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Encyclopedia > The Flash (TV series)
The scarlet speedster

DVD Box Art for The Flash: The Complete Series from Warner Home Video.
Format Action
Science Fiction
Created by Danny Bilson
Paul De Meo
Starring John Wesley Shipp as Barry Allen/The Flash
Amanda Pays as Dr. Tina McGee
Alex Désert as Julio Mendez
Notable Guest Stars:
Mark Hamill as James Jesse/The Trickster
Opening theme Danny Elfman
Country of origin United States
No. of episodes 22
Production
Running time 45 minutes
(60 with commercials)
Broadcast
Original channel CBS
Picture format 4:3 Standard
Original run September 20, 1990May 18, 1991
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

The Flash was a live action CBS television series from 1990-1991 that starred John Wesley Shipp as the superhero, The Flash, and co-starred Amanda Pays. The series was created by the writing team of Danny Bilson and Paul De Meo and composer Danny Elfman wrote the series’ title theme.[1][2][3] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The action genre is a class of creative works characterised by a greater emphasis on exciting action sequences than on character development or story-telling. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Danny Bilson is a writer, director, and producer in movies, television, videogames, and comic books. ... John Wesley Shipp (born January 22, 1955 in Norfolk, Virginia) is an American actor best known as Mitch Leery, the title characters father on the television drama Dawsons Creek from 1998 to 2002 and for roles in several daytime soap operas. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Amanda Pays (born on 6 June 1959 in London, England) is an English actress. ... Alex Désert (born July 18, 1968) is an actor who has appeared in TV series The Flash, Becker, Boy Meets World and the short-lived FOX series The Heights. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor. ... The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash. ... Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American musician who led the rock band Oingo Boingo as singer / songwriter from 1976 until its breakup in 1995, and has composed film scores extensively since 1985s Pee-wees Big Adventure. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... For other uses, see Aspect ratio. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1990 in television involved some significant events. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1991 in television involved some significant events. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by flesh-and-blood actors, as opposed to animation. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... John Wesley Shipp (born January 22, 1955 in Norfolk, Virginia) is an American actor best known as Mitch Leery, the title characters father on the television drama Dawsons Creek from 1998 to 2002 and for roles in several daytime soap operas. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Amanda Pays (born on 6 June 1959 in London, England) is an English actress. ... Danny Bilson is a writer, director, and producer in movies, television, videogames, and comic books. ... Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American musician who led the rock band Oingo Boingo as singer / songwriter from 1976 until its breakup in 1995, and has composed film scores extensively since 1985s Pee-wees Big Adventure. ...

Contents

Pilot

The series' pilot episode features an accident in which Central City Police forensic scientist Barry Allen's crime lab is struck by lightning. Allen is bathed in electrified chemicals. He soon discovers with the help of S.T.A.R. Labs scientist Tina McGee that the accident has changed his body's metabolism and as a result he has gained the ability to move at superhuman speed. To avenge the murder of his brother, motorcycle police officer Jay (named after the Golden Age Flash), Barry becomes The Flash. Tina modifies a red S.T.A.R. Labs prototype deep sea diving suit, designed to withstand tremendous pressures, as his Flash costume. Central City is a fictional city that appears in stories published by DC Comics, and is the home of the Silver Age version of the Flash, Barry Allen. ... Agents of the United States Army Criminal Investigation Division investigate a crime scene Forensic science (often shortened to forensics) is the application of a broad spectrum of sciences to answer questions of interest to the legal system. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Scientific and Technological Advanced Research Laboratories, usually shortened to S.T.A.R. Labs, are a research organization in various stories published by DC Comics. ... Scientific and Technological Advanced Research Laboratories, usually shortened to S.T.A.R. Labs, are a research organization in various stories published by DC Comics. ...


Rogues Gallery and cancellation

The series initially had a dark and gritty tone, and focused on having The Flash confront decidedly human villains, like corrupt officials and mobsters. Midway through the series' run, however, a few of The Flash's familiar "Rogues Gallery" of colorful supervillains began making appearances. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor. ... The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash. ... The Flashs Rogues Gallery. ...


