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Encyclopedia > The Great Exhibition
The Great Exhibition in Hyde Park 1851.
The Great Exhibition in Hyde Park 1851.
The enormous "Crystal Palace" went from plans to grand opening in just nine months.
The enormous "Crystal Palace" went from plans to grand opening in just nine months.
The front entrance of the Great Exhibition.
The front entrance of the Great Exhibition.
Paxton's "Crystal Palace" enclosed full-grown trees in Hyde Park.
Paxton's "Crystal Palace" enclosed full-grown trees in Hyde Park.

The Great Exhibition, also known as Crystal Palace, was an international exhibition that was held in Hyde Park, London, England, from 1 May to 15 October 1851 and the first in a series of World's Fair exhibitions of culture and industry that were to be a popular 19th century feature. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x544, 99 KB) Summary The Crystal Palace from the northeast from Dickinsons Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851, published 1854. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x544, 99 KB) Summary The Crystal Palace from the northeast from Dickinsons Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851, published 1854. ... Image File history File links Crystal_Palace_-_interior. ... Image File history File links Crystal_Palace_-_interior. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links GtExhib1851. ... Image File history File links GtExhib1851. ... Sir Joseph Paxton (1803–1865) was an English gardener and architect of The Crystal Palace. ... “Hyde Park” redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ...


The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations was organized by Prince Albert, Henry Cole, Francis Fuller, Charles Dilke and other members of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce as a celebration of modern industrial technology and design. It can be argued that the Great Exhibition was mounted in response to the highly successful French Industrial Exposition of 1844. Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's consort, was an enthusiastic promoter of a self-financing exhibition; the government was persuaded to form the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851 to establish the viability of hosting such an exhibition. Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Sir Henry Cole (15 July 1808, Bath – 18 April 1882, London) was a civil servant who facilitated many innovations in commerce and education in 19th century Britain. ... Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke, 1st Baronet (February 18, 1810–May 10, 1869), English politician, son of Charles Wentworth Dilke, proprietor and editor of The Athenaeum, was born in London, and was educated at Westminster School and Trinity Hall, Cambridge. ... The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) is a British multi-disciplinary institution, based in London. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... All Saints Chapel in the Cathedral Basilica of St. ... The French Industrial Exposition of 1844, held in a temporary structure on the Champs-Élysées in Paris, was one in a series of eleven French national industrial expositions held to encourage improvements in progressive agriculture and in technology, that had their origins in 1798. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851 is an institution founded in 1850 to administer the international exhibition of 1851, officially called the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations, held in The Crystal Palace. ...


A special building, nicknamed The Crystal Palace,[1] was designed by Joseph Paxton (with support from structural engineer Charles Fox) to house the show; an architecturally adventurous building based on Paxton's experience designing greenhouses for the sixth Duke of Devonshire, constructed from cast iron-frame components and glass made almost exclusively in Birmingham and Smethwick, which was an enormous success. The committee overseeing its construction included Isambard Kingdom Brunel. The massive glass house was 1848 feet (about 563 m) long by 454 feet (about 138 m) wide, and went from plans to grand opening in just nine months. The building was later moved and re-erected in an enlarged form at Sydenham in south London, an area that was renamed Crystal Palace; it was eventually destroyed by fire.[1] For other uses, see Crystal Palace. ... Sir Joseph Paxton (1803–1865) was an English gardener and architect of The Crystal Palace. ... structural engineer is an engineering profession who practices structural engineering. ... Charles Fox was a civil engineer in Derby in the nineteenth century. ... This article is about building architecture. ... The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken. ... William George Spencer Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire (1790 - 1858), was known as the Bachelor Duke. In 1811, at the age of 21, he inherited eight stately homes and 200,000 acres (809 km²) of land. ... Cast iron usually refers to grey cast iron, but can mean any of a group of iron-based alloys containing more than 2% carbon (alloys with less carbon are carbon steel by definition). ... This article is about the material. ... This article is about the British city. ... For the former parliamentary constituency, see Smethwick (UK Parliament constituency). ... Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859) (IPA: ), was a British engineer. ... For other uses, see Sydenham (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crystal Palace. ...


