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Encyclopedia > The Feynman Lectures on Physics
Cover of the book on quantum mechanics
Cover of the book on quantum mechanics

The Feynman Lectures on Physics, by Richard Feynman, Robert Leighton, and Matthew Sands is perhaps Feynman's most accessible technical work, and is considered a classic introduction to modern physics, including lectures on mathematics, electromagnetism, Newtonian physics, quantum physics, and even the relation of physics to other sciences. The three volumes were compiled from material presented in a 2-year introductory physics course given in the early 1960s by Feynman at Caltech. Six readily accessible chapters were later compiled into a book entitled Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher, and six more in Six Not So Easy Pieces: Einstein's Relativity, Symmetry and Space-Time. Richard Feynman: Cover of The Feynman Lectures on Physics Source: Amazon. ... Richard Feynman: Cover of The Feynman Lectures on Physics Source: Amazon. ... This article is about the physicist. ... Robert B. Leighton (September 10, 1919 - March 9, 1997) was an American physicist who spent his professional career at the California Institute of Technology. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles. ... Classical mechanics is a model of the physics of forces acting upon bodies. ... Fig. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ...


The first volume focuses on mechanics, radiation, and heat. The second volume is mainly on electromagnetism and matter. The third volume, on quantum mechanics, shows, for example, how the double-slit experiment contains the essential features of quantum mechanics. For other uses, see Mechanic (disambiguation). ... Radiation as used in physics, is energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles. ... For other uses, see Heat (disambiguation) In physics, heat, symbolized by Q, is energy transferred from one body or system to another due to a difference in temperature. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles. ... This article is about matter in physics and chemistry. ... Fig. ... Double-slit diffraction and interference pattern The double-slit experiment consists of letting light diffract through two slits, which produces fringes or wave-like interference patterns on a screen. ...

Contents

Background

By 1960 Richard Feynman was already a legend in his own time; at age 42 his research and discoveries in physics had resolved a number of troubling inconsistencies in several fundamental theories. In particular, it was his work in quantum electrodynamics which would lead to the award in 1965 of the Nobel Prize in physics. At the same time that Feynman was at the pinnacle of his fame, the faculty of the California Institute of Technology was concerned about the quality of the introductory courses being offered to the undergraduate students. It was felt that these were burdened by an old fashioned syllabus and that the exciting discoveries of recent years, many of which had occurred at Caltech, were not being conveyed to the students. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the physicist. ... Quantum electrodynamics (QED) is a relativistic quantum field theory of electrodynamics. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ...


Thus it was decided to reconfigure the first physics course offered to students at Caltech, with the goal being to generate more excitement in the students. Who better to teach this course than the most famous lecturer of physics on campus? To the surprise of the Department, Feynman readily agreed to give the course, though only once. Aware of the fact that this would be a historic event, Caltech recorded each lecture and took photographs of each drawing made on the blackboard by Feynman.


Based on the lectures and the tape recordings, a team of physicists and graduate students put together a manuscript that would become Richard Feynman's most widely read and influential scientific work: The Feynman Lectures on Physics.


As the two-year course (1961-63) was still being completed, word of it spread throughout the physics community. In a special preface to the 1989 edition, David Goodstein and Gerry Neugebauer claim that, as time went on the attendance by registered students dropped sharply but was matched by a compensating increase in the number of faculty and graduate students. Sands, in his memoir accompanying the 2005 edition, contests this claim.


Addison-Wesley published a collection of problems to accompany The Feynman Lectures on Physics. The problem sets were first used in the 1962-63 academic year and organized by Robert Leighton. Some of the problems are sophisticated enough to require understanding of topics as advanced as Kolmogorov's zero-one law, for example. In probability theory, Kolmogorovs zero-one law, named in honor of Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov, specifies that a certain type of event, called a tail event, will either almost surely happen or almost surely not happen; that is, the probability of such an event occurring is zero or one. ...


Addison-Wesley also released all the audio tapes of the lectures, over 103 hours with Richard Feynman, in CD format after remastering the sound and clearing the recordings.


In March of 1964, Feynman appeared before the freshman physics class as a guest lecturer, but the notes for this lecture were lost for a number of years. They were finally located, restored, and made available as Feynman's Lost Lecture: The Motion of Planets Around the Sun.


