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Encyclopedia > The Flash
The Flash. Art by Alex Ross.
The Flash. Art by Alex Ross.

The Flash is a DC Comics superhero possessing "super-speed", nicknamed the Scarlet Speedster. Created by Gardner Fox and Harry Lampert, the original Flash first appeared in Flash Comics #1 (1940). Image File history File links Flashlg. ... Image File history File links Flashlg. ... Rosss rendition of the Golden Age Batman and Robin. ... The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... Superman and Batman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for writing comic books and co-creating numerous comics characters, especially for DC Comics. ... Harry Lampert seen at Motor City Comic-Con 2002 Harry Lampert (November 3, 1916 in New York - November 13, 2004 in Boca Raton, Florida) was a cartoonist and author. ...


Thus far, three different people have assumed the identity of the Flash: Jay Garrick (1940-present), Barry Allen (1956-86), and Wally West (1986-present). Each of these individuals somehow gained the power of "super-speed", which includes the ability to run and move extremely fast, use superhuman reflexes, and violate certain laws of physics. A physical law or a law of nature is a scientific generalization based on empirical observations. ...


The second incarnation of the Flash was the first hero of the Silver Age of comic books in 1956. The character was featured in a short-lived live action television series in 1990, The Flash, that starred John Wesley Shipp in the title role. The Flash is also featured in the animated series Justice League. Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash. ... The dvd box set of the television series, The Flash. ... John Wesley Shipp (born January 22, 1956) is an American actor best known as Mitch Leery, the title characters father on the television drama Dawsons Creek from 1998 to 2002 and for roles in several daytime soap operas. ... 12 frames per second is the typical rate for an animated cartoon. ... Justice League is an animated series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ...

Contents


Publication history

Golden Age

The Flash first appeared in the Golden Age of comic books' Flash Comics #1 (1940), from All-American Publications, one of three companies that would eventually merge to form DC. This Flash was Jay Garrick, a college student who gained his speed through the inhalation of hard water vapors (later retconned into heavy water vapors), and who wore a winged metal helmet reminiscent of the mythological Roman god Mercury. He is notable as the first super-speedster in comics, and one of the first to have a singular super-power as opposed to the multi-powered Superman. In comic books, first appearance refers to the date or issue of a characters first appearance. ... Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... Hard water is water that has a high mineral content (water with a low mineral content being known as soft water). ... Retroactive continuity – commonly contracted to the portmanteau word retcon – refers to the act of changing previously established details of a fictional setting, often without providing an explanation for the changes within the context of that setting. ... Heavy water is dideuterium oxide, or D2O or 2H2O. It is chemically the same as normal water, H2O, but the hydrogen atoms are of the heavy isotope deuterium, in which the nucleus contains a neutron in addition to the proton found in the nucleus of any hydrogen atom. ... Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... This article treats Mercury in cult practice and in archaic Rome. ... Superman, aka Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and for several decades has been one of the most popular and well-known comic book icons of all-time. ...


Garrick was a popular character in the 1940s, supporting both Flash Comics and All-Flash Quarterly (later published bi-monthly as simply All-Flash); co-starring in Comic Cavalcade; and being a charter member of the Justice Society of America, the first superhero team, whose adventures ran in All Star Comics. With superheroers' post-war decline in popularity, 'Flash Comics was cancelled with issue #104 (1949). The Justice Society's final Golden Age story ran in All Star Comics #57 (1951; the title itself continued, as All Star Western). Green Lanterm, Wonder Woman and the Flash do their bit for the war: Comic Cavalcade #6 (Spring 1944), cover art by Paul Reinman. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a team of fictional superheroes whose adventures have been published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ...


Silver Age

In 1956, DC Comics successfully revived superheroes, ushering in what became known as the Silver Age of comic books. Rather than bringing back the same Golden Age heroes, as Atlas Comics, the 1950s precursor of Marvel Comics, unsuccessfully tried to do, DC reimagined them as new characters for the modern age. The Flash was the first revival, in the aptly named tryout comic book Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956). Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash. ... Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ... Showcase Comics was a series used to try out new characters by DC Comics. ...


