FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > The Great Dictator
The Great Dictator
Directed by Charles Chaplin,
Wheeler Dryden
Produced by Charles Chaplin
Written by Charles Chaplin
Starring Charles Chaplin,
Paulette Goddard,
Jack Oakie
Distributed by United Artists
Release date(s) October 15, 1940 (USA)
Running time 124 min.
Language English
Budget $2,000,000
IMDb profile

The Great Dictator is a film directed by and starring Charlie Chaplin. First released on October 15, 1940, it is a satire of Adolf Hitler and Nazism. Chaplin's film is highly exceptional for this period (1940), when the United States was still at peace with Nazi Germany, for its fearless satire and condemnation of Hitler and Nazism, and for its vivid portrayal of the plight of Jews in Europe. It holds the distinction of being both Chaplin's first "talkie", and his most commercially successful film. Image File history File links The_Great_Dictator. ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... George Wheeler Dryden (August 31, 1892 in London - September 30, 1957 in Los Angeles) was an English Actor and Film Director. ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... Paulette Goddard (June 3, 1910 – April 23, 1990) was an Oscar-nominated American film and theatre actress. ... Jack Oakie (November 12, 1903 – January 23, 1978) is an actor. ... The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... “Charles Chaplin” redirects here. ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Hitler redirects here. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. ...

Contents

Plot

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The film begins during World War I. Chaplin, as an unnamed private in the army of the fictional nation of Tomania, valiantly attempts to rescue an officer named Schultz (Reginald Gardiner), only to lose his memory when the plane the two had taken off in crashes into a tree. Schultz escapes from the wreckage, and Chaplin spends the next 20 years in the hospital, thoroughly oblivious to the changes that are taking place in Tomania: Adenoid Hynkel (Chaplin in a double role), now the ruthless dictator of Tomania, has undertaken to persecute Jews throughout the land, aided by ministers Garbitsch (Henry Daniell) and Herring (Billy Gilbert). Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nikolay II Aleksey Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Robert Nivelle Herbert H. Asquith D. Lloyd George Sir Douglas Haig Sir John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna... Reginald Gardiner (February 27, 1903-July 7, 1980) was a British-born actor in film and television. ... Dictator was the title of a magistrate in ancient Rome appointed by the Senate to rule the state in times of emergency. ... Henry Daniell (March 5, 1894 - October 31, 1963) was a British-born actor who had a long career on stage and screen. ... Billy Gilbert was an American comedian and actor most known for his odd and unusual sneeze routines. ...


The amnesiac soldier returns to his barbershop in the Jewish ghetto, still unaware of the political situation, and is shocked when storm troopers smash the windows of his shop. Later, he finds a friend, and ultimately a love interest, in Hannah (Paulette Goddard), a beautiful resident of the ghetto. Amnesia or amnæsia (from Greek ) (see spelling differences) is a condition in which memory is disturbed. ... A ghetto is an area where people from a specific ethnic background or united in a given culture or religion live as a group, voluntarily or involuntarily, in milder or stricter seclusion. ... The seal of SA The   or SA (German for Storm Division, usually translated as stormtroops or stormtroopers), functioned as a paramilitary organization of the NSDAP — the German Nazi party. ... Paulette Goddard (June 3, 1910 – April 23, 1990) was an Oscar-nominated American film and theatre actress. ...

Charlie Chaplin in character
Charlie Chaplin in character

Meanwhile, Schultz, who has come up in the ranks in the intervening 20 years, recognizes the barber and, though surprised to find him a Jew, orders the storm troopers to leave him and Hannah alone. Hynkel, in addition, has relaxed his stance on Tomanian Jewry in an attempt to woo a Jewish financier into giving him a loan. Egged on by Garbitsch, Hynkel has become obsessed with the idea of world domination. (In one famous scene, he dances with a large, inflatable globe to the tune of a theme from Wagner's Lohengrin.) On Garbitsch's advice, Hynkel has planned to invade the neighboring country of Osterlich and needs the loan to finance the invasion. Eventually, the financier refuses, and Hynkel reinstates his persecution of the Jews, this time to an even greater extent. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 149 KB) Summary The Great Dictator screenshot Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 149 KB) Summary The Great Dictator screenshot Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A loan is a type of debt. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Antarctica Oceania Africa Asia Europe North America South America Middle East Caribbean Central Asia East Asia North Asia South Asia Southeast Asia SW. Asia Australasia Melanesia Micronesia Polynesia Central America Latin America Northern America Americas C. Africa E. Africa N. Africa Southern Africa W. Africa C. Europe E. Europe N... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (Leipzig, May 22, 1813 – Venice, February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Lohengrin is a romantic opera (or music drama) in three acts by Richard Wagner. ...


