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Encyclopedia > The Fellowship of the Ring
The Lord of the Rings
Volume I - Volume II - Volume III

The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. It takes place in the fictional universe Middle-earth. The volume is divided into two books, Book I and II. It was originally released on July 24, 1954 in the United Kingdom. The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Middle-earth Portal

Contents

Image File history File links Arda. ...

Title

Tolkien conceived of The Lord of the Rings as a single volume comprising six sections he called "books" and extensive appendices. The original publisher made the decision to split the work into three parts, publishing the fifth and sixth books and the appendices under the title The Return of the King, in reference to Aragorn's assumption of the throne. Tolkien indicated he would have preferred The War of the Ring as a title, as it gave away less of the story. Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ...


Before it was decided to publish The Lord of the Rings in three volumes, Tolkien had hoped to publish the novel in one volume, or combined with The Silmarillion. At this stage he planned to title the individual books. The discarded title for Book I was The Return of the Shadow or The Ring Sets Out. Book II was titled The Fellowship of the Ring or The Ring Goes South. The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ...


Book I

The first book sets the stage for the adventure and follows the Hobbit Frodo Baggins as he flees from his home in the Shire to escape the minions of the Dark Lord Sauron. Sauron seeks the One Ring that will allow him to subdue Middle-earth. The One Ring has been inherited by Frodo who finds himself unwittingly in the midst of a struggle for world domination. In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, a Hobbit is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... Frodo Baggins is one of the most significant characters in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Eye of Sauron. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, The Doom of Man, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, The Doom of Man, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ...


The first chapter in the book begins quite lightly, following on from The Hobbit which is more of a children's story than The Lord of the Rings. Bilbo celebrated his 111th (or eleventy-first, as it is called) birthday, on the same day that Frodo celebrated his 33rd birthday (his 'coming of age'). At the birthday party, Bilbo disappeared after his speech, to the surprise of all. The wizard Gandalf later alerted Frodo to the darker aspects of the ring which Bilbo had used to make himself invisible. This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ...


Heeding Gandalf's advice, Frodo left his home, taking the Ring with him. He hoped to reach Rivendell, where he figured he would be safe from Sauron, and where those wiser than he can decide what to do about the Ring. Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


On his journey he was accompanied and aided by hobbit friends, Pippin, Merry, Sam, and Fatty. From the start they are pursued by Black Riders, the Ringwraiths who served Sauron. Narrowly escaping these and other dangers and meeting other interesting characters en route (e.g. Tom Bombadil), Frodo, Sam, Mery and Pippin eventually came to Bree, where they met Strider, a friend of Gandalf who led them the rest of the way to Rivendell, through further hardships. Frodo was stabbed upon the hill of Weathertop by the chief of the Nazgûl (The Witch-king of Angmar), with a 'morgul blade' — as part of the knife stayed inside him, he became sicker on the rest of the journey. They also passed the trolls which had been turned to stone in the previous book, The Hobbit. Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–?), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth; a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who is Frodo Bagginss servant and companion on the journey to Mordor. ... Fredegar Fatty Bolger is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. ... Nazgûl ilustration. ... Tom Bombadil is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Bree is a fictional village in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, east of the Shire and south of Fornost Erain. ... Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Weathertop (Sindarin Amon Sûl, Hill of Wind) is a significant hill in the Eriador region of Middle-earth, the southernmost and highest summit of the Weather Hills. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl and the Black Captain among other names, is a fictional character from the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth, Trolls are very large (twelve feet tall or more) humanoids of great strength and poor intellect. ...