In 2005, Michael A. Gottlieb and Ralph Leighton co-authored Feynman's Tips on Physics, which includes four of Feynman's freshman lectures (three on problem solving, one on inertial guidance) not included in the main text, a memoir by Matt Sands about the origins of the Feynman Lectures on Physics, and exercises (with answers) that were assigned to students by Robert Leighton and Rochus Vogt in recitation sections of the Feynman Lectures course at Caltech.


Contents

Volume 1. Mainly mechanics, radiation, and heat

Preface "When new ideas came in, I would try either to deduce them if they were deducible or to explain that it was a new idea ... and which was not supposed to be provable."
Chapter 1. Atoms in motion
Chapter 2. Basic Physics
Chapter 3. The relation of physics to other sciences
Chapter 4. Conservation of energy
Chapter 5. Time and distance
Chapter 6. Probability
Chapter 7. The theory of gravitation
Chapter 8. Motion
Chapter 9. Newton's laws of dynamics
Chapter 10. Conservation of momentum
Chapter 11. Vectors
Chapter 12. Characteristics of force
Chapter 13. Work and potential energy (A)
Chapter 14. Work and potential energy (conclusion)
Chapter 15. The special theory of relativity
Chapter 16. Relativistic energy and momentum
Chapter 17. Space-time
Chapter 18. Rotation in two dimensions
Chapter 19. Center of mass; Moment of inertia
Chapter 20. Rotation in space
Chapter 21. The harmonic oscillator
Chapter 22. Algebra
Chapter 23. Resonance
Chapter 24. Transients
Chapter 25. Linear systems and review
Chapter 26. Optics: The principle of least time
Chapter 27. Geometrical optics
Chapter 28. Electromagnetic radiation
Chapter 29. Interference
Chapter 30. Diffraction
Chapter 31. The origin of the refractive index
Chapter 32. Radiation damping. Light scattering
Chapter 33. Polarization
Chapter 34. Relativistic effects in radiation
Chapter 35. Color vision
Chapter 36. Mechanisms of seeing
Chapter 37. Quantum behavior
Chapter 38. The Relation of Wave and particle viewpoints
Chapter 39. The kinetic theory of gases
Chapter 40. The principles of statistical mechanics
Chapter 41. The brownian movement
Chapter 42. Applications of kinetic theory
Chapter 43. Diffusion
Chapter 44. The laws of thermodynamics
Chapter 45. Illustrations of thermodynamics
Chapter 46. Ratchet and pawl
Chapter 47. Sound. The wave equation
Chapter 48. Beats
Chapter 49. Modes
Chapter 50. Harmonics
Chapter 51. Waves
Chapter 52. Symmetry in physical laws This is a discussion of a present category of science. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... In physics, the conservation of energy states that the total amount of energy in an isolated system remains constant, although it may change forms, e. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Distance is a numerical description of how far apart objects are at any given moment in time. ... Probability is the likelihood that something is the case or will happen. ... The word theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on their methodologies and the context of discussion. ... “Gravity” redirects here. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... Newtons First and Second laws, in Latin, from the original 1687 edition of the Principia Mathematica. ... In physics, a conservation law states that a particular measurable property of an isolated physical system does not change as the system evolves. ... A vector going from A to B. In physics and in vector calculus, a spatial vector, or simply vector, is a concept characterized by a magnitude and a direction. ... In physics, force is anything that can cause a massive body to accelerate. ... In physics, mechanical work is the amount of energy transferred by a force. ... Potential energy is energy stored within a Physical system. ... In physics, mechanical work is the amount of energy transferred by a force. ... Potential energy is energy stored within a Physical system. ... For a less technical and generally accessible introduction to the topic, see Introduction to special relativity. ... Albert Einsteins theory of relativity is a set of two theories in physics: special relativity and general relativity. ... In classical mechanics, momentum (pl. ... In special relativity and general relativity, time and three-dimensional space are treated together as a single four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian manifold called spacetime. ... Dimension (from Latin measured out) is, in essence, the number of degrees of freedom available for movement in a space. ... In physics, the center of mass of a system of particles is a specific point at which, for many purposes, the systems mass behaves as if it were concentrated. ... Moment of inertia, also called mass moment of inertia and, sometimes, the angular mass, (SI units kg m², Former British units slug ft2), is the rotational analog of mass. ... A sphere rotating around its axis. ... Space has been an interest for philosophers and scientists for much of human history. ... This article is about the components of sound. ... In classical mechanics, a Harmonic oscillator is a system which, when displaced from its equilibrium position, experiences a restoring force proportional to the displacement according to Hookes law: where is a positive constant. ... This article is about the branch of mathematics. ... This article is about resonance in physics. ... Transient means passing with time. ... A linear system is a model of a system based on some kind of linear operator. ... For the book by Sir Isaac Newton, see Opticks. ... Fermats principle assures that the angles given by Snells law always reflect lights quickest path between P and Q. Fermats principle in optics states: This principle was first stated by Pierre de Fermat. ... See also list of optical topics. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, composed of the electric field and the magnetic field. ... Radiation as used in physics, is energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles. ... Interference of two circular waves - Wavelength (decreasing bottom to top) and Wave centers distance (increasing to the right). ... The intensity pattern formed on a screen by diffraction from a square aperture Diffraction refers to various phenomena associated with wave propagation, such as the bending, spreading and interference of waves passing by an object or aperture that disrupts the wave. ... The refractive index (or index of refraction) of a medium is a measure for how much the speed of light (or other waves such as sound waves) is reduced inside the medium. ... Radiation damping in accelerator physics is a way of reducing the beam emittance of a beam of accelerated charged particles. ... Scattering is a general physical process whereby some forms of radiation, such as light, sound or moving particles, for example, are forced to deviate from a straight trajectory by one or more localized non-uniformities in the medium through which it passes. ... In electrodynamics, polarization (also spelled polarisation) is the property of electromagnetic waves, such as light, that describes the direction of their transverse electric field. ... Color vision is the capacity of an organism or machine to distinguish objects based on the wavelengths (or frequencies) of the light they reflect or emit. ... Fig. ... A wave is a disturbance that propagates through space or spacetime, transferring energy and momentum and sometimes angular momentum. ... In particle physics, an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a particle not known to have substructure; that is, it is not made up of smaller particles. ... Kinetic theory or kinetic theory of gases attempts to explain macroscopic properties of gases, such as pressure, temperature, or volume, by considering their molecular composition and motion. ... -1... Statistical mechanics is the application of probability theory, which includes mathematical tools for dealing with large populations, to the field of mechanics, which is concerned with the motion of particles or objects when subjected to a force. ... Three different views of Brownian motion, with 32 steps, 256 steps, and 2048 steps denoted by progressively lighter colors. ... Kinetic theory or kinetic theory of gases attempts to explain macroscopic properties of gases, such as pressure, temperature, or volume, by considering their molecular composition and motion. ... diffusion (disambiguation). ... Thermodynamics (from the Greek θερμη, therme, meaning heat and δυναμις, dunamis, meaning power) is a branch of physics that studies the effects of changes in temperature, pressure, and volume on physical systems at the macroscopic scale by analyzing the collective motion of their particles using statistics. ... Thermodynamics (from the Greek θερμη, therme, meaning heat and δυναμις, dunamis, meaning power) is a branch of physics that studies the effects of changes in temperature, pressure, and volume on physical systems at the macroscopic scale by analyzing the collective motion of their particles using statistics. ... A ratchet may refer to: ratchet (device), a mechanical device for controlling rotational motion socket wrench, a tool that makes use of the above mechanical device ratchet (instrument), a music instrument Ratchet (Ratchet & Clank), a fictional character from the Ratchet & Clank video game series Ratchet (Robots), a fictional character and... Pawl was a Formula One constructor (Indy 500 only) in 1951, 1954 and 1955. ... Sound is a disturbance of mechanical energy that propagates through matter as a wave. ... A wave is a disturbance that propagates through space or spacetime, transferring energy and momentum and sometimes angular momentum. ... In acoustics, a beat is an interference between two sounds of slightly different frequencies, perceived as periodic variations in volume whose rate is the difference between the two frequencies. ... For other types of mode, see mode. ... In acoustics and telecommunication, the harmonic of a wave is a component frequency of the signal that is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency. ... A WAVES Photographer 3rd Class The WAVES were a World War II era division of the U.S. Navy that consisted entirely of women. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A physical law or a law of nature is a scientific generalization based on empirical observations. ...


