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Encyclopedia > The Fall of the House of Usher
The Fall of the House of Usher

1894 illustration by Aubrey Beardsley.
Author Edgar Allan Poe
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Genre(s) Horror
Publisher
Publication date September, 1839
Media type Print (Magazine)

"The Fall of the House of Usher" is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. The story was first published in Burton's Gentleman's Magazine in September 1839. It was slightly revised before being included in a collection of his fiction entitled Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque in 1840. It contains within it the poem "The Haunted Palace", which had earlier been published separately in the April 1839 issue of the Baltimore Museum magazine. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 392 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1312 × 2008 pixels, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Fall of the House of Usher, 1894-1895 Author: Aubrey Beardsley (1872 - 1898) Series: Illustrations of short stories by Edgar Allan Poe Faithful reproductions of... Aubrey Beardsley Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (August 21, 1872 – March 16, 1898) was an influential English illustrator, and author, best known for his erotic illustrations. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... September 1839 issue of Burtons Gentlemans Magazine, which included the first publication of The Fall of the House of Usher. Burtons Gentlemens Magazine or, more simply, Burtons Magazine, was a literary publication founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1837. ... See also: 1838 in literature, other events of 1839, 1840 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque is a collection of previously-published short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1840. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Haunted Palace is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ...

Contents

Plot summary

Wikisource has original text related to this article:

The tale opens with the unnamed narrator arriving at the house of his friend, Roderick Usher, having received a letter from him in a distant part of the country complaining of an illness and asking for his comfort. Although Poe wrote this short story before the invention of modern psychological science, Usher's symptoms can be described according to its terminology. They include hyperesthesia (extreme hypersensitivity to light, sounds, smells, and tastes), hypochondria, and acute anxiety. It is revealed that Usher's twin sister, Madeline, is also ill, suffering from catalepsy. The narrator is impressed with Usher's paintings, and attempts to cheer him by reading with him and listening to his improvised musical compositions on the guitar. Usher sings "The Haunted Palace", then tells the narrator that he believes the house he lives in to be sentient, and that this sentience arises from the arrangement of the masonry and vegetation surrounding it. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The Narrator is the entity within a story that tells the story to the reader. ... Hyperesthesia (or Hyperaesthesia) is a condition that involves an abnormal increase in sensitivity to stimuli of the senses. ... For the anatomical term, see hypochondrium. ... Anxiety is a physiological state characterized by cognitive, somatic, emotional, and behavioral components (Seligman, Walker & Rosenhan, 2001). ... Catalepsy is a condition characterized by muscular rigidity, fixity of posture and decreased sensitivity to pain. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... The Haunted Palace is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Not to be confused with sapience. ...

"The Fall of the House of Usher" was first published in the Sept. 1839 issue of Burton's Magazine.
"The Fall of the House of Usher" was first published in the Sept. 1839 issue of Burton's Magazine.

Usher later informs the narrator that his sister has died and insists that she be entombed for two weeks in a vault in the house before being permanently buried. They inter her, but over the next week both Usher and the narrator find themselves becoming increasingly agitated for no apparent reason. A storm begins. Usher comes to the narrator's bedroom, which is situated directly above the vault, and throws open his window to the storm. He notices that the bog surrounding the house seems to glow in the dark, as it glowed in Roderick Usher's paintings, although there is no lightning. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 378 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (562 × 890 pixels, file size: 255 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover of Burtons Gentlemans Magazine, September 1839 - first publication of Edgar Allan Poes The Fall of the House of Usher. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 378 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (562 × 890 pixels, file size: 255 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover of Burtons Gentlemans Magazine, September 1839 - first publication of Edgar Allan Poes The Fall of the House of Usher. ... Sept. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Lütt-Witt Moor, a bog in Henstedt-Ulzburg in northern Germany. ... Luminescence is light not generated by high temperatures alone. ...