Schultz voices his objection to the invasion, and Hynkel orders him placed in a concentration camp. Schultz flees to the ghetto and begins plans to overthrow the Hynkel regime. Eventually, both he and his barber friend are captured and condemned to the concentration camp. It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ...

Napaloni and Hynkel
Napaloni and Hynkel

Hynkel is initially opposed by Benzino Napaloni (Jack Oakie), dictator of Bacteria, in his plans to invade Osterlich. After some friction (and a food fight) between the two leaders, a deal is made (which Hynkel immediately breaks) and the invasion proceeds successfully. Hannah, who has since emigrated to Osterlich, once again finds herself living under Hynkel's regime. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jack Oakie (November 12, 1903 – January 23, 1978) is an actor. ...


Schultz and the barber escape from the camp wearing Tomanian uniforms (featuring the double cross in parody of the Nazi swastika). Border guards mistake the barber for Hynkel (with whom he shares a remarkable resemblance). Conversely, Hynkel, on a hunting trip trying to make up his mind about the invasion, is mistaken for the barber and is arrested by his own soldiers. Double Cross is the first produced, but the second aired, episode for the third season of the science fiction television show Sliders. ... A right-facing Swastika in a decorative Hindu form In the Western world, since World War II, the swastika is usually associated with the flag of Nazi Germany and the Nazi Party. ...

Adenoid Hynkel
Adenoid Hynkel

The barber, who has assumed Hynkel's identity, is taken to the Tomanian capital to make a victory speech. Garbitsch, in introducing "Hynkel" to the throngs, decries free speech and other supposedly traitorous and outdated ideas. In contrast, the barber then makes a rousing speech, reverting Hynkel's anti-Semitic policies and welcoming in a new era of democracy. The text of the speech can be read at Wikiquote. Image File history File links CharlieChaplinDictator2. ... Image File history File links CharlieChaplinDictator2. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Hannah, despondent over the recent events, hears the barber's speech on the radio, and is amazed when "Hynkel" addresses her directly: "Hannah, can you hear me? Wherever you are, look up! Look up, Hannah! The clouds are lifting, the sun is breaking through! We are coming out of the darkness and into the light! We are coming into a new world; a kindlier world, where men will rise above their greed, their hate, and their brutality. Look up, Hannah!" The film concludes with Hannah indeed looking up, with a renewed sense of optimism.

Spoilers end here.

Cast and analysis

The film stars Chaplin as Hynkel and the barber, Paulette Goddard as Hannah, Jack Oakie as Napaloni, Reginald Gardiner as Schultz, Henry Daniell as Garbitsch and Billy Gilbert as Field Marshal Herring, an incompetent advisor to Hynkel. Chaplin stars in a double role as the Jewish barber (the Tramp in all but name) and the fascist dictator, clearly modeled on Adolf Hitler. Paulette Goddard (June 3, 1910 – April 23, 1990) was an Oscar-nominated American film and theatre actress. ... Jack Oakie (November 12, 1903 – January 23, 1978) is an actor. ... Reginald Gardiner (February 27, 1903-July 7, 1980) was a British-born actor in film and television. ... Henry Daniell (March 5, 1894 - October 31, 1963) was a British-born actor who had a long career on stage and screen. ... Billy Gilbert was an American comedian and actor most known for his odd and unusual sneeze routines. ... Chaplin in his costume as The Tramp The Tramp was Charlie Chaplins most memorable on-screen character. ... Hitler redirects here. ...


The names of the aides of Adenoid Hynkel are similar to those of Hitler. Garbitsch (pronounced "garbage"), the right hand man of Hynkel is very similar to that of Joseph Goebbels and Field Marshal Herring was clearly modelled after the Luftwaffe chief, Hermann Goering while beyond doubt the "Diggaditchie" of Bacteria, Benzino Napaloni, was modelled after Il Duce, Benito Mussolini. Paul Joseph Goebbels (29 October 1897–1 May 1945) was a German politician and Minister for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda during the Nazi regime from 1933 to 1945. ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Hermann Göring Hermann Wilhelm Göring (also spelled Hermann Goering in English) (January 12, 1893–October 15, 1946) was a prominent and early member of the Nazi party, founder of the Gestapo, and one of the main architects of Nazi Germany. ... Duce was an Italian word meaning leader, derived from Latin word dux of the same meaning. ... Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini (July 29, 1883 – April 28, 1945) was the prime minister and dictator of Italy from 1922 until 1943, when he was overthrown. ...


