), is a British film, theatre and television actress, columnist, and comedienne. ... Derek Malcolm (born 1939) is a British film critic and historian. ... Johnjoe McFadden was born in Donegal, Ireland but raised in the UK. He obtained his PhD at Imperial College London and went on to work on human genetic diseases and then infectious diseases, at the University of Surrey in Guildford, UK. For more than a decade, Professor McFadden has specialised... Gareth McLean is a Scottish journalist who writes for The Guardian newspaper and the Radio Times magazine. ... George Monbiot. ... Charles Edward Montague (1867 &#8211; 1928) was an English journalist, known also as a writer of novels and essays. ... Thomas Malcolm Muggeridge (March 24, 1903–November 14, 1990) was a British journalist, author, satirist, media personality, soldier-spy and Christian scholar. ... James Naughtie, normally known as Jim, (born August 9, 1952 in Milltown of Rothiemay, near Huntly, Aberdeenshire, Scotland) is a BBC journalist and radio news presenter, especially of Radio 4s Today programme. ... Richard Norton Taylor (born June 6, 1944) is Security Affairs Editor of The Guardian. ... Maggie OKane – once an award winning foreign correspondent with the Londons Guardian daily newspaper, who notably filed graphic stories from Sarajevo while it was under siege between 1992 and 1996 – is editorial director of GuardianFilms, the papers film unit, started in 2004. ... Greg Palast is a New York Times-bestselling author[1] and a journalist for the British Broadcasting Corporation[2] as well as the British newspaper The Observer. ... David Pallister is an investigative journalist with The Guardian. ... Michael Parkinson CBE (born 28 March 1935) is an English broadcaster and journalist. ... Salam Pax (aka Salam Al-Janabi) (Salam is Arabic and Pax is Latin for peace) is a pseudonymous blogger from Iraq whose site Where is Raed? (see external links) received notable media attention during (and after) the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Jim Perrin is a British rock climber and travel writer. ... Melanie Phillips (born June 4, 1951) is a British journalist and author, best known for her column about political and social issues which currently appears in the Daily Mail. ... John Pilger at the Humber Mouth Hull literature festival 2006 John Pilger (born October 9, 1939) is an Australian journalist and documentary filmmaker from Sydney, primarily based in London, England. ... Anna Stepanovna Politkovskaya (Russian: ; 30 August 1958 – 7 October 2006) was a Russian journalist and human rights activist well known for her opposition to the Chechen conflict and the Putin administration. ... Peter Preston is a British journalist and author. ... Cover of Arthur Ransomes autobiography Arthur Mitchell Ransome (January 18, 1884 – June 3, 1967), was a British author and journalist, best known for writing the Swallows and Amazons series of childrens books, which tell of school-holiday adventures of children, mostly in the Lake District and the Norfolk... Andrew Nicholas James Rawnsley (born January 5, 1962) is a British political journalist and broadcaster. ... Brian Redhead (28 December 1929 _ 23 January 1994) was a British author, journalist and broadcaster. ... James H (Hengist) Reeve is a UK broadcaster and journalist, currently presenting the late night phone-in show at Key 103 in Manchester. ... Jon Ronson Jon Ronson (born 10 May 1967) is a Cardiff born Jewish journalist, author, documentary filmmaker and radio presenter. ... Michael Walter William Selvey (born April 25, 1948, Chiswick, Middlesex) is a former English cricketer who played in 3 Tests from 1976 to 1977. ... Paul Sheehan (born October 19, 1963) is a British born Canadian journalist who specializes in pop culture. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Michael Simkins Michael Simkins is an English actor from Brighton Sussex Early companies include Wandering Minstrels which he founded in Brighton in the 1970s Simkins graduated from RADA in the mid 1970s in the same year as Timothy Spall and is now an Associate Member of RADA. His... David Martin Scott Steel, Baron Steel of Aikwood, KT, KBE, PC (born 31 March 1938) is a British and Scottish politician and a Liberal Democrat member of the UK House of Lords. ... A leftist British journalist of minor note, known principally for his anti-American views. ... Charlotte Mary Stott (nee Waddington), (born Leicester, 18th July 1907 to 16th September 2002) was a journalist and the founding columnist on the Guardians Womens Page. ... Richard Henry Tawney (R.H. Tawney) (1880 - 1962) was an English writer, economist, historian, social critic and university professor and a leading advocate of Christian Socialism Born in Calcutta, India, Tawney was educated at Rugby School and Balliol College, Oxford where he studied modern history. ... Alan John Percivale Taylor (March 25, 1906 – September 7, 1990) was a renowned English historian of the 20th century. ... This page is about the economic historian Arnold Toynbee; for the universal historian Arnold Joseph Toynbee see this article. ... Polly Toynbee (born Mary Louisa Toynbee on December 27, 1946) is a journalist and writer in the United Kingdom, and has been a columnist for The Guardian newspaper since 1998. ... Jill Sheila Tweedie (22nd May 1936 - 12th November 1993) was an influential feminist, writer and broadcaster. ... Frederick Augustus Voigt (1892-1957), British journalist and author of German ancestry, most famous for his work with the Manchester Guardian and his opposition to dictatorship and totalitarianism on the European Continent. ... Ed Vulliamy is an English journalist and writer who witnessed and reported the Bosnia war. ... Hank Wangford is the stage name for an English country and western musician and songwriter (real name: Samuel Hutt, 1940). ... Brian Whitaker is the Middle East editor for the British newspaper The Guardian since May 2000. ... There have been multiple public figures named Michael White or Mike White, including: Michael White (journalist), Associate Editor and former Political Editor of The Guardian Michael White (politician), former Mayor of Cleveland, Ohio Michael White (clarinetist), New Orleans jazz musician Michael White (violinist), jazz musician Michael White (Bassist), member of... Ann Noreen Widdecombe (born 4 October 1947) is a British Conservative Party politician. ... Zoe Williams (born 1973) is a British columnist and journalist who was educated at Lincoln College, Oxford where she read Modern History. ... Edward Conrad Wragg (June 26, 1938 – November 10, 2005) was a British educationalist and academic known for his advocacy of the cause of education and opposition to political interference in the field. ... Hugo John Smelter Young (October 13, 1938 – September 22, 2003) was a British journalist and columnist and senior political commentator at The Guardian. ... Tony Zappone (born Anthony N. Zappone, October 9, 1947 in Tampa, Florida) began his career in journalism at age 14 as a freelance photographer with The Tampa Tribune, paid at the rate of three dollars per published news photo. ... Slavoj &#381;i&#382;ek. ...