Chapters

  • I - A Long-expected Party - details Bilbo and Frodo's birthday party, chapter ends with Bilbo leaving the Shire. The name is a reference to "An Unexpected Party", the first chapter of The Hobbit.
  • II - The Shadow of the Past - Gandalf tells Frodo the true nature of the ring, and how it must be taken to Mordor and destroyed. Sam who has been listening at the window, is told to accompany Frodo.
  • III - Three is Company - Frodo sells Bag End, and officially is going to move to a house at Crickhollow in the area beyond Bucklebury in Buckland, while he actually plans to disappear without causing too much of a fuss. Frodo, Sam and Pippin set out through the South Farthing of the Shire towards Buckland, and encounter a Black Rider. They also meet Gildor Inglorion the elf, with other elves.
  • IV - A Short Cut to Mushrooms - They meet Farmer Maggot, a feared old hobbit from Frodo's childhood, from taking a short cut. They find he actually has a kind nature, and he gives them some of his prized mushrooms. Merry joins them at the end.
  • V - A Conspiracy Unmasked - Takes place at Frodo's new house at Crickhollow. The title refers to Frodo about to tell Merry and Pippin about his quest, who he had previously believed not to know about it, and they tell him that they had known much of it all along. They also meet Fredegar Bolger, a friend of Frodo. Frodo decides to leave the next day through the Old Forest. It is a dangerous place, but Frodo wants to avoid the main roads at all costs as to avoid the Black Riders.
  • VI - The Old Forest - Although trying to avoid it, the hobbits get lost and travel to the River Withywindle, the "queerest part of the whole wood". The Hobbits all suddenly fall asleep and Merry and Pippin get trapped inside Old Man Willow, and are freed only when Tom Bombadil arrives.
  • VII - In the House of Tom Bombadil - The hobbits are invited to Tom's house and meet his "pretty lady", Goldberry, who is the daughter of the river. He gives them food and lodging and tells them stories about nature and history. Tom knows much about the hobbits, and even tries on the One Ring, yet it does not have any effect on him; it does not make him invisible. Frodo tries on the Ring then to see if it 'works', and Tom Bombadil is also able to see Frodo while he has the ring on.
  • VIII - Fog on the Barrow-downs - Travelling through the Barrow-downs, the hobbits are captured and imprisoned by a Barrow-wight, where they are rescued again by Tom Bombadil. The hobbits are given special weapons: daggers of the Men of Westernesse which were designed to fight against Sauron and his minions.
  • IX - At the Sign of the Prancing Pony - The hobbits reach the Inn of the Prancing Pony at Bree, where Frodo uses a false name, Mr. Underhill, to conceal the last name Baggins. Merry decides to go out on a walk while the rest of them go to the Common Room to have a drink. Frodo then meets a stranger named Strider, a Ranger from the North. However, when Pippin starts drinking and forgets about the danger that they are all in, Frodo has to sing a song in order to stop Pippin from talking too much. In the middle of Frodo's song, he slips and falls and in a cruel twist of fate, his finger accidentally slips through the Ring, causing him to vanish and starting a commotion among the citizens of Bree. Frodo escapes into a corner and Strider tells him that several people in the Inn saw what happened and left soon after.
  • X - Strider - Strider, who had at first seemed menacing, turns out to be friendly. The innkeeper, Butterbur, gives Frodo a late letter from Gandalf, which tells him that Strider is a friend of Gandalf's whose real name is Aragorn. Frodo realizes that Merry is still not among them. Shortly afterwards Merry runs into the room frightened. He saw that people from Bree were talking to some Black Riders that had shown up. Strider decides that it isn't safe to stay here and they move into another room.
  • XI - A Knife in the Dark - Some Bree-folk, agents of the Black Riders, attack the Inn at night and destroy the room the hobbits were supposed to stay in and run off all the horses in Bree. The Hobbits are forced to buy a scrawny, little pony from Bill Ferny (a spy for the Riders) and they quickly leave the town with Strider. They pass through the Midgewater Marshes, and reach a famous mountain called Weathertop. Disaster occurs when Strider leaves and then they are attacked by 5 Black Riders, Frodo puts on the Ring and tries to attack them but to no avail. The Nazgûl's leader (the Witch-king of Angmar) stabs Frodo with a morgul blade poisoning him and the Riders are barely driven off with fire by Strider, who returns at the last moment.
  • XII - Flight to the Ford - Strider attempts to heal Frodo with a plant called athelas. He helps relieve some of the pain, but Frodo has been stabbed with an evil blade and Aragorn realizes that they have to get to Rivendell to heal this wound. They pass the trolls, turned to stone in The Hobbit by Gandalf. They get closer to Rivendell with no sign of the Riders. Eventually, they meet the Elf-lord Glorfindel from Rivendell, who has fought the Riders before and is feared by them. He then comes with them to the Ford of Rivendell, but then the Riders come upon them. Frodo is forced to flee on Glorfindel's horse. Frodo tries to make a last stand at the River, but is overcome by his wound and the compulsion of the Ring. The Riders are almost upon him, when the River rises up in a flood which is caused by Elrond and Gandalf and washes them away as Frodo falls unconscious.

Bag End, as it is represented in a Lord of the Rings computer game. ... This article refers to the real-life village; for J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional village see Buckland (Middle-earth) Bucklebury is a village in Berkshire, England. ... Gildor Inglorion is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Farmer Maggot is a Hobbit in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth universe. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Old Man Willow is a fictional character, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... Tom Bombadil is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Goldberry is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... location of Barrow-downs in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Barrow-downs or Tyrn Gorthad were a series of low hills east of the Shire, behind the Old Forest, and west of the village of Bree. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Inn of the Prancing Pony was an inn where Frodo Baggins met Aragorn. ... location of Angmar in Middle-earth marked in red Angmar (Sindarin: Iron-home) is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Athelas is a fictional healing herb from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, also known as Kingsfoil or Asëa Aranion. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Glorfindel is an Elf, a Noldor who appears in the tales of Middle-earth. ...