This new Flash was Barry Allen, a police scientist who gained super-speed when bathed by chemicals after a shelf of them was struck by lightning. He adopted the name The Flash after reading a comic book featuring the Golden Age Flash. After several more appearances in Showcase, Allen's character was given his own title, The Flash, the first issue of which was #105 (resuming where Flash Comics had left off). Barry Allen was a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe and the second Flash. ...


The Silver Age Flash proved popular enough that several other Golden Age heroes were revived in new incarnations. A new superhero team, the Justice League of America, was also created, with the Flash as a charter member. The Justice League of America, also often referred to as the Justice League or JLA for short, is a DC Comics superhero team. ...

Left to right: Wally West, Bart Allen as Impulse, Jay Garrick, Johnny Quick, and Max Mercury (background), from Flash #97. Art by Mike Wieringo.
Left to right: Wally West, Bart Allen as Impulse, Jay Garrick, Johnny Quick, and Max Mercury (background), from Flash #97. Art by Mike Wieringo.

Download high resolution version (400x612, 84 KB)Cover to Flash (vol. ... Download high resolution version (400x612, 84 KB)Cover to Flash (vol. ... Bartholemew Henry Bart Allen II is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ... Max Mercury is the name of a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Michael Mike Wieringo is an American Comic-book artist and penciller. ...

The Flashes of two worlds

The Flash also introduced a much-imitated plot device into superhero comics, when it was revealed that Garrick and Allen existed on fictional parallel worlds. Their powers allowed them to cross the dimensional boundary between worlds, and the men became good friends. "The Flash of Two Worlds" was the first crossover in which a Golden Age character met a Silver Age character. Soon, there were crossovers between the entire Justice League and the Justice Society; their respective teams began an annual get-together which endured from the early 1960s until the mid-1980s. Parallel worlds started as a plot device in science fiction. ...


Allen's adventures continued in his own title until the advent of Crisis on Infinite Earths (The Flash ended as a series with #350). Allen's life had become considerably confused in the early 1980s, and DC elected to end his adventures and pass the mantle on to another character. Allen died heroically in the Crisis #8 (1986), though thanks to his ability to travel through time, he would continue to appear occasionally in the years to come. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a twelve-issue comic book limited series (or maxiseries) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


Modern Age

The third Flash is Wally West, who was introduced in Flash #110 (1959) as Kid Flash. West, Allen's nephew by marriage, gained the Flash's powers through an accident identical to Allen's. Adopting the Kid Flash identity, he maintained membership in the Teen Titans for years. Following Allen's death, West adopted the Flash identity in Crisis on Infinite Earths #12 and was given his own series, beginning with The Flash Vol. 2, #1 in 1987. Many issues began Flash with the simultaneously glad and rueful catchphrase, "My name is Wally West, and I'm the fastest man alive." Teen Titans redirects here. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...


In November 2005, DC Comics announced that this title would be among several cancelled at the conclusion of the "Infinite Crisis" company-crossover storyline, specifically as part of the "One Year Later..." event to be focused around the weekly series 52. Cover to Infinite Crisis #1. ... A fictional crossover occurs when otherwise separated fictional characters, stories, settings, universes, or media meet and interact with each other. ... 52 is the working title of a comic book series to be published by DC Comics, to debut in May 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue limited series Infinite Crisis. ...


A new Flash series was announced to begin in 2006, with Danny Bilson and Paul De Meo writing, and Ken Lashley as artist. It is unknown who will be behind the mask, but DC's Executive Editor Dan Didio stated, "the costume will be very familar."[1]


Fictional biographies

While several other individuals have used the name Flash, these have lived either on other parallel worlds, or in the future. Garrick, Allen and West are the best-known exemplars of the identity.


