FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > The Great Gig In The Sky
The Dark Side of the Moon
Album by Pink Floyd
Released March 2, 1973
Recorded Abbey Road
June 1972-January 1973
Genre Progressive rock
Electronic music
Musique concrète
Song cycle
Length 43:00
Label Harvest (UK)
Capitol (US)
Producer(s) Pink Floyd
Professional reviews
Tracks
  1. "Speak to Me" – 1:08
  2. "Breathe" – 2:48
  3. "On the Run" – 3:31
  4. "Time" (containing "Breathe (Reprise)") – 7:04
  5. "The Great Gig in the Sky" – 4:47
  6. "Money" – 6:23
  7. "Us and Them" – 7:48
  8. "Any Colour You Like" – 3:25
  9. "Brain Damage" – 3:50
  10. "Eclipse" – 2:06

"The Great Gig in the Sky" is the fourth track[1] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyd's 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. It features soaring voice instrumental music by Clare Torry. The song was called "The Religion Song" during recording. This article is about the album by Pink Floyd. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Musique concrète (French; literally, concrete music), is a style of avant-garde music that relies on natural environmental sounds and other non-musical noises to create music. ... A song cycle is a group of songs designed to be performed in sequence as a single entity. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Harvest Records was a record label, formed by EMI in 1969 to promote progressive rock music and to compete with Philips Vertigo label and Deccas Deram labels. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 5_stars. ... Robert Christgau (born April 18, 1942), is an American essayist, music journalist, and the self-declared Dean of American Rock Critics.[1] In print, his name is sometimes abbreviated as Xgau. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Image File history File links 5_stars. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Image File history File links Stars10090. ... Speak To Me is a song by the British progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... Breathe[1] is the second track[2] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... On the Run is the third track[1] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... Time is the fourth track[1] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon, and the only song on the album credited to all four members of the band. ... Breathe (Reprise) is a song by Pink Floyd. ... Alternate cover Cover of the singles 2003 re-issue (which coincided with the release of the albums 30th anniversary SACD re-issue) The Dark Side of the Moon Tracks Speak to Me (1:08) Breathe (2:48) On the Run (3:31) Time / Breathe (Reprise) (7:04) The... The Dark Side of the Moon Tracks Speak to Me (1:08) Breathe (2:48) On the Run (3:31) Time / Breathe (Reprise) (7:04) The Great Gig in the Sky (4:47) Money (6:23) Us and Them (7:48) Any Colour You Like (3:25) Brain Damage (3... Any Colour You Like is the eighth track[1] from English progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... Brain Damage is the ninth track[1] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... Eclipse is the tenth[1] and final track from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... // January 9 - Mick Jaggers request for a Japanese visa is rejected on account of a 1969 drug bust, putting an abrupt end to The Rolling Stones plans to tour Asia. ... This article is about the album by Pink Floyd. ... Voice instrumental music is the term used for compositions and improvisations for the human voice. ... Clare Torry is a British singer, best known for her soulfully evocative wordless vocals on Pink Floyds The Great Gig in the Sky on the 1973 album The Dark Side of the Moon Torry has also performed as a session singer and live backing vocalist with Olivia Newton-John...

Contents

Clare Torry's vocals

In an interview,[2] Torry mentioned that she was trying to emulate an instrument. So it was, from all published accounts, an improvisation with Torry apparently using her songwriting skills to give it form and function.


In fact, she mentions in her interview that she was never clearly told that the song was about death. In a different interview on the DVD "The Dark Side of the Moon" (Eagle Vision EV 30042-9 US NTSC version), Richard Wright mentions that she began singing words and they knew they didn't want that. Published interviews mention that she recorded the takes very quickly - on the DVD, the track sheet shows four tracks used for her vocals.


In her interview, she mentions that an accountant at Abbey Road called her; other interviews with band members mentioned that Alan Parsons suggested her. Alan Parsons (b. ...


Chris Thomas, who was brought in to assist Alan Parsons in mixing the album (arguments over the use of overall compression supposedly ensued) mentions that they were actually in mixdown at the time. On the DVD, various members mention that they had this song and weren't quite sure what to do with it. Wright further mentions that when she finished, she was apologetic about her performance even though those present were amazed at her improvisation. Chris Thomas is a respected British record producer who was born on January 13, 1947. ...


In Torry's interview she mentions that she left thinking that it wouldn't be included on the final cut. In fact, she states that the only way she knew it was used was when she saw it at a local record store, saw her name in the credits and purchased it.


