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Encyclopedia > The Economist

Type Weekly newsmagazine
(in UK, a registered newspaper)
Format Magazine

Owner The Economist Group
Editor John Micklethwait
Founded September 1843
Political allegiance Economic liberalism (moderate Libertarianism), "Extreme Centrism"
Price £3.60
US$5.99
€5.20
AUD$10.50
CAD$7.50
Headquarters 25 St James's Street
London
SW1A 1HG
England
Circulation over 1.2 million copies per week
ISSN 0013-0613

Website: www.economist.com

The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by "The Economist Newspaper Ltd" and edited in London. It has been in continuous publication since James Wilson established it in September 1843. As of summer 2007, its average circulation topped 1.2 million copies a week, about half of which are sold in North America.[1] Consequently it is often seen as a transatlantic (as opposed to solely British) news source. Image File history File links The_Economist_logo. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A newsmagazine, sometimes called news magazine, is a usually weekly magazine featuring articles on current events. ... The Economist Group delivers a series of publications and services under The Economist brand, such as The Economist (called a newspaper for historical reasons, but to all appearances a weekly news magazine), Economist. ... John Micklethwait, born in 1962, is editor-in-chief of The Economist magazine since March 23, 2006. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Libertarianism (disambiguation). ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For more information on international affairs, see one of the following links: Diplomacy Foreign affairs International relations This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... James Wilson was born in 1805 in Hawick in the Scottish Borders. ... A newspapers circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. ... For other uses, see Transatlantic (disambiguation). ...


The aim of The Economist is "to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress."[2] Subjects covered include international news, economics, politics, business, finance, science, technology, and the arts. The publication is targeted at the high-end "prestige" segment of the market and counts among its audience influential business and government decision-makers.[3] For other uses, see News (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Audience (disambiguation). ...


It takes a strongly argued editorial stance on many issues, especially its support for free trade and fiscal conservatism; it can thus be considered as a magazine which practises advocacy journalism. The Economist was first published in September 1843 by James Wilson to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Fiscal conservatism (also known as economic liberalism) is a term used in the United States to refer to economic and political policy that advocates restraint of government taxation, government expenditures and deficits, and government debt. ... Advocacy journalism is a genre of journalism which is strongly fact-based, but may seek to support a point-of-view in some public or private sector issue. ...


Although The Economist calls itself a newspaper and refers to its staff as correspondents, it is printed in magazine form on glossy paper, like a newsmagazine. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... A newsmagazine, sometimes called news magazine, is a usually weekly magazine featuring articles on current events. ...


The Economist belongs to The Economist Group. The publication interests of the group include the CFO brand family as well as the annual World in..., the lifestyle quarterly Intelligent Life, European Voice and Roll Call (known as "the Newspaper of Capitol Hill"). Another part of the group is The Economist Intelligence Unit, a research and advisory company providing country, industry and management analysis worldwide. Since 1928, half the shares of The Economist Group have been owned by the Financial Times, a subsidiary of Pearson PLC, and the other half by a group of independent shareholders, including many members of the staff. The editor's independence is guaranteed by the existence of a board of trustees, which formally appoints him and without whose permission he cannot be removed. The Economist Group delivers a series of publications and services under The Economist brand, such as The Economist (called a newspaper for historical reasons, but to all appearances a weekly news magazine), Economist. ... European Voice is an English language newspaper owned by The Economist group. ... For other senses of this term, see roll call (disambiguation). ... Capitol Hill is the name of a district in the following cities: Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado Capitol Hill, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Capitol Hill, Seattle, Washington Capitol Hill, Washington, DC It is also a common nickname for the United States Congress and the politicians who serve it (e. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication of The Economist Newspaper Limited in London. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Pearson plc LSE: PSON;NYSE: PSO is a London-based media conglomerate. ...

Contents

Features

The Economist's primary focus is world news, politics and business, but it also runs regular sections on science and technology as well as books and the arts. Every two weeks, the newspaper includes, as an additional section, an in-depth special report of a particular business issue, business sector or geographical region. Every three months, The Economist publishes a technology report called Technology Quarterly, or TQ. For other uses, see News (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ...