Much of the film is taken up by Hynkel and Napaloni arguing over the fate of Osterlich. Originally, Mussolini was opposed to the German takeover since he saw Austria as a buffer-state between Germany and Italy. The international community (in particular, France and Britain, Mussolini's Stresa front partners) did not share Italy's concern over German annexation of Austria and even supported League of Nations sanctions against Italy. Left alone, Mussolini soon (1936) submitted to Hitler's will, withdrew Italian troops from the Brenner Pass along the Austrian border, and moved closer to Germany, as Hitler did not apply sanctions against Italy. This conflict is almost forgotten today given Italy's Alliance with Germany and Austria during World War II. The Stresa Front was an agreement made between French foreign minister Pierre Laval, British prime minister Ramsay MacDonald, and Italian leader Benito Mussolini in April 1935. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded as a result of the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The film contains several of Chaplin's most famous sequences. The rally speech by Hynkel delivered in gibberish (the only word, that can be understood, is the often repeated "Schnitzel" (German for escalope), which is joked to be the only word of German Chaplin knew) is a true-on caricature of Hitler's oratory style, which Chaplin studied carefully in newsreels.[citation needed] Chaplin, as the barber, shaves a customer in time to a radio broadcast of Johannes Brahms's Hungarian Dance No. 5, recorded in one continuous take. But the film's most celebrated sequence is the haunting ballet dance between the power-mad dictator and a balloon globe in his palatial office, set to Richard Wagner's Lohengrin Overture. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Hungarian Dances by Johannes Brahms (WoO 1), are a set of 21 lively dance tunes based on Hungarian themes. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (Leipzig, May 22, 1813 – Venice, February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Lohengrin is a romantic opera (or music drama) in three acts by Richard Wagner. ...


The film ends with the barber, having been mistaken for the dictator, delivering an address in front of great audience and over the radio to the nation, following the Tomanian take-over of Osterlich (an obvious reference to the German Anschluss of Austria on March 12, 1938). The address is widely interpreted as an out-of-character personal plea from Chaplin. Chaplin's controversial speech, seen as an overtly political speech, may have contributed to the litany of reasons he was ultimately denied reentry in the United States during the McCarthy era. (See the article on Charlie Chaplin for further detail). And the speech was also denounced by the American Communist movement as Stalin had signed the non-aggression pact with Hitler before the release of the film. German troops march into Austria on 12 March 1938. ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in leap years). ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Breaking character, to break character, is a theatrical term used to describe when an actor, while actively performing in character, slips out of character and behaves as his or her actual self. ... McCarthyism, named after Joseph McCarthy, was a period of intense anticommunism, also (popularly) known as the (second) Red Scare, which occurred in the United States from 1948 to about 1956 (or later), when the government of the United States was actively engaged in suppression of the Communist Party USA, its... “Charles Chaplin” redirects here. ...


The signs in the shop windows of the ghettoized Jewish population in the film are written in Esperanto, a language which Hitler had condemned as a Jewish plot.[1] Look up Esperanto in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Making of the film

The film was written and directed by Chaplin, and was shot largely at the Chaplin Studios and other locations around Los Angeles (such as Laurel Canyon). The germination of the idea undoubtedly came from the physical resemblance between Chaplin's Tramp character and Hitler (particularly the mustache). Chaplin was also motivated by the escalating violence and repression of Jews by the Nazis throughout the late 1930s, the magnitude of which was conveyed to him personally by his European Jewish friends and fellow artists. It has been suggested that a 1934 Nazi propaganda leaflet mistakenly denouncing Chaplin as Jewish encouraged him to start the film project.[citation needed] Chaplin prepared the story throughout 1938 and 1939, and began filming in September 1939, one week after the beginning of World War II. By the time he finished filming almost 6 months later, France had fallen to the Nazis. The controversial final speech that ends the film was a late modification to the script, has been thought to have been motivated by the dire developments in Europe that occurred over the film's long production[citation needed]. The 2001 BBC documentary on the making of the film, The Tramp and the Dictator claimed to have evidence (largely newly discovered footage of the film production shot by Chaplin's elder half-brother Sydney) that the ending was only changed due to technical difficulties.[2] The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... Sydney Chaplin (1885-1965) was the elder half-brother of Charlie Chaplin and the half-uncle of the actor Sydney Chaplin (1926- ), who was born as Sydney Earle Chaplin. ...