Volume 2. Mainly electromagnetism and matter

Chapter 1. Electromagnetism
Chapter 2. Differential calculus of vector fields
Chapter 3. Vector integral calculus
Chapter 4. Electrostatics
Chapter 5. Application of Gauss' law
Chapter 6. The electric field in various circumstances
Chapter 7. The electric field in various circumstances (continued)
Chapter 8. Electrostatic energy
Chapter 9. Electricity in the atmosphere
Chapter 10. Dielectrics
Chapter 11. Inside dielectrics
Chapter 12. Electrostatic analogs
Chapter 13. Magnetostatics
Chapter 14. The magnetic field in various situations
Chapter 15. The vector potential
Chapter 16. Induced currents
Chapter 17. The laws of induction
Chapter 18. The Maxwell equations
Chapter 19. The principle of least action
Chapter 20. Solutions of Maxwell's equations in free space
Chapter 21. Solutions of Maxwell's equations with currents and charges
Chapter 22. AC circuits
Chapter 23. Cavity resonators
Chapter 24. Waveguides
Chapter 25. Electrodynamics in relativistic notation
Chapter 26. Lorentz transformations of the fields
Chapter 27. Field energy and field momentum
Chapter 28. Electromagnetic mass
Chapter 29. The motion of charges in electric and magnetic fields
Chapter 30. The internal geometry of crystals
Chapter 31. Tensors
Chapter 32. Refractive index of dense materials
Chapter 33. Reflection from surfaces
Chapter 34. The magnetism of matter
Chapter 35. Paramagnetism and magnetic resonance
Chapter 36. Ferromagnetism
Chapter 37. Magnetic materials
Chapter 38. Elasticity
Chapter 39. Elastic materials
Chapter 40. The flow of dry water
Chapter 41. The flow of wet water
Chapter 42. Curved space Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles. ... Differential calculus is the theory of and computations with differentials; see also derivative and calculus. ... Vector field given by vectors of the form (-y, x) In mathematics a vector field is a construction in vector calculus which associates a vector to every point in Euclidean space. ... Vector calculus (also called vector analysis) is a field of mathematics concerned with multivariate real analysis of vectors in two or more dimensions. ... Electrostatics (also known as static electricity) is the branch of physics that deals with the phenomena arising from what seem to be stationary electric charges. ... In physics, Gausss law gives the relation between the electric flux flowing out a closed surface and the charge enclosed in the surface. ... In physics, the space surrounding an electric charge or in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field has a property called an electric field. ... In physics, the space surrounding an electric charge or in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field has a property called an electric field. ... Electrical energy can refer to several closely related things. ... For other uses, see Electricity (disambiguation). ... “Air” redirects here. ... The electrons in the molecules shift toward the positively charged left plate. ... The electrons in the molecules shift toward the positively charged left plate. ... Magnetostatics is the study of static magnetic fields. ... Magnetic field lines shown by iron filings In physics, the space surrounding moving electric charges, changing electric fields and magnetic dipoles contains a magnetic field. ... In vector calculus, a vector potential is a vector field whose curl is a given vector field. ... For magnetic induction, see Magnetic field. ... Faradays law of induction (more generally, the law of electromagnetic induction) states that the induced emf (electromotive force) in a closed loop equals the negative of the time rate of change of magnetic flux through the loop. ... In electromagnetism, Maxwells equations are a set of equations first presented as a distinct group in the later half of the nineteenth century by James Clerk Maxwell. ... Fermats principle assures that the angles given by Snells law always reflect lights quickest path between P and Q. Fermats principle in optics states: This principle was first stated by Pierre de Fermat. ... In electromagnetism, Maxwells equations are a set of equations first presented as a distinct group in the later half of the nineteenth century by James Clerk Maxwell. ... In physics, free space is a concept of electromagnetic theory, corresponding roughly to the vacuum, the baseline state of the electromagnetic field, or the replacement for the electromagnetic aether. ... In electromagnetism, Maxwells equations are a set of equations first presented as a distinct group in the later half of the nineteenth century by James Clerk Maxwell. ... In electricity, current refers to electric current, which is the flow of electric charge. ... Electric charge is a fundamental conserved property of some subatomic particles, which determines their electromagnetic interaction. ... City lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Look up waveguide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, composed of the electric field and the magnetic field. ... The Lorentz transformation (LT), named after its discoverer, the Dutch physicist and mathematician Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (1853-1928), forms the basis for the special theory of relativity, which has been introduced to remove contradictions between the theories of electromagnetism and classical mechanics. ... The magnitude of an electric field surrounding two equally charged (repelling) particles. ... The electromagnetic mass of an electrically charged object, such as an electron, is the apparent increase in its mass due to its interaction with the electromagnetic field that surrounds it. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Electric charge is a fundamental conserved property of some subatomic particles, which determines their electromagnetic interaction. ... In physics, the space surrounding an electric charge or in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field has a property called an electric field. ... Magnetic field lines shown by iron filings In physics, the space surrounding moving electric charges, changing electric fields and magnetic dipoles contains a magnetic field. ... Calabi-Yau manifold Geometry (Greek γεωμετρία; geo = earth, metria = measure) is a part of mathematics concerned with questions of size, shape, and relative position of figures and with properties of space. ... Crystal (disambiguation) Insulin crystals A crystal is a solid in which the constituent atoms, molecules, or ions are packed in a regularly ordered, repeating pattern extending in all three spatial dimensions. ... For more technical Wiki articles on tensors, see the section later in this article. ... The refractive index (or index of refraction) of a medium is a measure for how much the speed of light (or other waves such as sound waves) is reduced inside the medium. ... material is the substance or matter from which something is or can be made, or also items needed for doing or creating something. ... The reflection of a bridge in Indianapolis, Indianas Central Canal. ... For other senses of this word, see magnetism (disambiguation). ... This article is about matter in physics and chemistry. ... Simple Illustration of a paramagnetic probe made up from miniature magnets. ... Magnetic resonance can mean: Nuclear magnetic resonance Electron spin resonance This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Ferromagnetism is the phenomenon by which materials, such as iron, in an external magnetic field become magnetized and remain magnetized for a period after the material is no longer in the field. ... In physics, magnetism is a phenomenon by which materials exert an attractive or repulsive force on other materials. ... Elasticity is a branch of physics which studies the properties of elastic materials. ... Look up elastic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up flow in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up flow in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Two-dimensional visualisation of space-time distortion. ...