The narrator attempts to calm Usher by reading aloud The Mad Trist, a novel involving a knight named Ethelred who breaks into a hermit's dwelling in an attempt to escape an approaching storm, only to find a palace of gold guarded by a dragon. He also finds hanging on the wall a shield of shining brass of which is written a legend: that the one who slays the dragon wins the shield. With a stroke of his mace, Ethelred fells the dragon, who dies with a piercing shriek, and proceeds to take the shield, which falls to the floor with an unnerving clatter. The Mad Trist by Sir Launcelot Canning is a story within a story found in Edgar Allan Poes The Fall of the House of Usher. Canning is a fictitious author--the storys real author is, of course, Poe himself. ... For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermit (disambiguation). ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the defensive device. ... “Brazen” redirects here. ... A development of the club, a mace consists of a strong, heavy wooden, metal-reinforced, or metal shaft, with a head made of stone, copper, bronze, iron or steel. ...


As the narrator reads of the knight's forcible entry into the dwelling, cracking and ripping sounds are heard somewhere in the house. When the dragon is described as shrieking as it dies, a shriek is heard, again within the house. As he relates the shield falling from off the wall, a reverberation, metallic and hollow, can be heard. Usher becomes increasingly hysterical, and eventually exclaims that these sounds are being made by his sister, who was in fact alive when she was entombed. The bedroom door is then blown open to reveal Madeline standing there. She falls violently in death upon her brother, who dies of his own terror. The narrator then flees the house, and, as he does so, notices a flash of light causing him to look back upon the House of Usher, in time to watch it break in two, the fragments sinking into the tarn. This article is about audio effect. ... Triad Lake in Glacier Peak Wilderness View of Tarn Hows, Cumbria A tarn (or corrie loch) is a mountain lake or pool, formed in a corrie excavated by a glacier. ...


Analysis

"The Fall of the House of Usher" is considered the best example of Poe's "totality," where every element and detail is related and relevant.[1] The Absolute is the totality of things; all that is, whether it has been discovered or not. ...


The theme of the crumbling, haunted castle is a key feature of Horace Walpole's Castle of Otranto, a late 18th Century novel which largely contributed in defining the Gothic genre. But Poe's version of Gothic literature is a biased one because it is fundamentally hyperbolic -- horror is here so intense that it verges on the grotesque. Romanticism is represented in the same way, for the character of Usher brings the stereotype of the Romantic poet to its extreme. Usher closely resembles the bedazzled, melancholy genius who is haunted by death and madness. However, he inspires awe as well as repulsion, owing to his corpse-like appearance. He is even, to a certain extent, a comic character. Indeed, he is both a sublime musician and writer as well as a hopeless drug addict. He is seemingly in love with his own sister, whom he irresponsibly buries even though he knows she is cataleptic.[original research?] Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ...


"The Fall of the House of Usher" shows Poe's ability to create an emotional tone in his work, specifically feelings of fear, doom, and guilt.[2] These emotions center on Roderick Usher who, like many Poe characters, suffers from an unnamed disease. Like the narrator in "The Tell-Tale Heart," his disease causes his hyperactive senses. The illness manifests physically but is based in Roderick's mental or even moral state. He is sick, it is suggested, because he expects to be sick based on his family's history of illness and is, therefore, essentially a hypochondriac.[3] Similarly, he buries his sister alive because he expects to bury her alive, creating his own self-fulfilling prophecy. For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... “Guilty” redirects here. ... The Tell-Tale Heart is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe written in 1843. ... Hypochondria (sometimes hypochondriasis) is the unfounded belief that one is suffering from a serious illness. ... A self-fulfilling prophecy is a prediction that directly or indirectly causes itself to become true. ...