Golden Age Flash (Jay Garrick)

Main article: Jay Garrick

Jay Garrick was a college student in 1940 (suggesting he was born around 1922) who accidentally inhaled hard water vapors after falling asleep in his laboratory where he had been smoking (years later Garrick's origin story was retconned so that he inhaled vapor from heavy water, which was slightly more believable than the original version). As a result, he found that he could run at superhuman speed and had similarly fast reflexes. After a brief career as a college football star, he donned a red shirt with a lightning bolt and a stylized metal helmet with wings (based on images of the Roman god Mercury [1]), and began to fight crime as the Flash. It was explained decades later that the helmet belonged to Jay's father, Joseph, who died in World War I when Jay was only ten. His first case involved battling the Faultless Four, a group of blackmailers. In the early stories, it seemed to be widely known that Garrick was the Flash. It was later explained that Jay kept his identity secret without a mask by continually vibrating his body while in public so that any photograph of his face would be blurred. Jay Garrick is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe and the first Flash. ... Hard water is water that has a high mineral content (water with a low mineral content being known as soft water). ... Retroactive continuity – commonly contracted to the portmanteau word retcon – refers to the act of changing previously established details of a fictional setting, often without providing an explanation for the changes within the context of that setting. ... Heavy water is dideuterium oxide, or D2O or 2H2O. It is chemically the same as normal water, H2O, but the hydrogen atoms are of the heavy isotope deuterium, in which the nucleus contains a neutron in addition to the proton found in the nucleus of any hydrogen atom. ... World War I, also known as the First World War and (before 1939) the Great War, the War of the Nations, War to End All Wars, was a world conflict lasting from August 1914 to the final Armistice (cessation of hostilities) on November 11, 1918. ...


Silver Age Flash (Barry Allen)

Main article: Barry Allen

Barry Allen was a police scientist in 1956 with a reputation for being very slow, deliberate, and frequently late, which frustrated his fiancee, Iris West. One night, as he was preparing to leave work, a lightning bolt shattered a case full of chemicals and spilled them all over Allen. As a result, Allen found that he could run extremely fast and had matching reflexes. He donned a set of red tights sporting a lightning bolt (reminiscent of the original Captain Marvel), dubbed himself the Flash (after his childhood hero in the comic books, Jay Garrick), and became a crimefighter. In his civilian identity, he stored the costume in his ring, which could eject the compressed clothing when Allen needed it and suck it back in with the aid of a special gas that shrinks the suit. Barry Allen was a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe and the second Flash. ... Captain Marvel is a comic book superhero, originally published by Fawcett Comics and now owned by DC Comics. ...


Modern Age Flash (Wally West)

Main article: Wally West

Wally West was the nephew of Iris West and Barry Allen by marriage, and was introduced in The Flash (1st series) #110 (1959). When West was about ten years old, he was visiting his uncle's police laboratory, and the freak accident that gave Allen his powers repeated itself, bathing West in electrically-charged chemicals. Now possessing the same powers as his uncle, West donned a copy of his uncle's outfit and became the young crimefighter Kid Flash. Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, and the current (third) Flash. ...


Powers and Abilities

All incarnations of the Flash can run and move their limbs at superhuman speeds, and possess superhuman reflexes. All possess an aura that prevents air friction from affecting their bodies and clothes while moving.


Barry Allen was believed to be the fastest of all known Flashes, and was known to have travelled faster than the "speed of thought. " However when Barry Allen pushed himself further (While imploding the Anti-Monitor's chief weapon during the Crisis on Infinite Earths) he appeared to waste away as he was converted into pure speed energy, travelled back in time, and was revealed to be the very bolt of lightning that gave him his powers. Barry Allen possessed several other abilities that Jay Garrick and Wally West have not always been able to duplicate. He could vibrate his molecules through solid matter, could run on thick snow clouds and could travel through time and to other dimensions with the help of a "cosmic treadmill". Most unusual was Allen's complete control of his molecules, allowing him to vibrate through solid matter and, on one occasion when transformed into a mirror, "melt" himself and reform as a human to defeat his foe the Mirror Master. The cosmic treadmill is a device that was invented by Barry Allen, the second Flash. ... A mirror is a surface with good specular reflection that is smooth enough to form an image. ... Mirror Master is a fictional character, a recurring foe of the Flash with large technical knowledge and skills involving the use of mirrors. ...