The film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Chaplin also received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actor, and Oakie for Best Supporting Actor; the film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. The film was Chaplin's first true talking picture and helped shake off accusations of Luddism following his previous release (Modern Times) released in 1936 when the silent era had all but ended in the late 1920s. // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. ... The Luddites were a group of English workers in the early 1800s who protested – often by destroying machines – against the changes produced by the Industrial Revolution that they felt threatened their jobs. ... Modern Times is a 1936 film by Charlie Chaplin that has his famous Little Tramp character struggling to survive in the modern, industrialized world. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The 1920s is a decade sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ...


Several similarities between Hitler and Chaplin have been noted and may have been a pivotal factor in Chaplin's decision to make The Great Dictator. Chaplin and Hitler had superficially similar looks, most famously their moustaches, and this similarity is most commented upon. (Tommy Handley wrote a song named "Who is This Man Who Looks like Charlie Chaplin?" [3]) Furthermore, the two men were born four days apart in April, 1889, and both grew up in relative poverty. Tommy (Thomas Reginald) Handley (1892 -1949) was a British comedian mainly known for the BBC radio program ITMA (Its That Man Again). He was born at Toxteth Park, (Liverpool) on 17 January 1892 and died on 9 January 1949 from a brain hemorrhage. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


In addition, there were some rumors circulating that in the early days of Hitler's political career, he was aware of Charlie Chaplin's popularity in the motion picture business, and was told repeatedly that he shared physical traits with Charlie, therefore he grew the same famous square shaped mustache in order to boost his own popularity.[citation needed]


The making of the film coincided with rising tensions throughout the world. Speculation grew that this and other anti-fascist films such as Mortal Storm and Four Sons would remain unreleased given the United States's neutral relationship with Germany. The project continued largely because Chaplin was financially and artistically independent of other studios; also, failure to release the film would have bankrupted Chaplin, who had invested $1.5m of his own money in the project. The film eventually opened in New York City in September, 1940, to a wider American audience in October and the United Kingdom in December. The film was released in France in April 1945, shortly after the liberation of Paris. Four Sons was a 1928 film drama directed by John Ford and screen written by Philip Klein based on a story by I.A.R. Wylie. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... The Liberation of Paris in World War II took place in late August 1944 after the battle of Normandy. ...


When interviewed about this film being on such a touchy subject, Charlie Chaplin had only this to say: "Half-way through making The Great Dictator I began receiving alarming messages from United Artists ... but I was determined to go ahead for Hitler must be laughed at." The documentary The Tramp and The Dictator provides audio of a 1983 interview with Chaplin associate Dan James, in which he reports that President Franklin D. Roosevelt sent his advisor Harry Hopkins to personally meet with Chaplin and encourage him to move ahead with the satirical film. FDR redirects here. ... Harry Lloyd Hopkins Harry Lloyd Hopkins (August 17, 1890 – January 29, 1946) was one of Franklin Roosevelts closest advisors. ...


Chaplin originally intended to call the film The Dictator, but received notice from Paramount Pictures that they would charge him $25,000 for use of the title—they owned the rights to an unrelated novel by Richard Harding Davis[citation needed]. Chaplin balked at the conditions and inserted "Great" into the title. (In France the film is known as Le Dictateur.) Richard Harding Davis (18th April 1864 - 11th April 1916) was a writer and journalist best known for his involvement in the William Randolph Hearsts unproven plot to start the Spanish-American War in order to boost newspaper sales. ...


According to the The Tramp and the Dictator, the film was not only sent to Hitler, but an eyewitness confirmed he did see it.[2] According to the Internet Movie Database, Chaplin, after being told Hitler saw the movie, replied: "I'd give anything to know what he thought of it."[4] The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about motion pictures, actors, movie stars, TV shows, TV stars, production crew personnel, movie pictures, cast, crew as well as video games. ...


Reception

The film was well received at the time of its release, and was popular with the American public. Critical opinion was mixed, with many reviewers critical of Chaplin's final speech, and some felt the slapstick portrayal of storm troopers was inappropriate (this opinion magnified as the horrors of the Nazis were uncovered, and is readily apparent to modern audiences). But Jewish audiences were deeply moved by the portrayal of Jewish characters and their plight, which was still a taboo subject in Hollywood films of the time. It was shown in London during the Battle of Britain, and was reportedly a great morale booster. General Eisenhower personally requested French dubbed versions of the film from Chaplin for distribution in France after the Allied victory there.[citation needed] Combatants United Kingdom Including combatants from:[1] Poland New Zealand Canada Czechoslovakia Belgium Australia South Africa France Ireland United States Jamaica Palestine Rhodesia Germany Including combatants from Italy Commanders Hugh Dowding Hermann Göring Albert Kesselring Strength 754 single-seat fighters 149 two-seat fighters 560 bombers 500 coastal 1... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ...