The House of Usher, itself doubly referring both to the actual structure and the family, plays a significant role in the story. It is the first "character" that the narrator introduces to the reader, presented with a humanized description: its windows are described as "eye-like" twice in the first paragraph. The fissure that develops in its side is symbolic of the decay of the Usher family and the house "dies" along with the two Usher siblings. This connection was emphasized in Roderick's poem "The Haunted Palace" which seems to be a direct reference to the house that foreshadows doom.[4]


L. Sprague de Camp, in his Lovecraft: A Biography [p.246f], wrote that "[a]ccording to the late [Poe expert] Thomas O. Mabbott, [H. P.] Lovecraft, in 'Supernatural Horror,' solved a problem in the interpretation of Poe" by arguing that "Roderick Usher, his sister Madeline, and the house all shared one common soul". The explicit psychological dimension of this tale has prompted many critics to analyze it as a description of the human psyche, comparing, for instance, the House to the unconscious, and its central crack to the personality split which is called Dissociative identity disorder. Mental disorder is also evoked through the themes of melancholy, possible incest and vampirism. An incestuous relationship between Roderick and Madeline is not explicitly stated, but seems implied by the strange attachment between the two.[5] Lyon Sprague de Camp, (November 27, 1907 – November 6, 2000) was an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Thomas Ollive Mabbott (1898-1968) was born and raised in New York City. ... This article is about the author. ... Supernatural Horror in Literature is a collection of essays written in 1927 and added to between 1933 and 1935 by the famed fantasy and horror author H. P. Lovecraft (1890-1937). ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), as defined by the American Psychiatric Associations Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), is a mental condition whereby a single individual evidences two or more distinct identities or personalities, each with its own pattern of perceiving and interacting with the environment. ... Melancholia (Greek μελαγχολια) was described as a distinct disease as early as the fifth and fourth centuries BC in the Hippocratic writings. ... Incest is defined as sexual intercourse between closely related persons. ... Vampirism is a term used differently in popular culture and in zoology. ...


Major themes

  • The doppelgänger theme, prominent in such works of Poe as "William Wilson", appears as well in "The Fall of the House of Usher". The reflection of the house in the tarn is described in the opening paragraph, and "a striking similitude between the brother and sister" is mentioned when Madeline "dies".
  • Poe uses the theme of the death and resurrection of a woman here as well as in "Ligeia" and "Morella."
  • The theme of mental illness is explored in this work, as it is in numerous other tales such as "Berenice".
  • Interment while alive is also explored in "The Premature Burial" and "The Cask of Amontillado".
  • There are also various Gothic elements, such as the decrepit castle and tarn, whose signs of decay reflect the mental condition of Usher, which is rapidly deteriorating.

For other uses, see Doppelgänger (disambiguation). ... William Wilson is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1839. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation), Dead (disambiguation), or Death (band). ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ligeia is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Morella is a short story by 19th century American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe. ... A mental illness or mental disorder refers to one of many mental health conditions characterized by distress, impaired cognitive functioning, atypical behavior, emotional dysregulation, and/or maladaptive behavior. ... Berenice is a short horror story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the Southern Literary Messenger in 1835. ... Texas funeral redirects here. ... The Premature Burial is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe and published in 1850. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Cask of Amontillado The Cask of Amontillado (sometimes spelled The Casque of Amontillado) is a short story, written by Edgar Allan Poe and first published in the November 1846 issue of Godeys Ladys Book. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole Gothic fiction is an important genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. ...

Allusions and references

  • The opening epigraph quotes "Le Refus" (1831) by the French songwriter Pierre-Jean de Béranger (1780-1857), translated to English as "his heart is a suspended lute, as soon as it is touched, it resounds". Béranger's original text reads "Mon cœur" (my heart) and not "Son cœur" (his/her heart).
  • The narrator describes Usher's musical compositions as reminding him of "the wild air of the last waltz of Von Weber". Poe here refers to a popular piano work of his time -- which, though going by the title "Weber's Last Waltz" was actually composed by Carl Gottlieb Reissiger (1798-1859).[6] A copy of the music by Reissiger was found among Weber's papers upon his death in 1826 and it was mistakenly attributed to Weber.
  • Usher's painting reminds the narrator of the British painter Henry Fuseli (1741-1825).