Wally West has been shown to have a connection to the Speed Force, an extradimensional energy source, which provides his powers and gives him several other abilities. While all speedsters are powered by the force, West mainlines the power from the force itself and cannot be cut off from the source, unlike the others. Wally has on several occasions sped faster than light and been pulled into and exited the speed force by his own volition. He can create his costume out of pure speed energy, and can either impart his high velocities to other people and objects already in motion or steal the velocity they possess. Jay Garrick also possesses this ability to some degree; he stole speed from Black Adam in order to defeat the villainous Johnny Sorrow, and he has threatened to steal Bart Allen's (formerly Impulse, currently the new Kid Flash) speed on at least one occasion when he was misbehaving. West can vibrate through objects; in the past, West would cause whatever he vibrated through to explode, but has recently shown this to be a controlled ability as he can pass through objects without any ensuing explosion. Although not nearly as precise as Allen when he used his cosmic treadmill, West has shown to be able to traverse time and dimensions with his own powers, much like Allen in Showcase #4 in 1956. However West, now accelerates to the point that he is skirting the very edge of the Speed Force dimension, and can traverse along the timestream to specific points as they become visible, much like watching a movie in fast forward or reverse (However he must have a particular speedster's vibratory signature to search for and lock onto, or be very familiar with the vibration of that time period). The Speed Force is a concept presented in various issues of The Flash published by DC Comics. ... Black Adam is a Fawcett Comics and DC Comics supervillain, often a rival of Captain Marvel. ... Bartholemew Henry Bart Allen II is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...


Occasionally, the top speeds of the Flashes are light speed, although Barry Allen and Wally West have been shown to have sped faster than light (as mentioned previously). On several occasions, the Flash has been shown in various races against Superman to determine which one is faster (or as part of a mutual effort to thwart some type of threat); these races, however, often resulted in ties (or indeterminate results). However, in recent races between Wally and Superman, Wally has been shown to be the faster of the two. Cherenkov effect in a swimming pool nuclear reactor. ... Superman, aka Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and for several decades has been one of the most popular and well-known comic book icons of all-time. ...


Speedsters may at times utilize the ability to speed-read at incredible rates and in doing so process vast amounts of information. Whatever knowledge they acquire in this manner is usually temporary, although the current Kid Flash seems to be the exception. The idea of "speed knowledge" being temporary is a retcon introduced by Geoff Johns. Kid Flash is the name of three fictional characters, all superheroes, in the DC Comics universe. ... Geoff Johns (born January 25, 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American writer of comic books. ...


Flashes and other super speedsters (such as Superman) also have the ability to speak to one another at a highly accelerated rate. This is often done to have private conversations in front of non-fast people (as when Flash speaks to Superman about his ability to serve both the Titans and the JLA in The Titans #2).


Awards

The comics and characters have been nominated for and won several awards over the years, including:

Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for writing comic books and co-creating numerous comics characters, especially for DC Comics. ... Carmine Infantino (born May 24, 1925, Brooklyn, New York City) is an American comic book artist and editor who was a major force in the Silver Age of Comic Books. ... The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ... Hawkman is a comic book superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... John Broome (1738 - 1810) was a New York political figure. ... Carmine Infantino (born May 24, 1925, Brooklyn, New York City) is an American comic book artist and editor who was a major force in the Silver Age of Comic Books. ...

Appearences in other media

Early appearances

A version of the Flash guest-starred in Adventures of Aquaman in 1968. Flash appeared off and on in the animated series Super Friends throughout its run from 1973 to 1985. Super Friends is an animated series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1973 to 1985. ...


