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Encyclopedia > The Evergreen State College
The Evergreen State College

Motto: Omnia Extares (Let it all hang out)
Established: 1967
Type: Public Baccalaureate
President: Thomas L. Purce
Faculty: 232
Staff: 502
Students: 4,416
Undergraduates: 4,171
Postgraduates: 292
Location: Olympia, Washington, USA
Campus: Suburban on 1,000 acres (4 km²)
Gender balance: 53% women, 47% men
Colors: Green and White
Mascot: Geoduck
Website: www.evergreen.edu
The Evergreen signature clock tower
The Evergreen signature clock tower

The Evergreen State College, or TESC, is an accredited public liberal arts college and is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges that is located in Olympia, Washington. Founded in 1967, Evergreen was formed to be an experimental and non-traditional college. Faculty issue narrative evaluations of students' work rather than grades, and Evergreen organizes most studies into largely interdisciplinary classes that generally constitute a full-time course load. The current TESC President is Thomas L. (Les) Purce and its Board Chair is Christopher Hedrick. Image File history File links Wrdmrk_EVERGREEN.gif The Evergreen State College wordmark File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Thurston Incorporated January 28, 1859 Government  - Mayor Mark Foutch Area  - Total 18. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Binomial name Conrad, 1849 The geoduck (pronounced gooey duck[1]), Panopea abrupta, is a species of large saltwater clam, a marine bivalve mollusk. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1152x864, 400 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Evergreen State College User:Goldom/gallery ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1152x864, 400 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Evergreen State College User:Goldom/gallery ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... The Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC) is a consortium of state-supported liberal arts colleges. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Thurston Incorporated January 28, 1859 Government  - Mayor Mark Foutch Area  - Total 18. ... In education, narrative evaluation is a form of performance measurement and feedback which can be used as an alternative or supplement to grading. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In late 2006, Evergreen's level of academic challenge among freshman and seniors was marked in the top ten percent of all baccalaureate colleges in the nation by the National Survey of Student Engagement, a study by Indiana University and the Pew Charitable Trusts.[1] Author and former New York Times education editor Loren Pope cites Evergreen as one of two public colleges in the United States in his book Colleges That Change Lives. The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) (pronounced: nessie) is a survey instrument used to gauge the level of student participation at universities and colleges in Canada and the United States as it relates to learning. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... It has been suggested that Pew Research Center be merged into this article or section. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Loren Pope is a nationally renown college advisor with several national publicatons on colleges and universities in the United States. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ...


TESC offers a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Bachelor of Science, Master of Environmental Studies, Master of Public Administration, and Master in Teaching. As of 2005 there were approximately 4,500 students taught by approximately 225 faculty members. The Evergreen State College has a large influence on the culture and economy of the growing city of Olympia. A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ... Environmental studies is the systematic study of human interaction with their environment. ... The Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree is one of several master level professional public affairs degrees that provides training in public policy and project/program implementation (more recently known as public management). ...

Contents

Identity and athletics

Evergreen's motto is Omnia Extares, which is a latinization of "let it all hang out" as well as an allusion to the school mascot, the geoduck. School colors are green and white. The Geoduck Fight Song is the college's official fight song. It was written in 1971 by Malcolm Stilson, a staff librarian at the college from 1970 into the 1980's. He was well known at the college for writing satirical musicals about Evergreen and Olympia (such as "Das Kapital Mall") which were performed by faculty and staff members. In proper performances of the fight song, arm motions accompany the third and fourth lines of each verse. The lyrics are as follows: Binomial name Conrad, 1849 The geoduck (pronounced gooey duck[1]), Panopea abrupta, is a species of large saltwater clam, a marine bivalve mollusk. ... For the single by Marilyn Manson, see The Fight Song. ...

Go, Geoducks, go!
Through the mud and the sand let's go!
Siphon high, squirt it out, swivel all about.
Let it all hang out!
Go, Geoducks, go!
Stretch your necks when the tide is low!
Siphon high, squirt it out, swivel all about.
Let it all hang out!

Lyrics to the college's alma mater are as follows:

Omnia Extares, Omnia Extares
Alma Mater, Evergreen
Omnia Extares

The basketball and soccer programs are noted for recent national rankings in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ...