The most famous Rogues in the series were The Trickster, played by Mark Hamill, and his sidekick Prank, played by Corinne Bohrer. This foreshadowed Hamill's subsequent success at playing The Joker in Batman: The Animated Series. Hamill would later reprise the role of The Trickster on an episode of Justice League Unlimited. Captain Cold, played by Michael Champion, and Mirror Master, played by David Cassidy, also appeared in their own episodes. Although fans were pleased to see more DC characters' inclusions in the series, the interpretations were radically different from the source material (with the exception of Hamill's Trickster). Captain Cold, for instance, was turned into an albino hitman while the Mirror Master was little more than a common thug with a nickname. The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor. ... Prank is a fictional character from The Flash TV Series, created by Danny Bilson and Paul De Meo. ... Corinne Bohrer (born October 18 1958 in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina) is an American comic actress. ... The Joker redirects here. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Captain Cold, also known as Leonard Snart, is a comic book villain created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino for The Flash comic book, and is one of the scarlet speedsters enemies. ... Mirror Master is a fictional character, a recurring foe of the Flash with large technical knowledge and skills involving the use of mirrors. ... This article is about David Cassidy the actor. ... Albinism is a genetic condition resulting in a lack of pigmentation in the eyes, skin and hair. ... A hitman (alternately, hit man), also referred to as a contract killer, is a hired assassin, usually in the employ of organized crime. ...


Ultimately, these appearances were too little, too late to save the series, which struggled with a high per-episode price tag, stiff competition from NBC's strong Thursday night lineup and Fox, and frequent preemptions due to breaking coverage of the Persian Gulf War and NBA basketball games, resulting in low ratings, a fluctuating time slot which resulted a shift to Saturdays by the spring, and, eventually, cancellation after a single season. This article is about the television network. ... Must See TV was the name given to NBCs popular Thursday-night prime time television lineup during the mid and late 1990s. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... The NBA on NBC was a weekly presentation of National Basketball Association games on the National Broadcasting Company television network from 1990 to 2002. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ...


Recurring themes/running gags

The series had certain recurring themes/running gags, such as Barry secretly using his superhuman speed to his or others' benefit while out of costume, moving so fast as to be unseen, and the corresponding surprised reactions of others when things seemed to move or happen with no visible cause (the latter was also often used in reaction to his actions in costume as The Flash). Another was the fact that a side-effect of Barry's powers was a ravenous hunger, due to his body requiring food to replace the tremendous amount of energy he burned at super-speed; he would often be shown consuming huge meals, as well as sneaking snacks whenever he could, sometimes at super-speed (such as consuming an entire tray of hors d'œuvres at a reception when no one was looking, or drinking an entire gallon jug of milk in less than five seconds-- using enough suction to crush the jug when it empties). An anthropomorphized running gag from the webcomic 1/0. ...


Home video: VHS and DVD

For over a decade after the series' end, the only episodes commercially available were in three VHS "movies", two of which were compilations of similarly-themed episodes re-edited into a movie-length feature: Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ...

  • The Flash — the series' movie-length pilot (which had been re-edited into two separate episodes after its initial complete airing)
  • The Flash II: Revenge of The Trickster — compilation of episodes "The Trickster" and "Trial of the Trickster", featuring Mark Hamill's turn as the titular villain
  • The Flash III: Deadly Nightshade — compilation of episodes "Ghost In The Machine" and "Deadly Nightshade", where The Flash teams up with Nightshade (played by Jason Bernard), a now middle-aged costumed hero who was the protector of Central City in his youth. This third Flash VHS tape was only released in the United Kingdom (region 2, PAL format).

