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Encyclopedia > The Graduate
The Graduate
Directed by Mike Nichols
Produced by Lawrence Turman
Written by Charles Webb (novel)
Calder Willingham
Buck Henry
Starring Dustin Hoffman
Anne Bancroft
Katharine Ross
Music by Paul Simon & Art Garfunkel
Distributed by United Artists (UK theatrical)
MGM (US DVD)
Embassy Pictures (US theatrical)
Studio Canal (current rights holder)
Release date(s) Flag of the United States 21 December 1967
Flag of the United Kingdom 8 August 1968
Flag of Australia 22 August 1968
Running time 105 min.
Language English
Budget $3,000,000
Gross revenue $104,642,560
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

The Graduate is a 1967 film directed by Mike Nichols based on novel of the same name by Charles Webb, who wrote the piece shortly after graduating from Williams College. The screenplay is by Calder Willingham and Buck Henry. The film tells the story of Benjamin Braddock (played by Dustin Hoffman), a recent college graduate with no well-defined aim in life, who is seduced by Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft) and then falls in love with her daughter Elaine (Katharine Ross). The Graduate is a novel written by Charles Webb that was made into an enormously successful film of the same name directed by Mike Nichols. ... // Formed in the demise of two popular Central-Illinois bands, The Graduate is a collaboration between long time friends Tim Moore, Corey Warning, Matt Kennedy, Max Sauer, and Jared Wuestenberg. ... The Graduate is the fifth studio album of MC Lars released on iTunes February 14, 2005 and in stores March 21, 2006. ... Image File history File links The_Graduate_poster. ... Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky) is an Academy Award winning movie director of films such as The Graduate and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. He was born on November 6, 1931 in Berlin, to a Jewish Russian family. ... Template:Wikified Template:Expanded Lawrence Turman (28 November 1926, Los Angeles, CA - present) is a celebrated Hollywood producer who presently serves as the director of the Peter Stark Producing Program at the University of Southern California. ... Charles Webb (born on June 9, 1939 in San Francisco, California) is the author of several novels, the most famous being his first, The Graduate, which was made into an enormously successful film. ... Calder Willingham was an American, novelist and screenwriter. ... Buck Henry Zuckerman (born December 9, 1930 in New York, New York) is an American actor, writer and director, best known for his work in television, film, comedy, and satire. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Katharine Juliet Ross (born January 29, 1940 in Los Angeles, California) is an Academy Award-nominated American movie and stage actress. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... Art Garfunkel in Bad Timing (1980) Arthur Ira Garfunkel (born November 5, 1941) is an American white gollywog and actor, best known as half of the folk duo Simon and Garfunkel. ... This article is about the film studio. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Embassy Pictures Corporation (aka Embassy Film Associates) was an independent studio and distributor responsible for such films as The Graduate and The Lion in Winter. ... StudioCanal (aka Le Studio Canal, Canal Plus, Canal + Distribution, and Canal+ Image S.A.), is a French-based production and distribution company that owns the third-largest film library in the world. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky) is an Academy Award winning movie director of films such as The Graduate and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. He was born on November 6, 1931 in Berlin, to a Jewish Russian family. ... The Graduate is a novel written by Charles Webb that was made into an enormously successful film of the same name directed by Mike Nichols. ... Charles Webb (born on June 9, 1939 in San Francisco, California) is the author of several novels, the most famous being his first, The Graduate, which was made into an enormously successful film. ... Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Calder Willingham was an American, novelist and screenwriter. ... Buck Henry Zuckerman (born December 9, 1930 in New York, New York) is an American actor, writer and director, best known for his work in television, film, comedy, and satire. ... Benjamin Braddock (born 1942) is the main charcter of Charles Webbs 1963 novel (as well as the 1967 film) The Graduate. School athlete Ben had just recently graduated from college, uncertain about his future. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... // In sociology, seduction is the process of deliberately enticing a person into an act. ... Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Katharine Juliet Ross (born January 29, 1940 in Los Angeles, California) is an Academy Award-nominated American movie and stage actress. ...

Contents

Synopsis

The film explores the life of 21-year-old Benjamin Braddock shortly after earning his bachelor's degree from an unnamed college in the Northeast. The school is widely believed to be Williams College, Webb's Alma Mater (in the opening sequence of the movie, Dustin Hoffman, playing Benjamin Braddock, is wearing a Williams College tie). Benjamin Braddock (born 1942) is the main charcter of Charles Webbs 1963 novel (as well as the 1967 film) The Graduate. School athlete Ben had just recently graduated from college, uncertain about his future. ... For other degrees, see Academic degree. ... Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Charles Webb (born on June 9, 1939 in San Francisco, California) is the author of several novels, the most famous being his first, The Graduate, which was made into an enormously successful film. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ...


The movie begins at a party celebrating his graduation at his parents' house in Pasadena a suburb of Los Angeles. Benjamin is visibly uncomfortable at the party attended by mostly his parents' friends. He remains aloof while his parents deliver accolades and neighborhood friends ask him about his future plans. Benjamin escapes from each person who comes to congratulate him, exposing his seeming embarrassment at all the honors he had won at college. Mrs. Robinson, the wife of his father's business partner, asks Benjamin to drive her home, which he reluctantly does. We never learn Mrs. Robinson's first name (or, indeed, the first names of any of Benjamin's and Elaine's parents) during the course of the film (in the novel, we are told that the initial of Mrs. Robinson's first name is G). Pasadena may refer to: Cities in the United States: Pasadena, Texas Pasadena, California Pasadena, Maryland Cities in Canada: Pasadena, Newfoundland Other place names called Pasadena: Pasadena, South Australia, a suburb of Adelaide South Pasadena, California South Pasadena, Florida Pasadena Hills, Missouri Pasadena Park, Missouri Other: USS Pasadena (SSN-752), a... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ...