History

The Evergreen State College, c. 1978

In 1964, a report was issued by the Council of Presidents of Washington State baccalaureate institutions stating that another college was needed in the state to balance the geographical distribution of the existing state institutions. This report spurred the 1965 Washington legislature to create the Temporary Advisory Council on Public Higher Education to study the need and possible location for a new state college. Image File history File links Evergreenaerial. ... Image File history File links Evergreenaerial. ...


In 1965-66, the Temporary Advisory Council on Public Higher Education (assisted by Nelson Associates of New York) concluded "at the earliest possible time a new college should be authorized," to be located at a suburban site in Thurston County within a radius of approximately 10 miles (16 km) from Olympia.


Evergreen's enabling legislation - HB 596 (Chapter 47, Laws of 1967) - stated that the campus should be no smaller than 600 acres (2.4 km²), making it then the largest campus in the state as well as the first public four-year college created in Washington in the 20th century.


On January 24, 1968, The Evergreen State College was selected from 31 choices as the name of the new institution. On November 1, 1968, Charles J. McCann assumed the first presidency of the college. McCann and the founding faculty held the first day of classes October 4, 1971 with 1178 students. McCann served from 1968 until his retirement June 6, 1977 when former Governor Daniel J. Evans, who signed the legislation creating Evergreen, assumed the presidency. Evans left the president's office abruptly in 1983 when he was appointed to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy created by the death of Senator Henry M. Jackson. The largest building on campus is named in honor of Evans, the Daniel J. Evans Library Building. The entrance to the campus bears McCann's name, the Charles J. McCann plaza. In 2004, the college completed the 170,000-square-foot (16,000 m²) Seminar II building, and significant work is now underway at the Daniel J. Evans Library. The current president is Thomas L. Purce. is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles J. McCann was the first president of The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Daniel Jackson Evans Daniel Jackson Evans (born November 11, 1925) served three terms as governor of the state of Washington from 1965 to 1977, and represented the state in the United States Senate from 1983 to 1989. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Henry Martin Scoop Jackson (May 31, 1912 – September 1, 1983) was a U.S. Congressman and Senator for Washington State from 1941 until his death. ...


On Valentine's Day 2008[1], a riot occured on campus following a hip-hop concert. Rioters overturned a Thurston County Sheriff's patrol vehicle and damaged several other police vehicles after a campus police officer attempted to arrest a subject for assault inside the concert arena on campus. Thurston County Sheriff, Olympia and Tumwater Police and the Washington State Patrol responded to provide mutual aid to the campus police department. Several students and non-students were arrested in connection with the riot and an investigation continues to identify additional suspects. Damages totaled $50,000. The college reimbursed the county sheriff's office for the damages sustained to their patrol vehicle. Teamsters, armed with pipes, riot in a clash with riot police in the Minneapolis Teamsters Strike of 1934. ... Olympia (Greek: Ολυμπία Olympía or Ολύμπια Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ...