During live performances by Pink Floyd, up to three singers were used, each taking different parts of the song. For example, Durga McBroom performed on the A Momentary Lapse of Reason and The Division Bell tours, as well as at Knebworth and on Gilmour's solo tours. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alternate cover US remaster cover A Momentary Lapse of Reason is Pink Floyds 1987 album, the bands first release after the official departure of Roger Waters from the band in 1985. ... This article is about the Pink Floyd album. ...


Aside from the soaring vocals there are two spoken parts, an introduction at 0:38 spoken by “Gerry” (an Irish Abbey Road Studios doorman at the time), and Myfanwy 'Miv' Watts' (wife of roadie Peter 'Puddie' Watts, and mother of actress Naomi Watts) voice at 3:33. Naomi Ellen Watts (born September 28, 1968) is a British actress known for her roles in Mulholland Drive, the film remakes of The Ring and King Kong, as well as her Academy Award-nominated role in the film 21 Grams. ...


In 2004, Torry sued Pink Floyd and EMI for songwriting royalties, on the basis that her contribution to "Great Gig in the Sky" constituted co-authorship with Rick Wright; originally, she was paid the standard Sunday flat studio rate of £30. In 2005, a settlement was reached in High Court in Torry's favour, although terms were not disclosed[3] In the P*U*L*S*E DVD booklet, The Great Gig in the Sky is credited to Wright and "vocal composition by Clare Torry". For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... Richard Wright, also known as Rick Wright (born July 28, 1945), is the keyboard player of Pink Floyd. ... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of England and Wales in England and Wales: see Courts of England and Wales. ... P*U*L*S*E is a Pink Floyd concert video taken from the October 20, 1994 concert at Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, in The Division Bell tour, which is currently available on DVD. There was considerable delay in the release of the DVD edition of P*U*L...


Composition

Most of the song is a slightly altered arrangement of the beat and bassline from the song "Breathe". The beat and bassline were very much part of Pink Floyd's playing style as far back as Atom Heart Mother. However, due to the altered beat and bassline, it is not directly related to "Breathe", unlike the last part of "Time" (sometimes listed in songbooks as "Breathe (Reprise)"), and "Any Colour You Like" (sometimes nicknamed "Breathe (2nd Reprise)"). Breathe[1] is the second track[2] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... Atom Heart Mother is a 1970 (see 1970 in music) progressive rock album by Pink Floyd. ... Time is the fourth track[1] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon, and the only song on the album credited to all four members of the band. ... Breathe (Reprise) is a song by Pink Floyd. ... Any Colour You Like is the eighth track[1] from English progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ...


When the Dark Side of the Moon suite was performed in 1972 (before the album was released), the song was completely different and went under the title "The Mortality Sequence". Then, it was simply an organ and samples of people speaking about death being played during the performance.


Spoken parts

(At 0:38)

And I am not afraid of dying. Any time will do; I don't mind. Why should I be Afraid of dying? There's no reason for it—you've gotta go sometime.

Gerry

(At 3:33, faintly)

I never said I was frightened of dying.

Myfanwy 'Miv' Watts, wife of roadie Peter 'Puddie' Watts

Sometimes misheard as "if you can hear this whisper, you're a dime," or "if you hear this whisper, you are dying," or "if you are scared of heights, you shouldn't be flying."


Trivia

  • At the end the song, with about 13 seconds left, while the last note is ringing, the track speeds up. This puts the note slightly out of tune.[citation needed]
  • A re-recorded version piece was used as the backing music in a UK television advert for an analgesic (Nurofen) in the early '90s (the band were not involved in this version, but Clare Torry again did the vocal).[4] The original version was used in a Dole banana commercial around the time of the release of the album.
  • In live performances of the song during the band's 1974-1975 tour, David Gilmour would play both lap steel guitar and the Hammond organ, allowing Richard Wright to concentrate solely on piano (his keyboards were arranged where he couldn't play both.) David's pedal steel for Great Gig was located accordingly beside Rick's Hammond. This practice was discontinued in 1987 after additional touring keyboardist Jon Carin took over the Hammond parts.
  • The song was mentioned by Jack Black in the movie School of Rock in which one of his students Tamika was told to study the vocals.
  • The song was used in the film C.R.A.Z.Y.
  • The song was used in the film Pirates of Silicon Valley
  • The song serves as a benchmark for believers of the Dark Side of the Rainbow phenomenon. The entry of Torry's lamenting vocals coincides almost exactly with the tornado striking Dorothy's farm, and the song ends just as Dorothy steps outside to find herself in Oz [citation needed].