Articles often take a definite editorial stance and almost never carry a byline. This means that no specific person or persons can be named as the author. Not even the name of the editor (from 2006, John Micklethwait) is printed in the issue. It is a longstanding tradition that an editor's only signed article during his tenure is written on the occasion of his departure from the position. The author of a piece is named in certain circumstances: when notable persons are invited to contribute opinion pieces; when Economist writers compile special reports; and to highlight a potential conflict of interest over a book review. The names of Economist editors and correspondents can be located, however, via the media directory pages of the website. The byline on a newspaper or magazine article gives the name, and often the position, of the writer of the article. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound for presentation through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications. ... John Micklethwait, born in 1962, is editor-in-chief of The Economist magazine since March 23, 2006. ... A conflict of interest is a situation in which someone in a position of trust, such as a lawyer, a politician, or an executive or director of a corporation, has competing professional or personal interests. ...


The newspaper has a trademark tight writing style that is famous for putting a maximum amount of information into a minimum of column inches.[4] Since 1995, The Economist has published one obituary every week, of a famous (or infamous) person from any field of endeavour. Obituary for World War I death An obituary is a notice of the death of a person, usually published in a newspaper, written or commissioned by the newspaper, and usually including a short biography. ...


The Economist is known for its Big Mac Index, which uses the price of a Big Mac hamburger sold by McDonald's in different countries as an informal measure of the purchasing power of currencies. While whimsical, exchange rates in Western countries have been more likely to adjust to the Big Mac index than vice-versa.[citation needed] McDonalds Big Mac purchased in Australia The Big Mac Index is an informal way of measuring the purchasing power parity (PPP) between two currencies and provides a test of the extent to which market exchange rates result in goods costing the same in different countries. ... For other uses, see Big Mac (disambiguation). ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... PPP The purchasing power parity (PPP) theory was developed by Gustav Cassel in 1920. ...


Each opinion column in the newspaper is devoted to a particular area of interest. The names of these columns reflect the topic they concentrate on:

Two other regular columns are: Walter Bagehot (3 February 1826 – 24 March 1877), IPA (see [[1]]), was a nineteenth century British economist. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ... The Frankish Empire was the territory of the Franks, from the 5th to the 10th centuries, from 481 ruled by Clovis I of the Merovingian Dynasty, the first king of all the Franks. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1642 Incorporated 1713 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  16. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... Binomial name L. The American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), also known as American plane, Occidental plane, and Buttonwood, is one of the species of Platanus native to North America. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ...

  • Face Value: about prominent people in the business world.
  • Economics Focus: a general economics column frequently based on academic research.

The magazine goes to press on Thursdays, is available online from Thursday between 6 and 7pm GMT, and is available on newsstands in many countries the next day. It is printed in seven sites around the world. A typical newsstand in New York City. ...


The Economist newspaper sponsors yearly "Innovation Awards", in the categories of bioscience, computing and communications, energy and the environment, social and economic innovation, business-process innovation, consumer products, and a special “no boundaries” category.


The Economist also produces the annual The World in [Year] publication.

Editors

The editors of the Economist have been:

James Wilson was born in 1805 in Hawick in the Scottish Borders. ... For other persons named Herbert Spencer, see Herbert Spencer (disambiguation). ... Richard Holt Hutton (June 2, 1826 – September 9, 1897) was an English writer and theologian. ... Walter Bagehot (3 February 1826 – 24 March 1877), IPA (see [[1]]), was a nineteenth century British economist. ... Sir Robert Harry Inglis Palgrave (1827-1919) was a British economist. ... Francis Wrigley Hirst (1873-1958) was a British journalist and writer, mostly on economic topics. ... Walter Thomas Layton, 1st Baron Layton, CH, CBE (March 15, 1884-February 14, 1966), was a British economist, editor and newspaper proprietor. ... Donald Tyerman CBE (1 March 1908–4 April 1981) was an English journalist and editor. ... Sir Alastair Burnet (born July 12, 1928) is a British journalist and broadcaster, known for his work in news and current affairs programming. ... Andrew Stephen Bower Knight (born 1st November 1939 in England) is a journalist, editor, and media magnate. ... Rupert Lascelles Pennant-Rea, born January 23, 1948, is a British businessman, journalist, and former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. ... Bill Emmott, born August 6, 1956, is an English journalist. ... John Micklethwait, born in 1962, is editor-in-chief of The Economist magazine since March 23, 2006. ...