Arriving at her home, she pleads for him to come inside, saying that she doesn't like to enter a dark house. Once inside, she forces a drink on him, and later exposes herself to him offering to have an affair with him. This scene, known as the "Mrs. Robinson, you are trying to seduce me" scene, as said by Benjamin, is said to be one of the most iconic scenes in the film. Initially flustered, he is immediately shocked by her advances and flees. A few days later he calls her and their affair begins.


Benjamin is clearly uncomfortable with sexuality, but he is drawn into the affair with the older, but still attractive, Mrs. Robinson. Their affair appears to last most of the summer. All of their scenes pass in a musically-backed montage, showing the endless pass of time. One scene is edited so that it appears Benjamin is walking directly from his parents' dining room into the hotel room he shares with Mrs. Robinson. This seems to accent the separation of him and his parents, though they still live under the same roof. Look up montage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Meanwhile Benjamin is hounded by his father to select a graduate school to attend. Benjamin, clearly not interested in pursuing his studies, shrugs off his father's wishes and spends his time lounging and sleeping with Mrs. Robinson. His affair may serve as an escape from his lack of direction or ambition, and his fear and anxiety of his impending future. Mr. Robinson, unaware of his wife's budding affair, encourages Benjamin to call his daughter, Elaine. Benjamin's parents also repeatedly encourage him to date her. During one liaison, Mrs. Robinson violently forces a promise from Ben to never date Elaine. Whether out of fear of Mrs. Robinson, or sensing that getting involved with the daughter of his lover could be disastrous, he tries to avoid it. However, because of the three parents' persistent intervention, he is essentially forced to date her. Therefore, he tries to ensure his date with her will be a disaster so she would not want to pursue a relationship with him. He drives recklessly, practically ignoring Elaine, and then takes her to a strip club where she is openly offended and silently begins to cry. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the book or movie Striptease see Striptease (book) and Striptease (movie) A striptease is a performance, usually a dance, in which the performer gradually removes their clothing for the purposes of sexually arousing the audience, usually performed in nightclubs. ...


After she storms out of the establishment, he is overcome with guilt and pursues her, apologizes, and then kisses her. What follows is a relationship with the younger Robinson, exactly what Benjamin and Mrs. Robinson were trying to avoid.


From here, Benjamin's life falls apart. His affair is discovered and, although he follows Elaine to the University of California, Berkeley, where she is a student, he is barred from seeing Elaine any further. She proceeds to become engaged to another man; one her parents find acceptable. However, Benjamin, believing (with some justification) that she loves him, refuses to give up hope, despite warnings from Mr. Robinson and threats of arrest from Mrs. Robinson. Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... “Engaged” redirects here. ...


In the famous conclusion of the film, Benjamin undertakes a desperate drive across a distance of many miles to somehow head off Elaine's wedding. He is forced to stop for directions, his car runs out of gas, and he is ultimately forced to run the final few blocks. He arrives just as the bride and groom are exchanging vows, and stands looking down at the couple from an upper window. He begins pounding on the glass and screaming "Elaine! Elaine!". This does not garner much response at first, but when Elaine gives the return cry "Ben!", mayhem ensues. Nuptial is the adjective of wedding. It is used for example in zoology to denote plumage, coloration, behavior, etc related to or occurring in the mating season. ... A vow (Lat. ...


After a violent struggle with Elaine's parents and wedding guests (Ben armed only with a large cross), Ben and Elaine escape on a public bus. The escaping couple sits smiling at the back of the bus, the other passengers stare at them in mute disbelief, and the movie closes with a shot through the back window of Ben and Elaine's smiles fading to an enigmatic neutral expression, and Simon and Garfunkel's soundtrack. Also known as the Latin cross or crux ordinaria. ... The duo of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel are American popular musicians known collectively as Simon and Garfunkel. ...


Main cast

Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... Benjamin Braddock (born 1942) is the main charcter of Charles Webbs 1963 novel (as well as the 1967 film) The Graduate. School athlete Ben had just recently graduated from college, uncertain about his future. ... Katharine Juliet Ross (born January 29, 1940 in Los Angeles, California) is an Academy Award-nominated American movie and stage actress. ... Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Mrs. ... Brian Avery (born 1979) is a former volunteer for the International Solidarity Movement (ISM), who was injured in the face on April 5, 2003 while working for the ISM in the West Bank town of Jenin. ... Murray Hamilton (March 24, 1923 – September 1, 1986) was an American stage, screen, and television character actor. ... For other persons named William Daniels, see William Daniels (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth Wilson (born April 4, 1921) is a Tony Award-winning American actress. ...

Production

Screenplay

The original screenplay had the movie opening with Benjamin delivering a valedictory speech at his college commencement. The ceremony is outdoors and Benjamin is using notes on sheets of paper to aid his speech. Having rhetorically asked what the point of college was he begins to explain the reasons are obvious. At that point a gust of wind blows his note sheets off the podium leaving Benjamin unable to explain what it was all about. He is left stammering at the podium "it's because, it's because..." only to awaken from his dream to find the jetliner he is riding in is about to land. This foreshadowing was not included in the movie and the opening scenes show Benjamin on the airplane as it lands, then standing on the moving walkway in the airport terminal looking lost and forlorn. However, the idea was used for the opening of the film Reality Bites (1994). Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Reality Bites is a 1994 film written by Helen Childress and featuring the directorial debut of Ben Stiller. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