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... An analgesic (colloquially known as a painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain (achieve analgesia). ... It has been suggested that Nurofen plus be merged into this article or section. ... Clare Torry is a British singer, best known for her soulfully evocative wordless vocals on Pink Floyds The Great Gig in the Sky on the 1973 album The Dark Side of the Moon Torry has also performed as a session singer and live backing vocalist with Olivia Newton-John... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named Jack Black, see Jack Black (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see School of Rock (disambiguation). ... C.R.A.Z.Y. is an award-winning and popular 2005 French language Canadian film from Quebec. ... Pirates of Silicon Valley (1999) is an unauthorized made-for-television docudrama written and directed by Martyn Burke. ... Dark Side of the Rainbow (also known as Dark Side of Oz) is a perceived effect created by listening to the 1973 Pink Floyd album The Dark Side of the Moon while watching the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz for moments where the film and the album appear to...

Alternative and Live versions

  • P•U•L•S•E features a live version sung by host of backing singers, one of whom is Sam Brown. Similarly, the Delicate Sound of Thunder video features three different backing singers who provide the vocalisations for the song.
  • On the Echoes compilation album, the song segues from "Marooned" into "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun".
  • A bootleg version that was recorded in 1972 exists with no vocals here
  • Theresa Thomason performed Clare Torry's famous vocal improvisation on "The Great Gig in the Sky" when Dream Theater covered Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon at the Heineken Music Hall in Amsterdam, Holland on October 11, 2005 and the Hammersmith Apollo in London on October 25, 2005. The London show was recorded and released again on both DVD and CD through Dream Theater's Ytsejam Records.

P•U•L•S•E (pronounced and sometimes written as Pulse) is a live double CD by Pink Floyd, released on May 29, 1995[1], and is considered widely by many fans to be the best live album released by Pink Floyd, despite the departure of former band leader Roger... Delicate Sound of Thunder is a Pink Floyd live double album from the David Gilmour-led era of the band which was recorded over five nights at the Nassau Coliseum in Long Island, New York in August 1988 and mixed at Abbey Road Studios in September 1988. ... The song Marooned is an instrumental track on Pink Floyds 1994 album The Division Bell. ... Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun is a song by British psychedelic rock band Pink Floyd, and is featured on their second album, A Saucerful of Secrets (1968). ... Theresa Thomason is an African-American gospel singer. ... Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band comprising James LaBrie, John Petrucci, Jordan Rudess, John Myung, and Mike Portnoy. ...

Covers

On the Easy Star All-Stars' Dub Side of the Moon album, there are two different Dub music versions of the track, The Great Gig in the Sky (Track 4) and Great Dub in the Sky (Track 11). Easy Star All-Stars are a group of reggae artists who are signed to their own Easy Star record label, which is based in New York. ... Dub Side of the Moon is a dub reggae version of the Pink Floyd classic, The Dark Side of the Moon, by the Easy Star All-Stars. ... For other uses, see Dub. ...


Phish also does a live cover in Live Phish 7, Disc 3, Track 6


Personnel

with: Richard William Rick Wright (born July 28, 1943 in Hatch End, London, England) is a self-taught pianist and keyboardist best known for his long career with Pink Floyd. ... David Jon Gilmour CBE (born March 6, 1946 in Cambridge) is an English musician best known as a guitarist, singer, and songwriter in the band Pink Floyd. ... George Roger Waters (born September 6, 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, guitarist, bassist, songwriter, and composer. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ...

Clare Torry is a British singer, best known for her soulfully evocative wordless vocals on Pink Floyds The Great Gig in the Sky on the 1973 album The Dark Side of the Moon Torry has also performed as a session singer and live backing vocalist with Olivia Newton-John...

Notes

  1. ^ The track number depends upon the album version; some releases merge the two tracks "Speak to Me" and "Breathe," for instance.
  2. ^ http://www.brain-damage.co.uk/other-related-interviews/clare-torry-october-2005-brain-damage-excl.html
  3. ^ http://www.kget.com/entertainment/music/story.aspx?content_id=496814A9-C736-429E-8686-7ADB0B52B02F
  4. ^ Echoes FAQ. Retrieved on August 29, 2006.

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Great Gig in the Sky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (736 words)
"The Great Gig in the Sky" is the fifth track from British progressive rock band Pink Floyd's 1973 album, Dark Side of the Moon.
In 2004, Torry sued Pink Floyd and EMI for songwriting royalties, on the basis that her contribution to "Great Gig in the Sky" constituted co-authorship with Rick Wright; originally, she was paid the standard Sunday flat studio rate of £30.
In 2005, a settlement was reached in High Court in Torry's favour, although terms were not disclosed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m