In 1977 he appeared in Legends of the Superheroes, as actor Rod Haase. Legends of the Superheroes was an umbrella title for two TV movies based on the Superfriends cartoon show that aired on NBC in January 1979. ...


The Flash 1990 series

Main article: The Flash (TV series)
John Wesley Shipp starred as Barry Allen/Flash.
John Wesley Shipp starred as Barry Allen/Flash.

The Flash was a live action CBS television series that starred John Wesley Shipp and Amanda Pays. The Flash featured in the series was the silver-age Flash, Barry Allen. The Flash's most famous villain in the series was the Trickster, played by Mark Hamill; this foreshadowed Hamill's subsequent success at playing the Joker in Batman: The Animated Series. Captain Cold, played by Michael Champion, and Mirror Master, played by David Cassidy, also appeared in their own episodes. The complete series was released as a DVD set by Warner Bros. in 2006. The dvd box set of the television series, The Flash. ... Image File history File links Flash1. ... Image File history File links Flash1. ... John Wesley Shipp (born January 22, 1956) is an American actor best known as Mitch Leery, the title characters father on the television drama Dawsons Creek from 1998 to 2002 and for roles in several daytime soap operas. ... The dvd box set of the television series, The Flash. ... For other uses, see CBS (disambiguation). ... John Wesley Shipp (born January 22, 1956) is an American actor best known as Mitch Leery, the title characters father on the television drama Dawsons Creek from 1998 to 2002 and for roles in several daytime soap operas. ... Amanda Pays (born on 6 June 1959 in London, England) is an English actress. ... The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and a rogue to The Flash. ... Mark Hamill Mark Hamill (born September 25, 1951 in Oakland, California) is an American actor and voice actor. ... The Joker is a fictional DC Comics supervillain, widely considered to be Batmans main archenemy. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... Captain Cold, also known as Leonard Snart, is a comic book villain created by DC Comics for the Flash, and is one of the scarlet speedsters enemies. ... Mirror Master is a fictional character, a recurring foe of the Flash with large technical knowledge and skills involving the use of mirrors. ... David Cassidy, in a still from The Partridge Family. ...


Justice League of America pilot

The Flash was in a CBS live-action unaired pilot called Justice League of America, portrayed by Kenny Johnston. For other uses, see CBS (disambiguation). ...


DC Animated Universe

The Flash appeared in Superman: The Animated Series, voiced by Charlie Schlatter, in the second-season episode "Speed Demons". As in the traditional comic book story-lines, the Flash and Superman race to find out who is faster, but the Weather Wizard gets in the way. The Flash is voiced by Michael Rosenbaum (Lex Luthor on the television series Smallville) in the Justice League animated series. This Flash is Wally West, however he is an amalgamation of Barry Allen and Wally. (In Justice League Unlimited, Wally is a forensic scientist, which was Barry's profession. Wally in the comics is an auto mechanic.) Michael Rosenbaum also voiced Kid Flash for a Fall 2005 episode of Teen Titans animated series entitled "Lightspeed". He later appeared in a cameo in the episode "Calling all Titans" and then he reappeared fully in the episode "Titans Together". Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Weather Wizard is the name of a DC Comics supervillain. ... Michael Rosenbaum Michael Owen Rosenbaum (born July 11, 1972) is a Jewish American actor born in Oceanside, New York. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and archenemy of Superman. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Smallville is an American television series that debuted in 2001 on The WB Television Network. ... Justice League is an animated series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Amalgamation, meaning to combine or unite into one form, has several uses: In chemistry, mining and dentistry, amalgamation is the blending of mercury with another metal or alloy to produce an amalgam. ... A forensic scientist is a scientist who analyzes biological, chemical, or physical samples taken into evidence during a criminal investigation. ... A mechanic works on the rear end of a car An auto mechanic is a mechanic who specializes in automobile maintenance, repair, and sometimes modification. ... Kid Flash is the name of three fictional characters, all superheroes, in the DC Comics universe. ... Teen Titans is an American animated television series created by Sam Register and Glen Murakami and produced by Warner Bros. ...