Casting

Warren Beatty was originally offered the title role of Benjamin Braddock, but he turned it down, due to the filming of Bonnie and Clyde. Robert Redford tested for the part, but he and director Mike Nichols decided they needed someone who appeared more uncomfortable with his sexuality. Burt Ward was also offered the role of Benjamin, only to decline because he chose to renew his contract with the Batman television series, subsequently becoming typecast as Robin the Boy Wonder; he has openly regretted turning down the part.[citation needed]Natalie Wood tested but was turned down for the role of Elaine. Sally Field was strongly considered for the part, but the role was given to Katharine Ross instead. Henry Warren Beatty (born March 30, 1937), better known as Warren Beatty, is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actor, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Burt Ward (born Bert John Gervis, Jr. ... This article is about the 1960s television series. ... A classic image of Batman and Robin reinterpreted by painter Alex Ross. ... Natalie Wood (July 20, 1938 – November 29, 1981) was a three time Academy Award nominated American film actress. ... Sally Margaret Field (born November 6, 1946) is a two-time Academy Award winning American actress. ... Katharine Juliet Ross (born January 29, 1940 in Los Angeles, California) is an Academy Award-nominated American movie and stage actress. ...


When work on the adaptation of the book began back in late 1962, Marilyn Monroe was slated to play Mrs. Robinson. Patricia Neal was the first choice of the producers, but she turned the role down because she had not yet fully recovered from a stroke. Actress and singer Doris Day was also approached to play Mrs. Robinson, but passed on the offer. Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe Award-winning American actress, singer, model and pop icon. ... Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... Doris Mary Ann von Kappelhoff (born April 3, 1924)[1] is an American singer, actress, and animal welfare advocate known as Doris Day. ...


Dustin Hoffman was playing a 21-year-old college graduate, but was actually 29 during filming and 30 when the film was released. Anne Bancroft, whose character is in her early 40s, was only six years his senior in real life. Similarly, Katharine Ross, who played her daughter, was only nine years younger than Bancroft.


The Graduate was the breakthrough role for Hoffman, whose sole previous film role was in The Tiger Makes Out (1967). His next big successes (and Oscar nominations) came from Midnight Cowboy, Lenny, and All the President's Men. A Breakthrough role is a term in the film industry to describe the film of an actor or actress which contributed significantly to the development of their career. ... The Tiger Makes Out is a 1967 comedy film about a kidnapper and his unintended victim, starring Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson and directed by Arthur Hiller. ... This article is about the 1969 film. ... Lenny is a 1974 film about the life of the comedian Lenny Bruce, starring Dustin Hoffman. ... This article is about the 1976 film. ...


In the Berkeley boarding house where Benjamin ends up living, the landlord is played by Norman Fell, who would later gain fame as landlord "Mr. Roper" on the popular 1970s sitcom Three's Company. Richard Dreyfuss has his first role in this movie, a small and uncredited one, and only one line: "Shall I get the cops? I'll get the cops." Earlier in the film, Mike Farrell, later a star of TV's M*A*S*H, can be glimpsed as one of the hotel bellhops when Benjamin and Elaine go there. As the other bellhops address Benjamin as "Mr. Gladstone," Farrell's character asks "Hello. How are you sir?" (This scene comes at 1:04:30 into the movie.) Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ... Boarding House is a privately owned house,in which individuals or families on vaccation, holidays, deputition,transfered on temporary duties, on some particular training,short&mediun tenure visitors,working professionals & lodgers,rent one or more rooms sets for one or more nights,sometimes for extended periods of weeks, months and... Norman Fell (born Norman Feld March 24, 1924 – December 14, 1998) was a Golden Globe award-winning American film and television actor most famous for his role as landlord Mr. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... For the Entourage episode, see Threes Company (Entourage). ... Richard Stephen Dreyfuss (born October 29, 1947) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Mike Farrell (born February 6, 1939) is an American actor, best known for his role as Captain B.J. Hunnicutt on the popular television series M*A*S*H (1975-83). ... M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, inspired by the 1968 novel M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker (penname for H. Richard Hornberger) and its sequels, but primarily by the 1970 film MASH, and influenced by the... A bellhop (also bellboy or bellman) is a hotel porter, who helps patrons with their luggage while checking in or out. ...


William Daniels, who played Benjamin's father Mr. Braddock, is famous not only for his role as the voice of K.I.T.T. on the 1980s television program Knight Rider, but also as the obsessive-compulsive surgeon Mark Craig in the 1980s hospital drama St. Elsewhere and as teacher extraordinaire George Feeny in the 1990s sitcom Boy Meets World. For other persons named William Daniels, see William Daniels (disambiguation). ... KITT on display at Universal Studios. ... For the American media company, see Knight Ridder. ... For other things named OCD, see OCD (disambiguation). ... Surgeon may refer to: a practitioner of surgery the moniker of British electronic music producer and DJ, Anthony Child; see Surgeon (musician) This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... St. ... George Feeny is a fictional character from the television show, Boy Meets World, played by William Daniels Throughout the series George tries his best to guide young Cory, Shawn, and their friends as they encounter problems in their lives on their road to adulthood. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Boy Meets World is an American television sitcom that chronicled the events and everyday life lessons of Cory Matthews, who grows up from a pre-pubescent boy to a married man. ...


Elizabeth Wilson, who played Benjamin's mother, Mrs. Braddock, was a familiar face on television during the 1970s, guest-starring in such series as All in the Family, and The Mary Tyler Moore Show; among her other film roles, she played a pivotal role in the 1980 workplace comedy Nine to Five. Elizabeth Wilson (born April 4, 1921) is a Tony Award-winning American actress. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see All in the Family (disambiguation). ... Mary Tyler Moore is an American television sitcom created by James L. Brooks and Allan Burns that aired on CBS from September 19, 1970 to March 19, 1977. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Nine to Five, also known as 9 to 5, is a 1980 comedy movie starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton, and Dabney Coleman and a television series of the same name starring Rachel Dennison, Rita Moreno, and Valerie Curtin. ...