Book II

Book II chronicles Frodo's stay at Rivendell in the house of Elrond, where a plan is hatched to destroy the Ring in Mordor. At first Frodo met his uncle Bilbo whom he had not seen since he left Hobbiton much earlier. Frodo set forth from Rivendell with eight companions: two Men, Aragorn and Boromir, son of the Steward of the land of Gondor; an Elven prince, Legolas; Frodo's old friend and powerful wizard, Gandalf; Gimli the Dwarf; and Frodo's three hobbit companions. These Nine Walkers were chosen to represent all the free races of Middle-earth and as a balance to the Nine Riders. They were also accompanied by Bill the Pony, whom Strider and the Hobbits acquired in Bree as a pack horse. Their attempt to cross the Misty Mountains was foiled by heavy snow, so they were forced to take a path under the mountains via Moria, an ancient dwarf kingdom, now full of orcs and other evil creatures, where Gandalf fell into the abyss after battling a Balrog. Spoiler warning: Elrond the Half-elven (F.A. 525 – ?) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by fantasy author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... Boromir is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Legolas is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... Gimli is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Bill is a fictional pony in The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, bought by Frodo Baggins and his companions in Bree, as they fled the Shire on their way to Rivendell. ... The Misty Mountains as seen in the prologue to The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... This Tolkien article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe perspective. ... A Balrog fighting Gandalf, as depicted by Ted Nasmith. ...


The remaining eight members of the Fellowship then spent some time in the elf-haven of Lothlórien, where they received gifts from the rulers Galadriel and Celeborn that in many cases prove useful later in the quest. They left Lórien by river, but Frodo began to realize the Ring was having a malevolent effect on some members of the party, especially Boromir, who eventually tried to take the Ring from Frodo. In the process, Frodo put on the Ring to escape him. This book ends when Frodo and Sam depart secretly for Mordor and the Fellowship of the Ring dissolves. location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... Spoiler warning: In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy book The Lord of the Rings, Celeborn (pronounced with a hard c as in cake) was the Elven husband of Galadriel; Lord of the Galadhrim; and co-ruler along with Galadriel of Lothlórien. ...


Chapters

  • I - Many Meetings - After awakening from a sleep of four days, Frodo meets Gandalf and Bilbo again, as well as Glóin the dwarf from The Hobbit, Elrond and others.
  • II - The Council of Elrond - A council attended by many people; Gandalf tells the story of his escape from Saruman; they decide that the Ring must be destroyed and Frodo offers to take it to Mordor. During the meeting Elrond proclaims the formation of the Fellowship of the Ring.
  • III - The Ring goes South - The nine members of the Fellowship travel south through Hollin; they try to take the road over the mountain Caradhras but are forced to turn back.
  • IV - A Journey in the Dark - They travel to the gates of Moria, where they have to deal with the Watcher in the Water, an aquatic monster in the lake in front of it. Gandalf eventually opens the doors. They reach the tomb of Balin.
  • V - The Bridge of Khazad-dûm - Attacked by orcs, trolls and a Balrog, they make their way to the bridge in Khazad-dûm, where Gandalf and the balrog fall.
  • VI - Lothlórien - The company meets the elves of Lórien. The elves reluctantly agree to let Gimli the dwarf pass. Aragorn takes Frodo to the hill of Cerin Amroth. About this time Gandalf is revived and lies motionless.
  • VII - The Mirror of Galadriel - The company meets Celeborn and Galadriel. Frodo is shown the mirror of Galadriel.
  • VIII - Farewell to Lórien - The elves give them cloaks, waybread and other gifts; they leave Lórien on boats down the Great River.
  • IX - The Great River - they notice Gollum following them down the river on a log; they reach the falls of Rauros, where they must choose between travelling on the east or west bank of the river to pass the falls.
  • X - The Breaking of the Fellowship - They arrive at the lawn of Parth Galen; they still face the choice of whether to go east or west; Boromir tries to take the Ring from Frodo, who puts it on to escape him; Other members of the company split up trying to find Frodo. Frodo and Sam go across the river and head east.