Satirists David Austin (March 29, 1935 — November 19, 2005) was a British cartoonist. ... Steve Bell at Dundee University Steve Bell (born February 26, 1951) is an English political cartoonist, whose work appears in The Guardian and other places. ... Joe Berger is an illustrator and filmmaker. ... Guy Berkeley Berke Breathed (born June 21, 1957) is an American cartoonist, childrens book author/illustrator, director, and screenwriter, best known for Bloom County, a 1980s cartoon-comic strip which dealt with socio-political issues as seen through the eyes of highly exaggerated characters (e. ... Peter Clarke was at school with John Bratby. ... John Kent (21 June 1937 - 14 April 2003) was an New Zealand cartoonist who is best known as the author of the Varoomshka comic strip in the English newspaper The Guardian during the 1970s. ... Sir David Alexander Cecil Low (7 April 1891–19 September 1963) was a New Zealand political cartoonist. ... Martin Rowson (born 15 February 1959) is a British cartoonist. ... The cover to Gemma Bovery Rosemary Elizabeth Posy Simmonds (born 9 August 1945) is a British newspaper cartoonist and writer and illustrator of childrens books. ... Garry Trudeau Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948, in New York City) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ...

Experts Jeremy Hardy (born 17 July 1961) is a British alternative comedian. ... Armando Iannucci (born 1964, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish comedian, satirist and radio producer. ... Terence Graham Parry Jones (born in Colwyn Bay, Wales, on February 1, 1942) is a British comedian, screenwriter and actor, film director, childrens author, popular historian, political commentator and TV documentary host. ... Craig Brown (born May 23, 1957) is a British satirist and writer probably best-known for his work in Private Eye. ... Craig Brown (born May 23, 1957) is a British satirist and writer probably best known for his work in Private Eye. ... John OFarrell (born March 27, 1962) is a British author, broadcaster and comedy script writer. ... Mark Steel (born 1961) is an English socialist columnist and comedian. ...

  • Emily Bell
  • Richard Ehrlich
  • Matthew Fortt
  • Malcolm Gluck
  • Jack Schofield

Photographers/Picture Editors The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

  • Eamonn McCabe

The Newsroom archive

The Guardian and its sister newspaper The Observer also provide The Newsroom, a visitor centre in London. It contains their archives, including bound copies of old editions, a photographic library and other items such as diaries, letters and notebooks. This material may be consulted by members of the public. The Newsroom also mounts temporary exhibitions and runs an educational programme for schools. There is also an extensive Manchester Guardian archive at the University of Manchester's John Rylands Library and there is a collaboration programme between the two archives. The British Library also has a large archive of the Manchester Guardian, available in online, hard copy, microform, and CD-ROM in their British Library Newspapers collection. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Archive of the AMVC An archive refers to a collection of historical records, and also refers to the location in which these records are kept. ... Lens and mounting of a large format camera Photography is the technique of recording and generating permanent images, by the capturing and preservation of physical stimulus-patterns on a layer of photosensitive material. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... See Diary (novel) for the novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... For other uses, see Letter (disambiguation). ... A spiral-bound notebook with pen A notebook (also notepad, writing pad, legal pad etc. ... Affiliations Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) Website http://www. ... The John Rylands Library (inaugurated October 1899) is a collection of historic books and manuscripts in Manchester, England. ... British Library main building, London The British Library (BL) is the national library of the United Kingdom. ...


In November 2007 The Guardian and The Observer made their archives available over the internet via DigitalArchive. The current extent of the archives available are 1821 to 1975 for The Guardian and 1900 to 1975 for The Observer. However, these archives are to be expanded in the future. Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

An online newspaper, also known as a web newspaper, is a newspaper that exists on the World Wide Web or Internet. ... Broadcast journalism refers to television news and radio news, as well as the online news outlets of broadcast affiliates. ... Internet radio (aka e-Radio) is an audio broadcasting service transmitted via the Internet. ... Internet television (or Internet TV) is television distributed via the Internet. ...

References

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  2. ^ http://thebrowser.blogs.fortune.cnn.com/
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  37. ^ G24 e-daily page
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  41. ^ Media Guardian "Comedy stars and radio DJs top the download charts." The Guardian.
  42. ^ John Plunkett, 2006-02-06. "[2]." The Guardian.
  43. ^ Hansard 374:54 2001-11-19.
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  47. ^ BBC News, 2003-08-18. "Doctor slang is a dying art."
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  49. ^ The Paul Foot Award for Campaigning Journalism - 2007 Short List
  50. ^ Foot award winners keep investigative journalism light burning bright
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  52. ^ Zorza inThe Guardian Index, 1842-1928 Book preview, Adam Matthew Publications, Marlborough, Wiltshire.Retrieved on 2007-07-22.
  53. ^ Profile:"Pundit with a Punch", Time, 7 July 1958.Retrieved on 2007-07-22.
  54. ^ The Legend at Shenton's website.Retrieved on 2007-07-22.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ... An aggregator or news aggregator is a type of software that retrieves syndicated Web content that is supplied in the form of a web feed (RSS, Atom and other XML formats), and that are published by weblogs, podcasts, vlogs, and mainstream mass media websites. ... Mascot: Beaver Affiliations: University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Website: http://www. ...


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