Murray Hamilton, who played Mr. Robinson, is best known for playing the mayor in Jaws. Murray Hamilton (March 24, 1923 – September 1, 1986) was an American stage, screen, and television character actor. ... It has been suggested that Orca (Jaws boat) be merged into this article or section. ...


Veteran actresses Marion Lorne and Alice Ghostly appear together in a brief party scene. The pairing was somewhat coincidental, for Ghostly would go on to costar on the sitcom Bewitched, in a role largely designed to replace Lorne's character when that actress died in May 1968. Marion Lorne Marion Lorne (née Marion McDougal), was an American actress born in August 12, 1883, 1886 or 1888 (sources vary) at West Pittston, a small mining town that was situated half way between Wilkes-Barre and Scranton, Pennsylvania, of British immigrant parents. ... Alice Ghostley (born August 14, 1926 in Vernon County, Missouri), is an American actress best known for playing the character of Bernice Clifton on Designing Women, Esmerelda on Bewitched and Cousin Alice on Mayberry R.F.D. after Frances Bavier left the show, and her character Aunt Bee was written... This article is about an American television sitcom. ...


Filming

Some of the exterior shots of Benjamin on the campus were actually filmed on the campus of the University of Southern California. Other scenes were filmed on the Berkeley campus, on Durant Avenue in Berkeley, and on Telegraph Avenue as well. In one shot, the Alpha-Romeo is going west on the upper deck of the San Francisco Bay Bridge, although Hoffman is supposed to be on his way to Berkeley, which is to the east. The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... On a normal day, street vendors line Telegraph Avenue near the UC Berkeley campus. ... Alfa Romeo is an Italian automobile manufacturer founded in 1910. ... The Bay Bridge, with the skyline of San Francisco in the background. ...


The hotel scenes were filmed at the famed Ambassador Hotel, the same hotel in which US Senator and Presidential candidate Robert Kennedy was assassinated the year after the film's release. The Ambassador Hotel was a landmark hotel in Los Angeles, California. ... Robert Kennedy Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925–June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ...


While supposedly on his way to interrupt Elaine's wedding in Santa Barbara, California, Ben is shown driving through a tunnel on US highway 101. Humorously, the actual tunnel is on the northbound side of the highway, just north of Gaviota, yet Ben is driving south from Berkeley. For a quick link, please see the city of Santa Barbara, California. ...


The church used for the Wedding scene is actually the United Methodist Church in LaVerne, California. In an interview,[citation needed] Hoffman revealed that he was uneasy about the scene in which he pounds on the church window, as the owner of the church had been watching the filming disapprovingly. Apparently, Hoffman's Christ-like pose when banging on the pane was an attempt to minimize its rattling, rather than an intentional religious reference. The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination. ... La Verne is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ...


Music

The Graduate Original Soundtrack album cover.
The Graduate Original Soundtrack album cover.

The film boosted the profile of folk-rock duo Simon and Garfunkel, whose soundtrack album (The Graduate Original Soundtrack), on the strength of the hit single "Mrs. Robinson", rose to the top of the charts in 1968 (knocking off The Beatles' White Album). Image File history File links Graduate. ... Image File history File links Graduate. ... An album cover is a cover used to package commercial audio recordings such as the printed cardboard covers that were typically used to package 12 gramophone records from the 1960s through to the 1980s when the 12 record was the major format for distribution of popular music. ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... The duo of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel are American popular musicians known collectively as Simon and Garfunkel. ... The Graduate was an album of songs from the soundtrack of Mike Nichols movie The Graduate, featuring many songs from the folk-rock duo Simon and Garfunkel. ... The Graduate Original Soundtrack was an album of songs from the soundtrack of Mike Nichols movie The Graduate, featuring many songs from the folk-rock duo Simon and Garfunkel. ... Mrs. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The self-titled double album The Beatles, released by the Beatles in 1968 at the height of their popularity, is often hailed as one of the major accomplishments in popular music. ...


According to a Variety article by Peter Bart in the 15 May 2005 issue, Nichols had become obsessed with Simon & Garfunkel's music while shooting the film. Lawrence Turman, his producer, made a deal for Simon to write three new songs for the movie. By the time they were nearly finished editing the film, Simon had only written one new song. Nichols begged him for more but Simon, who was touring constantly, told him he didn't have the time. He did play him a few notes of a new song he had been working on; "It's not for the movie... it's a song about times past — about Mrs. Roosevelt and Joe DiMaggio and stuff." Nichols advised Simon, "It's now about Mrs. Robinson, not Mrs. Roosevelt." Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Peter Bart, an American born July 24, 1932, has been the editor-in-chief of Variety since 1989. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Template:Wikified Template:Expanded Lawrence Turman (28 November 1926, Los Angeles, CA - present) is a celebrated Hollywood producer who presently serves as the director of the Peter Stark Producing Program at the University of Southern California. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Marketing