History

Front page of The Economist, on May 16, 1846

The August 5, 1843 prospectus for the newspaper, enumerated thirteen areas of coverage that its editors wanted the newspaper to focus on:[9] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1064x1638, 1258 KB) Summary This is the front page of The Economist, on May 16, 1846. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1064x1638, 1258 KB) Summary This is the front page of The Economist, on May 16, 1846. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A prospectus is a legal document that institutions and businesses use to describe what they have to offer for participants and buyers. ...

  1. Original leading articles, in which free-trade principles will be most rigidly applied to all the important questions of the day.
  2. Articles relating to some practical, commercial, agricultural, or foreign topic of passing interest, such as foreign treaties.
  3. An article on the elementary principles of political economy, applied to practical experience, covering the laws related to prices, wages, rent, exchange, revenue, and taxes.
  4. Parliamentary reports, with particular focus on commerce, agriculture, and free trade.
  5. Reports and accounts of popular movements advocating free trade.
  6. General news from the Court, the Metropolis, the Provinces, Scotland, and Ireland.
  7. Commercial topics such as changes in fiscal regulations, the state and prospects of the markets, imports and exports, foreign news, the state of the manufacturing districts, notices of important new mechanical improvements, shipping news, the money market, and the progress of railways and public companies.
  8. Agricultural topics, including the application of geology and chemistry; notices of new and improved implements, state of crops, markets, prices, foreign markets and prices converted into English money; from time to time, in some detail, the plans pursued in Belgium, Switzerland, and other well-cultivated countries.
  9. Colonial and foreign topics, including trade, produce, political and fiscal changes, and other matters, including exposés on the evils of restriction and protection, and the advantages of free intercourse and trade.
  10. Law reports, confined chiefly to areas important to commerce, manufacturing, and agriculture.
  11. Books, confined chiefly, but not so exclusively, to commerce, manufacturing, and agriculture, and including all treatises on political economy, finance, or taxation.
  12. A commercial gazette, with prices and statistics of the week.
  13. Correspondence and inquiries from the newspaper's readers.

In 1845 during Railway Mania, The Economist changed its name to The Economist, Weekly Commercial Times, Bankers' Gazette, and Railway Monitor. A Political, Literary and General Newspaper.[10] Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political economy was the original term for the study of production, the acts of buying and selling, and their relationships to laws, customs and government. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... The Court of St Jamess is the popular name of the royal court of the United Kingdom. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... This article is about the country. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Farm equipment is any kind of machinery used on a farm to help with farming. ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (almost exclusively Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ... An exposé is an article or book intended to reveal shocking or surprising information. ... A gazette is a newspaper. ... A letter to the editor [1] (sometimes abbreviated LTTE or LTE) is a letter sent to a publication about issues of concern to its readers. ... Railway mania was the term given to the speculative frenzy in Britain in the 1840s. ...


