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Encyclopedia > The Doctor Dances
168b - The Doctor Dances
Doctor Christopher Eccleston (Ninth Doctor)
Writer Steven Moffat
Director James Hawes
Script Editor Elwen Rowlands
Producer Phil Collinson
Executive Producer(s) Russell T. Davies
Julie Gardner
Mal Young
Production code 1.10
Series Series 1
Length 2 of 2 episodes, 45 mins
Originally broadcast May 28, 2005
Preceded by "The Empty Child"
Followed by "Boom Town"
IMDb profile

"The Doctor Dances" is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on May 28, 2005. It is the second of a two-part story and saw Jack Harkness, played by John Barrowman, join the Doctor as a companion. The first part, "The Empty Child", was broadcast on May 21. This episode, together with "The Empty Child", won the 2006 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form.[1] Christopher Eccleston (born February 16, 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor, best known as the ninth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who and for other television roles, as well as for his roles in several high-profile low-budget films. ... The Ninth Doctor refers to the ninth official incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Steven Moffat (born 1961 in Paisley, Scotland) is a British comedy/drama writer who has contributed to television series since the late 1980s. ... James Hawes is a British television director, who has worked on a variety of the most popular series on British television since the early 1990s. ... Elwen Rowlands is a British television script editor. ... Phil Collinson is a British television producer. ... Russell T Davies, interviewed for the documentary series Doctor Who Confidential in 2005. ... She was born on September 3, 1981 in Richmond, Virginia. ... Mal Young (born in Liverpool, England, on January 26, 1957) is a British television producer and executive . ... This is a list of Doctor Who television serials. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Empty Child is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on May 21, 2005. ... Boom Town is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on June 4, 2005. ... This is a list of Doctor Who television serials. ... A broadcast of the long-running and popular British science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who is a long-running British science fiction television programme produced by the BBC, (and a 1996 television movie). ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jack Harkness, also known as Captain Jack (an alias; his real name is, as yet, unrevealed), is a fictional character played by John Barrowman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and one of its spin-offs, Torchwood. ... John Barrowman (born 11 March 1967 in Glasgow) is a Scottish-American actor, musical performer, dancer, singer, and TV presenter who has lived and worked both in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Companion, in the long-running BBC television science fiction programme Doctor Who and related works, is a term used to describe a character who travels with and shares the adventures of the Doctor. ... The Empty Child is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on May 21, 2005. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually by members of the World Science Fiction Convention for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ...

Contents

Synopsis

The Child's plague is spreading throughout wartime London, and its zombie army is on the march. The Ninth Doctor and Rose form an alliance with intergalactic con man Captain Jack, but find themselves trapped in the abandoned hospital. The answer lies at the crash site, but time is running out... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Ninth Doctor refers to the ninth official incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Rose Tyler is a fictional character played by Billie Piper in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup because it is in list format. ... Jack Harkness, also known as Captain Jack (an alias; his real name is, as yet, unrevealed), is a fictional character played by John Barrowman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and one of its spin-offs, Torchwood. ...


Plot

"All that weapons tech in the hands of an hysterical four-year-old... looking for his mummy."

Following on from the end of "The Empty Child", the gas-masked virus carriers each call out "Mummy?" while they back the Doctor, Rose and Jack up into a corner; meanwhile, in a house in another part of London, the Child himself is cornering Nancy. At the last moment, the Doctor forcefully steps forward and commands the zombies in a stern, parental voice, to go to their room. The zombies pause, uncertain, and simultaneously, so does the Child. The Doctor repeats his order, saying that he is very cross with them, and slowly, the zombies turn and return to their beds, and the Child turns away from Nancy, leaving the house and wandering away. The Doctor relaxes, glad that his ruse worked — it would have been a terrible set of last words. The Empty Childs zombie army advances towards ground zero. ... The Empty Childs zombie army advances towards ground zero. ... The Empty Child is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on May 21, 2005. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... A group of actors portraying zombies in a film A zombie is an animated human body devoid of a soul. ...