The complete series is now available as a DVD set, released by Warner Bros. on January 10, 2006. Many of the original releases of the set suffered from a flaw on Disc 1 which manifested just before the final segment of the episode "Pilot", causing the scene to skip or freeze, and ultimately caused a return to the disc's main menu before the final segment was complete. When the problem was discovered, Warner Bros. corrected the flaw and issued "fixed" versions of Disc 1 in exchange for the flawed versions. Jason Bernard (b. ... The following is an excerpt of the article entitled DVD. For the sake of convenience, the terms Region 0, Region 1, Region 2, Region 3, Region 4, Region 5, Region 6, Region 7 and Region 8 redirect to this page. ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ...


Cast

Actor Role
John Wesley Shipp Barry Allen/The Flash
Amanda Pays Christina 'Tina' McGee
Alex Désert Julio Mendez
Mike Genovese Lt. Warren Garfield
Richard Belzer Joe Kline
Gloria Reuben Sabrina
Dick Miller Fosnight
Mark Hamill James Jesse/The Trickster
Michael Champion Leonard Snart/Captain Cold
David Cassidy Sam Scudder/Mirror Master
Joyce Hyser Megan Lockhart
Biff Manard Officer Michael Francis Murphy
Vito D'Ambrosio Officer Tony Bellows
Michael Nader Nicolas Pike
Jason Bernard Desmond Powell/The Nightshade

John Wesley Shipp (born January 22, 1955 in Norfolk, Virginia) is an American actor best known as Mitch Leery, the title characters father on the television drama Dawsons Creek from 1998 to 2002 and for roles in several daytime soap operas. ... Amanda Pays (born on 6 June 1959 in London, England) is an English actress. ... Alex Désert (born July 18, 1968) is an actor who has appeared in TV series The Flash, Becker, Boy Meets World and the short-lived FOX series The Heights. ... Richard Jay Belzer (born August 4, 1944) is an American stand up comedian, writer and actor, perhaps best known for his work as Det. ... Gloria Reuben (born June 9, 1964 in Toronto) is a Canadian film actress. ... Richard Dick Miller (born December 25, 1928) is an American character actor who has appeared in many films, particularly those produced by Roger Corman, and later in films of directors who started their careers with Corman, including Joe Dante and James Cameron. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor. ... This article is about David Cassidy the actor. ... Joyce Hyser (b. ... Categories: Stub | 1945 births | Soap opera actors ... Jason Bernard (b. ...