Opinions

When the newspaper was founded, the term "economism" denoted what would today be termed fiscal conservatism in the United States, or economic liberalism in the rest of the world (and historically in the United States as well). The Economist generally supports free markets and opposes extreme socialism. It is in favour of globalisation and free immigration. Economic liberalism is generally associated with the right, but is now favoured by some traditionally left-wing parties. It also supports social liberalism, which is often seen as left-wing, especially in the United States. This contrast derives in part from The Economist's roots in classical liberalism, disfavouring government interference in either social or economic activity. According to former editor Bill Emmott, "the Economist's philosophy has always been liberal, not conservative."[11] However, the views taken by individual contributors are quite diverse. The Economist was first published in September 1843 by James Wilson to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress. ... Economism is an ideology in which supply and demand are the only important factors in decisions, and literally outstrip or permit ignoring all other factors. ... Fiscal conservatism (also known as economic liberalism) is a term used in the United States to refer to economic and political policy that advocates restraint of government taxation, government expenditures and deficits, and government debt. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community[1] for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ... Globalization is a term used to describe the changes in societies and the world economy that are the result of dramatically increased trade and cultural exchange. ... Social liberalism is either a synonym for new liberalism or a label used by progressive liberal parties in order to differentiate themselves from the more conservative liberal parties, especially when there are two or more liberal parties in a country. ... Classical liberalism (also known as traditional liberalism[1] and laissez-faire liberalism[2]) is a doctrine stressing the importance of human rationality, individual property rights, natural rights, the protection of civil liberties, constitutional limitations of government, free markets, and individual freedom from restraint as exemplified in the writings of Adam...


The Economist has endorsed both the Labour Party and the Conservative Party in recent British elections, and both Republican and Democratic candidates in the United States. The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The new logo of the Conservative Party The Conservative Party is the largest centre right political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


A history of The Economist by the editors of Economist.com puts it this way:

What, besides free trade and free markets, does The Economist believe in? "It is to the Radicals that The Economist still likes to think of itself as belonging. The extreme centre is the paper's historical position." That is as true today as when former Economist editor Geoffrey Crowther said it in 1955. The Economist considers itself the enemy of privilege, pomposity and predictability. It has backed conservatives such as Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher. It has supported the Americans in Vietnam. But it has also endorsed Harold Wilson and Bill Clinton, and espoused a variety of liberal causes: opposing capital punishment from its earliest days, while favouring penal reform and decolonisation, as well as—more recently—gun control and gay marriage.

[12]

The Economist has frequently criticised figures and countries deemed corrupt or dishonest. In recent years, for example, it has been critical of World Bank president Paul Wolfowitz, Silvio Berlusconi, Italy's former Prime Minister (who dubbed it The Ecommunist[13]); Laurent Kabila, the late president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo; and Robert Mugabe, the head of government in Zimbabwe. The Economist also called for Bill Clinton's impeachment and later for Donald Rumsfeld's resignation after the emergence of the Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse.[14] Although The Economist supported George W. Bush's election campaign in 2000[citation needed] and as of January 2007 maintains vocal support for the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq (but criticized the "almost criminal negligence" of the Bush Administration’s handling of the war),[15] the editors backed John Kerry in the 2004 election.[16][17] The paper has also supported some left-wing issues such as progressive taxation, criticizing the U.S. tax model in a recent issue, and seems to support some government regulation on health issues (such as smoking in public areas) and income inequality (higher taxes for the wealthy), as long as it is done lightly. The Economist consistently favours guest worker programs and amnesties especially in 2006 when they titled one of their articles "Sense not Sensenbrenner."[18] Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (born December 22, 1943) is a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, working on issues of international economic development, Africa and public-private partnerships. ...   (born September 29, 1936) is an Italian politician, entrepreneur, and media proprietor. ... Note: if you came to this web page after seeing it in a SPAM email, please be advised that (a) we have nothing to do with that spam and (b) the person who sent you the message is a criminal who is trying to steal your money. ... Mugabe redirects here. ... The impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presiding. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a U.S. Republican politician and businessman, who was the 13th Secretary of Defense under President Gerald Ford from 1975 to 1977, and the 21st Secretary of Defense under President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2006. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse Beginning in 2004, accounts of abuse, rape, although this has not been proven,[1], homicide[2], and torture of prisoners held in the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq (also known as Baghdad Correctional Facility) came to public attention. ... Frank James (Jim) Sensenbrenner, Jr. ...


