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Encyclopedia > The Ed Sullivan Show
Toast of the Town
The Ed Sullivan Show

Ed Sullivan
Genre Variety
Starring Ed Sullivan
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
No. of seasons 24
No. of episodes 1087
Production
Location CBS Studio 50
Ed Sullivan Theater
Running time 60 Minutes
Broadcast
Original channel CBS
Original run June 20, 1948
June 6, 1971
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. It ran on CBS every Sunday night at 8pm, and is one of the few shows to have been run in the same time slot, weekly on the same day of the week, and on the same network, for more than two decades. Virtually every type of entertainment appeared on the show; opera singers, rock stars, songwriters, comedians, ballet dancers, and circus acts were regularly featured. The format was essentially the same as vaudeville, and although vaudeville had died a generation earlier, Sullivan presented many ex-vaudevillians on his show. Fair use of a grayscaled (original) image from: www. ... A variety show is a show with a variety of acts, often including music and comedy skits, especially on television. ... Ed Sullivan Edward Vincent Sullivan (September 28, 1901 – October 13, 1974) was an American entertainment writer and television host, best known as the emcee of a popular TV variety show called The Ed Sullivan Show that was at its height of popularity in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Ed Sullivan. ... CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... A variety show is a show with a variety of acts, often including music and comedy skits, especially on television. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Ed Sullivan Edward Vincent Sullivan (September 28, 1901 – October 13, 1974) was an American entertainment writer and television host, best known as the emcee of a popular TV variety show called The Ed Sullivan Show that was at its height of popularity in the 1950s and 1960s. ... CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The show was originally titled Toast of the Town, but was widely referred to as The Ed Sullivan Show for years before September 25, 1955, when that became its official name. In its debut, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis performed along with Broadway composers Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II previewing the score to South Pacific. is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an Italian American singer, film actor, and comedian. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... For other other uses, see South Pacific South Pacific is a musical play, with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II and book by both Hammerstein and Joshua Logan. ...


The show was broadcast live from CBS-TV Studio 50 in New York City, which is now named The Ed Sullivan Theater and is the home of The Late Show with David Letterman.The last Ed Sullivan Show was episode# 1071, aired on March 28, 1971. It featured the following musical acts: Melanie, Joanna Simon, Danny Davis and the Nashville Brass and Sandler and Young. Live television refers to television broadcasts of events or performances on a delay of between zero and fifteen seconds, rather than from video recordings or film. ... Ed Sullivan. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Ed Sullivan. ... Late Show with David Letterman is an hour-long weeknight comedy and talk show broadcast by CBS from the Ed Sullivan Theater on Broadway in New York City. ... Popular singing team from the sixties, seventies and eighties with Tony Sandler and Ralph Young The team of Tony Sandler & Ralph Young appeared with Polly Bergen in her show at the Las Vegas Thunderbird Hotel & Casino, doing eleven minutes between her costume changes. ...

Contents

Background

Along with the new talent Sullivan booked each week, he also had recurring characters appear many times a season, such as his "Little Italian Mouse" puppet sidekick Topo Gigio, who debuted April 14, 1963, and ventriloquist Señor Wences. While most of the episodes aired live from New York City, the show also aired live on occasion from other nations, such as the United Kingdom, Australia, and Japan. For many years, Ed Sullivan was a national event each Sunday evening, and was the first exposure for foreign performers to the American public. Gigio with Cino Tortorella during Zecchino dOro festival Topo Gigio, aka Prof. ... Ventriloquism is an act of deception in which a person (ventriloquist) manipulates his or her voice so that it appears that the voice is coming from elsewhere. ... Señor Wences (April 17, 1896 – April 20, 1999) was a prominent 20th century ventriloquist whose popularity grew with his frequent appearances on CBSs Ed Sullivan Show. ...


On the occasion of the show's ten-year anniversary telecast, Sullivan commented on how the show had changed during a June 1958 interview syndicated by the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA): United Media is large editorial column and comic strip newspaper syndication service based in the United States, owned by The E.W. Scripps Company. ...

The chief difference is mostly one of pace. In those days, we had maybe six acts. Now we have 11 or 12. Then, each of our acts would do a leisurely ten minutes or so. Now they do two or three minutes. And in those early days I talked too much. Watching these kines I cringe. I look up at me talking away and I say "You fool! Keep quiet!" But I just keep on talking. I've learned how to keep my mouth shut.

The program did not shy away from airing performances from black entertainers. Sullivan also commented on this during his NEA interview: Kinescope (IPA: [], []) originally referred to the cathode ray tube used in television monitors. ... United Media is large editorial column and comic strip newspaper syndication service based in the United States, owned by The E.W. Scripps Company. ...

The most important thing [during the first ten years of the program] is that we've put on everything but bigotry. When the show first started in '48, I had a meeting with the sponsors. There were some Southern dealers present and they asked if I intended to put on Negroes. I said yes. They said I shouldn't, but I convinced them I wasn't going to change my mind. And you know something? We've gone over very well in the South. Never had a bit of trouble.