Jack explains how his con was supposed to work: he would find some space junk, throw it through time, convince a Time Agent that it was worth something and get fifty percent of the payment before a German bomb would land and erase all evidence of the swindle before the buyer could claim it. He says the London Blitz is particularly good for this, as bombs fall all the time, and recommends Pompeii as another suitable location that can double as a "vacation". The Doctor does not approve, and points to the dormant zombies around the room as the consequences of what Jack did. Jack protests that the crashed ship was an empty, burnt-out medical transport and so could not have anything to do with this. As the Doctor heads for the door and upstairs, they hear the all-clear siren sounding. The Blitz, a popular English contraction of the German word Blitzkrieg, was the sustained and intensive bombing of Britain, particularly London, from September 7, 1940 through to May 1941 by the German Luftwaffe in World War II. Although the Blitz is named after Blitzkrieg, it was not an example of... Pompeii is a ruined Roman city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. ...


Nancy hears the all-clear as well, but before she can leave the house, she is caught by the family that lives there, who grab and force her back inside until the authorities can deal with her. However, when alone with Mr Lloyd, Nancy adroitly points out that there was much more food on the table than should have been in a time of rationing. She says that half the street believes that Mrs Lloyd is "messing about" with the butcher, but she knows that it is actually Mr Lloyd who is doing so, leaving the implied threat of blackmail hanging. She demands wire cutters, a torch and food before she is allowed to leave.


Back at the hospital, the three time travellers reach Room 802, where the Child, the first victim of the "bomb", was taken. The Doctor gets Jack to use his sonic blaster, identifying the weapon as coming from the 51st century. The blaster digitises the lock, leaving a clean square hole where it used to be, and they enter. The room is in disarray, the glass separating the observation booth from the rest of the room smashed. The Doctor prompts Jack, who notes that whatever did this was powerful and angry. On the floor are toys, and on the walls are child's drawings in crayon. The Doctor turns on the tape recorder in the booth, and the voice of Dr Constantine issues from the speakers. Constantine had been questioning the Child, but all the Child kept asking was if he was his "mummy".


As the tape continues to play, the Doctor walks around the room, thinking out loud. The homeless children he encountered earlier were living around the bombsite. Suppose one of them wandered near the crashed ship and was somehow altered. The Child is incredibly powerful, and it will soon realise that. The Doctor realises as well that he sent the Child to its room: the very room they are in right now. He turns around and sees the Child standing there, asking its eternal question.


The Doctor uses Jack's blaster to digitise a wall of the room and they run out into the corridor. Jack reverses the settings and reintegrates the wall, sealing the Child in. However, their respite is short-lived as the Child begins to batter its way through the wall and the zombies start approaching them from both sides. The Child is not just controlling them — it is every living thing it has infected. Rose pulls Jack's blaster down to disintegrate the floor just as the zombies close in and they fall down to the ward below. The zombies in that ward wake up as well, and the trio run for a door, sealing it shut behind them with the Doctor's sonic screwdriver. Unfortunately, it is a storeroom, and a dead end. As the Doctor looks for a way out, Jack vanishes. The Fourth Doctor and his sonic screwdriver (from The Sontaran Experiment). ...


Nancy reaches her makeshift living space at the abandoned rail yard, and finds the other children there. She chides them, saying that they should have looked for somewhere else to stay, but they say they are safe with her. Nancy disclaims this, saying that it is not that the Child keeps coming after them; the Child keeps coming after her. As if to prove her point, a typewriter in the hovel starts typing on its own, tapping out the Child's question. Nancy leaves, heading for the bombsite.


In the storeroom, Jack's voice comes over a disconnected radio. He had used his ship's teleporter, but could not take the others along because it was keyed to his molecular structure. He is trying to override the navigational computer's security, but it will take some time. Jack is able to communicate over the disconnected radio because of his ship's Om-Com technology — an ability the Child also has. The Child's voice comes over the radio, tauntingly saying that it is going to find them, and Jack jams the signal by playing Glenn Miller's "Moonlight Serenade", the same music he and Rose danced to on his spaceship. Teleportation is the movement of objects or elementary particles from one place to another, more or less instantaneously, without traveling through space. ... Alton Glenn Miller (March 1, 1904 — presumably December 15, 1944), was an American jazz musician and bandleader in the swing era. ... This article is about the Miller-Parish song. ...


As the Doctor works on breaking through the concrete by setting up a resonance pattern with the sonic screwdriver, he asks Rose why she seems to trust Jack. Rose says Jack reminds her of the Doctor, except with "dating and dancing." The Doctor is mildly offended that Rose assumes he cannot dance, and Rose, amused, asks him to prove it. As they start to dance, however, they are teleported up to Jack's ship. There, the nanogenes heal the Doctor's hand that he burnt on the TARDIS console when it sparked during the pursuit of the cylinder. The Doctor identifies Jack's "borrowed" ship as being of Chula design like the crashed ship. Jack works on getting the nav-com back online, and in answer to Rose's questions, he explains that his confidence trickster activities are not wholly mercenary. He had left the Time Agents when he discovered that they had stolen two years of his memory. Jack observes that the Doctor does not trust him, and he may be right not to. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with nanorobotics. ... The TARDIS The TARDIS[1][2] is a time machine and spacecraft in the British science fiction television programme Doctor Who. ...