Episodes

  • Episode 1 - Pilot: The origin of a superhero. An accident gives police crime lab expert Barry Allen awesome powers of speed, and he vows to use them to bring his brother's murderer to justice. But first, Allen must learn to control his sudden, remarkable talents.
  • Episode 2 - Out of Control: He needs subjects for genetic-engineering research. Tina's former colleague is the main suspect when the bodies of murdered homeless people mysteriously disappear from crime scenes.
  • Episode 3 - Watching the Detectives: A crooked D.A. discovers the superhero's civilian identity and uses that information to blackmail him into becoming his secret accomplice.
  • Episode 4 - Honor Among Thieves: Guarding a priceless exhibit has the police stretched thin. A situation a criminal mastermind exploits citywide with several thefts.
  • Episode 5 - Double Vision: A mad scientist implants a device in the superhero's brain and gains remote control of his powers.
  • Episode 6 - Sins of the Father: Ex-cop Henry Allen dismisses Barry's modern police techniques until his son captures an escaped con targeting Henry.
  • Episode 7 - Child's Play: A 60's drug icon who faked his own death and went into hiding reasserts himself by unleashing a new addictive designer drug on the world.
  • Episode 8 - Shroud of Death: Barry puts together bits of metal found at crime scenes and discovers they form a neo-fascist group's medallion, with Lt. Garfield as the group's next target.
  • Episode 9 - Ghost in the Machine: The Ghost controls the airwaves, tapping into video feeds just as he did back in 1955. Nightshade, a crimefighter of that era, resurfaces to fight him with The Flash joining him.
  • Episode 10 - Sight Unseen: A criminal who developed a cloaking device renders himself invisible and establishes a deadly vendetta endangering Star Labs and Central City.
  • Episode 11 - Beat the Clock: The Flash must race against time and the electric chair to prove the innocence of a jazz saxophonist who was convicted of murdering his famous wife.
  • Episode 12 - Tina, Is That You?: Tina embarks on a crime spree with an all-girl gang after a disastrous bio-feedback experiment, and her first target is The Flash!
  • Episode 13 - The Trickster: The hunter becomes the hunted as a schizophrenic killer being pursued by Megan Lockheart begins to stalk her. Inspired by The Flash, the villain dons a flashy outfit and calls himself The Trickster.
  • Episode 14 - Be My Baby: The Flash helps a mother protect her child against her dangerous husband, who wants the child only for its genetic potential.
  • Episode 15 - Fast Forward: While pursuing his brother's killer The Flash is sent ten years into the future, where Nicholas Pike is the mayor of Central City and any mention of The Flash is against the law.
  • Episode 16 - Deadly Nightshade: The Flash and Nightshade team up once again to stop a murderous vigilante who has taken Nightshade's name.
  • Episode 17 - Captain Cold: On the hottest day of the year, four gangsters are found frozen to death. They are the victims of a notorious hitman known as Captain Cold, and his next target may be The Flash.
  • Episode 18 - Twin Streaks: A scientist uses The Flash's blood to clone Barry Allen, and the clone decides to assume Barry's identity.
  • Episode 19 - Done with Mirrors: A criminal genius using mirrors and holograms to commit his crimes hunts down his double-crossing partner, whose found refuge with one of her old high school friends — Barry Allen!
  • Episode 20 - Good Night, Central City: When bodies begin disappearing from the police morgue and a gang of thieves start putting people to sleep, it falls to The Flash to save the victims and clear Barry Allen's name at the same time.
  • Episode 21 - Alpha: An conscience-stricken android seeks The Flash's aid to avoid being programmed as the perfect assassin.
  • Episode 22 - The Trial of the Trickster: The Trickster is preparing to go on trial, but with the help of his sidekick, Prank, and a brainwashing device, he soon enlists The Flash's assistance in passing judgement on Central City.

The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash. ... Captain Cold, also known as Leonard Snart, is a comic book villain created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino for The Flash comic book, and is one of the scarlet speedsters enemies. ...