Six million people – equivalent to a third of the entire population of Great Britain – visited the Exhibition. The Great Exhibition made a surplus of £186,000 which was used to found the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Science Museum and the Natural History Museum which were all built in the area to the south of the exhibition, nicknamed "Albertopolis", alongside the Imperial Institute. The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... The Science Museum on Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London is part of the National Museum of Science and Industry. ... For other similarly-named museums see Museum of Natural History. ... Albertopolis is a nickname for the area centered around South Kensington, London, between Cromwell Road and Kensington Gore, which contains a large number of educational and cultural sites, including Imperial College London Natural History Museum Royal Albert Hall Royal College of Art Royal College of Music Royal Geographical Society Science... Affiliations Russell Group Association of MBAs IDEA League Association of Commonwealth Universities Golden Triangle Oak Ridge Associated Universities Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ...


The exhibition caused controversy at the time. Some conservatives feared that the mass of visitors might become a revolutionary mob,[citation needed] while radicals such as Karl Marx saw the exhibition as an emblem of the capitalist fetishism of commodities. Today the Great Exhibition has become a symbol of the Victorian Age, and its thick catalogue illustrated with steel engravings is a primary source for High Victorian design. Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Rather unusually, these Angels wear white hart (deer) badges, with the personal emblem of King Richard II of England, who commissioned this, the Wilton diptych, about 1400. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... A fetish (from French fétiche; from Portuguese feitiço; from Latin facticius, artificial and facere, to make) is an object believed to have supernatural powers, or in particular a man-made object that has power over others. ... The word commodity has a different meaning in business than in Marxian political economy. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, June 20, 1837) gave her name to the historic era. ...

Contents

Exhibits

Alfred Charles Hobbs (1812 - 1891) was a famous American lockpicker. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... For other uses, see Fax (disambiguation). ... Mathew B. Brady, circa 1875 For other persons named Matthew Brady, see Matthew Brady (disambiguation). ... The Tempest Prognosticator The Tempest Prognosticator, also known as the Leech Barometer, is an invention by George Merryweather in which leeches are used in a barometer. ... A barometer is an instrument used to measure atmospheric pressure. ... For other uses, see Leech (disambiguation). ... This article is about the yachting competition. ... George Jennings (10 November 1810–17 April 1882) was an English sanitary engineer and plumber who invented the first public toilets. ... Koh-i-noor is Persian and means Mountain of Light. The Koh-i-Noor, Koh-i-Nur, or Kohinoor is a 108 carat diamond that originated in the subcontinent of India and belonged to various Indian and Persian rulers at different points in its history. ... This article is about the mineral. ...

Further reading

  • Auerbach, Jeffrey A. The Great Exhibition of 1851: A Nation on Display, Yale University Press, 1999.
  • Gibbs-Smith, Charles Harvard The Great Exhibition of 1851, 2nd edition, London: HMSO, 1981.
  • Greenhalgh, Paul Ephemeral vistas: the expositions universelles, great exhibitions and world's fairs, 1851-1939, Manchester University Press, 1988
  • Leapman, Michael. The World for a Shilling: How the Great Exhibition of 1851 Shaped a Nation, Headline Books, 2001.
  • Dickinson's Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851, Dickinson Brothers, London, 1854.[1]