Meanwhile, Nancy has reached the crash site, and uses the wire cutters to get past the barbed wire. However, as she reaches the tarpaulin-covered ship, she is discovered by the soldiers guarding the site and placed under arrest. She is brought to a hut where Jenkins, a sick soldier bearing the lighting scar mark of the Child's plague, is resting. Despite pleading with the commanding officer (the same Army officer Jack was talking to the previous episode) not to leave her there, he handcuffs her to the table. Once left alone, Nancy can do nothing but watch helplessly as Jenkins painfully transforms into another gas-masked zombie.


The Doctor, Jack and Rose reach the crash site as well. Rose offers to distract the guards' commander, but Jack points out that he knows Algy, and Rose is not his type. Jack goes ahead instead, leaving Rose slightly shocked. The Doctor points out that in the 51st century, people are more flexible in who they "dance" with. However, when Jack tries to talk to Algy, the British officer transforms into a zombie and collapses. The Doctor hears singing from a nearby hut and finds Nancy, who is keeping the zombie Jenkins asleep with a lullaby. The Doctor frees her from her bonds and they all head to the Chula transport.


As Jack tries to open the coded lock on the transport, he sets off an alarm which awakens the zombies in Albion Hospital, who then start to move toward the site. The Doctor orders Jack to secure the gates and tells Rose and Nancy to reconnect the barbed wire with the sonic screwdriver. Nancy asks Rose who they are, and Rose tells her that they are from the future. When Nancy is sceptical that there will even be a future, given all the carnage of war around them, Rose confidentially tells her that the British will win the war. Albion Hospital is a fictional hospital appearing in the Doctor Who episodes The Empty Child and Aliens of London. ...


Jack manages to open the transport and reveals that it is empty. However, the Doctor asks Rose what they should expect in a Chula medical transport, and Rose hits on the right answer: nanogenes. The ship was full of them, and when it crashed, billions and billions of nanogenes escaped, programmed to heal everything they came across. However, the first thing the nanogenes found was a dead child wearing a gas mask, and never having seen a "normal" living human before, they used that as their only pattern. They then started to transform everything they encountered to fit that baseline. The nanogenes have given unimaginable power to a little boy searching for his mother, one who is both willing and able to tear apart the world to do it.


Cries of "mummy" fill the air as the zombie army, led by the Child, approach the site. When Jack triggered the alarm, the ship thought it was under attack and so summoned the zombies as troops to protect it. The transport was a battlefield medical unit, built to heal Chula warriors and send them back to the front lines; that was why the Child was so strong and could transmit its voice using the same technology as Jack's ship. Nancy begins to cry, saying that it is all her fault. The Doctor starts to comfort her, but then realises that the Child — Jamie — is not her brother, but her son, whose maternity she kept a secret even from him.


Jack notes the bomb is seconds away from dropping, but the nav-com is back on-line and the teleporter is only working for him again. The Doctor tells him to do what he has to, and Jack teleports away, making Rose think he has abandoned them. The Doctor asks Nancy to tell Jamie the answer to the question he has been asking all along. Jamie steps up to Nancy, asking once again whether she is his mummy. Nancy answers yes, she is, and she will always be. They embrace, and the nanogenes swell up around them in a cloud of glowing particles. To the Doctor's delight, the nanogenes scan Nancy and Jamie, matching their DNA. Because she is Jamie's mother, Nancy's genetic code provides them the information they lacked with Jamie. The nanogenes recognise Nancy's living form as the correct pattern and, using this as their new baseline, restore Jamie back to full health. With a laugh of joy, the Doctor unmasks the restored Jamie and lifts him in his arms. The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions for the development and function of living organisms. ...


