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Encyclopedia > The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail

The April 23, 2007 front page of The Globe and Mail
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner CTVglobemedia
Publisher Phillip Crawley
Editor Edward Greenspon
Founded 1844
Political allegiance Centrist [1]
Price $1.00 CAD Monday to Friday
$2.50 CAD Saturday
Not published on Sunday
Headquarters 444 Front Street West
Toronto, Ontario
M5V 2S9
ISSN 0319-0714

Website: www.theglobeandmail.com

The Globe and Mail is a Canadian English-language nationally distributed newspaper, based in Toronto and printed in six cities across the country. With a weekly circulation of two million, it is Canada's largest-circulation national newspaper and second-largest daily newspaper after the Toronto Star. The Globe and Mail is widely considered to be Canada's newspaper of record. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 308 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (490 × 954 pixels, file size: 139 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) New frontpage of the Globe and Mail after its April 23, 2007 redesign (taken from the Globe & Mail web-site; April 23rd front page). ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... “Baton Broadcasting” redirects here. ... Edward Greenspon is the editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail newspaper, based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Jan. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... “C$” redirects here. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... English is a West Germanic language originating in England, and the first language for most people in Australia, Canada, the Commonwealth Caribbean, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States of America (also commonly known as the Anglosphere). ... A newspapers circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... // A newspaper of record is a colloquial term that generally refers to a newspaper that meets at least one of two criteria: high standards of journalism, the articles of which establish a definitive record of current events, for use by future scholars, and/or compliance with the legal requirements necessary...


The paper is a division of CTVglobemedia Publishing Inc. Its parent company, CTVglobemedia, also owns the Canadian television networks CTV and A-Channel. “Baton Broadcasting” redirects here. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... This article is about the Broadcast Television Network CTV, for the broadcasting television company see CTVglobemedia. ... A-Channel, previously known as the NewNet, is a Canadian English language privately owned television system owned by CTVglobemedia. ...

Contents

History

The predecessor to The Globe and Mail was The Globe, founded in 1844 by Scottish immigrant George Brown, who would later become a Father of Confederation. Brown's liberal politics led him to court the support of the Clear Grits, precursor to the modern Liberal Party of Canada. The Globe began in Toronto as a weekly party organ for Brown's Reform Party, but seeing the economic gains that he could make in the newspaper business, Brown soon targeted a wide audience of liberal minded freeholders. He selected as the motto for the editorial page a quotation from Junius, "The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures." The quotation is carried on the editorial page daily to this day. The Globe was founded in 1844 by George Brown, who was later a Father of Confederation as the Reform Party voice in Toronto. ... George Brown George Brown (November 29, 1818 – May 9, 1880) was a Scottish-born Canadian journalist and politician. ... Canadian Confederation, or the Confederation of Canada, was the process that ultimately brought together a union among the provinces, colonies and territories of British North America to form a Dominion of the British Empire, which today is a federal nation state simply known as Canada. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Junius was the pseudonym of a writer who contributed a series of letters to the Public Advertiser, from January 21, 1769 to January 21, 1772. ...


By the 1850s, The Globe had become an independent and well-regarded daily newspaper. It began distribution by railway to other cities in Ontario shortly after Canadian Confederation. At the dawn of the twentieth century, The Globe added photography, a women's section, and the slogan "Canada's National Newspaper," which remains on its front-page banner today. It began opening bureaus and offering subscriptions across Canada. Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ...


In 1936, The Globe(which had a circulation of 78,000 by this point) merged with The Mail and Empire(circulation 118,000), itself formed through a merger in 1895 between The Toronto Mail and Toronto Empire. The Mail was founded in 1872 by a rival of Brown's, Tory politician Sir John A. Macdonald. Macdonald was the first Prime Minister of Canada and the founder of the party that spawned the modern Conservative Party of Canada, and The Mail served as a Conservative Party organ. The Mail and Empire, Christmas 1897 The Mail and Empire was formed from the merger of The Toronto Mail and Toronto Empire newspapers, both conservative newspapers in Toronto, Canada. ... The Toronto Mail was a newspaper in Toronto and later merged with the Toronto Empire to form the The Mail and Empire. ... Toronto Empire was a newspaper established in Toronto in 1872 and the voice of the Conservatives in the city. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... The Right Honourable Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, QC (January 11, 1815 - June 6, 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada from July 1, 1867 - November 5, 1873 - and - October 17, 1878 - June 6, 1891. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...