Flash tapping into the Speed Force in the Justice League Unlimited episode, "Divided We Fall".
Flash tapping into the Speed Force in the Justice League Unlimited episode, "Divided We Fall".

Some fans criticized the Justice League animated series characterization of the Flash, mainly due to the chauvinistic dialogue in early episodes. However, others argued that he provided a needed foil to the other characters; his humorous attitude and setting reflects Silver Age roots. The importance of the Flash as the "heart" of the Justice League was shown in the episode "A Better World", when his death in an alternate timeline triggered a series of events which turned that alternate League (the "Justice Lords") into virtual dictators of Earth. He has also proven key in saving the day in a few episodes, such as Divided We Fall, in which he defeated the fused Braniac/Lex Luthor when all the other six founding Justice League members could not. The episode Flash and Substance is centered on the opening of the Flash Museum. Many of the Flash's rogues make cameos in this episode, while focusing on Captain Boomerang, Mirror Master, Captain Cold, and The Trickster (voiced by Mark Hamill). Linda Park also appears as a reporter covering the museum opening. Image File history File links Flash using the speed force in Justice League Unlimited. ... Image File history File links Flash using the speed force in Justice League Unlimited. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) is an animated television series produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Brainiac is a fictional supervillain in DC Comics, most often appearing as an opponent of Superman. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and archenemy of Superman. ... The Flash Museum is a museum that appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... George Digger Harkness, alias Captain Boomerang, is a fictional supervillain in the DC Universe. ... Mirror Master is a fictional character, a recurring foe of the Flash with large technical knowledge and skills involving the use of mirrors. ... Captain Cold, also known as Leonard Snart, is a comic book villain created by DC Comics for the Flash, and is one of the scarlet speedsters enemies. ... The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and a rogue to The Flash. ... Mark Hamill Mark Hamill (born September 25, 1951 in Oakland, California) is an American actor and voice actor. ...


Smallville

Bart Allen races Clark Kent in the Smallville episode "Run"
Enlarge
Bart Allen races Clark Kent in the Smallville episode "Run"

The Flash made a guest appearance in the television series Smallville, in the fourth-season episode "Run" (first aired October 20, 2004) played by Kyle Gallner. He is portrayed as a self-centered teenager who uses his powers for personal gain. He goes by the name Bart Allen, but is shown to be carrying multiple ID cards also identifying him as Jay Garrick, Barry Allen, and Wally West. His speed in the episode seemed to far surpass Clark Kent's and they apparently became friends towards the end, with allusions being made to forming a "league" one day. Since in Smallville Clark Kent has not yet become Superman, it is not clear if this version of The Flash will grow up to become Barry Allen, Wally West Bart Allen (Impulse), or some other Flash entirely. Image File history File links Smallville-run2. ... Image File history File links Smallville-run2. ... Bartholemew Henry Bart Allen II is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Smallville is an American television series that debuted in 2001 on The WB Television Network. ... October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 72 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kyle Gallner (born 1985) is an American actor. ... Bartholemew Henry Bart Allen II is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Superman, aka Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and for several decades has been one of the most popular and well-known comic book icons of all-time. ... Barry Allen was a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe and the second Flash. ... Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, and the current (third) Flash. ... Bartholemew Henry Bart Allen II is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...


Movie

In December 2004, David Goyer (writer of the Blade trilogy and Batman Begins) announced plans to write and direct a major motion picture about The Flash, with Ryan Reynolds in the title role. The pair hope to get the green-light from Warner Bros at some point in the next year or so. David S. Goyer is a comic book writer, screenwriter, and film director. ... Blade is a 1998 vampire movie adapted from a comic book. ... Batman Begins (2005) is an American film based on the comic book character created by Bob Kane. ... Ryan Reynolds Ryan Rodney Reynolds (born October 23, 1976 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) is a Canadian actor. ...


Other appearances

Barry Allen appeared in the comic strip The World's Greatest Superheros.