Rose suddenly remembers the bomb, but the Doctor says it has been taken care of. As it streaks down towards them, so does Jack's ship, capturing the bomb in its tractor beam. The Doctor had judged Jack's psychology right and the former Time Agent has returned for the rescue. Jack is riding the bomb itself in the beam, and tells the Doctor that the bomb has commenced detonation. Jack is keeping it in stasis, but it will not last. The Doctor asks him to get rid of it as safely as he can. Jack tells Rose good-bye, and teleports with the bomb back to his ship, which flies away. The Doctor waves his fingers, summoning the nanogenes around them and applying a patch to their programming. He hurls the nanogenes towards the zombies, crying out triumphantly, "Everybody lives, Rose! Just this once — everybody lives!"


The former zombies rise; all of them restored to their normal selves and with their ailments cured by the nanogenes, even to the extent of Mrs Harcourt regrowing her missing leg. The Doctor leaves Dr Constantine to tend to his patients, bidding them farewell with an exhortation to beat the Germans, save the world, and not forget the welfare state. He sets the Chula transport to self-destruct once they leave, to fulfil history's requirement of an explosion. As Rose and the Doctor enter the TARDIS, the Doctor is almost insufferably pleased with himself — the reprogrammed nanogenes will fix all the earlier damage they did before they deactivate and Nancy and Jamie will get the help they need from Dr Constantine. Rose then asks about Jack and the unexploded bomb, and his smile fades. There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ...


In space, Jack discovers that there is no way to eject the bomb or even himself, and his situation seems hopeless. With an air of resignation, he orders "emergency protocol 417", a large martini (with too much vermouth) and begins to drink as the strains of Glenn Miller start to play… from the open doors of the TARDIS appearing at the back of his ship. He enters the console room and the Doctor tells him to shut the doors, welcoming him to his ship. The Doctor switches the music to "In the Mood" and starts to dance with Rose, who points out that Jack may want that dance. The Doctor agrees, but mischievously asks, "But who with?" As Jack watches, smiling, the Doctor and Rose dance around the console. See: Martini (cocktail) - a popular cocktail. ... It has been suggested that Punt e mes be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the big band-era song popularized by Glenn Miller. ...


Cast

Doctor Who or, see History of Doctor Who. ... Christopher Eccleston (born February 16, 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor, best known as the ninth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who and for other television roles, as well as for his roles in several high-profile low-budget films. ... Rose Tyler is a fictional character played by Billie Piper in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Billie John Piper (originally registered as Lianne Piper[1]), born on 22 September 1982, is an English actress. ... Richard Wilson OBE (born July 9, 1936) is a Scottish actor and theatre director, best known for playing Victor Meldrew in the popular BBC situation comedy One Foot in the Grave. ... Florence Hoath (born 8 December 1984) is a British actress and daughter of British actress Tina Martin. ... Jack Harkness, also known as Captain Jack (an alias; his real name is, as yet, unrevealed), is a fictional character played by John Barrowman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and one of its spin-offs, Torchwood. ... John Barrowman (born 11 March 1967 in Glasgow) is a Scottish-American actor, musical performer, dancer, singer, and TV presenter who has lived and worked both in the United Kingdom and the United States. ...

Cast notes

Several celebrities have made guest appearances in Doctor Who. ...