With the merger, The Globe became The Globe and Mail. Press reports at the time stated, "the minnow swallowed the whale". The merger was arranged by George McCullagh, who fronted for mining magnate William Henry Wright and became the first publisher of The Globe and Mail. McCullagh committed suicide in 1952, and the newspaper was sold to the Webster family of Montreal. As the paper lost ground to The Toronto Star in the local Toronto market, it began to expand its national circulation. William Henry Wright (April 21, 1876 - September 20, 1951) was a Canadian industrialist and publisher. ... The Toronto Star is a major metropolitan newspaper produced in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


In 1965, the paper was bought by Winnipeg-based FP Publications controlled by Brig. Richard Malone, which owned of a chain of local Canadian newspapers. FP put a strong emphasis on the Report on Business section that was launched in 1962, thereby building the paper's reputation as the voice of Toronto's business community. FP Publications and The Globe and Mail were sold in 1980 to the Thomson Group, a company run by the family of Kenneth Thomson. Report on Business might refer to: Report on Business, the business section of the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail Report on Business Magazine, the business magazine published by and carried in The Globe and Mail Report on Business Television, a Canadian specialty television channel carrying business news and analysis... Kenneth Roy Thomson, born September 1, 1923 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is the 2nd Baron Thomson of Fleet and a businessman and art collector. ...


The Globe and Mail has always been a morning newspaper. Since the 1980s, it has been printed in separate editions in six Canadian cities: Halifax, Montreal, Toronto (several editions), Winnipeg (actually printed in Brandon, Manitoba), Calgary and Vancouver. In 1995, the paper launched its Web site, globeandmail.com, which had its own content and journalists in addition to the content of the print newspaper. It later spawned a companion Web site, globeinvestor.com, focusing on financial and investment-related news. In 2004, access to some features of globeandmail.com became restricted to paid subscribers only. Motto: E Mari Merces(Latin) From the Sea, Wealth Coordinates: , Country Province Established April 1, 1996 Government  - Type Regional Municipality  - Mayor Peter Kelly  - Governing body Halifax Regional Council  - MPs List of MPs Alexa McDonough Geoff Regan Michael Savage Peter Stoffer (Bill Casey) (Gerald Keddy) (Peter MacKay)  - MLAs List of MLAs... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ... For other uses, see Winnipeg (disambiguation). ... Brandon Manitoba, a city in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ...


Although the Thomson family has served as the figureheads of the paper since 1980, control of the paper was sold to telecommunications company BCE Inc. in 2001. A year earlier BCE had also acquired CTV, a major private television network. With the sale, the Globe and CTV were merged into a new company named Bell Globemedia (now CTVglobemedia), which became a subsidiary of BCE with the Thomson family retaining a minority stake. In late 2005, BCE announced it would significantly reduce its stake in Bell Globemedia, leaving the Thomson family, through its holding company Woodbridge, as the largest shareholder with a 40-percent stake. BCE, Torstar (owner of the Toronto Star) and the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan would each control a 20-percent stake. Because several of these companies own competing broadcast outlets, the deal required approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), Canada's broadcast regulator. This approval was granted on July 21, 2006. Bell Canada Enterprises is a major telecommunications company and a provider of telephone services in Canada. ... This article is about the Broadcast Television Network CTV, for the broadcasting television company see CTVglobemedia. ... “Baton Broadcasting” redirects here. ... Torstar Corporation TSX: TS.NV.B-T is an independently-owned Canadian broadly based media company that is named after its principal holding, the Toronto Star daily newspaper. ... The Ontario Teachers Pension Plan is the pension plan for the public school teachers of Ontario. ... The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC, in French Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes) was established in 1968 by the Canadian Parliament to replace the Board of Broadcast Governors. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Political stance

Even before the Globe merged with the Mail and Empire, the paper was widely considered the voice of the Upper Canada elite—that is, the Bay Street financial community of Toronto and the intellectuals of university and government institutions. The merger of the Liberal Globe and the Tory Mail and Empire prefigured the paper's editorial stance, and its support alternated between the two established national parties. In the past century, the paper has consistently endorsed either the Liberal Party or the now-defunct Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in every federal election. The paper had endorsed a third party on two occasions at the provincial level: it endorsed the social-democratic New Democratic Party in the 1991 Saskatchewan provincial election and British Columbia provincial election. The New Democrats won both elections and went on to form provincial governments. Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... Torontos Bay Street in the heart of the financial district. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In any two-party system of politics, a third party is a party other than the two dominant ones. ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ... The Twenty-Second Provincial General Election in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan was held on October 21, 1991. ... The 35th provincial election in the Province of British Columbia, Canada, was called on September 19, 1991, and held on October 17, 1991. ...