Wally West appeared in the Justice League Task Force Super Nintendo fighting game. Justice League Task Force is a western Super NES and Sega Genesis tournament fighting game developed by Blizzard Entertainment and published by the now-defunct Acclaim. ... The European SNES design is identical to the Super Famicom. ...


Wally West appeared in a novel Stop Motion, written by Mark Schultz. Mark Schultz is an American comicbook writer and artist. ...


References in popular culture

Jimmy Bennett as a child fan of The Flash in the movie Daddy Day Care
Jimmy Bennett as a child fan of The Flash in the movie Daddy Day Care
  • "The Ballad Of Barry Allen" is a song by Jim's Big Ego featured on They're Everywhere and released through Creative Commons. The song portrays Barry Allen's ability to move at super-speed from an alternate viewpoint: namely, that to him the entire world is moving excruciatingly slowly ("I've got time to think / about the beauty of / the thousand variations of / the beating of the wings of / the hummingbird suspended in / the aspic of the world / moving slower than molasses, / as I'm off to catch the girl / who's falling off the bridge").
  • In 2002, the lead con-man character in the movie Catch Me If You Can played by Leonardo DiCaprio used the alias "Barry Allen" to elude G-man Tom Hanks in reference to his love for the comic book.
  • In the 2003 movie Daddy Day Care, Jimmy Bennett plays a boy who thinks he is the Flash and refuses to take off his costume, plus a sugar rush actually allows him to go super speed for a while.
  • In Season 5 of the TV series Angel, Illyria is able to escape from the group by slowing down time. They believe she has super speed. Gunn comments:

- "So she did a Barry Allen on us." Image File history File links The Flash from the movie Daddy Day Care File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links The Flash from the movie Daddy Day Care File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jimmy Bennett Jimmy Bennett (born February 9, 1996 in Seal Beach, California) is an American child actor. ... Jims Big Ego is a Boston, Massachusetts-based band formed in 1995 under the leadership of singer/songwriter Jim Infantino. ... Version 2 of Some Rights Reserved logo No Rights reserved logo The Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative work available for others legally to build upon and share. ... Genera Many, see text. ... ASPIC can refer to: Advanced SCSI Programmable Interrupt Controller Application Service Provider Industry Consortium Armed Services Personnel Interrogation Center Association for Strategic Planning in Internal Communications Authors Standard Prepress Interfacing Cod This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... Daddy Day Care DVD cover Daddy Day Care is a 2003 comedy film which tells the story of an unemployed father who convinces his male friends to help him to start a day care center. ... Jimmy Bennett Jimmy Bennett (born February 9, 1996 in Seal Beach, California) is an American child actor. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (born March 6, 1972) is one of the National Basketball Associations most dominant basketball players. ... Dwyane Tyrone Wade, Jr. ... Superman, aka Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and for several decades has been one of the most popular and well-known comic book icons of all-time. ...


(Blank response fom others)


- "Jay Garrick? Wally We... . She was moving really fast."


Related characters

As the first super-speed hero in comic books, the Flash was inspired by or has spawned a variety of imitators and conceptual descendants. These include:

Hermes bearing the infant Dionysus, by Praxiteles Hermes (Greek IPA ), in Greek mythology, is the god of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of orators, literature and poets, of athletics, of weights and measures and invention and commerce in general, of the cunning of... Greek mythological characters (Most of the gods and goddesses had Roman equivalents. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) is an animated television series produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Quicksilver (Pietro Maximoff) is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Avengers are a Marvel superhero team, consisting of many of the Marvel Universes most popular and powerful heroes. ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ... Jesse Chambers, aka Jesse Quick, is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ... T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents is a team of comic book superheroes originally published by Tower Comics in the 1960s. ... Max Mercury is the name of a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... This article refers to the superhero. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Blur is a superhero in the Marvel Comics alternate universe MAX imprint. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ... Supreme Power is an 18-issue comic book series which was published under Marvel Comics MAX imprint (for mature audiences) from 2003 to 2005. ... J. Michael Straczynski Joseph Michael Straczynski (born July 17, 1954) is an award-winning American writer/producer of television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. ... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Promotional ad for the New Universe. ... Blurr is the name given to three fictional characters in the Transformers Universes. ... The Autobots (also known as Cybertrons in Japan) are the heroes in the Transformers toyline and related spin-off comics and cartoons. ... Transformer or Transformers may refer to: Transformer, an electrical device Transformer (album), Lou Reeds 1972 rock album Transformers (myth) of Pacific Northwest native myth The fictional Transformers Universe: Transformers Universes Transformers series, television series Transformers (comic), produced primarily by Marvel Comics (1984-1993), Dreamwave Productions (2002-2004), and IDW... Mark Thomas Miller and Courteney Cox in Misfits of Science Misfits of Science was a short-lived American superhero fantasy TV series from 1985, lasting for only 16 episodes. ... Más y Menos poised for action; Más is on the right, Menos on the left. ... Teen Titans is an American animated television series created by Sam Register and Glen Murakami and produced by Warner Bros. ... Cartoon Network is a cable television channel created by Turner Broadcasting and dedicated to showing animated programming. ... This article is about velocity in physics. ... Top Cow Productions (TCP) is an imprint of Image Comics founded by Marc Silvestri in the 1992. ... The Terrific Whatzit (real name Merton McSnurtle, also known as McSnurtle the Turtle) was a funny animal superhero who appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... Funny animal is a cartooning term for the genre of comics and animated cartoons in which the main characters are humanoid or talking animals. ... For the Discworld character, see Carrot Ironfoundersson. ... The Justa Lotta Animals is a fictional superhero team that appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... Reverse Flash is a title that has been taken by three supervillains in DC Comics. ... Jesse Chambers, aka Jesse Quick, is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Zoom is a comic book super-villain in the DC Universe. ... Kid Flash (Iris West) is a superheroine in an alternate future of the DC Comics universe She was constantly annoyed by that her father, who had almost completely given up his life to patrol Keystone City non-stop, never made time for her, although he did make time for her... Professor Zoom is a comic book super-villain in the DC Universe. ... Don & Dawn: The Tornado Twins The Tornado Twins were fictional superheroes in the DC Comics Universe. ... Inertia Inertia is a comic book character in the DC Comics universe. ... XS (Jenni Ognats), is a fictional character, a superheroine in the future of the DC Comics universe. ... Bartholemew Henry Bart Allen II is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... X-Men 2099 is a comic book published by Marvel from 1993 to 1996 that explores the possibility of what a team of X-Men would be like in the year 2099. ...

References

  1. a Dan Didio on the New Flash Team (newsarama.com)

External links

  • Alan Kistler's Profile On: THE FLASH - A detailed analysis of the history of the Flash by comic book historian Alan Kistler. Covers infromation all the way from Jay Garrick to Barry Allen to today, as well as discussions on the various villains of the Flash and his imitators. Various art scans.
  • Golden Age Flash Toonopedia entry
  • Silver Age Flash Toonopedia entry
  • Crimson Lightning, an online index to the comic book adventures of the Modern Age Flash.
  • Alan Kistler's Guide To THE CRISIS - An in-depth three part retrospective by comic book historian Alan Kistler on the Crisis, including a comprehensive issue-by-issue summary, map of the multiple universes, a discussion on why the Crisis had to happen and how effective it was, various cover and interior art scans, and a discussion on Marv Wolfman's novelization. Includes a detailed retelling of Barry Allen's discovery of the multiverse, his role in the Crisis, and his death.
  • The Flash JLResource.com entry
  • The Flash: Those Who Ride The Lightning, comprehensive fan site devoted to the Fastest Man Alive and other super-speed characters of the DC Universe. One of the most comprehensive DC comics sites on the internet.
  • Index to Barry Allen's Earth-One adventures
  • [2] Comic Book Awards Almanac

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