In his 1964 autobiography, Chaplin stated that he would not have been able to make such jokes about the Nazi regime had he known about the actual extent of the Nazi horrors, particularly the death camps and the Holocaust. Indeed, it took over half a century before films were produced that took the artistic challenge to find any humour in that situation, such as Roberto Benigni's Life is Beautiful (1997). It is somewhat notable, regardless, that the film was produced approximately one year before the construction of the true death camps such as Auschwitz. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ... Roberto Benigni as Johnny Stecchino Roberto Benigni (born October 27, 1952) is an Oscar-winning Italian film and television actor and director. ... Life Is Beautiful (Italian: La vita è bella) is a 1997 Italian language film which tells the story of an Italian Jew, Guido Orefice (played by Roberto Benigni, who also directed and co-wrote the film), who lives in his own romantic fairy tale world, but must learn how to use... This is a list of film-related events in 1997. ... Extermination camps were the facilities constructed by Nazi Germany in World War II where the Nazis systematically killed millions of people as part of what was later deemed The Holocaust. ... Auschwitz (Konzentrationslager Auschwitz) was the largest of the Nazi German concentration camps. ...


See also

  • Casablanca
  • You Nazty Spy! and I'll Never Heil Again, a pair of Three Stooges shorts with a similar subject matter, released around the same time as The Great Dictator. It was heavily publicized at the time that Chaplin was preparing a Hitler satire, and the publicity may have inspired these films.
  • Der Fuehrer's Face. A Donald Duck cartoon that spoofs the severity of the Nazi dicatorship and the effect it had on the people directly affected by it

Casablanca is a 1943 romantic film set during World War II in the Vichy-controlled Moroccan city of Casablanca. ... You Nazty Spy! (1940) is an 18-minute short subject by the Three Stooges that satirized Nazi Germany. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Moe Howard, Curly Howard and Larry Fine The Three Stooges were a American vaudeville and comedy act in the first half of the 20th century. ... Sheet music for the title song. ... Donald Duck is an animated cartoon and comic-book character from Walt Disney Productions. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Hoffmann, Frank W.; William G. Bailey (1992). Mind & Society Fads. Haworth Press. ISBN 1560241780. , p. 116: "Between world wars, Esperanto fared worse and, sadly, became embroiled in political power moves. Adolph Hitler wrote in Mein Kampf that the spread of Esperanto throughout Europe was a Jewish plot to break down national differences so that Jews could assume positions of authority.... After the Nazis' successful Blitzkrieg of Poland, the Warsaw Gestapo received orders to 'take care' of the Zamenhof family.... Zamenhof's son was shot... his two daughters were sent to the Treblinka death camp."
  2. ^ a b The Tramp and the Dictator, official BBC web site
  3. ^ "Who Is This Man" lyrics
  4. ^ Trivia for The Great Dictator on IMDb

L. L. Zamenhof Dr. Ludovic Lazarus (Ludwik Lejzer, Ludwik Łazarz) Zamenhof (December 15, 1859 – April 14, 1917) was an eye doctor, philologist, and the initiator of Esperanto, the most widely spoken and successful constructed language in the world. ...

Additional references

  1. Chaplin and American Culture: The Evolution of a Star Image. Charles J. Maland. Princeton, 1989.
  2. National Film Theatre/British Film Institute Notes on The Great Dictator.
  3. The Tramp and the Dictator, directed by Kevin Brownlow 2001.
  4. MoreThings "Charlie Chaplin's Heroic Failure"

1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The used book sale in front of the National Film Theatre The National Film Theatre is located on the South Bank of the river Thames in London. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about motion pictures, actors, movie stars, TV shows, TV stars, production crew personnel, movie pictures, cast, crew as well as video games. ...

The Films of Charlie Chaplin

The Mack Sennett Comedies: Kid Auto Races at Venice “Charles Chaplin” redirects here. ... Kid Auto Races At Venice is 1914 Charlie Chaplin film in which his Tramp character makes a first appearance. ...