Notable alumni and students

Lynda Barry (born January 2, 1956) is an American cartoonist and author. ... Craig Bartlett (b. ... Josh Blue (born November 27, 1978) is an American comedian who was voted the Last Comic Standing on NBCs reality show Last Comic Standing during its fourth season, which aired May–August, 2006. ... Last Comic Standing is an American reality television talent show that premiered in 2003. ... Carrie Brownstein (born September 27, 1974), is an American musician and actress. ... Sleater-Kinney are an indie rock trio from Olympia, Washington influenced by the riot grrrl movement of the 1990s. ... Charles Burns (born September 27, 1955 in Washington, D.C.) is an award-winning U.S. cartoonist and illustrator. ... Rachel Corrie Rachel Corrie (April 10, 1979 – March 16, 2003) was an American member of the International Solidarity Movement (ISM) who traveled to the Gaza Strip during the Al-Aqsa Intifada. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Heather Duby is a female American singer/songwriter (born July 26, 1974). ... Timo Ellis is a rock drummer from New York City, currently in the band Morningwood. ... Phil Elverum was the sole permanent member of the Olympia, Washington-based indie rock band The Microphones. ... Steve Fisk is a Washington-based audio engineer, record producer and musician. ... John Bellamy Foster is an editor of the Monthly Review, a prominent socialist magazine. ... Monthly Review is a socialist magazine published in New York City. ... The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) is an organization known as a collecting society that protects intellectual property, ensuring that music which is broadcast, commercially recorded, or otherwise used for profit, pays a fee to compensate the creators of that music. ... Elizabeth Furse (born October 13, 1936), U.S. Democratic Party politician, She served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1993 to 1999, representing the 1st District of Oregon. ... Tim Girvin is a highly-skilled calligrapher and illustrator. ... Joey Gjertsen (born June 13, 1982 in Tacoma, Washington) is an American soccer player, who plays for the Vancouver Whitecaps of the USL First Division. ... The Montreal Impact (French: Impact de Montréal) are a Canadian soccer team in the North American USL First Division. ... The United Soccer Leagues First Division (often referred to as simply, USL-1) is a professional mens soccer league in North America. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Life in Hell is a weekly comic strip by Matt Groening. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Futurama is an animated United States cartoon series (March 28, 1999-2003) created by Matt Groening (who also created The Simpsons). ... The A.V. Club is an entertainment newspaper and website published by The Onion. ... Kathleen Hanna (b. ... Bikini Kill was a punk band of the Riot Grrrl movement formed in Olympia, Washington in October of 1990. ... Le Tigre (album) Le Tigre (shirt) Le Tigre is a feminist electro post-punk band formed in 1998 by Kathleen Hanna. ... Thorn Kief Hillsbery is an American novelist. ... Benjamin Hoff (born 1946) is the author of several books on Taoism, including his bestselling The Tao of Pooh and The Te of Piglet. ... Cover of The Tao of Pooh The Tao of Pooh is a book by Benjamin Hoff (Dutton Books: 1982, ISBN 0-525-24458-1). ... Steve House is a professional climber and mountain guide. ... For other people with this name, see Calvin Johnson. ... K Records is an independent record label in Olympia, Washington, co-founded, owned, and operated by Calvin Johnson, formerly of the bands Cool Rays, Beat Happening, The Go Team, The Halo Benders and, at present, in the band Dub Narcotic Sound System. ... Keely at a concert in 2005 Conrad Keely is the lead singer for the rock band . ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Jason Reece at a concert in 2005 …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead is an indie rock band best known for their heavy yet anthemic music and their tendency to destroy their equipment at the end of their performances (a rock and roll tradition usually associated... Megan Kelso (born 1968, in Seattle, Washington) is an American comic book artist and writer. ... The World Beard and Moustache Championships is a biennial competition in which men with beards and moustaches display lengthy, highly-styled facial hair. ... Soka University of America (SUA) is a private university located in Aliso Viejo, California. ... Klyne Audio Arts, Ltd. ... Klyne Audio Arts, Ltd. ... Medical marijuana refers to the use of marijuana, a form of cannabis as a therapy or prescription drug, most notably as an anti-emetic. ... Nomy Lamm is an accordion-wielding singer/songwriter/activist, and a self-described “Fat-ass bad-ass jew dyke amputee. ... This article refers to the American television show by this title. ... George Timothy Clooney (born May 6, 1961) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter, who gained fame as one of the lead doctors in the long-running television drama, ER (1994–99), as Anthony Edwardss characters best friend and partner... Saab Lofton at a Rally Saab Lofton is an author and radio personality. ... Lois Maffeo (professionally known as Lois) is an American musician and writer who lives in Olympia, Washington. ... Robert Waterman McChesney is a media critic, academic, and activist. ... Monthly Review is a socialist magazine published in New York City. ... Mickel in court. ... Judith Moore (born 1940 - died May 15, 2006) is an American author and essayist best known for her 2005 book Moore was born in Oklahoma in 1940 and became an obese child, weighing 112 pounds by second grade. ... Inga Muscio is a third wave feminist writer and public speaker. ... Jared Pappas-Kelley (born 15 February 1974) is the co-creator and publisher of Toby Room magazine. ... Bruce Pavitt is an American, best known for founding the record label Sub Pop. ... Sub Pop is a record label in Seattle, Washington famous for first signing Nirvana, Soundgarden, and other grunge bands. ... Russell Potter is an American writer and college professor who has written extensively on a variety of subjects, among them postmodern theory, Hip hop culture, popular music, and the history of British exploration of the Arctic in the nineteenth century. ... There have been a number of people named David Price: Sir David Price (British politician) was a British Conservative Member of Parliament in the 1970s and 1980s David Price (Canadian politician) was a Member of Parliament from Quebec David Price (American politician) is a Democratic Congressman representing the 4th district... Don Krasher Price (23 January 1910-9 July 1995) was an American political scientist. ... Judge Christine Quinn-Brintnall took office in November 2000 after being elected to the Washington State Court of Appeals, Division II, which covers Pierce County and 12 other counties. ... Heather Rae (born October 1, 1966 in Venice, California) is an American film producer, director and actress. ... For other persons named Michael Richards, see Michael Richards (disambiguation). ... Cosmo Kramer is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Michael Richards. ... Seinfeld is an Emmy Award-winning American sitcom that originally aired on NBC from July 5, 1989 to May 14, 1998, running a total of 9 seasons. ... Don Roff (born December 13, 1966, in Walla Walla, Washington) is a writer and filmmaker. ... Ken Silverstein is a freelance investigative writer based in Washington. ... D. C. Simpson is the creator of the webcomic Ozy and Millie and the political cartoon I Drew This. ... Steve Thomas is the former host of This Old House on PBS. Thomas hosted the show from 1989 until 2003 (seasons 9-24). ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... 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Big Fantastic, LLC is a production company located in Santa Monica, California which develops online video entertainment. ... John Wozniak (born in Saint Paul, Minnesota on January 19, 1971) is an American musician. ... For the album, see Marcy Playground (album) Marcy Playground is an American alternative rock or post-grunge band. ... Mirah Yom Tov Zeitlyn (Born September 17, 1974, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), is an American musician. ... Adam Nyerere Bahner (born July 6, 1982), better known by the stage name Tay Zonday,[1] is a Youtube Award winning, Peoples Choice Award nominated, Webby Award nominated aspiring American singer, songwriter and keyboardist. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ...