The show included frequent performances from black entertainers such as Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., Nat King Cole, Bo Diddley, The Fifth Dimension, James Brown, Aretha Franklin, Mahalia Jackson, The Supremes, The Four Tops, Nina Simone and The Temptations. A bigot is a prejudiced person who is intolerant of opinions, lifestyles, or identities differing from his or her own. ... Diahann Carroll, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1955 Diahann Carroll (born July 17, 1935) is an American actress and singer. ... Sammy Davis, Jr. ... Nathaniel Adams Coles, known professionally as Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a popular American singer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. ... Bo Diddleys emphasis on rhythm largely influenced popular music, especially that of rock and roll in the 1960s. ... The Fifth Dimension The Fifth Dimension (also known as The 5th Dimension) is an American popular music vocal group, whose repertoire also includes R&B, soul, and jazz. ... James Joseph Brown, Jr. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American R&B, Pop and Gospel singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Mahalia Jackson (October 26, 1911[1] – January 27, 1972) was an American gospel singer, widely regarded as the best in the history of the genre. ... For other uses, see Supremes (disambiguation). ... The Four Tops are an American vocal quartet, whose repertoire has included doo-wop, jazz, soul music, R&B, disco, adult contemporary, and showtunes. ... Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known as Nina Simone (February 21, 1933–April 21, 2003), was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, and civil rights activist. ... “Temptations” redirects here. ...


In that same 1958 NEA interview, Sullivan noted his pride about the role that the show had had in improving the public's understanding of mental illness. Sullivan considered his May 17, 1953 telecast to be the single most important episode in the show's first decade. During that show, a salute to the popular Broadway director Joshua Logan, the two men were watching in the wings and Sullivan asked Logan how he thought the show was doing. According to Sullivan, Logan told him that the show was dreadfully becoming "another one of those and-then-I-wrote shows;" Sullivan asked him what he should do about it, and Logan volunteered to talk about his experiences in a mental institution. Sullivan took him up on the offer, and in retrospect believed that several advances in the treatment of mental illness could be attributed to the resulting publicity, including the repeal of a Pennsylvania law about the treatment of the mentally ill and the granting of funds for the construction of new psychiatric hospitals. A mental illness or mental disorder refers to one of many mental health conditions characterized by distress, impaired cognitive functioning, atypical behavior, emotional dysregulation, and/or maladaptive behavior. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joshua Logan (1908-1988), a director and writer, was best known for Broadway and Hollywood shows such as Mister Roberts, Picnic, and South Pacific. ... A psychiatric hospital (also called, at various places and times, mental hospital or mental ward, historically often asylum, lunatic asylum, or madhouse), is a hospital specialising in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ...


The show enjoyed phenomenal popularity in the 1950s and early 1960s. As had occurred with Amos 'n Andy on the radio in the early 1930s, the family ritual of gathering around the television set to watch Ed Sullivan became almost a U.S. cultural universal. Ed Sullivan was regarded as a kingmaker, and performers considered an appearance on his program as a guarantee of stardom. The show's iconic status is illustrated by a song from the 1960 musical, Bye Bye Birdie. In the song, "Hymn for a Sunday Evening," a family of viewers expresses their regard for the program in worshipful tones. Amos & Andy (also rendered as Amos n Andy) was a situation comedy popular in the United States from the 1920s through the 1950s. ... Bye Bye Birdie is a Tony Award-winning musical with a book by Michael Stewart, lyrics by Lee Adams, and music by Charles Strouse. ...


In the late 1960s, Sullivan remarked that his program was waning as the decade went on. He realized that to keep viewers, the best and brightest in entertainment had to be seen, or else the viewers were going to keep on changing the channel. Along with declining viewership, Ed Sullivan attracted a higher median age for the average viewer as the seasons went on. These two factors were the reason for the show's cancellation in 1971. Sullivan would produce one-off specials for CBS until his death in 1974. CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ...


Famous performances

The Ed Sullivan Show is especially known to today's generation for airing breakthrough performances by Elvis Presley and The Beatles. Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


Elvis Presley

On September 9, 1956, Presley made his first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show (after earlier appearances on shows hosted by the Dorsey Brothers and Steve Allen) even though Sullivan had previously vowed never to allow the performer on his show. At the time Presley was filming Love Me Tender so Sullivan's producer Marlo Lewis flew to Los Angeles, California to supervise the Hollywood side of the show taping. Sullivan, however, was not able to host his show in New York City because he was recovering from a near fatal automobile accident. Oscar-winner Charles Laughton guest-hosted in Sullivan's place. Laughton appears in front of plaques with gold records and states, "These gold records, four of them... are a tribute to the fact that four of his recordings have sold, each sold, more than a million copies. And this by the way is the first time in record making history that a singer has hit such a mark in such a short time. ... And now, away to Hollywood to meet Elvis Presley". is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dorsey Brothers consisted of the dynamic duo Big Band musicians Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey who found fame in the 1940s playing with great Big Band favorites Glenn Miller and Benny Goodman among others. ... Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian and writer instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... Love Me Tender was the first motion picture made by singer Elvis Presley and was released in 1956. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ...


Once on camera, Elvis cleared his throat and said, “Thank you Mr Laughton, ladies and gentlemen. Wow”, and wiped his brow. “This is probably the greatest honor I’ve ever had in my life. Ah. There’s not much I can say except, it really makes you feel good. We want to thank you from the bottom of our heart. And now.." Don't Be Cruel, which was, after a short introduction by Elvis, followed by Love Me Tender. Elvis's second set in the show consisted of "Ready Teddy" and a short on air comment to Sullivan, “Ah, Mr Sullivan. We know that somewhere out there you are looking in, and, ah, all the boys and myself, and everybody out here, are looking forward to seeing you back on television.” Next, Elvis declares, “Friends, as a great philosopher once said, “You ain’t nothin’ but a Hound Dog...”, as he launches into a short (1:07) version of the song. [1] The show was viewed by a record 60 million people which at the time was 82.6% of the television audience and the largest single audience in television history. Dont be Cruel is a song by Otis Blackwell, which was recorded by Elvis Presley in 1956. ... Love Me Tender is a song sung by Elvis Presley, to the tune of Aura Lee (or Aura Lea), a Civil War song by George R. Poulton. ... The term Hound Dog may refer to: The song Hound Dog, which was first recorded by Big Mama Thornton in 1953 as a blues song. ...