Tone and voice

The Economist does not print by-lines identifying the authors of articles other than survey articles and articles written by outsiders "By Invitation". In their own words: "It is written anonymously, because it is a paper whose collective voice and personality matter more than the identities of individual journalists."[19] Where needed, references to the author within the article are made as "your correspondent." Rare exceptions to this rule occur where there might otherwise be a conflict of interest such as when reviewing a book written by someone connected with The Economist.


The editorial staff enforces a strictly uniform voice throughout the magazine.[20] As a result, most articles read as though they were written by a single author, displaying dry, understated wit, and precise use of language.[21][22]


The magazine's treatment of economics presumes a working familiarity with fundamental concepts of classical economics. For instance, it does not explain terms like invisible hand, macroeconomics, or demand curve, and may take just six or seven words to explain the theory of comparative advantage. However, articles involving economics do not presume any formal training on the part of the reader, and aim to be accessible to the reasonably educated and intelligent layperson. The newspaper usually does not translate short French quotes or phrases, and sentences in Ancient Greek or Latin are not uncommon. It does however almost always describe the business of an entity whose name it prints, even if it's a well-known entity; for example, in place of "Goldman Sachs", The Economist might write "Goldman Sachs, an investment bank". For other uses, see Invisible hand (disambiguation). ... Circulation in macroeconomics Macroeconomics is a branch of Economics that deals with the performance, structure, and behavior of the economy as a whole. ... In economics, the demand curve can be defined as the graph depicting the relationship between the price of a certain commodity, and the amount of it that consumers are willing and able to purchase at that given price. ... In economics, David Ricardo is credited for the principle of comparative advantage to explain how it can be beneficial for two parties (countries, regions, individuals and so on) to trade if one has a lower relative cost of producing some good. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ...


It strives to be well-rounded. As well as financial and economic issues, it reports on science, culture, language, literature, and art, and is careful to hire writers and editors who are well-versed in these subjects.[citation needed]


The publication displays a sense of whimsy. Many articles include some witticism, image captions are often humorous and the letters section usually concludes with an odd or light-hearted letter. These efforts at humor have sometimes had a mixed reception. For example, the cover of the September 20, 2003 issue, headlined by a story on the Cancún WTO ministerial meeting, featured a cactus giving the middle finger.[23] Readers sent both positive and negative letters in response.[24] is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Giant Mexican flag in the Hotel Zone Cancún (pronounced as IPA: ) is a coastal city in Mexicos easternmost state, Quintana Roo, on the Yucatán Peninsula. ... “WTO” redirects here. ... The finger. ...


Circulation

Circulation for the newspaper, audited by the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC), was over 1.2 million for the first half of 2007.[25] Sales inside North America were around 54% of the total, with sales in the UK making up 14% of the total and continental Europe 19%. The Economist claims sales, both by subscription and on newsstands, in over 200 countries. The Audit Bureau of Circulations is one of the several organizations of the same name operating in different parts of the world. ...


The newspaper consciously adopts an internationalist approach and notes that over 80% of its readership is from outside the UK, its country of publication. Global sales have doubled since 1997. Of its American readers, two out of three make more than $100,000 a year.[1] Internationalism is a political movement which advocates a greater economic and political cooperation between nations for the benefit of all. ...


The Economist Newspaper Limited is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Economist Group. One half of The Economist Group is owned by private shareholders, including members of the Rothschild banking family of England (Sir Evelyn de Rothschild was Chairman of the company from 1972 to 1989), and the other half by the Financial Times, a subsidiary of The Pearson Group. The editorial independence of The Economist is strictly upheld. An independent trust board, which has power to block any changes of the editor, exists to ensure this. The Economist Group delivers a series of publications and services under The Economist brand, such as The Economist (called a newspaper for historical reasons, but to all appearances a weekly news magazine), Economist. ... The Rothschild banking family of England was founded in 1798 by Nathan Mayer von Rothschild (1777-1836) who first settled in Manchester but then moved to London. ... Sir Evelyn Robert Adrian de Rothschild (born August 29, 1931) is a British financier and a member of the prominent Rothschild banking family of England. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Pearson plc LSE: PSON;NYSE: PSO is a London-based media conglomerate. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ...