Pierre-Jean de Béranger (August 19, 1780 - July 16, 1857), was a French songwriter. ... Carl Maria von Weber Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst, Freiherr von Weber (November 18, 1786 in Eutin, Holstein – June 5, 1826 in London, England) was a German composer, conductor, pianist and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romantic school. ... Carl Gottlieb Reißiger (also Karl Reissiger, Carl Reissiger, Karl Reißiger) (January 31, 1798, Belzig – November 7, 1859, Dresden) was a German Kapellmeister and composer. ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fuseli talking to Johann Jakob Bodmer, 1778-1781. ...

Roderick Usher's library

All of the books mentioned in the story are real works except for The Mad Trist. No book like the Vigiliae Mortuorum secundum chorum Ecclesiae Maguntinae exists exactly as Poe described it, though there is a real (and very rare) book by that title, which means "The Office of the Dead as sung by the choir of the Church of Mainz". Aside from these, the books are: For other uses, see Book (disambiguation). ... The Mad Trist by Sir Launcelot Canning is a story within a story found in Edgar Allan Poes The Fall of the House of Usher. Canning is a fictitious author--the storys real author is, of course, Poe himself. ... The Office of the Dead was an office traditionally read before a burial mass in the Roman Catholic Church. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ...

Notes: Jean-Baptiste-Louis Gresset (August 29, 1709 - June 16, 1777), was a French poet and dramatist, best known for his poem Vert-Vert. ... Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli (May 3, 1469 – June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher, musician, poet, and romantic comedic playwright. ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... Heaven and Hell is the common English title of a book written by mystic Emanuel Swedenborg in Latin, published in 1758. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Robert Fludd Robert Fludd, also known as Robertus de Fluctibus (1574, Bearsted, Kent – September 8, 1637, London) was a prominent English Paracelsian physicist, astrologer, and mystic. ... Ludwig Tieck Johann Ludwig Tieck (May 31, 1773 – April 28, 1853) was a German poet, translator, editor, novelist, and critic, who was part of the Romantic movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. ... Tommaso Campanella (September 5, 1568–May 21, 1639), baptized Giovanni Domenico Campanella, was an Italian philosopher, theologian and poet. ... The City of the Sun (Italian: La città del Sole; Latin: Civitas Solis) is a philosophical work by the Italian Dominican philosopher Tommaso Campanella. ... Nicolau Aymerich, b. ... Nicholas Eymerics most prominent and enduring work is the Directorium Inquisitorum, which he had composed as early as 1376. ... Pomponius Mela, who wrote around AD 43, was the earliest Roman geographer. ...

  • Fludd wrote two works which had sections on chiromancy (palmistry). Both are given above. The relevant sections are entitled, respectively, De Scientia Animae Naturalis cum vitali seu astrologia chiromantica and De Signis sine praesagis chiromanticis.
  • Campanella originally wrote City of the Sun in Italian in 1602 as La città del Sole before rewriting it in Latin between 1613 and 1623, and its subsequent publication in Latin as Civitas Solis in Frankfurt in 1623.
  • De la Chambre later published Discours sur les Principes de la Chiromancie as part of L'Art de Connaitre Les Hommes in 1662.

The Fortune Teller, by Caravaggio (1594–95; Canvas; Louvre), depicting a palm reading Chiromancy or cheiromancy, (Greek cheir, “hand”; manteia, “divination”), is the art of characterization and foretelling the future through the study of the palm, also known as palmistry, palm-reading, chirology or hand analysis. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...   (German: , English: American English: ) is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany, with a mid-2007 population of 663,567. ...

Literary significance and criticism

"The Fall of the House of Usher" is considered Poe's most famous work.[7] This highly unsettling macabre work is considered as the masterpiece of Anglo-Saxon Gothic literature. Indeed, as in many of his tales, Poe borrows much from the Gothic tradition. Still, as G. R. Thomson writes in his Introduction to Great Short Works of Edgar Allan Poe[p 36], "the tale has long been hailed as a masterpiece of Gothic horror; it is also a masterpiece of dramatic irony and structural symbolism." Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole Gothic fiction is an important genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. ...