Volume 3. Quantum mechanics

Chapter 1. Quantum behavior
Chapter 2. The relation of wave and particle viewpoints
Chapter 3. Probability amplitudes
Chapter 4. Identical particles
Chapter 5. Spin one
Chapter 6. Spin one-half
Chapter 7. The dependence of amplitudes on time
Chapter 8. The Hamiltonian matrix
Chapter 9. The ammonia maser
Chapter 10. Other two-state systems
Chapter 11. More two-state systems
Chapter 12. The hyperfine splitting in hydrogen
Chapter 13. Propagation in a crystal lattice
Chapter 14. Semiconductors
Chapter 15. The independent particle approximation
Chapter 16. The dependence of amplitudes on position
Chapter 17. Symmetry and conservation laws
Chapter 18. Angular momentum
Chapter 19. The hydrogen atom and the periodic table
Chapter 20. Operators
Chapter 21. The Schrödinger equation in a classical context: a seminar on superconductivity Fig. ... A wave is a disturbance that propagates through space or spacetime, transferring energy and momentum and sometimes angular momentum. ... In particle physics, an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a particle not known to have substructure; that is, it is not made up of smaller particles. ... In quantum mechanics, a probability amplitude is a complex-valued function that describes an uncertain or unknown quantity. ... In particle physics, an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a particle not known to have substructure; that is, it is not made up of smaller particles. ... In physics, spin refers to the angular momentum intrinsic to a body, as opposed to orbital angular momentum, which is the motion of its center of mass about an external point. ... In physics, spin refers to the angular momentum intrinsic to a body, as opposed to orbital angular momentum, which is the motion of its center of mass about an external point. ... In quantum mechanics, a probability amplitude is a complex-valued function that describes an uncertain or unknown quantity. ... The quantum Hamiltonian is the physical state of a system, which may be characterized as a ray in an abstract Hilbert space (or, in the case of ensembles, as a trace class operator with trace 1). ... For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... A hydrogen radio frequency discharge, the first element inside a hydrogen maser (see description below) A maser is a device that produces coherent electromagnetic waves through amplification due to stimulated emission. ... Systems is an annual information and telecommunications trade fair in Munich, Bavaria, Germany Categories: | | ... Systems is an annual information and telecommunications trade fair in Munich, Bavaria, Germany Categories: | | ... In atomic physics, hyperfine structure is a small perturbation in the energy levels (or spectrum) of atoms or molecules due to the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, arising from the interaction of the nuclear magnetic dipole with the magnetic field of the electron. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ... Wave propagation refers to the ways waves travel through a medium (waveguide). ... In mineralogy and crystallography, a crystal structure is a unique arrangement of atoms in a crystal. ... A semiconductor is a material that is an insulator at very low temperature, but which has a sizable electrical conductivity at room temperature. ... Sphere symmetry group o. ... In physics, a conservation law states that a particular measurable property of an isolated physical system does not change as the system evolves. ... This gyroscope remains upright while spinning due to its angular momentum. ... Depiction of a hydrogen atom showing the diameter as about twice the Bohr model radius. ... “The Periodic Table” redirects here. ... In mathematical formulations of quantum mechanics, an operator is a linear transformation from a Hilbert space to itself. ... For a non-technical introduction to the topic, please see Introduction to quantum mechanics. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor, cooled with liquid nitrogen. ...