Glóin is the name of two fictional characters of J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eregion or Hollin was a kingdom of the Ñoldorin Elves in Eriador during the Second Age, located near the West Gate of Khazad-dûm under the shadow of the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ... In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Caradhras, also called the Redhorn (the literal English translation of the Sindarin name), is one of the mightiest peaks in the Misty Mountains. ... The Watcher in the Water in J.R.R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth is a mysterious and horrific beast that lurked in a lake caused by the damming of the Sirannon river, beneath the western walls of Moria. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Balin was a Dwarf leader, the son of Fundin and elder brother of Dwalin. ... A Balrog fighting Gandalf, as depicted by Ted Nasmith. ... Cerin Amroth, in the fictional universe of Middle-earth, is the mound of Amroth, that stood in the heart of Lórien and held the house of that King before he was lost. ... Spoiler warning: In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy book The Lord of the Rings, Celeborn (pronounced with a hard c as in cake) was the Elven husband of Galadriel; Lord of the Galadhrim; and co-ruler along with Galadriel of Lothlórien. ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ...

Destiny

Behind the events that befall the Ring-Bearer and the Fellowship, the reader begins to sense, there lurks always a sense of Destiny, and in the end, it will be a concatenation of the effects spawned by the nature of Good itself, that undoes Evil. Frodo says of the ring's slave, Gollum, "What a pity that Bilbo did not stab that vile creature, when he had a chance!" and Gandalf's response is For other uses of Fate, see Fate Destiny refers to a predetermined course of events. ...

"Pity? It was Pity that stayed his hand. Pity, and Mercy: not to strike without need. And he has been well rewarded, Frodo. Be sure that he took so little hurt from the evil, and escaped in the end, because he began his ownership of the Ring so. With Pity."

See also

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (film)

This article is about the musical. ...

External links

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  • Detailed summary and analysis of The Fellowship of the Ring
  • Detailed summary and analysis of characters, themes, and symbols of The Fellowship of the Ring



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J. R. R. Tolkien
Bibliography
Fiction: Songs for the Philologists (1936) • The Hobbit or There and Back Again (1937) • Leaf by Niggle (1945) • The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun (1945) • Farmer Giles of Ham (1949) • The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son (1953) • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (1954), The Two Towers (1954), The Return of the King (1955) • The Adventures of Tom Bombadil and Other Verses from the Red Book (1962) • The Road Goes Ever On (1967) • Tree and Leaf (1964) • The Tolkien Reader (1966) • Smith of Wootton Major (1967)
Posthumous publications : The Father Christmas Letters (1976) • The Silmarillion (1977) • Unfinished Tales (1980) • Bilbo's Last Song (1990) • The History of Middle-earth (12 Volumes) (1983–1996) • Roverandom (1998) • The Children of Húrin (2007) • The History of The Hobbit (2007)
Academic Works : A Middle English Vocabulary (1922) • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (trans. 1925) • Some Contributions to Middle-English Lexicography (1925) • The Devil's Coach Horses (1925) • Ancrene Wisse and Hali Meiðhad (1929) • The Name 'Nodens' (1932) • Sigelwara Land parts I and II, in Medium Aevum (1932-34) • Chaucer as a Philologist: The Reeve's Tale (1934) • Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics (1937) • The Reeve's Tale: version prepared for recitation at the 'summer diversions' (1939) • On Fairy-Stories (1939) • Sir Orfeo (1944) • Ofermod and Beorhtnoth's Death (1953) • Middle English "Losenger": Sketch of an etymological and semantic enquiry (1953) • Ancrene Wisse: The English Text of the Ancrene Riwle (1962) • English and Welsh (1963) • Introduction to Tree and Leaf (1964) • Contributions to the Jerusalem Bible (as translator and lexicographer) (1966) • Tolkien on Tolkien (autobiographical) (1966)
Posthumous publications : Finn and Hengest (1982) • The Monsters and the Critics (1983) • Beowulf and the Critics (2002)
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Fellowship of the Ring (characters) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (404 words)
The Fellowship of the Ring (or Company of the Ring, see below), as described in the first volume of The Lord of the Rings, which bears the same name, is a union of 9 representatives from each of the free peoples in Middle-earth, the number chosen to match the 9 Ringwraiths.
The Fellowship is entrusted with the task of assisting and protecting Frodo as he bears the One Ring to the land of Mordor where he can destroy it by throwing it into Mount Doom.
The fellowship is led at first by Gandalf, but after his fall in the mines of Moria, Aragorn leads them until Boromir's treachery coupled with the attack of the Orcs effects the breaking of the Fellowship.
The Fellowship of the Ring - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2085 words)
The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J.R.R. Tolkien.
The remaining eight members of the Fellowship then spend some time in the elf-haven of Lothlórien, where they receive gifts from the elf queen Galadriel that in many cases prove useful later in the quest.
III - The Ring goes South - The nine members of the fellowship travel south through Hollin; they try to take the road over the mountain Caradhras but are forced to turn back.
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