In fact, "The Fall of the House of Usher" has been criticized for being too formulaic. Poe was criticized for following his own patterns established in works like "Morella" and "Ligeia" using stock characters in stock scenes and stock situations. Repetitive themes like an unidentifiable disease, madness, and resurrection are also criticized.[8] Morella is a short story by 19th century American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe. ... Ligeia is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ...


Film, TV or theatrical adaptations

In the low-budget Roger Corman film from 1960, known in the United States as House of Usher, the narrator falls in love with the sickly Madeline, much to Roderick's horror. As Roderick reveals, the Usher family has a history of evil and cruelty so great that he and Madeline pledged in their youth never to have children and to allow their family to die with them. When Madeline falls into a deathlike slumber, her brother rushes to have her placed in the family crypt. When she wakes up, Madeline goes insane from being buried alive and breaks free through insanity-induced strength. She confronts her brother only to fall dead at his feet. Suddenly the house begins to collapse and the narrator flees as Roderick is killed by the falling house. The film was Corman's first in a series of eight films inspired by the works of Edgar Allan Poe. Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ...


Czech surrealist animator Jan Švankmajer made a movie based on this story. Max Ernst. ... An animator is an artist who creates multiple images called frames that form an illusion of movement called animation when rapidly displayed. ... Dimensions of Dialogue, 1982 Jan Å vankmajer (born 4 September 1934 in Prague) is a Czech surrealist artist. ... This article is about motion pictures. ...


List of films

La Chute de la maison Usher (English title: The Fall in the House of Usher) is a horror film directed by Jean Epstein. ... Jean Epstein, born 25 March 1897, died 3 April 1953, Paris, France, was a film director and early film theoretician. ... The Fall of the House of Usher is a 1928 horror film based upon the work of the same title by Edgar Allan Poe. ... James Sibley Watson, Jr. ... House of Usher (also known as Fall of the House of Usher) is a 1960 horror movie based on the Edgar Allan Poe story of the same name. ... Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... Categories: People stubs | Animators | 1934 births ... Mathieu Carrière The Art of Protest Mathieu Carrière (born August 2, 1950 in Hannover, Germany) is an actor. ... Martin Landau (born June 20, 1931) is an Academy Award-winning American film and television actor. ... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ... Jesus (or Jess) Franco (born May 12, 1930 as Jesús Franco Manera) is a Spanish film director, writer, cinematographer and actor. ... Howard Vernon Howard Vernon (15 July 1914 - 25 July 1996) was a Swiss actor. ... Robert Oliver Reed (February 13, 1938 – May 2, 1999) was an English actor known for his macho image on and off screen. ... This article needs to be wikified. ...

Music

The Alan Parsons Project's first release (1976's Tales of Mystery and Imagination) features a long instrumental named after this story. The track has five parts: "Prelude", "Arrival", "Intermezzo", "Pavane", and "Fall" and its style showcases 20th century classical music and progressive rock. This article is about the collective named The Alan Parsons Project. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tales of Mystery and Imagination is a progressive rock album by The Alan Parsons Project, released in 1976 (see 1976 in music). ... 20th century classical music, the classical music of the 20th century, was extremely diverse, beginning with the late Romantic style of Sergei Rachmaninoff, Impressionism of Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, and continuing through the Neoclassicism of middle-period Igor Stravinsky, and ranging to such distant sound-worlds as the complete... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ...


Peter Hammill composed and recorded an opera based on the story in 1991. In this work, the house itself becomes a vocal part, to be sung by the same performer who sings the role of Roderick Usher. The libretto by Chris Judge Smith incorporates material from other writings by Poe, and also adopts the subplot of a romantic attraction between Madeline Usher and the narrator, who is given the name Montresor. Peter Joseph Andrew Hammill (born 5 November 1948) is an English singer-songwriter, and a founding member of progressive rock band Van der Graaf Generator. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Antonio Ghislanzoni, nineteenth century Italian librettist. ... Christopher John Judge Smith (born 1948 in England), is a songwriter, composer and performer, and a founder member of progressive rock band Van der Graaf Generator. ...