See also

This is a list of worlds fairs, a comprehensive chronological list of worlds fairs (with notable permanent buildings built). ... The Festival of Britain emblem, designed by Abram Games, from the cover of the South Bank Exhibition Guide, 1951 The Festival of Britain was a national exhibition which opened in London and around Britain in May 1951. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c The Great Exhibition of 1851. Duke Magazine (2006-11). Retrieved on 2007-07-30.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Crystal Palace
  • Prince Albert's speech of 1849, announcing "The Exhibition of 1851"
  • "Memorials of the Great Exhibition" Cartoon Series from Punch
  • Royal Engineers Museum Royal Engineers and the Great Exhibition
  • "In Our Time"BBC radio programme discussing the Great Exhibition and its impact.
  • Images from the catalogue on flickr.com
  • Charlotte Bronte's account of a visit to the Great Exhibition
  • Great Exhibition Collection in the National Art Library
  • Watercolours of the Great Exhibition. Paintings and Drawings. Victoria and Albert Museum. Retrieved on 2007-11-13.
Preceded by
(none)
World Expositions
1851
Succeeded by
Exposition Universelle (1855)
Flickr is a photo sharing website and web services suite, and an online community platform, which is generally considered an example of a Web 2. ... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Court of Honor and Grand Basin of the 1893 Worlds Columbian Exposition List of world expositions is an annotated list of every world exposition sanctioned by the Bureau of International Expositions (BIE), including those recognised retrospectively. ... Images of the Palais dIndustrie The Exposition Universelle of 1855 was a Worlds Fair held in Paris, France. ... [[Media:Italic textLondon has a recorded history that goes back over 2,000 years. ... [[Media:Italic textLondon has a recorded history that goes back over 2,000 years. ... [[Media:Italic textLondon has a recorded history that goes back over 2,000 years. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... The County of London was an administrative county and ceremonial county of England from 1889 to 1965. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The history of local government in London, England can be broken down into a number of periods: History of local government in the United Kingdom History of London ^ a b Barlow, I., Metropolitan Government, (1991) ^ Saint, A., Politics and the people of London: the London County Council (1889-1965), (1989... The Metropolitan Board of Works (MBW) was the principal instrument of London-wide government from 1855 until the establishment of the London County Council in 1889. ... London County Council emblem is still seen today on buildings, especially housing, from that era London County Council (LCC) was the principal local government body for the County of London from 1889 until 1965, when it was replaced by the Greater London Council. ... Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ... The Greater London Authority (GLA) is the city-wide governing body for London, England. ... The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... This article is about the elected mayor of Greater London. ... The end of the revolt: Wat Tyler (also spelt Tighler) killed by Walworth while Richard II watches, and a second image of Richard addressing the crowd The Peasants Revolt, Tyler’s Rebellion, or the Great Rising of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... A bill of mortality for the plague in 1665. ... Detail of painting from 1666 of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it would have appeared on the evening of Tuesday, 4 September from a boat in the vicinity of Tower Wharf. ... Michael Faraday giving his card to Father Thames, caricature commenting on a letter of Faradays on the state of the river in the Times in Summer 1855 The Great Stink or The Big Stink was a time in the summer of 1858 during which the smell of untreated sewage... ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... Swinging London is a catchall term applied to a variety of dynamic cultural trends in the United Kingdom (centred in London) in the second half of the 1960s. ... Ken Livingstone, the current Mayor of London The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom. ... The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... There have been two London Olympics (London hosting the Olympic Games), in 1908 and 1948, with a third scheduled for 2012. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... London 2012 redirects here. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, on the north bank of the River Thames. ... The Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts. ... Clock Tower and New Palace Yard from the west The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see London Bridge (disambiguation). ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... The Clock Tower, colloquially known as Big Ben (a name that correctly refers to the main bell) Big Ben redirects here. ... The Monument, London to commemorate the Great Fire of London, designed by Sir Christopher Wren The viewing platform The Monument seen from the ground The Monument to the Fire of London, more commonly known as The Monument, is a 61-metre (202-foot) tall stone Roman doric column in the... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... Coat of arms of the City of London Corporation as shown on Blackfriars station. ... Not to be confused with Mayor of London. ... The Guildhall The Guildhall complex in c. ... Livery Companies are trade associations based in the City of London. ... In 1747, the Lord Mayor went to the City of Westminster on a barge via the River Thames. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... 19th Century depiction of the Bow Street Magistrates Court, to which the Bow Street Runners were attached. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ... The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... The London Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London, England. ... The new Abbey Mills Pumping Station The original Abbey Mills pumping station The London sewerage system is part of the water infrastructure serving London. ... The London Underground is a rapid transit system that serves a large part of Greater London and some neighbouring areas of Essex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Great Exhibition - ninemsn Encarta (291 words)
The Great Exhibition, also known as Crystal Palace, was an international exhibition that was held in Hyde Park, London, England, from 1 May to 15 October 1851 and the first in...
The catalogue of the exhibition filled hundreds of closely printed pages including a vast array of products that ranged from locomotives to steel furnaces, musical instruments, firearms, sewing machines, and machines for washing ore, grinding wheat, sawing wood, making wire, and mixing chocolate.
Great Britain won nearly all the prizes: more than a trade fair, the Great Exhibition was a national experience.
The Great Exhibition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (526 words)
The Great Exhibition, also known as the Crystal Palace Exhibition, was an international exhibition held in Hyde Park, London, from 1 May to 15 October 1851 and the first in a series of World's Fair exhibitions of culture and industry that were to be a popular 19th century feature.
The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations was organised by Prince Albert, Henry Cole, Francis Fuller and other members of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce as a celebration of modern industrial technology and design.
The Great Exhibition made a surplus of £186,000 which was used to found the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Science Museum and the Natural History Museum which were all built in the area to the south of the exhibition, nicknamed "Albertopolis", alongside the Imperial Institute.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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