While the paper was known as a generally conservative voice of the business establishment in the postwar decades, historian David Hayes, in a review of its positions, has noted that the Globe's editorials in this period "took a benign view of hippies and homosexuals; championed most aspects of the welfare state; opposed, after some deliberation, the Vietnam War; and supported legalizing marijuana." It was a 1967 Globe and Mail editorial that coined the phrase "The State has no place in the bedrooms of the nation," in defence of legalization of homosexuality. The line was later picked up by future Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau to become one of his most famous slogans. “Trudeau” redirects here. ...


Under the editorship of William Thorsell in the 1980s and 1990s, the paper strongly endorsed the free trade policies of Progressive Conservative Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. The paper also became an outspoken proponent of the Meech Lake Accord and the Charlottetown Accord. During this period, the paper continued to favour such socially liberal policies as decriminalizing drugs (including cocaine, whose legalization was advocated most recently in a 1995 editorial) and expanding gay rights. The Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was a trade agreement reached by Canada and the United States in October of 1987. ... Martin Brian Mulroney (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... The Meech Lake Accord was a set of failed amendments to the Constitution of Canada negotiated in 1987 by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the provincial premiers, including Robert Bourassa, premier of Quebec. ... Headline on October 27, 1992 Globe and Mail. ...


In the 1990s and early 2000s, the paper generally supported the policies of Liberal Prime Ministers Jean Chrétien and Paul Martin. In the 2006 federal election, the paper turned away from the Liberals to Stephen Harper's Conservative Party of Canada. Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, BCL, LLD (h. ... Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC, MP, BA, LLB, LLD (h. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...


Recent developments

In recent years, the paper has made changes to its format and layout, such as the introduction of colour photographs, a separate tabloid book-review section and the creation of the Review section on arts, entertainment and culture. Although the paper is sold throughout Canada and has long called itself "Canada's National Newspaper", The Globe and Mail also serves as a Toronto metropolitan paper, publishing several special sections in its Toronto edition that are not included in the national edition. As a result, it is sometimes ridiculed for being too focused on the Greater Toronto Area, part of a wider humorous portrayal of Torontonians being blind to the greater concerns of the nation. (A similar criticism is sometimes applied to The New York Times). Critics sometimes refer to the paper as the Toronto Globe and Mail or Toronto's National Newspaper. Recently, in an effort to gain market share in Vancouver, The Globe and Mail began publishing a three-page section of British Columbia news in the B.C. edition of its paper. A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


Other satirical nicknames for the paper include Mop and Pail or Grope and Flail, both of which were coined by longtime Globe and Mail humour columnist Richard J. Needham. Richard J. Needham (1912-1996) was a legendary Canadian humour columnist for The Globe and Mail. ...


Since the launch of the National Post as another English-language national paper in 1998, some industry analysts have proclaimed a "national newspaper war" between The Globe and Mail and the National Post. Thus far, The Globe and Mail has continued to outsell the National Post, which some attribute to the Globe's strong position in Toronto, the country's largest city and the 4th largest media centre in North America (see Media sub-section in Toronto article). The National Post is a Canadian English-language national newspaper based in Don Mills, Ontario, a district of Toronto. ...


On April 23, 2007, the paper introduced significant changes to its print design and also introduced a new unified navigation system to its websites.[2] The paper added a "lifestyle" section to the Monday-Friday editions, entitled Globe Life, which has been described as an attempt to attract readers from the rival Toronto Star. Additionally, the paper followed other North American papers by dropping detailed stock listings in print and by shrinking the printed paper to a 12-inch width. is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ...


Key people

Senior editors

  • Cathrin Bradbury, managing editor (features)
  • Neil A. Campbell, executive editor
  • Edward Greenspon, editor-in-chief
  • Colin MacKenzie, managing editor (news)
  • Steve McAllister, sports editor
  • Stephen Northfield, foreign editor
  • David Walmsley, national editor
  • John Stackhouse, editor, Report on Business
  • Sylvia Stead, deputy editor
  • John Geiger, editorial board editor
  • Patrick Martin, comment editor
  • Jill Borra, Globe life editor

Edward Greenspon is the editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail newspaper, based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Steve McAllister is the sports editor of Canadas national newspaper, The Globe and Mail. ... John Stackhouse, BCom (born 1962) is a Canadian journalist and author. ... Report on Business might refer to: Report on Business, the business section of the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail Report on Business Magazine, the business magazine published by and carried in The Globe and Mail Report on Business Television, a Canadian specialty television channel carrying business news and analysis... John E. Geiger (born 1875 - died ?) was an American rower who competed in the 1900 Summer Olympics. ... Patrick Martin (born May 23, 1983 in Detroit, Michigan), better known by his stage name Alex Shelley, is an American professional wrestler. ...