Abbreviated editions

"Six Easy Pieces grew out of the need to bring to as wide an audience as possible a substantial yet non-technical physics primer based on the science of Richard Feynman.... General readers are fortunate that Feynman chose to present certain key topics in largely qualitative terms without formal mathematics...."


Six Easy Pieces (1994)

  • Chapters
  1. Atoms in motion
  2. Basic Physics
  3. The relation of physics to other sciences
  4. Conservation of energy
  5. The theory of gravitation
  6. Quantum behavior

Properties For alternative meanings see atom (disambiguation). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This is a discussion of a present category of science. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... In physics, the conservation of energy states that the total amount of energy in an isolated system remains constant, although it may change forms, e. ... The word theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on their methodologies and the context of discussion. ... “Gravity” redirects here. ... Fig. ...

Six Not So Easy Pieces (1998)

  • Chapters
  1. Vectors
  2. Symmetry in physical laws
  3. The special theory of relativity
  4. Relativistic energy and momentum
  5. Space-time
  6. Curved space

A vector going from A to B. In physics and in vector calculus, a spatial vector, or simply vector, is a concept characterized by a magnitude and a direction. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A physical law or a law of nature is a scientific generalization based on empirical observations. ... For a less technical and generally accessible introduction to the topic, see Introduction to special relativity. ... Albert Einsteins theory of relativity is a set of two theories in physics: special relativity and general relativity. ... In classical mechanics, momentum (pl. ... In special relativity and general relativity, time and three-dimensional space are treated together as a single four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian manifold called spacetime. ... Two-dimensional visualisation of space-time distortion. ...

Quotations

  • Feynman once commented, about these three volumes: "[This set of books] has views which are very close to my own."

External Links

  • Official web site with Feynman's exercise problems and errata
  • The Douglas Robb Memorial Lectures Free-to-view videos provided by the Vega Science Trust.

Publishing information

  • The Feynman Lectures on Physics (with Leighton and Sands). 3 volumes 1964, 1966. Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 63-20717
    • ISBN 0-201-02115-3 (1970 paperback three-volume set)
    • ISBN 0-201-50064-7 (1989 commemorative hardcover three-volume set)
    • ISBN 0-8053-9045-6 (2006 the definitive edition (2nd printing); hardcover)
  • Feynman's Tips On Physics: A Problem-Solving Supplement to the Feynman Lectures on Physics (hardcover) ISBN 0-8053-9063-4
  • Six Easy Pieces (hardcover book with original Feynman audio on CDs) ISBN 0-201-40896-1
  • Six Easy Pieces (paperback book) ISBN 0-201-40825-2
  • Six Not-So-Easy Pieces (paperback book with original Feynman audio on CDs) ISBN 0-201-32841-0
  • Six Not-So-Easy Pieces (paperback book) ISBN 0-201-32842-9
  • Exercises for the Feynman Lectures (paperback book) ISBN 2-356-48789-1 from the Caltech Bookstore

  Results from FactBites:
 
Boston Globe Online / Table of Contents (607 words)
Feynman, who died at the University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center after an eight-year battle with abdominal cancer, was a popular and energetic lecturer who, despite his illness, continued to teach at the California Institute of Technology until two weeks ago.
Feynman, who called his Nobel Prize "a pain in the neck," was "extraordinarily honest with himself and everyone else," and added that "he didn't like ceremony or pomposity.
Feynman caused consternation in his years with the Manhattan Project, which developed the atomic bomb, by figuring out in his spare time how to pick the locks on filing cabinets that contained classified information.
The Feynman Lectures on Physics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (798 words)
The Feynman Lectures on Physics, by Richard Feynman, is perhaps his most accessible technical work for anyone with an interest in physics and today is considered to be the classic introduction to modern physics, including lectures on mathematics, electromagnetism, Newtonian physics, quantum physics, and even the relation of physics to other sciences.
By 1960 Richard Feynman was already a legend in his own time; at age 42 his research and discoveries in physics had resolved a number of troubling inconsistencies in several fundamental theories.
The Feynman Lectures on Physics (with Leighton and Sands).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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