Sullivan hosted a second appearance by Presley on October 28 later the same year. Elvis performed Don't Be Cruel, then Love Me Tender. Sullivan then addresses the audience as he stands beside Elvis, who begins shaking his legs, elicting screams from the audience. By the time Sullivan turns his head, Elvis is standing motionless. After Presley leaves the stage, Sullivan states, “I can’t figure this darn thing out. You know. He just does is this and everybody yells.” Elvis appears a second time in the show and sings Love Me. is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dont be Cruel is a song by Otis Blackwell, which was recorded by Elvis Presley in 1956. ... Love Me Tender was the first film made by singer Elvis Presley and was released in 1956. ... At least three different songs have been recorded with the title Love Me. // Jimmy Lee and Wayton Walker recorded a song titled Love Me by S. Lewis in 1955. ...

Hound Dog October 28, 1956
Hound Dog October 28, 1956

Still later he does a nearly four minute long verison of Hound Dog and is shown in full the entire song. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 567 pixelsFull resolution (1533 × 1086 pixel, file size: 425 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is a screenshot of a copyrighted television program or station ID. As such, the copyright for it is most likely owned by the... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 567 pixelsFull resolution (1533 × 1086 pixel, file size: 425 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is a screenshot of a copyrighted television program or station ID. As such, the copyright for it is most likely owned by the... The term Hound Dog may refer to: The song Hound Dog, which was first recorded by Big Mama Thornton in 1953 as a blues song. ...


For the third and final appearance, January 6, 1957 Presley performed a medley of Hound Dog, Love Me Tender, and Heartbreak Hotel, followed by a 50 second version of Don't Be Cruel. For a second set later in the show he did "Too Much" and "When My Blue Moon Turns to Gold Again". For his last set he sang Peace in the Valley. Although much has been made of the fact that Elvis was shown only from the waist up, except for the short section of Hound Dog, all of the songs on this show were ballads. is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The term Hound Dog may refer to: The song Hound Dog, which was first recorded by Big Mama Thornton in 1953 as a blues song. ... Love Me Tender was the first film made by singer Elvis Presley and was released in 1956. ... For the Whitney Houston song, see Heartbreak Hotel (Whitney Houston song). ... Dont be Cruel is a song by Otis Blackwell, which was recorded by Elvis Presley in 1956. ... Peace In The Valley is an album released by J.D. Sumner. ... The term Hound Dog may refer to: The song Hound Dog, which was first recorded by Big Mama Thornton in 1953 as a blues song. ...


Sullivan praised Elvis at the end of the show, saying "This is a real decent, fine boy. We've never had a pleasanter experience on our show with a big name than we've had with you.... You're thoroughly all right." [[1]]


Many television historians consider Elvis Presley's appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show as helping to bridge a large generation gap between Great Depression and World War II era parents and their baby boomer children. Later performers would use this bridge to introduce themselves to millions of American households. Among them were The Rolling Stones, The Doors, and The Beatles. A generation gap is a popular term used to describe wide differences in cultural norms between members of a younger generation and their elders. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For the video game, see Baby Boomer (video game). ... “Rolling Stones” redirects here. ... This page is about the rock band. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


The Beatles

In late 1963, Sullivan found himself among a throng of 15,000 excited kids at Heathrow Airport in London who were there to see a young British recording group, the Beatles. Sullivan was intrigued. In December, 1963, Beatles manager Brian Epstein arranged for the group, still relatively unknown in the United States, to appear 3 three times on the show at $4000 per appearance. Epstein was then able to convince Capitol Records to mount a publicity campaign for the Beatles arrival, and to release I Want to Hold Your Hand. The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Brian Samuel Epstein (IPA: ) (born in Liverpool, England; 19 September 1934 – 27 August 1967) was the manager of The Beatles. ... Music sample I Want to Hold Your Hand ( file info) Problems? See media help. ...


The Beatles appeared on 3 consecutive Sundays in February, 1964, to great anticipation and fanfare as [I Want to Hold Your Hand had swiftly risen to #1 in the charts. Their first appearance on February 9 is considered a milestone in American pop culture and the beginning of the British invasion in music. The broadcast drew an estimated 73 million viewers, at the time a record for an American television program, and was characterized by an audience composed largely of screaming teenage girls in tears. The Beatles followed Ed's show opening intro, performing All My Loving, Till There Was You, and She Loves You. Then, late in the hour, they returned to perform I Saw Her Standing There and I Want to Hold Your Hand. For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... All My Loving is a song by The Beatles, written by Paul McCartney, but credited to Lennon-McCartney, from the 1963 album With the Beatles. ... Till There Was You is a song written by Meredith Willson for his 1957 musical play The Music Man, and which also appeared in the 1962 movie version. ... She Loves You is a hit song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, originally recorded by the The Beatles for release as a single in 1963. ... It has been suggested that I Saw Him Standing There be merged into this article or section. ... Music sample I Want to Hold Your Hand ( file info) Problems? See media help. ...