Letters

The Economist frequently receives letters from senior businesspeople, politicians and spokespeople for government departments, Non-Governmental Organisations and pressure-groups, but well-written or witty responses from anyone are considered, and controversial issues frequently produce a torrent of letters. For example, the survey of Corporate Social Responsibility, published January 2005, produced largely critical letters from Oxfam, the UN World Food Programme, UN Global Compact, the Chairman of BT, an ex-Director of Shell and the UK Institute of Directors.[26]. It is accustomed to publishing letters that are critical of city-states such as Singapore and Lee Kuan Yew where the Asia-Pacific headquarters of The Economist is based.[citation needed] It has published a lively selection of letters on topics such as intelligent design and global warming. Most of the letters The Economist chooses to publish pull no punches in criticising its editorial stance.[citation needed] The father of a soldier, who had been sent to Iraq three times, demanded that The Economist apologise for supporting the war.[citation needed] After The Economist ran a critique of Amnesty International and human rights in general in its issue dated March 24, 2007, its letters page ran a vibrant reply from Amnesty, as well as several other letters in support of the organisation, including one from the head of the UN Human Rights Commission.[citation needed] Letters published in the magazine are typically between 150 and 200 words long. Most other letters received are published online in 'The Inbox'. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a concept which encourages organizations to consider the interests of society by taking responsibility for the impact of the organizations activities on customers, employees, shareholders, communities and the environment in all aspects of its operations. ... Oxfam International logo Oxfam International is a confederation of 13 organizations working with over 3000 partners in more than 100 countries to find lasting solutions to poverty and injustice. ... Italian €2 commemorative coin of 2004 celebrating the WFP The World Food Programme (WFP), the worlds largest humanitarian agency, provides food to more than 90 million people in 80 countries. ... The United Nations Global Compact was announced by United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan in an address to The World Economic Forum on January 31, 1999, when he challenged business leaders to join the Global Compact to bring companies together with UN agencies, labour groups and civil society to support... BT Group plc (also known as British Telecommunications plc) which trades as BT (and previously as British Telecom) is the privatised UK state telecommunications operator. ... Royal Dutch Shell plc is a multinational oil company of British and Dutch origins. ... The Institute of Directors (IoD) is a UK based organisation, incorporated by royal charter in 1903 to support, represent and set standards for company directors. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Special features

Fortnightly, The Economist publishes special reports (previously called surveys) on a given topic—the five main categories being Countries and Regions, Business, Finance and Economics, Science and Technology, and Other. The reports consist of a series of articles in the form of summaries and analysis, and, contrary to the magazine's custom, they carry a byline. Every three months, there's a Technology Quarterly that can be thought of as a special report focusing on recent trends and developments in science and technology. There are several uses of the word survey, relating to two primary meanings: land surveying; and statistical surveys of people or other items, such as animals, organisations, or messages. ... The byline on a newspaper or magazine article gives the name, and often the position, of the writer of the article. ...


Since July 2007 [27], there has also been a complete audio edition of the magazine available 5pm London time on Fridays, the next day after the print magazine is published. It is free for subscribers and available for a fee for non-subscribers. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Censorship

Sections of The Economist criticising authoritarian regimes, such as China, are frequently removed from the newspaper by the authorities in those countries. Despite having its Asia-Pacific office in Singapore, The Economist regularly has difficulties with the Lee dynasty, having been sued successfully by them for libel on a number of occasions.[28] This is a Chinese name; the family name is 李 (Li) Lee Kuan Yew, GCMG, CH (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; born September 16, 1923; also spelled Lee Kwan-Yew), was the first Prime Minister of the Republic of Singapore from 1959 to 1990. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ...