Notable student groups

The Seminar II building, completed in 2004
The Seminar II building, completed in 2004

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1152x864, 354 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Evergreen State College User:Goldom/gallery ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1152x864, 354 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Evergreen State College User:Goldom/gallery ... Capoeira or the Dance of War drawn by Johann Moritz Rugendas (1793—1838) Capoeira Angola is the traditional style of Bahian Capoeira. ... KAOS 89. ... Community radio is a type of radio service that caters to the interests of a certain area, broadcasting material that is popular to a local audience but is overlooked by more powerful broadcast groups. ... The initialism SDS can abbreviate: Safety Data Sheet Samsung SDS: SI Company of Republic of Korea Satellite Data System Scientific Data Systems, a mainframe computer vendor from the 1960s Secondary database server Speech dialog system (RNS-E) Secure DTD2000 System Serb Democratic Party Shwachman-Diamond syndrome Slovenian Democratic Party Social...

Notable faculty

Stephanie Coontz is a feminist sociologist, author, and faculty member at The Evergreen State College. ... Willi Unsoeld (October 25, 1926 - March 4, 1979) was an American climber who, along with Tom Hornbein, led the first American expedition to summit Mount Everest on May 22, 1963. ... Michael Vavrus, PhD., is a faculty member at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington in the areas of teacher education and political economy. ...

See also

The Washington State Institute for Public Policy, a creation of the Washington state legislature, researches public policy issues of interest to the legislature and state agencies, in association with The Evergreen State College. ... The local history of Olympia, Washington includes long-term habitation by Native Americans, chartering by a famous British explorer, settlement of the town in the 1840s, the controversial siting of a state college in the 1960s and the ongoing development of arts and culture from a variety of influences. ...

References

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

External links

See Washington state entry. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Central Washington University, or CWU, is an accredited four-year educational institution located in Ellensburg, Washington in the United States. ... Eastern Washington University is a public comprehensive state university. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... Washington State University (WSU) is a major public research university in Pullman, Washington. ... Western Washington University (WWU or Western) is one of six state-funded, four-year universities of higher education in the U.S. state of Washington. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
EPA-Green Power Partners (0 words)
The Evergreen State College’s commitment to sustainability and green power is clear with the college’s exceptional commitment to 100 percent green power usage on campus.
Evergreen students voted overwhelmingly in December of 2004 to go green – enacting a student fee of one dollar per credit to purchase green power from renewable sources in the northwest region through the utility’s Green Power program, putting theory into practice.
The student proposal was approved by Evergreen’s Board of Trustees as a part of the college’s biennial budget in June, 2005.
Colleges That Change Lives - The Evergreen State College (256 words)
A public liberal arts college founded in 1969.
Kaplan/Newsweek ranked Evergreen as one of the "12 Hottest Schools" for 2004.
Evergreen's seniors and first-year students scored in the 90th percentile for the Active and Collaborative Learning benchmark compared to all Baccalaureate-Liberal Arts Colleges in the National Survey of Student Engagement.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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