In the promotional poster for the film, Mrs. Robinson's leg is not that of Anne Bancroft, but of the then-unknown model Linda Gray — most famous for playing Sue Ellen Ewing in the television soap Dallas. Linda Gray went on to play the role of Mrs. Robinson in the stage version of The Graduate in the West End and on Broadway.[1] Linda Ann Gray (born September 12, 1940 in Santa Monica, California) is an American actress, best known for her role as Larry Hagmans long-suffering wife, Sue Ellen Ewing on the television soap opera Dallas as a recurring character in the series first season in the spring of 1978... Main title caption from Dallas. ... The Southfork Ranch, home of the Ewing family The original cast of Dallas. ... Linda Ann Gray (born September 12, 1940 in Santa Monica, California) is an American actress, best known for her role as Larry Hagmans long-suffering wife, Sue Ellen Ewing on the television soap opera Dallas as a recurring character in the series first season in the spring of 1978... // West End most commonly refers to: West End of London West End theatre West End may also refer to: West End, Queensland in Brisbane West End, Queensland (Townsville) in Townsville West End, Vancouver of Vancouver, British Columbia West End of New Westminster, in British Columbia West End, Winnipeg of Winnipeg... Broadway may refer to: Broadway theatre, theatrical productions produced in one of thirty-nine professional New York theatres The Broadway Theatre, a theatre located on Broadway in Manhattan A street: Broadway (Manhattan) Broadway (Los Angeles) Broadway Street (Chicago) Broadway (Seattle) Broadway, New South Wales, Australia Broadway Market, London Broadway (Vancouver...


Awards and recognition

Hoffman earned an Oscar nomination for his performance as did Bancroft and Ross. The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ...


Along with the acting nominations, the film also received nominations for Best Cinematography, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Picture. Mike Nichols won the Academy Award for Best Director ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ...


The film won the BAFTA Award for Best Film. This page lists the winners and nominees for the BAFTA Award for Best Film, BAFTA Award for Best Film not in the English Language and Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film for each year, in addition to the retired earlier versions of those awards. ...


The film is consistently in the Internet Movie Database's top 250 films, ranked #9 on the American Film Institute's list of 100 Years... 100 Laughs, #17 on their list of 100 Years... 100 Movies --10th Anniversary Edition, it places #18 on the List of highest-grossing films in the United States and Canada (adjusted for inflation), and has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 100 funniest American films. ... The first of the AFI 100 Years. ... Here are the 50 top-grossing movies of all time in the United States and Canada, based on total receipts as of July 16, 2007. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Stage adaptation

John Reid produced a play in 2000, adapted from the movie, which was a hit both in London's West End and on Broadway and has toured the United States. There is also a Brazilian version adapted by Miguel Falabella. Several actresses have starred as Mrs. Robinson, including Kathleen Turner, Lorraine Bracco, Jerry Hall, Morgan Fairchild, Vera Fischer and Linda Gray. The Broadway production in 2002 starred Kathleen Turner, Jason Biggs, and Alicia Silverstone. John Reid is a Scottish manager and music industry figure currently living and working in Australia. ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Miguel Falabella (born on October 10, 1957 in Rio de Janeiro) is a Brazilian TV, cinema and theater actor, producer and director. ... Mary Kathleen Turner (born June 19, 1954) is an Academy Award nominated American actress. ... Lorraine Bracco (born October 2, 1954[1]) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominated and Screen Actors Guild winning American actress best known for her roles as Karen Hill in Goodfellas and Dr. Jennifer Melfi on the hit HBO TV series, The Sopranos. ... Jerry Hall at the Lighthouse Gala auction in aid of Terrence Higgins Trust. ... Morgan Fairchild (born February 3, 1950) is an American actress. ... Vera Lúcia Fischer (b. ... Linda Ann Gray (born September 12, 1940 in Santa Monica, California) is an American actress, best known for her role as Larry Hagmans long-suffering wife, Sue Ellen Ewing on the television soap opera Dallas as a recurring character in the series first season in the spring of 1978... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Mary Kathleen Turner (born June 19, 1954) is an Academy Award nominated American actress. ... Jason Biggs, born on May 12, 1978 an American actor who obtained wide fame in 1999 for his role as Jim Levenstein in the American Pie series of teen films. ... Alicia Silverstone, (born October 4, 1976) is an American actress and former fashion model. ...


The play often receives media attention due to a sequence that requires the (often notable) actress playing Mrs. Robinson to disrobe and act a scene in the nude. Some productions of the play also incorporate an on-stage topless love scene involving the Mrs. Robinson character.


Possibility of sequel

Charles Webb has written a sequel to his original novel entitled Home School, but initially refused to publish it in its entirety because of a contract he signed in the 1960s. When he sold film rights to The Graduate, he also surrendered the rights to any sequels. If he were to publish Home School, Canal+, the French media company that owns the rights to The Graduate, would be able to adapt it for the screen without his permission.[2] Extracts of Home School were printed in The Times on May 2, 2006.[3] Webb also told the newspaper that there was a possibility he would find a publisher for the full text, provided he could retrieve the film rights using French intellectual property law.[4] On 30 May 2006 The Times reported that Webb had signed a publishing deal for Home School with Random House which he hoped would enable him to instruct the French lawyers to attempt to retrieve his rights. The novel is due to be released in Britain in the summer of 2007.[5] Charles Webb (born on June 9, 1939 in San Francisco, California) is the author of several novels, the most famous being his first, The Graduate, which was made into an enormously successful film. ... For other uses, see Sequel (disambiguation). ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... Film rights, like dramatic rights, these belong to the author, who may sell or option them to someone in the film industry - a producer or director, for example (or sometimes a specialist broker of such properties) - who will then try to gather the other professionals and secure the financial backing... Canal+ (Canal Plus, meaning Channel Plus/More in French) is a French premium pay television channel launched in 1984. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ...


In Robert Altman's Hollywood satire The Player (1992), Buck Henry, co-writer of The Graduate, plays a screenwriter attempting to pitch a sequel to The Graduate to a Hollywood producer. Henry's character reminds the producer that the leading actors are all still alive and envisages a scenario in which Ben, Elaine and Mrs Robinson live together in a ménage à trois. For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... The Player (1992) is a movie that tells the story of Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), a Hollywood studio executive who believes he is being blackmailed by a screenwriter whose script he once rejected. ... Buck Henry Zuckerman (born December 9, 1930 in New York, New York) is an American actor, writer and director, best known for his work in television, film, comedy, and satire. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Look up ménage à trois in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Popular culture references

Some scenes and themes in the film have become deeply embedded in the popular consciousness, even decades after its release, and have been widely parodied. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ...