The Beatles returned to the show, this time broadcast from Miami Beach, on February 16. A crush of people nearly prevented the boys from making it on stage in time. A wedge of policemen was needed, and the band began playing She Loves You only a few seconds after reaching their instruments. They continued with This Boy, and All My Loving, and returned later to close the show with I Saw Her Standing There, From Me to You and I Want to Hold Your Hand. Miami Beach is a city located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... She Loves You is a hit song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, originally recorded by the The Beatles for release as a single in 1963. ... This Boy is a song by the UK rock band The Beatles. ... All My Loving is a song by The Beatles, written by Paul McCartney, but credited to Lennon-McCartney, from the 1963 album With the Beatles. ... It has been suggested that I Saw Him Standing There be merged into this article or section. ... From Me To You is the name of the hit song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and released by their band, the Beatles, as a single in 1963. ... Music sample I Want to Hold Your Hand ( file info) Problems? See media help. ...


They were shown on tape February 23 (this appearance had been taped earlier in the day on February 9 before their first live appearance). They followed Ed's intro with Twist and Shout and Please Please Me and closed the show once again with I Want to Hold Your Hand. February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Please Please Me track listing Side one I Saw Her Standing There Misery Anna (Go to Him) Chains Boys Ask Me Why Please Please Me Side two Love Me Do P.S. I Love You Baby Its You Do You Want to Know a Secret? A Taste of Honey... Please Please Me is the first album recorded by The Beatles, rush-released on 22 March 1963 in the United Kingdom to capitalise on the success of singles Please Please Me (#1)[1] and Love Me Do (#17). ... Music sample I Want to Hold Your Hand ( file info) Problems? See media help. ...


The Beatles appeared for the final time on September 12, 1965 and earned Sullivan a 60% share of the nighttime audience for one of the appearances. This time, they followed 3 acts before coming out to perform I Feel Fine, I'm Down and Act Naturally, then closed the show with Ticket to Ride, Yesterday and Help! is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... The following is a list of most watched television episodes, organized by country and based on various criteria. ... I Feel Fine is the name of a song written by John Lennon (although credited to Lennon-McCartney) and released in 1964 by The Beatles as the A side of their seventh UK single. ... Im Down is a song by the Beatles written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon/McCartney) and first released as the B-side to the single Help! in 1965. ... Act Naturally is a song originally recorded by Buck Owens and covered by The Beatles on the album Help! The Beatles version is sung by Ringo Starr and was performed by the band on The Ed Sullivan Show. ... Ticket to Ride is a song by The Beatles from their 1965 album, Help!. It was recorded 15 February 1965 at Abbey Road Studios and released as a single in 1965. ... Music sample Yesterday ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... Help! is a song by The Beatles. ...


Although the appearances by The Beatles and Elvis are considered the most famous rock and roll performances on Ed Sullivan, several months before Elvis debuted, Sullivan invited Bill Haley & His Comets to perform their then-current hit "Rock Around the Clock" in early August 1955. This was later recognized by CBS and others (including music historian Jim Dawson in his book on "Rock Around the Clock") as the first performance of a rock and roll song on a national television program. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Rock Around the Clock is a rock n roll song from 1952, written by Max C. Freedman and James E. Myers (the latter under the pseudonym Jimmy De Knight). Although first recorded by Sonny Dae & the Knights, the more famous version by Bill Haley & His Comets is not, strictly speaking...


Controversies

On November 20, 1955, Bo Diddley was the first African-American to appear on The Ed Sullivan Show, only to infuriate him ("I did two songs and he got mad." Bo Diddley later recalls, "Ed Sullivan said that I was one of the first colored boys to ever double-cross him. Said that I wouldn't last six months."). Diddley had been asked to sing Tennessee Ernie Ford's hit "Sixteen Tons". But when he appeared on stage, he sang his #1 R&B hit "Bo Diddley." He was banned from further appearances. is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Bo Diddleys emphasis on rhythm largely influenced popular music, especially that of rock and roll in the 1960s. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Tennessee Ernie Ford Ernest Jennings Ford (February 13, 1919 – October 17, 1991), better known by the stage name Tennessee Ernie Ford, was a pioneering U.S. recording artist and television host who enjoyed success in the country & western, pop, and gospel musical genres. ... Sixteen Tons is a song about the misery of coal mining, written in 1947 by U.S. country singer Merle Travis. ... Bo Diddley is a rhythm and blues song first recorded and sung by Bo Diddley at the Universal Recording Studio in Chicago and released on the Chess Records subsidiary, Checker Records in 1955. ...


In 1962, Jackie Mason allegedly gave Sullivan the finger on air. A tape of the incident shows Mason doing his stand-up comedy act and then looking toward Sullivan, commenting that Sullivan was signaling him. Sullivan was reportedly telling Mason to wrap it up, since CBS was about to cut away to show a speech by President John F. Kennedy. Mason began working his own fingers into his act and pointed toward Sullivan with his middle finger slightly separated. After Mason left the stage, the camera then cut to a visibly angry Sullivan. Sullivan argued with Mason backstage, then terminated his contract. Mason denied knowingly giving Sullivan the finger and later filed a libel suit. Sullivan publicly apologized to Mason when he appeared on the show a year later. Mason dropped the lawsuit, but never appeared on the show again. Jackie Mason (born Yacov Moshe Maza on June 9, 1931, in Sheboygan, Wisconsin) is an American stand-up comedian. ... This article is about the gesture. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ...