Foreign bureaus

North America
  • Paul Koring, Washington Bureau Chief
  • Alan Freeman, Washington Bureau
  • Barrie McKenna, Washington Bureau
  • Sinclair Stewart, New York Bureau Chief
  • Simon Houpt, New York Bureau
Europe
  • Doug Saunders, European Bureau Chief (London)
  • Elizabeth Renzetti, European Bureau (London)
  • Eric Reguly, European Bureau (Rome)
  • Graeme Smith, Moscow Bureau Chief
  • Jane Armstrong, Moscow Bureau
Middle East, Asia and Africa
  • Mark MacKinnon, Middle East Bureau Chief (Jerusalem)
  • Geoffrey York, Asia Bureau Chief (Beijing)
  • Carolynne Wheeler, Middle East Bureau (Jerusalem)
  • Stephanie Nolen, Africa Bureau Chief, Johannesburg

Doug Saunders (born 1967) is a well-known Canadian journalist, a weekly columnist and daily reporter for the Globe and Mail, a Canadian national newspaper based in Toronto, Canada. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Stephanie Nolen (born September 3, 1971 in Montreal) is a Canadian journalist and writer. ...

Staff columnists

Christie Blatchford is a Canadian newspaper columnist and broadcaster. ... Stephen Brunt is a well-known Canadian sports journalist. ... Murray Campbell (January 20, 1950 - ) is a staff columnist for The Globe and Mail, and has been at that post since 2002. ... John Doyle (born 1957) is one of the two television critics with the Canadian Globe and Mail newspaper. ... Eric Duhatschek is a distinguished Canadian sports journalist. ... Marcus Gee is an award-winning international affairs columnist for The Globe and Mail, Canadas largest national daily newspaper, which he joined in 1991. ... John Ibbitson, courtesy The Lavin Agency John Ibbitson (born 1955 in Gravenhurst, Ontario) is a Canadian political columnist. ... Michael Kesterton (born 1945) is a columnist with The Globe and Mail. ... Leah McLaren is a Canadian journalist and author who writes for the daily newspaper The Globe and Mail. ... Neil Reynolds (born ca 1940) is a Canadian journalist and one-time politician. ... Doug Saunders (born 1967) is a well-known Canadian journalist, a weekly columnist and daily reporter for the Globe and Mail, a Canadian national newspaper based in Toronto, Canada. ... Jeffrey Simpson, The Globe and Mails national affairs columnist, has won all three of Canadas leading literary prizes -- the Governor Generals Award for non-fiction book writing, the National Magazine Award for political writing, and the National Newspaper Award for column writing. ... Margaret Wente (born 1950) is a columnist for Canadas largest national daily newspaper, The Globe and Mail. ... Jan Wong (pinyin: Huáng Míngzhēn) 黃明珍(born 1953 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian journalist of Chinese ancestry. ...

References

  1. ^ World Newspapers and Magazines: Canada. Worldpress.org (2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-02.
  2. ^ The next generation of The Globe

The Canadian Encyclopedia is the most authoritative resource on Canada. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

“Baton Broadcasting” redirects here. ... Canada has a well-developed media sector, but cultural output—particularly in English Canada—is often overshadowed by imports from the United States. ... Report on Business might refer to: Report on Business, the business section of the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail Report on Business Magazine, the business magazine published by and carried in The Globe and Mail Report on Business Television, a Canadian specialty television channel carrying business news and analysis...

Notes

  1. ^ World Newspapers and Magazines: Canada. Worldpress.org (2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-02.
  2. ^ The next generation of The Globe

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
globeandmail.com - Privacy Policy (3695 words)
Globe may also collect, use or disclose Personal Information without knowledge or consent if seeking the consent of the Person might defeat the purpose of collecting the information such as in the investigation of a breach of an agreement or a contravention of a federal or provincial law.
Globe may also use or disclose Personal Information without knowledge or consent in the case of an emergency where the life, health or security of an individual or property is threatened.
Globe may disclose Personal Information without knowledge or consent to collect a debt, to comply with a subpoena, warrant or other court order, or as may be otherwise related to the legal or regulatory requirements described herein.
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