On June 15, 2006 Iran banned the sale of The Economist because of a map labelling the Persian Gulf as the "Gulf". Iran's action can be put into context within the larger issue of the Persian Gulf naming dispute.[29] is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Sheikh Saeed House, Dubai, UAE. A historic map is altered to erase the word Persian from the Persian Gulf. ...


Robert Mugabe's government in Zimbabwe went further, and imprisoned Andrew Meldrum, The Economist's correspondent there. The government charged him with violating a statute against "publishing untruth" for writing that a woman was decapitated by Mugabe supporters. The decapitation claim was retracted and allegedly fabricated by the woman's husband. The correspondent was later acquitted, only to receive a deportation order.[30] Mugabe redirects here. ... Andrew Meldrum (born 1952) is an American reporter and journalist. ...


References in popular culture

  • In The Simpsons episode "Catch 'Em If You Can", Homer is traveling by air in first class and says "Look at me, I'm reading The Economist. Did you know Indonesia is at a crossroads?" and when questioned by his wife, he simply replies "It is!" Four days later, with its customary dry wit, The Economist alluded to the quote, and published an article about Indonesia referring to the "crossroads". The title of the issue was "Indonesia's Gambit".[31][32]

Simpsons redirects here. ... Catch em If You Can is the 18th episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season, first aired on April 25, 2004. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ...

See also

Cover of the Nov 12, 2005 issue of The Spectator magazine. ... The New Statesman is a left-of-centre political weekly published in London. ... Democracy index map. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b 'Economist' Magazine Wins American Readers. NPR. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  2. ^ http://www.economist.co.uk/opinion/
  3. ^ How our readers view The Economist. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  4. ^ The Economist style guide. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  5. ^ The Concise Dictionary of National Biography makes him assistant editor 1858-1860
  6. ^ He was Wilson's son-in-law
  7. ^ A journalist and biographer[1]
  8. ^ 'a solid Scots journalist, Edward Johnstone (1883–1907)'[2]
  9. ^ Prospectus. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  10. ^ The many paradoxes of broadband. firstmonday.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  11. ^ Time for a referendum on the monarchy. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  12. ^ About us. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  13. ^ Report of Rome anti-war demo on Saturday 24th with photos. Indymedia. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  14. ^ Resign Rumsfeld. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  15. ^ Mugged by reality. economist.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
  16. ^ Crunch time in America. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  17. ^ The incompetent or the incoherent?. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  18. ^ Sense, not Sensenbrenner, The Economist, March 30, 2006
  19. ^ The Economist — About us. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  20. ^ The Economist — Style guide. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  21. ^ The Economist — Tone. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  22. ^ Johnson. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  23. ^ Issue Cover for Sep 20th 2003, economist.com
  24. ^ Letters: Pointing the Finger, The Economist, October 2, 2003
  25. ^ Worldwide circulation. economist.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  26. ^ Compilation: Full text of responses to Economist survey on Corporate Social Responsibility (January-February 2005). Business & Human Rights. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  27. ^ Allen, Katie (July 11, 2007). Economist launches audio magazine. Guardian Unlimited. Retrieved on 2007-08-16.
  28. ^ Inconvenient truths in Singapore. Asia Times. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  29. ^ Iran bans The Economist over map. Jerusalem Post. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  30. ^ Guardian and RFI correspondent risks two years in jail. Reporters Without Borders. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  31. ^ The electoral week — On the trail. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-28.
  32. ^ Investing in Indonesia. economist.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-28.

NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... The Independent Media Center, also called Indymedia or the IMC, is a loose network of amateur or alternative media organizations and journalists who organize into decentralized collectives, normally around geographic locations. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Asia Times Online is an Internet-only publication that reports and examines geopolitical, political, economic and business issues, looking at these from an Asian perspective. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli newspaper in the English language. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is a French origin international non-governmental organization that advocates freedom of the press, founded by its current general-secretary, Robert Menard. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Edwards, Ruth Dudley (1993) The Pursuit of Reason: The Economist 1843–1993, London: Hamish Hamilton, ISBN 0-241-12939-7

External links


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