  • A family friend, Mr. McGuire, gives Benjamin one-word career advice: "Plastics." Some see this as advice on the key to corporate success--becoming shallow and fake or "plastic," which Ben struggles with and is a recurring theme in the film. But it was also amazing foresight: while plastics were in use in 1967, since then they have come to be the predominant type of material used in consumer products, medical equipment, packaging, and even automobiles. The "plastics scene" was referenced in 1968 in a recruiting poster for V.I.S.T.A.(Volunteers in Service to America, aka "the domestic Peace Corps"); in the B&W poster, a dark picture of Dustin Hoffman as the confused Benjamin Braddock is captioned "Plastics Can Wait a Year", (join V.I.S.T.A).
  • In the 1994 music video for the song “If You GoJon Secada plays Dustin Hoffman in a parody. Instead of driving a red 1966 Alfa Romeo Spider 1600 like Hoffman, Secada drives a black first generation Camaro until it stops running. The video continues the parage as Secada and the girl (still in a wedding dress) board a public bus.
  • Benjamin's climactic drive to get to Elaine's wedding is spoofed in Wayne's World 2 (in which Wayne, like Benjamin, is desperate to stop his lover from marrying another man), Bubble Boy, and an episode of SCTV (in which the driver, played by Bill Murray, turns out to merely be the wedding photographer)
  • The opening credit sequence of Ben on the moving sidewalk is replicated in the opening of Quentin Tarantino's film Jackie Brown as well as a recent commercial for Geico insurance.
  • Benjamin's Spider runs out of gas
    The car that Benjamin drives in the film is a red 1966 Alfa Romeo Spider 1600 "Duetto". 1966 was the first production year of the car. The Graduate gave rise to the Spider's fame and longevity, to the point that Alfa Romeo marketed the car in the States as the 'Alfa Graduate'. The Graduate portrays a number of Alfa traits accurately, such as the signature noisy-valved 'Alfa Rasp' of the 1600 at flat-tack, and the famous depiction of the typical Alfa semi-reliability at various stages, in particular the famously non-functional fuel gauge which leaves our hero in the lurch at the critical moment.
  • Anne Bancroft's line "Would you like me to seduce you? Is that what you're trying to tell me?" has been used as a sample in multiple songs, including George Michael's "Too Funky" from 1992 and one of the later versions of Los del Rio's Macarena from 1995.
  • In the opening scene of Robert Altman's 1992 film The Player, a writer, (Buck Henry), can be heard talking to Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), discussing making a sequel to The Graduate with the same actors reprising their roles. Presumably, Mrs. Robinson, now elderly, would be forced to move in with Benjamin and Elaine, who by now have an adult daughter.
  • A 1999 Muppet calendar features Miss Piggy and Kermit the Frog in a spoof of the film's poster titled, "The Undergraduate."
  • In 1999, the film Other Sister, the ending scene is shown as the two main charaters watch. The same scene is paralled later in the film when Giovanni Ribisi swings from the top of the back of the church, to Juliette Lewis, professing his love for her.
  • In 2005, Rob Reiner released Rumor Has It... in which Jennifer Aniston plays the daughter of a family from Pasadena. Upon realization that it was her family who inspired Charles Webb to write The Graduate, she seeks out Benjamin Braddock's character, whose name is Beau Burroughs, played by Kevin Costner.
  • The famous line, "Mrs. Robinson, you're trying to seduce me," (and matching camera shot from under Mrs. Robinson's leg) have been referenced many times in parodies. Some examples:
  • The ending scene where Ben crashes the wedding has also been parodied numerous times:
    • In The Simpsons episode "Lady Bouvier's Lover" Abraham Simpson similarly crashes the wedding of Montgomery Burns and Jacqueline Bouvier. Additionally Abe and Jacqueline leave the wedding in a bus, where a parody of "The Sound of Silence" is played ("The Sounds of Grandpa.")
    • The final wedding scene was replicated almost shot-for-shot in Wayne's World 2 (even down to the use of an Alfa Spider complete with 'Mrs. Robinson' soundtrack by Simon and Garfunkel on the radio and using the same church). It was also replicated (or parodied) in "Bubble Boy", in the very same church.
    • In the Daria episode "Write Where it Hurts", A Scene where Brittany and Kevin get married, Jane crashes the wedding in almost the same style.
    • In the Family Guy episode "When You Wish upon a Weinstein", Lois crashes Chris's bar mitzvah in similar style, replacing a church with a synagogue and using a Star of David instead of a cross to lock the doors.
    • In the final advert in a series of Renault Clio ad's which ran for years in the UK, which had become popular due to the characters of Nicole and Papa. In the final advert, British comedians Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer had special cameos. Nicole, supposed to be marrying Vic, has Bob come to crash the wedding and drives her away in a Renault Clio.
    • In the Monk episode #85, "Mr. Monk and the Wrong Man", Monk twice crashes a wedding, banging on the glass of a locked door and yelling the bride's name.
  • In the movie Old School, Will Ferrell's character falls into a pool during a party. The camera then looks up toward the surface and Sounds of Silence is played in the background. This is very reminiscent of the scene where Benjamin wears the scuba suit for his twenty-first birthday.
  • In the film American Pie, some scenes depicting the love affair between Stiffler's mom and Finch are reminiscent of certain scenes in The Graduate (particularly when Finch meets Stiffler's mom for the first time while smoking sitting on a stool, cross-legged). Also during that scene a cover version of Mrs. Robinson plays.
  • In an episode of the television sitcom The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, an old friend of Uncle Phil's, named Mrs. Robinson, comes over for dinner. Will goes out with her daughter and afterwards is seduced by and spends the night with Mrs. Robinson.
  • In "The Hamptons" episode of Seinfeld, Kramer asks Jerry to rub suntan lotion on his back to which Jerry replies "Who are you, Mrs. Robinson?"
  • In That 70's Show, after an encounter with Jackie's good-looking but much older mother, Eric remarks: "I wonder if she'd like to watch The Graduate with me sometime."
  • In the strategy game Civilization IV once you discover the technology Plastics the narrator says: "I want to say one word to you. Just one word. Plastics.".
  • Parodied on the Australian movie show The Bazura Project, Episode 1.11, as part of the episode's opening sequence.
  • In the final episode of Survivor: Africa, Kelly Goldsmith quotes dialogue between Benjamin and Mrs. Robinson when casting her final vote.
  • In Big Brother 8 (US), an alliance is named "Mrs. Robinson" as it consists of three younger men and an older woman.
  • In an episode of Rugrats called Let Them Eat Cake is loosely based on the end scene of the movie [Elaine running away from the wedding but then hooking up with Ben]