Bob Dylan was slated to make his first nationwide television appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show on May 12, 1963, and intended to perform "Talkin' John Birch Paranoid Blues," a song he wrote lampooning the John Birch Society and the red-hunting paranoia associated with it. During the afternoon rehearsal that day, CBS officials told Dylan they had deemed the song unacceptable for broadcast and wanted him to substitute another. "No; this is what I want to do," Dylan responded. "If I can't play my song, I'd rather not appear on the show." He then left the studio, walking out on the stint. This article is about the recording artist. ... The John Birch Society is a conservative American exceptionalist organization founded in 1958 to fight what it saw as growing threats to the Constitution of the United States, especially a suspected communist infiltration of the United States government, and to support free enterprise. ...


On September 17, 1967 The Doors appeared on the show. The show's network censors demanded the group to change its lyrics for their hit song Light My Fire, altering the line "Girl, we couldn't get much higher" because of what the censors said was a reference to drugs. Jim Morrison, the band's lead singer, didn't agree and sang the original line instead with no notice to the show's producers. Morrison insisted that it was an accident, and that he meant to change the lyric but was so nervous about performing on live television that he forgot to change it when he was singing. Sullivan was reportedly so furious that he refused to shake their hands. They were never invited back. is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... This page is about the rock band. ... This article is about The Doors song. ... For other persons named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison. ...


In contrast, the Rolling Stones were instructed to change the title of their "Let's Spend the Night Together" single for the band's January 15, 1967 appearance. The band complied, with Mick Jagger ostentatiously rolling his eyes heavenward whenever he reached the song's one-night-only, clean refrain, "Let's spend some time together." This article is about the rock band. ... Lets Spend the Night Together was a 1967 song by the Rolling Stones. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Phillip Mick Jagger CBE (born July 26, 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ...


Broadway

The show is also famous for showcasing original cast members of Broadway shows performing hit numbers from the musicals in which they were then appearing, at a time when this was rare. There were appearances from Broadway celebrities such as Carol Lawrence and Larry Kert singing Tonight from West Side Story, Julie Andrews singing Wouldn't It Be Lovely? from My Fair Lady as well as What Do The Simple Folk Do? (with Richard Burton) from Camelot, and Richard Kiley singing The Impossible Dream from Man of La Mancha. La Mancha leading lady Joan Diener also made an extremely rare television appearance in her stage role of Aldonza/Dulcinea, singing the song What Does He Want of Me? For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Fantasticks is the longest-running musical in history Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Carol Lawrence is a musical theater actress, who has also made numerous appearances in film and television. ... Larry Kert performing at Ed Sullivan show (1958) Larry Kert (December 5, 1930 - June 5, 1991) was an American actor, singer, and dancer. ... For The Games song, see Westside Story (song). ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... My Fair Lady is a musical with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe, based on George Bernard Shaws Pygmalion. ... Richard Burton CBE (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984) was a Welsh actor. ... The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Richard Paul Kiley (March 31, 1922 – March 5, 1999) was an American stage, television, and film actor, though he is best known for his voice work, as narrator of various documentary series. ... The Impossible Dream (The Quest) is a Pop/Soul song covered by Sarah Connor. ... Man of La Mancha is a 1965 Broadway musical in one act which tells the story of the classic novel Don Quixote as a play within a play, performed by Miguel de Cervantes and his fellow prisoners as he awaits a hearing with the Spanish Inquisition. ... Joan Diener (February 24, 1930 - May 13, 2006) was an American actress, dancer, and singer, best known for being the first to play the role of Aldonza in the Broadway musical, Man of la Mancha, in 1965; also known for being the first to play the role of Lalume in...


All of these artists performed their songs wearing the same makeup and costumes that they wore in the shows, in order to preserve the illusion that one was actually seeing the musical in question. This was also extremely rare on television at the time. (Several of these performances have recently been released on a DVD). Cosmetics or makeup are substances to enhance the beauty of the human body, apart from simple cleaning. ... The term costume can refer to wardrobe and dress in general, or to the distinctive style of dress of a particular people, class, or period. ... Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ...


Parodies

Due to the program's legacy, many musicians have parodied The Ed Sullivan Show over the years in countless music videos. Among the notable include:

  • L.A. Guns' "Never Enough"
  • Billy Joel's "Tell Her About It"
  • Nirvana's "In Bloom"
  • Outkast's "Hey Ya!"
  • Red Hot Chili Peppers's "Dani California"
  • Rain: The Beatles Experience opens their concerts with prerecorded footage of a man doing an intentionally poor Ed Sullivan impression in black and white and then intoducing the band, which plays the first part of the show with an exact recreation of the set the Beatles used.

L.A. Guns is a rock band from Los Angeles, California, originally formed in 1983 and continuing on today. ... William Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American singer, pianist, songwriter, composer and musician. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... Nevermind track listing Smells Like Teen Spirit (1) In Bloom (2) Come as You Are (3) For the upcoming film, see In Bloom (film). ... OutKast are an American hip hop duo based out of East Point, Georgia, a nearby city to Atlanta, Georgia. ... Hey Ya! is a hip hop song written and produced by André 3000 for his 2003 album The Love Below, part of OutKasts double album Speakerboxxx/The Love Below. ... Red Hot Chili Peppers are an American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1983. ... Dani California is the first single from the American rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers ninth studio album, Stadium Arcadium. ...