Trivia

  • The comic book version of the Trickster developed a variety of "gag" weapons over the years, but initially his gimmick was a pair of flying shoes. James Jesse, inspired by his reverse-namesake Jesse James, used his flying shoes to rob airplanes in mid-flight. The flying ability was completely negated from the TV series and instead the Trickster used a variety of joke weapons. (Following Mark Hamill's appearance on the TV show, an occasional recurring in-joke was used in the comics, where the Trickster, while using his flying shoes, quipped that he was "doing his Luke Skywalker imitation.")
  • In the original TV series broadcast episodes 12 and 13 were shown out of sequence; episode 12 makes direct reference to events from episode 13.
  • Joyce Hyser would appear as the character Megan Lockhart in 3 episodes.
  • In the comics, Barry Allen died in the mid-80's maxi-series Crisis on Infinite Earths, sacrificing himself to save all of reality. He was replaced by Wally West, his nephew by marriage. Some of this is referenced in the episode "Fast Forward", when Barry lands ten years in the future to find Central City in the hands of the madman who killed his brother, Nicholas Pike. Time travel was a common plot device in the comics and used extensively to allow Barry to interact with his successor after his death. Barry was also capable of entering alternate dimensions with the use of what he called the cosmic treadmill.
  • In "Deadly Nightshade", Nightshade reveals that he knew Fosnight when he was "running numbers" for Gorilla Grodd. Presumably, this Grodd was a human mobster with a convenient nickname. In the comics, Grodd was an actual gorilla, a hyper-intelligent renegade from a hidden city of gorillas in Africa. According to Danny Bilson & Paul De Meo in a 2006 interview, if the TV series had continued, Gorilla Grodd would've made an appearance in Season 3.
  • The character of Nightshade has some elements clearly influenced by golden age DC character Sandman, such as his signature appearance (gas mask, trenchcoat and fedora) or his use of a non-lethal knockout gun. Other elements might be references to another Golden Age superhero, Dr. Mid-Nite.
  • In "Watching The Detectives", Tina is expecting a call from Carter Hall. Carter Hall is, in the comics, a museum curator who spends his nights as Hawkman.
  • Numerous references to the Flash legacy are referenced throughout the show. S.T.A.R. Labs is located on Garrick Avenue and Barry's older Brother is named Jay. Jay Garrick was the name of the original Flash.
  • Barry, when pretending to be the scientist who "created" The Flash, calls himself Professor Zoom. Professor Zoom, a.k.a. the Reverse-Flash, was a madman from the future who wore an inverted version of the Flash's costume (primarily yellow in answer to the Flash's red suit, with a red lightning bolt). His real name was Eobard Thawne, and he was a distant relative of the Allens.
  • In the comics, Barry and Iris West married. She was a reporter in the vein of Lois Lane and was noted for landing the first interview with the Flash. More notably, Iris' nephew Wally became the third Flash following Barry's death in Crisis on Infinite Earths. In the TV show, Barry's nephew Shawn bears a striking resemblance to Wally.
  • Tina McGee never actually met Barry Allen in the comics. She was an associate of Wally West's Flash. Her story about her husband falling victim to his own experiments, however, was present in the comics. Instead of being named David, in the comics he's Jerry, and he survives his tests, though he's left horribly deformed. His experiments in the comics involved replicating the Flash's abilities as mass-production. He was briefly known as Speed Demon or Speed McGee.
  • Danny Elfman's theme tune is etremely similar to his theme from Batman. In fact, its main musical motif is virtually identical.
  • The Asian reporter who hounds Barry in early episodes was named Linda Park. In the comics, she hounded Wally West. The two started out with an adversarial relationship, but eventually fell in love and got married.
  • Executive producers Danny Bilson and Paul DeMeo became the writers of the Flash comic book series beginning with The Flash: Fastest Man Alive #1 (2007), scripting a total of eight issues of the series' 13 issues. The series focused on Bart Allen, Barry's grandson. Another regular writer on the show, Howard Chaykin, is currently doing the art for DC Comics' Hawkgirl.
  • The Flash costume was designed and created by Robert Short, based upon the Barry Allen-era costume of the comics. Notable changes from the suit's comics counterpart include more dramatic "lightning bolt" trim on the gloves and symmetrical lighning bolt design on the belt, and plain red boots instead of yellow trimmed with "wings" similar to the mask. The detailing of the mask around the mouth was also slightly modified. The new symmetrical belt and wingless (but still yellow) boots later made it into the Flash comics.
  • When The Trickster first appears he does so as a maniacal stage magician. This is possibly a reference to Abra Kadabra, a Flash villain from the 64th Century where the science of his era resembles magic in ours.

Joyce Hyser (b. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... In DC Comics publications, the cosmic treadmill is a time travel device that was invented by Barry Allen, the second Flash. ... Gorilla Grodd is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an opponent of The Flash. ... Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ... The Sandman, in comic books, refers to several different fictional characters: DC Comics, 1940s -- The Sandman. ... Cover to JSA: All-Stars #3. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Scientific and Technological Advanced Research Laboratories, usually shortened to S.T.A.R. Labs, are a research organization in various stories published by DC Comics. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... Professor Zoom is a comic book super-villain in the DC Universe. ... Kid Flash (Iris West) is a superheroine in an alternate future of the DC Comics universe. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American musician who led the rock band Oingo Boingo as singer / songwriter from 1976 until its breakup in 1995, and has composed film scores extensively since 1985s Pee-wees Big Adventure. ... Batman is a 1989 Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. ... Linda Park (also Linda Park-West) is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Howard Victor Chaykin (born 1950 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American comic book writer and artist famous for his innovative storytelling and sometimes controversial material. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor. ... The Trickster is a morally ambiguous demigod on The CW Television Networks Supernatural, and is portrayed by Richard Speight, Jr. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... The Joker can mean any of the following: The Joker is a comic strip character, also included in movies and television programs based on the comic strip. ... Solomon Grundy is a 19th century childrens nursery rhyme, and was presented by James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps in 1842. ... The Trickster is a morally ambiguous demigod on The CW Television Networks Supernatural, and is portrayed by Richard Speight, Jr. ... Abra Kadabra is a DC Comics supervillain and a primary foe of the Flash. ...