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... VISTA or Volunteers in Service to America created by Lyndon Johnsons Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, was the domestic version of the Peace Corps. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... B&W may refer to: Black-and-white (photography, cinematography, etc. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Track Listing “As Time Goes By” Herman Hupfield 2:48 “If You Go” Geoffrey Parsons, Michel Emer 2:39 “Oh Love Hast Thou Forsaken Me” William Bowers 2:33 “Say It Isnt So” Irving Berlin 2:53 “I Wish I Didnt Love You So” Frank Loesser 2:45... Jon Secada (born Juan Secada, 4 October 1961, Havana, Cuba) is a Cuban-American singer and songwriter. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Alfa Romeo Spider Duetto. ... Modified 1969 Chevrolet Camaro. ... Look up Spoof in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Waynes World 2 is a 1993 comedy film starring Mike Myers and Dana Carvey as hosts of a cable access television show from Aurora, Illinois. ... The 2001 film Bubble Boy Bubble Boy is a 2001 comedy film directed by Blair Hayes and stars Jake Gyllenhall in the title role. ... SCTV can refer to a number of things, including the following: SCTV (Indonesia) from Surya Citra Television, headquartered in Indonesia. ... The Secret of Monkey Island (SMI) is a well known adventure game that spawned a series of famous and classic comedy adventure games, known as the Monkey Island series as well as making a name for LucasArts (then Lucasfilm Games) as a producer of adventure games, thus the largest competitor... Guybrush Threepwood is the main character of the Monkey Island series of computer adventure games by LucasArts. ... Elaine Marley in Curse of Monkey Island Elaine Marley is one of the primary characters in the Monkey Island series of adventure games developed by LucasArts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An inclined moving sidewalk at Beaudry metro station in Montreal This article or section should be merged with escalator. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Oscar winning screenwriter. ... Jackie Brown is a 1997 motion picture, the third film directed by Quentin Tarantino. ... The Government Employees Insurance Company, usually known by the acronym GEICO, is an American auto insurance company. ... Image File history File links GraduateSpider. ... Image File history File links GraduateSpider. ... Alfa Romeo Spider Duetto. ... Alfa Romeo Spider Duetto. ... The Alfa Romeo 1600 spider was the last stylistic effort by Battista Pininfarina. ... A fuel gauge (or gas gauge) is an instrument used to indicate the level of fuel contained in a tank. ... Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... This article is about the musician. ... Too Funky was a song written and performed by George Michael and released by Epic Records in 1992. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article needs cleanup. ... Macarena is a song by Los del Río about a woman of the same name. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... The Player (1992) is a movie that tells the story of Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), a Hollywood studio executive who believes he is being blackmailed by a screenwriter whose script he once rejected. ... Buck Henry Zuckerman (born December 9, 1930 in New York, New York) is an American actor, writer and director, best known for his work in television, film, comedy, and satire. ... Tim Robbins at Cannes, 2001 Height: 6 ft 4 in / 1. ... John Denver and the Muppets: A Christmas Together The Muppets are a group of puppets and costume characters created by Jim Henson and the company he created. ... Miss Piggy being moved on Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Miss Piggy is a Muppet character primarily played by Frank Oz. ... Kermit singing Bein Green in the first season of Sesame Street. ... Antonino Giovanni Ribisi (born December 17, 1974) is an American actor. ... Juliette L. Lewis (born June 21, 1973[1]) is an Oscar-nominated American actress and musician. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Rob Reiner (born March 6, 1945) is an American actor, director, producer, writer, childrens advocate and political activist. ... Rumor Has It. ... Jennifer Aniston (born February 11, 1969) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe Award-winning American film and television actress, best known for her role as Rachel Green in the popular television sitcom Friends. ... Kevin Michael Costner (born January 18, 1955) is an American film actor and director who often produces his own films. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Lisas Substitute is the 19th episode of the second season of The Simpsons. ... Ms. ... This article is about the American television series. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... Matthew Broderick (born March 21, 1962) is a Tony Award-winning American film and stage actor who is perhaps best known for his role as the title character in Ferris Buellers Day Off. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ... Jan Hooks in 1988 Jan Hooks (born April 23, 1957 in Decatur, Georgia) is an American actress and comedian best known for her work on NBCs Saturday Night Live, on which she appeared from 1986 to 1991. ... Spin City was an American sitcom television series that ran from 1996 to 2002 on ABC, and was created by Gary David Goldberg & Bill Lawrence, based on a fictional local government running New York City, originally starring Michael J. Fox as Mike Flaherty, the Deputy Mayor of New York. ... Priscilla Beaulieu Presley (born Priscilla Ann Wagner on May 24, 1945 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American model, author and actress and ex-wife of rock n roll singer and musician Elvis Presley and mother of singer/songwriter Lisa Marie Presley. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 2002 films | Comedy films | Teen films ... Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... The Kiss Seen Around the World is an episode from the third season of the FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... These are characters from the animated TV series Family Guy. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... Roseanne is an Emmy Award winning American sitcom which aired on ABC from 1988 to 1997, starring stand-up comedian Roseanne Barr. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Lady Bouviers Lover is the twenty-first episode of The Simpsons fifth season, which originally aired on May 12, 1994. ... Abraham J. Simpson also known as Abe, Grampa or Grampa Simpson is a fictional character featured in the animated cartoon television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Charles Montgomery Burns, normally referred to as Mr. ... Jacqueline Emily Jackie Bouvier is a fictional character on The Simpsons, as the mother of Marge Simpson, Patty Bouvier, and Selma Bouvier, and the wife of Clancy Bouvier. ... The Sound of Silence is the song that propelled the 1960s folk music duo Simon and Garfunkel to popularity. ... Waynes World 2 is a 1993 comedy film starring Mike Myers and Dana Carvey as hosts of a cable access television show from Aurora, Illinois. ... The 2001 film Bubble Boy Bubble Boy is a 2001 comedy film directed by Blair Hayes and stars Jake Gyllenhall in the title role. ... For St. ... Write Where It Hurts is the thirteenth and final episode of the second series of Daria. ... Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... “When You Wish Upon a Weinstein” is an episode of Family Guy that would have first aired in 2000, but due to concerns about its content it was not aired until November 9, 2003, when it was broadcast on Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim. ... When a Jewish child reaches the age of maturity (12 years and one day for girls, 13 years and one day for boys) that child becomes responsible for him/herself under Jewish law; at this point a boy is said to become Bar Mitzvah (בר מצו&#1493... A synagogue (from ancient Greek: , transliterated synagogÄ“, assembly; ‎ beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: or Template:Lanh-he beit tefila, house of prayer, shul; Ladino: , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ... This article is about a Jewish symbol. ... The Renault Clio is a supermini/subcompact produced by the French automaker Renault. ... James Jim Roderick Moir, more commonly known by the pseudonym Vic Reeves, (born January 24, 1959) is an English comedian, best known for his double act with Bob Mortimer (see Vic and Bob). ... Robert Bob Renwick Mortimer (born May 23, 1959 in Middlesbrough, England), is an English comedian and actor who is best known for his double act with Vic Reeves (see Vic and Bob). ... Monk is an Emmy Award winning television show about the private detective Adrian Monk (Tony Shalhoub), afflicted by Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and multiple phobias. ... Old School is a comedy motion picture released by DreamWorks SKG in 2003, about three thirty-somethings who seek to re-live their college days by starting a fraternity, and the tribulations they encounter in doing so. ... John William Will Ferrell (born July 16, 1967[1]) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American comedian, impressionist, writer and actor who first established himself as a cast member of Saturday Night Live, and has since gone on to a successful film career. ... This article is about the 1999 film. ... Mrs. ... The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air is an Emmy, BAFTA, and RTS-award winning popular American television sitcom that aired on NBC from September 10, 1990, to May 20, 1996. ... The Hamptons is the eighty-fifth episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... Seinfeld can refer to: Seinfeld - a popular TV series that ran 1989-1998. ... That 70s Show logo That 70s Show is a Fox Network television sitcom centered around the lives of a group of teenagers living in the fictional suburb of Point Place, near Green Bay, during the late 1970s. ... Chess is one of the most well-known and played strategy games of all time. ... This article or section may contain excessive or improper use of copyrighted images and/or audio files. ... Bazura hosts Lee (left) and Shannon (right; up) The Bazura Project is a television show broadcast on Channel 31 Melbourne, 31 Brisbane and Television Sydney starring Shannon Marinko and Lee Zachariah. ... Survivor: Africa was the third installment of the popular United States reality show Survivor. ... Big Brother 8 was the eighth season of the US version of the reality TV-show Big Brother on CBS. The season was announced on February 1, 2007. ... A rugrat may also be a pejorative term for a toddler. ...

Criticism

In his book The Gift of Fear, Gavin de Becker criticizes the film saying that it taught an entire generation of American men that the way to gain favor with a woman is pursue them at all costs and ignore them when they say they are not interested; and that this has romanticized stalkers. While a great deal of scholarship is devoted to this film, the most prominent themes critics tend to latch onto are those of gender relations as well as the more generalized historical context of the film, coming as it did in the 1960s at a time when the generation gap was quite pronounced. Gavin de Becker (born October 26, 1954) [1] is an American specialist in security issues, especially for governments, corporations, and celebrities. ... Look up Stalker in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


References

  1. ^ Linda Gray at the Internet Broadway Database. Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  2. ^ http://books.guardian.co.uk/news/articles/0,,1446288,00.html Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  3. ^ http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-2160200,00.html Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  4. ^ http://timesnews.typepad.com/news/2006/05/stuck_in_a_lega.html Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  5. ^ http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2202109,00.html Retrieved on 2007-10-12.

Internet Broadway Database The Internet Broadway Database (IBDb) is an online database of Broadway theatre productions and their personnel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Preceded by
A Man for All Seasons
BAFTA Award for Best Film
1968
Succeeded by
Midnight Cowboy

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