Celebrity Guests

1948

An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an Italian American singer, film actor, and comedian. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Monica Lewis Monica Lewis (born May 5, 1925) is a singer and actress. ... Cab Calloway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907–November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader. ... Harry Hershfield (1885 - 1974) was the american comic artist, humour writer. ... Peggy Lee (May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter and Oscar-nominated performer. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... Jan August Born Jan Auggustoff, (born 24 September 1904, New York City Died 9 January 1976, New York City) was an American pianist and xylophonist. ... William Count Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. ... Lon Chaney, Jr. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Ezzard Mack Charles (July 7, 1921 - May 27, 1975) was a professional boxer and former Heavyweight Champion of the world. ... Hope Emerson in Caged (1950) Hope Emerson (October 29, 1897 - April 25, 1960) was an American actress. ... Nanette Fabray (born October 27, 1920 in San Diego, California) is an American actress. ... Nellie Lutcher (born October 15, 1915) was an African-American jazz singer and pianist who achieved some prominence in the late 1940s and early 1950s. ... Alexander Al Schacht (November 11, 1892, in New York, New York - July 14, 1984, in Waterbury, Connecticut), was a former professional baseball player. ...

1949

Sidney Blackmer (July 13, 1895–October 6, 1973) was an American actor. ... Johnny Farrell (April 4, 1901 - June 14, 1988) was an American professional golfer. ... Arthur Murray (April 4, 1895 – March 3, 1991), was a dance instructor and businessman, whose name is most often associated with the dance studio chain that bears his name. ... The Ravens were an R&B vocal group. ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... Arnold Raymond Cream (January 31, 1914 – February 25, 1994), better known as Jersey Joe Walcott was a world heavyweight boxing champion. ... Luise Rainer in The Great Ziegfeld (1936) Luise Rainer (born January 12, 1910 in either Düsseldorf, Germany or Vienna, Austria) is a two-time Academy Award-winning film actress. ... Nanette Fabray (born October 27, 1920 in San Diego, California) is an American actress. ... Sammy Cahn (June 18, 1913 – January 15, 1993) was an award-winning American lyricist, songwriter and musician, best known for his romantic lyrics to tin pan alley and Broadway songs, as recorded by Frank Sinatra, Doris Day and many others. ... Skitch Henderson (born Lyle Russell Cedric Henderson, January 27, 1918; died November 1, 2005, New Milford, Connecticut) was a British-born American pianist, conductor, and composer. ... Actor Lon McCallister, born Herbert Alonzo McCallister Jr. ... Doretta Morrow (January 27, 1928 - February 28, 1968) was an American actress and dancer. ... Gene Nelson (March 24, 1920 - September 16, 1996), born Leander Eugene Berg, was a dancer, film actor and director. ... Jule Styne (December 31, 1905 – September 20, 1994) was a British-born American songwriter, especially famous for a series of Broadway Musicals, which included several very well known and frequently revived shows. ... Forrest Tucker (right) in Cosmic Monsters. ... Carol Bruce (born November 15, 1919 in Great Neck, New York) is a character actress. ... Tony Martin (born December 25, 1912) is an American actor and traditional pop singer. ... Henry W. Harry Armstrong (July 22, 1879 - February 28, 1951) was a U.S. boxer, booking agent, producer, singer, pianist and Tin Pan Alley composer. ... Herbert John Jackie Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, and musician. ... W.C. Handy photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 William Christopher Handy (November 16, 1873 - March 28, 1958) was an African American blues composer, often known as The Father of the Blues. ... Diana Barrymore (March 3, 1921 – January 25, 1960) was an American actress. ... Faye Emerson (July 8, 1917 - March 9, 1983) was an American film actress and television host. ... This biography does not cite any references or sources. ... Vincent Richard Impellitteri (February 4, 1900 – January 29, 1987) was appointed Acting Mayor of New York City upon the resignation of then Mayor William ODwyer, on September 1, 1950. ... Patricia Morison was born on 19 March 1915 in New York, NY, USA and was a film actress through the 1930s to 1980s as well as having several TV appearances including Cheers. ... Larry Storch (born January 8, 1923) is an American actor best known for his comedic television roles, including voiceover work for cartoons, and his live-action role the bumbling Corporal Randolph Agarn on F Troop. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... Buddy Baer (born June 11, 1915 — died July 18, 1986) was an American boxer, and the brother of heavyweight champion Max Baer. ... Anne Jeffreys (born January 26, 1923 in Goldsboro, North Carolina) is an American actress and singer. ... Nathaniel Adams Coles, known professionally as Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a popular American singer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. ... John Carradine (February 5, 1906 - November 27, 1988) was an American actor, best known for his roles in horror films and Westerns. ... Joey Adams was a Borscht Belt comedian who was inducted into the Friars Club in 1977 and wrote the book Borscht Belt in 1973. ... Fay Bainter (December 7, 1891 – April 16, 1968) was an American actress. ... Jarmila Novotná (born September 23, 1907, in Prague; died February 9, 1994, in New York City) was a celebrated Czech soprano and, from 1940 to 1956, a star of the Metropolitan Opera. ... Sigmund Romberg (July 29, 1887 – November 9, 1951) was an American composer best known for his operettas. ... Jane Kean (b. ... Paul Winchell and Jerry Mahoney Paul Winchell (December 21, 1922 – June 24, 2005), born Pinkus Wilchinski (the family later shortened the name to Wilchin) in New York City, was an American ventriloquist and voice actor whose fame flourished in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Kitty Kallen (born on May 25, 1922) was an American popular singer, who sang with a number of big bands in the 1940s, coming back in the 1950s to score her biggest hit, 1954s Little Things Mean A Lot. Born in Philadelphia to a Jewish family, she won an... Mostel in Sirocco (1951) Zero Mostel (February 28, 1915 – September 8, 1977) was a Brooklyn-born stage and film actor best known for his portrayal of comic characters such as Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof , Pseudolus in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, and Max... Harold Clayton Lloyd (April 20, 1893 – March 8, 1971) was an American film actor and director, most famous for his silent comedies. ... Vincent (Vinnie) Richards (1903—1959) was a top American tennis player in the early decades of the 20th Century, known as a superlative volleyer. ... Sam Levenson (December 28, 1911-August 27, 1980), American humorist, writer, and journalist. ... Juanita Hall (born November 6, 1901, died February 28, 1968, Bay Shore, New York) was the first African American to win a Tony Award, for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Bloody Mary in the musical South Pacific in 1950. ... An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. ... Carmen Cavalarro was an American pianist from New York. ... Ethel Smith (November 22, 1910 - May 10, 1996) was an organist who played primarily in a pop style on the Hammond organ. ... Sarah Lois Vaughan (nicknamed Sassy and The Divine One), (March 27, 1924 – April 3, 1990) was an American jazz singer, described as one of the greatest singers of the 20th century [1]. // Sarah Vaughan was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1924. ... Anthony Lavelli, Jr. ... Ralph Branca at age 78. ... Carl Anthony Furillo (March 8, 1922 - January 21, 1989) was an American Major League Baseball right fielder and right-handed batter who played his entire career for the Brooklyn & Los Angeles Dodgers. ... Ervin Martin Palica (born as Ervin Martin Pavliecivich February 9, 1928 in Lomita, California, died May 29, 1982) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Jean-Baptiste Illinois Jacquet (October 31, 1922 - July 22, 2004) was a jazz tenor saxophonist most famous for his solo on Flying Home. He is better known simply as Illinois Jacquet. ... Bobby Riggs on the cover of Sports Illustrated just before his match with Billie Jean King in 1973 Riggs at Wimbledon in 1939 Robert Larimore (Bobby) Riggs (February 25, 1918 – October 25, 1995) was a 1930s–40s tennis player who was the World No. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... Charles Buddy Rogers (born on August 13, 1904; died on April 21, 1999) was an American actor and jazz musician. ... Edward Everett Horton (March 18, 1886 - September 29, 1970) was an American actor with a long career including motion pictures, theater, radio, television and voice work for animated cartoons. ... Hazel Dorothy Scott (1920 – 1981) was a jazz and classical pianist and singer. ... Sonny Tufts (16 July 1911 - 4 June 1970) - US movie actor. ... Phil Foster with Penny Marshall and Cindy Williams on the set of Laverne & Shirley Phil Foster: Actor, Performer Born: in Brooklyn, March 29, 1914 Died: in California, July 8, 1985 Best Known For: Playing Frank De Fazio, on the television show Laverne & Shirley. ... Toni Arden was an American traditional pop music singer. ... Harold Lang (December 21, 1920 - July 26, 1985) was an American dancer and actor. ... Sunny Skylar (born October 11, 1913) was an American composer, singer, lyricist, and music publisher. ... Alan Dale (July 9, 1926-April 20, 2002) was a singer of traditional popular and rocknroll music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dame Maggie Teyte (born Margaret Tate April 17, 1888 - May 26, 1976) was one of Britains foremost operatic sopranos of the twentieth century. ... Robert Lawrence Layne was born December 19, 1926, in Santa Ana, Texas. ... Louis Prima (December 7, 1910 – August 24, 1978) was an American entertainer, singer, actor, songwriter, and trumpeter. ... Musician/Comedian Victor Borge For the Cape Verdean politician, see Víctor Borges. ... George Kirby (June 8, 1923 – September 30, 1995) was an American comedian, singer, and actor from Chicago, Illinois. ... Paul Drake was the detective in the television lawyer series Perry Mason, played by William Hopper. ... Fletcher Hamilton Henderson, Jr. ... The Rat Pack. ... Joseph Francis Page (October 28, 1917 - April 21, 1980), nicknamed Fireman and The Gay Reliever, is a former Major League Baseball player. ... Ethel Waters (October 31, 1896–September 1, 1977) was an Oscar-nominated American blues vocalist and actress. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... Pearl Bailey in “St. ... Joey Bishop (born Joseph Abraham Gottlieb on February 3, 1918 in The Bronx, New York, USA) is a Jewish American actor. ... Oran Thaddeus Page (Dallas, Texas, 27 January 1908 – 4 November 1954 in New York City) jazz trumpeter, singer, bandleader, better known as Hot Lips Page by the public, and Lips Page by his fellow musicians. ... Claude Buddy Young (January 5. ... Leonard poses for a press kit photo. ... Peggy Ann Garner (February 3, 1932 - October 16, 1984) was a American cinema and theater actress. ... Fritzi Scheff (1879-1954) was an American actress and vocalist, born in Vienna, Austria. ... Georgia Gibbs (August 17, 1919[1] - December 9, 2006) was an American singer, most popular in the 1950s. ... Image:Darcel156. ... Leo Fuchs (May 15, 1911-December 31, 1994) was a Polish actor. ... Vaughn Monroe (October 7, 1911 - May 21, 1973) was a singer, trumpeter and big band leader, most popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Fran Warren (born March 4, 1926) is an American popular singer. ... Billy Eckstine (8 July 1914 – 8 March 1993), born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as William Clarence Eckstein. ... Lisa Kirk (February 25, 1925 - November 11, 1990) was an American actress and singer. ... Adolph Green (December 2, 1914 – October 23, 2002) was an American lyricist and playwright who, with long-time collaborator Betty Comden, penned the screenplays and songs for some of the most beloved movie musicals, particularly as part of Arthur Freeds production unit at MGM, during the genres heyday. ... Henry King (* 24th January 1886 in Christiansburg, Virginia; † 29th June 1982 in Toluca Lake, California) was an American film director. ... Allyn Ann McLerie (b. ... Bosh Pritchard was a running back in the NFL who played running back for ten seasons for the Cleveland Rams, the Philadelphia Eagles and the New York Giants Categories: | | | | | | | ... Gene Sheldon (1908-1982) was an American comic actor specializing in pantomime as his career and broadcasted on Toledos radio in 1925. ... Maude Nugent (1877 - 1958) was a U.S. songwriter. ... Mimi Benzell (May 6, 1924 - December 23, 1970) was an American soprano who performed with the Metropolitan Opera before establishing herself as a Broadway musical theatre, television, and nightclub performer. ... Johnny Marks (November 10, 1909 - September 3, 1985) was a Jewish-American songwriter[1]. He was born in Mount Vernon, New York. ...