Comic Book

A comic book tie-in special based on the TV series was published by DC Comics in 1991 titled The Flash TV Special #1 running at 76 pages, featured two stories (one story was written by John Byrne with art by Javier Saltares), plus a behind-the-scenes look on the making of the TV series with photos. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ...


Video Game

A video game was released for Game Boy in 1991 by THQ, and was based on the TV series. It was released in the US and had a password system. For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... THQ Inc. ...

The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Harry Lampert seen at Motor City Comic-Con 2002 Harry Lampert (November 3, 1916 in New York - November 13, 2004 in Boca Raton, Florida) was a cartoonist and author. ... Robert Kanigher (June 18, 1915 - May 6, 2002) was a prolific comic book writer whose career spanned five decades. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Michael Lance Mike Wieringo (June 24, 1963–August 12, 2007)[1] was an American comic book artist best known for his work on DC Comics The Flash and Marvel Comics Fantastic Four. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Jesse Chambers is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Iris West Allen is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics. ... Linda Park (also Linda Park-West) is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Max Mercury is the name of a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Johnny Quick is the name of a Golden Age DC Comics character with the power of superhuman speed. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of The Flash. ... Abra Kadabra is a DC Comics supervillain and a primary foe of the Flash. ... The Black Flash is a fictional comic book character from DC Comics. ... Captain Cold, also known as Leonard Snart, is a comic book villain created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino for The Flash comic book, and is one of the scarlet speedsters enemies. ... George Digger Harkness and his son Owen Mercer, both known as Captain Boomerang, are fictional characters in the DC Universe. ... Cobalt Blue is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy to the Flash. ... Gorilla Grodd is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an opponent of The Flash. ... Heat Wave is a fictional villain in the DC Universe and a primary foe of the Flash. ... Inertia is a comic book character in the DC Comics universe. ... Manfred Mota is a DC Comics villain and adversary to The Flash. ... Mirror Master is a fictional character, a recurring foe of the Flash with large technical knowledge and skills involving the use of mirrors. ... Pied Piper (real name: Hartley Rathaway) is a fictional former supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Reverse Flash is a title that has been taken by three supervillains in DC Comics. ... The Top was a DC Comics supervillain and one of the earliest rogues of The Flashs (Barry Allen). ... The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash. ... Weather Wizard is the name of a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ... Some members of the Flashs Rogues Gallery. ... Central City is a fictional city that appears in stories published by DC Comics, and is the home of the Silver Age version of the Flash, Barry Allen. ... Keystone City is a fictional city featured in stories of the Flash published by DC Comics. ... The Flash Museum is a museum that appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ... The much-homaged cover of The Flash #123 Flash of Two Worlds! is a landmark [1] comic book story that was published in The Flash #123 (Sept. ... Throughout his 60 year history, the Flash has appeared in numerous media. ... The Flash is an video game based on the Comic book hero created by DC Comics. ... In DC Comics publications, the cosmic treadmill is a time travel device that was invented by Barry Allen, the second Flash. ...

See also

For other meanings of the term, see Bird of prey. ... Justice League of America is an unsuccessful TV-pilot based on the characters of The Justice League. ... Aquaman is a television pilot developed by Smallville creators Al Gough and Miles Millar for The WB Television Network, based on the DC Comics character Aquaman. ... The Fantastic Four is an unreleased low-budget feature film completed in 1994. ...

External links

  1. ^ 1990 Pilot Closing Theme
  2. ^ 1990 Live Action Theme - RA
  3. ^ 1990 Live Action Theme - MP3

 
 

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