Another operatic version was composed by Philip Glass, with a libretto by Arthur Yorinks. Claude Debussy wrote about 30 minutes of The Fall of the House of Usher, an unfinished opera that was to be a companion piece to another short opera based on Poe's The Devil in the Belfry. Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ... Arthur Yorinks is a writer/librettist for theater and opera as well as the author of over two dozen books for children, including the Caldecott Medal winner, Hey, Al. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... The Devil in the Belfry is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ...


Other adaptations

Pulp writer and filmmaker Edward D. Wood published a short story titled The Fall of the Balcony of Usher. For the Canadian philanthropist, see Edward Rogers Wood. ...


The actor and director Steven Berkoff wrote a play based on the story. Steven Berkoff (born August 3, 1937) is an English actor, writer and director. ...


Allusions in other works

  • Brian Stableford's 1988 science fiction story, The Growth of the House of Usher expands on Poe's idea of the house being sentient. It features a dying architect who invites a friend to his house, which is entirely a product of biotechnology with Poe-related features (for instance, its basement produces cloned "Madelines" whose life-cycle is to climb to higher levels of the house then die).
  • In "Lisa the Simpson," a ninth season episode of The Simpsons, the Simpsons watch a fictitious TV special entitled "When Buildings Collapse." One of the buildings to fall is called The House of Usher.
  • The punk/post-hardcore band Finch released a song from their second full length CD, Say Hello to Sunshine, called "The Casket of Roderick Usher".
  • The premise of horror computer game Clive Barker's Undying is distinctly comparable to Poe's story, and also developing in the sister of the protagonist character's ill friend having perished under a wasting disease, and (as well as his other dead siblings), returning to life from the grave.
  • Geggy Tah has a song entitled "House Of Usher" on their second CD which makes reference to Madeline's being buried alive.
  • In Jasper Fforde's novel The Fourth Bear, the maiden name of the main character Jack Spratt's wife Madeleine is revealed to be Usher. This revelation occurs in a chapter in which she wonders whether she might be a fictional character.
  • In the 1962 World War II adventure film The War Lover starring Steve McQueen, a bomber plane is named "The House of Usher." Later in the film, the plane returns to base, severely damaged, and crash lands, the crew member killed. This film was released two years after the 1960 release of "The House of Usher" starring Vincent Price.

Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451, is widely considered... The Martian Chronicles is a 1950 science fiction novel by Ray Bradbury that chronicles the colonization of Mars by humans fleeing from a troubled Earth, and the conflict between aboriginal Martians and the new colonists. ... Brian Stableford (born July 25, 1948) is a British science fiction writer who has published more than 50 novels. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Molecular cloning refers to the procedure of isolating a defined DNA sequence and obtaining multiple copies of it in vivo. ... Lisa the Simpson is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons ninth season. ... The Simpsons Season 9 DVD Digipak. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Dorothy Gladys Dodie Smith (May 3, 1896 - November 24, 1990) was an English novelist and playwright. ... I Capture the Castle was the first novel written by Dodie Smith, published in 1948. ... Finch is an American rock band from Temecula, California. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... Say Hello to Sunshine is the second album by Finch, released on June 7, 2005. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Lindisfarne were a popular British folk/rock group of the 1970s, fronted by singer/songwriter Alan Hull. ... Alans first Album: Pipedream James Alan Hull (February 20, 1945 — November 17, 1995) was a British singer-songwriter and founding member of the Tyneside folk-rock band Lindisfarne. ... Lady Eleanor is a song written by Alan Hull, featured on the first Lindisfarne album, Nicely out of Tune. ... Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... For information on interactive gaming in general, see video game. ... Clive Barkers Undying is a horror-themed first-person shooter computer game based on the Unreal Tournament game engine. ... Geggy Tah is a band initally comprised of Greg Kurstin and Tommy Jordan. ... Jasper Fforde (born in London on 11 January 1961) is a novelist and aviator living in Wales. ... The Fourth Bear is a mystery/fantasy novel by Jasper Fforde published in July 2006. ... Jack Spratt is the protagonist in a series of novels by Jasper Fforde. ... The War Lover is a 1962 film based on the John Hersey book and stars Steve McQueen, Robert Wagner and Shirley Anne Field. ... Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an Academy Award-nominated American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool.[1] He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ...