1950

Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... Jane Kean (b. ... Frankie Laine, born Francesco Paolo LoVecchio (March 30, 1913 – February 6, 2007), was one of the most successful American singers of the twentieth century. ... Lillian Roth (December 13, 1910 - May 12, 1980) was an American singer and actress. ... Joey Adams was a Borscht Belt comedian who was inducted into the Friars Club in 1977 and wrote the book Borscht Belt in 1973. ... Vic Damone (born June 12, 1928 in Brooklyn, New York) is an ItalianAmerican singer. ... Pearce as Gladys Kravitz in Bewitched with George Tobias as her husband Abner, (1964). ... Dinah Shore (born Frances Rose Shore February 29, 1916 - February 24, 1994) was an American singer and actress. ... Teresa Brewer (born as Theresa Breuer, May 7, 1931 in Toledo, Ohio) is an American pop and jazz singer who was one of the most popular female singers of the 1950s. ... Luise Rainer in The Great Ziegfeld (1936) Luise Rainer (born January 12, 1910 in either Düsseldorf, Germany or Vienna, Austria) is a two-time Academy Award-winning film actress. ... Vaughn Monroe (October 7, 1911 - May 21, 1973) was a singer, trumpeter and big band leader, most popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Melvin Howard Tormé (September 13, 1925 – June 5, 1999), nicknamed The Velvet Fog, is best known as one of the great male jazz singers. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Diana Wynyard (January 16, 1906 – May 13, 1964) was a British actress. ... Gordon Jenkins Gordon Hill Jenkins (12 May 1910-1 May 1984) was an American arranger who was an influential figure in popular music in the 1940s and 1950s, renowned for his lush string arrangements. ... Monica Lewis Monica Lewis (born May 5, 1925) is a singer and actress. ... Margaret OBrien during her career as a child star. ... Don Cornell (April 21, 1919 in New York City - February 23, 2004 in Aventura, Florida) was a popular singer of the 1940s and 1950s. ... Bernard Delfont, Baron Delfont of Stepney Kt (5 September 1909-28 July 1994) was a leading Ukrainian-born theatrical impresario. ... Virginia Gibson and Gordon MacRae Virginia Gibson (Virginia Gorski) (St. ... The Ink Spots were a popular black vocal group that helped define the musical genre that led to rhythm & blues and rock and roll, and the subgenre doo-wop. ... ÁSammy Kaye (born Samuel Zarnocay, Jr. ... Leonard poses for a press kit photo. ... Mimi Benzell (May 6, 1924 - December 23, 1970) was an American soprano who performed with the Metropolitan Opera before establishing herself as a Broadway musical theatre, television, and nightclub performer. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Sheila Bond (born March 16, 1928, New York City) is a Tony award winning actress. ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger according to his birth certificate. ...

References

  • Joe Garner, Stay Tuned: Television's Unforgettable Moments (Andrews McMeel Publishing; 2002) ISBN 0-7407-2693-5
  • Slate article about the Beatles' appearances on the Ed Sullivan show

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ed Sullivan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (803 words)
The show was broadcast from CBS Studio 50 on Broadway in New York City, which in 1967 was renamed the Ed Sullivan Theater (and is now the home of The Late Show with David Letterman).
In the 1950s and 1960s, Sullivan was a respected starmaker because of the number of performers that became household names after appearing on the show.
Sullivan was so upset and angry he refused to do a final show, although he did come back to CBS for several TV specials and a 25th anniversary show in 1973.
The Ed Sullivan Show - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1706 words)
Sullivan took him up on the offer, and in retrospect believed that several advances in the treatment of mental illness could be attributed to the resulting publicity, including the repeal of a Pennsylvania law about the treatment of the mentally ill and the granting of funds for the construction of new psychiatric hospitals.
Ed Sullivan was regarded as a kingmaker, and performers considered an appearance on his program as a guarantee of stardom.
Sullivan, however, was not able to host his show in New York City because he was recovering from a near fatal automobile accident.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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