The Chaplin-Mutual Comedies: The Floorwalker, The Fireman, The Vagabond, One A.M., The Count, The Pawnshop, Behind the Screen, The Rink, Easy Street, The Cure, The Immigrant, The Adventurer The Floorwalker was Charlie Chaplins first Mutual Film Company made in 1916. ... The Fireman was the second film Charlie Chaplin created for Mutual Films in 1916. ... The Vagabond was Chaplins third film with Mutual Films. ... One A.M. was an unique Charlie Chaplin film created for Mutual Films in 1916. ... The Count was Charlie Chaplins fifth film for Mutual Films in 1916. ... The Pawnshop was Chaplins sixth film for Mutual Film Company. ... Behind the Screen is a 1916 short film written and directed by Charlie Chaplin, who also starred along with Eric Campbell and Edna Purviance. ... The Rink, a silent film from 1916, was Charlie Chaplins 8th film for Mutual Films. ... Easy Street is a 1917 short comedy film by Charlie Chaplin. ... The Cure is a 1917 short comedy film written and directed by Charlie Chaplin. ... The Immigrant (also called Broke) is a 1917 short comedy film starring the Charlie Chaplin Little Tramp character as an immigrant coming to the United States who is accused of theft on the voyage across the Atlantic Ocean, and befriends a young woman along the way. ... Italic textThe AdventurerItalic text was a film made in 1917 by Charlie Chaplin. ...

Feature-length films: Tillie's Punctured Romance, The Kid, A Woman of Paris, The Gold Rush, The Circus, City Lights, Modern Times, The Great Dictator, Monsieur Verdoux, Limelight, A King in New York, A Countess from Hong Kong Title card for the beginning of the film Cast Description of Charlie Chaplins character Description of Marie Dresslers character The moving picture Chaplin and his girlfriend see, labeled a farce comedy but shown as a morality play. ... Chaplin and Jackie Coogan in The Kid The Kid is a 1921 Charlie Chaplin film. ... A Woman of Paris is a feature-length silent film that debuted in 1923. ... The Gold Rush is a 1925 silent film comedy written, directed, and starring Charlie Chaplin in his Little Tramp role. ... The Circus is a 1928 silent film which finds Charlie Chaplins Little Tramp character being chased by a police officer at a circus. ... City Lights is a 1931 film written by, directed by and starring Charlie Chaplin. ... Modern Times is a 1936 film by Charlie Chaplin that has his famous Little Tramp character struggling to survive in the modern, industrialized world. ... Monsieur Verdoux is a film by Charles Chaplin that debuted in 1947. ... Limelight is a 1952 film written, directed by and starring Charles Chaplin, co-starring Claire Bloom, with a guest appearance by Buster Keaton. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... A Countess from Hong Kong was a 1967 comedy film and the last film directed by Charlie Chaplin. ...

Other films: The New Janitor, Chaplin The New Janitor was the 27th comedy from Keystone to feature Charlie Chaplin. ... Chaplin is a 1992 semi-biographical film about the life of Charles Chaplin. ...

Stock company: Edna Purviance, Eric Campbell, Albert Austin, Henry Bergman Edna Purviance on the cover of Photoplay magazine Edna Purviance (October 21, 1895 – January 11, 1958) was an American actress during the silent movie era. ... Alfred Eric Campbell (26 April 1878, Dunoon - 20 December 1917, Hollywood) was a Scottish silent film star, who was featured in eleven films starring Charlie Chaplin. ... Albert Austin (13 December 1881 or 1885 - 17 August 1953) was an actor, film star, director and script writer, primarily in the days of silent movies. ... Henry Bergman (February 23, 1868 - October 22, 1946) was an American actor of stage and film. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Great Dictator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1887 words)
The Great Dictator is a film directed by and starring Charlie Chaplin.
According to the 2001 documentary on the film, The Tramp and the Dictator, the film was not only sent to Hitler, but an eyewitness confirmed he did see it [1].
It was shown in London during the Battle of Britain, and was reportedly a great morale booster.
The DVD Journal | Reviews : The Great Dictator: The Chaplin Collection (3949 words)
The Great Dictator opens with a simple declaration: "This is the story of the period between two world wars — an interim during which insanity cut loose, liberty took a nose dive, and humanity was kicked around somewhat."
The Great Dictator is essentially a tragic picture — or tragi-comic in the classic sense — and it has strongly bitter overtones." And in a bow to technological inevitability, this was Chaplin's first full-on sound film with dialogue.
The Great Dictator fed ammo to the growing conservative faction in America who already had it in for Chaplin because of both his personal life and the politics they ascribed to him.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     

André François
15th May 2010
What is Hynkel's last name alluding to?

Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m