References

  1. ^ Beebe, Maurice. "The Universe of Roderick Usher" as collected in Poe: A Collection of Critical Essays, Robert Regan, ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc., 1967. p. 123
  2. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. New York City: Cooper Square Press, 1992. ISBN 0815410287 p. 111
  3. ^ Butler, David. "Usher's Hypochondriasis: Mental Alienation and Romantic Idealism in Poe's Gothic Tales" as collected in On Poe: The Best from "American Literature". Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1993. ISBN 0822313111 p. 189-90
  4. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. New York City: Cooper Square Press, 1992. ISBN 0815410287 p. 111
  5. ^ Hoffman, Daniel. Poe Poe Poe Poe Poe Poe Poe. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1972. ISBN 0807123218 p. 297
  6. ^ http://www.eapoe.org/geninfo/poemisc.htm
  7. ^ Kennedy, J. Gerald. "Introduction: Poe in Our Time" collected in A Historical Guide to Edgar Allan Poe. Oxford University Press, 2001. ISBN 0195121503 p. 9
  8. ^ Krutch, Joseph Wood. Edgar Allan Poe: A Study in Genius. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1926. p. 77

External links

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
 view  talk  edit Works of Edgar Allan Poe
Poems

Poetry (1824) • O, Tempora! O, Mores! (1825) • Song (1827) • Imitation (1827) • Spirits of the Dead (1827) • A Dream (1827) • Stanzas (1827) (1827) • Tamerlane (1827) • The Lake (1827) • Evening Star (1827) • A Dream (1827) • To Margaret (1827) • The Happiest Day (1827) • To The River —— (1828) • Romance (1829) • Fairy-Land (1829) • To Science (1829) • To Isaac Lea (1829) • Al Aaraaf (1829) • An Acrostic (1829) • Elizabeth (1829) • To Helen (1831) • A Paean (1831) • The Sleeper (1831) • The City in the Sea (1831) • The Valley of Unrest (1831) • Israfel (1831) • The Coliseum (1833) • Enigma (1833) • Fanny (1833) • Serenade (1833) • Song of Triumph from Epimanes (1833) • Latin Hymn (1833) • To One in Paradise (1833) • Hymn (1835) • Politician (1835) • May Queen Ode (1836) • Spiritual Song (1836) • Bridal Ballad (1837) • To Zante (1837) • The Haunted Palace (1839) • Silence, a Sonnet (1839) • Lines on Joe Locke (1843) • The Conqueror Worm (1843) • Lenore (1843) • Eulalie (1843) • A Campaign Song (1844) • Dream-Land (1844) • Impromptu. To Kate Carol (1845) • To Frances (1845) • The Divine Right of Kings (1845) • Epigram for Wall Street (1845) • The Raven (1845) • A Valentine (1846) • Beloved Physician (1847) • An Enigma (1847) • Deep in Earth (1847) • Ulalume (1847) • Lines on Ale (1848) • To Marie Louise (1848) • Evangeline (1848) • A Dream Within A Dream (1849) • Eldorado (1849) • For Annie (1849) • The Bells (1849) • Annabel Lee (1849) • Alone (1875) Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The works of American author Edgar Allan Poe include many poems, short stories, and one novel. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Tamerlane is a long poem by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the 1827 collection Tamerlane and Other Poems. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... To Science, or Sonnet - To Science is an 1829 poem written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Al Aaraaf was written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1829. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: To Helen (Poe, 1831) To Helen is the first of two poems to carry that name written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Lenore is a poem by the American author, Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The City in the Sea is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe that was published in 1845, but dates back to an earlier 1831 version originally titled The Doomed City. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Bridal Ballad Bridal Ballad is a poem written by American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The Haunted Palace is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The Conqueror Worm is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe about human mortality and the inevitability of death. ... Lenore is a poem by the American author, Edgar Allan Poe. ... Eulalie, or Eulalie - A Song, is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the July 1845 issue of the American Review and reprinted shortly thereafter in the August 9, 1845 issue of the Broadway Journal. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wikisource. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... For other uses, see The Raven (disambiguation). ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The Beloved Physician is a poem, written by renowned American writer Edgar Allen Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Ulalume is a poem written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1847. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... A Dream Within A Dream is a poem written by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1849. ... Gaily bedight, A gallant knight, In sunshine and in shadow, Had journeyed long, Singing a song, In search of Eldorado. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Bells The Bells is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... {NPOV} Annabel Lee is the last complete poem[1] composed by American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... Alone is a 22-line poem by Edgar Allan Poe, originally written in 1829 and left untitled. ...

Tales
Metzengerstein (1832) • The Duc De L'Omelette (1832) • A Tale of Jerusalem (1832) • Loss of Breath (1832) • Bon-Bon (1832) • MS. Found in a Bottle (1833) • The Assignation (1834) • Berenice (1835) • Morella (1835) • Lionizing (1835) • The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall (1835) • King Pest (1835) • Shadow - A Parable (1835) • Four Beasts in One - The Homo-Cameleopard (1836) • Mystification (1837) • Silence - A Fable (1837) • Ligeia (1838) • How to Write a Blackwood Article (1838) • A Predicament (1838) • The Devil in the Belfry (1839) • The Man That Was Used Up (1839) • The Fall of the House of Usher (1839) • William Wilson (1839) • The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion (1839) • Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling (1840) • The Business Man (1840) • The Man of the Crowd (1840) • The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841) • A Descent into the Maelström (1841) • The Island of the Fay (1841) • The Colloquy of Monos and Una (1841) • Never Bet the Devil Your Head (1841) • Eleonora (1841) • Three Sundays in a Week (1841) • The Oval Portrait (1842) • The Masque of the Red Death (1842) • The Landscape Garden (1842) • The Mystery of Marie Roget (1842) • The Pit and the Pendulum (1842) • The Tell-Tale Heart (1843) • The Gold-Bug (1843) • The Black Cat (1843) • Diddling (1843) • The Spectacles (1844) • A Tale of the Ragged Mountains (1844) • The Premature Burial (1844) • Mesmeric Revelation (1844) • The Oblong Box (1844) • The Angel of the Odd (1844) • Thou Art the Man (1844) • The Literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq. (1844) • The Purloined Letter (1844) • The Thousand-and-Second Tale of Scheherazade (1845) • Some Words with a Mummy (1845) • The Power of Words (1845) • The Imp of the Perverse (1845) • The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether (1845) • The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar (1845) • The Sphinx (1846) • The Cask of Amontillado (1846) • The Domain of Arnheim (1847) • Mellonta Tauta (1849) • Hop-Frog (1849) • Von Kempelen and His Discovery (1849) • X-ing a Paragrab (1849) • Landor's Cottage (1849)
Other works
Essays: Maelzel's Chess Player (1836) • The Daguerreotype (1840) • The Philosophy of Furniture (1840) • A Few Words on Secret Writing (1841) • The Rationale of Verse (1843) • Morning on the Wissahiccon (1844) • Old English Poetry (1845) • The Philosophy of Composition (1846) • The Poetic Principle (1846) • Eureka (1848) Hoaxes:The Balloon-Hoax (1844) Novels: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1837) • The Journal of Julius Rodman (1840) Plays: Scenes From 'Politian' (1835) Other: The Conchologist's First Book (1839) • The Light-House (1849)

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