Continuity

  • Jack mentions Pompeii as another ideal place for a con, although he jokingly says that one has to set the alarm clock for "volcano day". The Seventh Doctor and Mel visited the ill-fated city in the Big Finish Productions audio drama The Fires of Vulcan. Jack implies that he has gone back to Pompeii several times, but does not explain how he avoids his other selves on one particular day in history.
  • It is established that Jack comes from the 51st century. This is a particularly significant period in the Doctor Who fictional universe, being the time of the Great Breakout, an expansionistic period where mankind headed for the stars (The Invisible Enemy) as well as the home era of K-9. Other historical events of the 51st century include a new ice age, a near world war, early experiments in time travel, the establishment of the Time Agents and the rise and fall of the villanous Magnus Greel (The Talons of Weng-Chiang). Parts of the Tenth Doctor episode "The Girl in the Fireplace" take place in this era as well.
  • "The Empty Child" and "The Doctor Dances" are the only Doctor Who stories strongly connected with an alien race in which none of its members or representatives are actually seen.
  • The Doctor identifies Jack's sonic blaster as coming from the Weapon Factories of Villengard and implies that he blew them up. He also notes that there is a banana grove where the factories were, and that "bananas are good" as a source of potassium. The Tenth Doctor repeats this sentiment in "The Girl in the Fireplace" (also scripted by Steven Moffat) and claims that he invented the banana daiquiri in 17th century France.
  • As mentioned in Doctor Who Confidential, in this episode "dancing" is used as a metaphor for sex. In this light, lines like "The world doesn't end if the Doctor dances," the Doctor being offended that Rose assumes that he does not dance, and the Doctor saying at the end that he remembers that he can, are references to the long-standing controversy regarding the Doctor's sexuality, and whether or not the series should address it. Moffat also alludes to this metaphor in "The Girl in the Fireplace".
  • Rose offering to distract the guards using her femininity echoes a tactic used successfully by Ace in 1989's The Curse of Fenric (a story also set during World War II).
  • As the Doctor notes, "Just this once, everybody lives!" Other stories where nobody died include The Edge of Destruction (1964) and Fury from the Deep (1968); as well as the 2006 episode "Fear Her". The Celestial Toymaker (1966) and Castrovalva (1982) involved the destruction of (technically) non-living beings. A typical "everyone dies" story is Horror of Fang Rock (1977). Whether Jack's ship "dies" depends on whether it was artificially intelligent (and then, also depends on how one views the relationship between AI and "life").
  • Continuing the "bad wolf" references, the German bomb that Jack sits on has the words "Schlechter Wolf" stencilled on its shell which, literally translated from German, means "Bad Wolf", although the concept of "bad wolf" would normally be translated as "Böser Wolf" into German. (See Story arcs in Doctor Who.)
  • Mickey's website, "Who is Doctor Who?" and the UNIT website both carry reports about unexploded "Schlechter Wolf" bombs in the present day, implying they may be something more sinister than just a German terror weapon.[2][3] The bomb as pictured is unusual, with thick fins and a non-aerodynamic nose. Also, the stencilling would be expected not to spiral round the casing.
  • Rose teases the Doctor about the fact that he is grinning like he was Father Christmas. The Doctor then retorts, "Who says I'm not, 'red bicycle when you were twelve'?", and Rose's reaction implies that this is something she did not tell the Doctor. Whether or not the Doctor was just being prescient, making a lucky guess, spied on the Tylers that Christmas morning, or whether he really did (or will) leave Rose a red bicycle for Christmas when she was twelve has as yet not been expanded on.
  • According to a police officer in Torchwood episode "Everything Changes", Captain Jack went missing on 21 January 1941.

Mount Vesuvius (Italian: Monte Vesuvio) is a volcano east of Naples, Italy, located at 40°49′N 14°26′ E. It is the only active volcano on the European mainland, although it is not currently erupting. ... The Seventh Doctor is the name given to the seventh incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Melanie Bush, or simply Mel, is a fictional character played by Bonnie Langford in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Big Finish Productions is a British company that produces audio plays released straight to compact disc, based on British cult science fiction properties. ... This is a list of audio plays based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who produced by Big Finish Productions. ... The Fires of Vulcan is a Big Finish Productions audio drama based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... A fictional universe is a cohesive imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction. ... The Invisible Enemy is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from October 1 to October 22, 1977. ... K-9, or K9, is the name of several robotic dogs in the long-running British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... A world war is a war affecting the majority of the worlds major nations. ... The Talons of Weng-Chiang is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts from February 26 to April 2, 1977. ... The Tenth Doctor is the name given to the tenth and current incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... The Girl in the Fireplace is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... General Name, Symbol, Number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, Period, Block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... The Tenth Doctor is the name given to the tenth and current incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... This article is about the mixed drink. ... The Doctor Who Confidential logo Doctor Who Confidential is a documentary series created by the British Broadcasting Corporation to complement the revival of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ... Ace (given name Dorothy) is a fictional character played by Sophie Aldred in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Curse of Fenric is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from October 25 to November 15, 1989. ... The Edge of Destruction (also known as Inside the Spaceship, among other titles, see below) is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in 2 weekly parts on February 8 and February 15, 1964. ... Fury from the Deep is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in six weekly parts from March 16 to April 20, 1968. ... Fear Her is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Celestial Toymaker is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from April 2 to April 23, 1966. ... Castrovalva is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four twice-weekly parts from January 4 to January 12, 1982 It was the first full serial to feature Peter Davison in the starring role. ... Horror of Fang Rock is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from September 3 to September 24, 1977. ... Garry Kasparov playing against Deep Blue, the first machine to win a chess game against a reigning world champion. ... For other uses, see Life (disambiguation). ... In both the original run and since the 2005 revival, long-running British science fiction television programme Doctor Who has featured a number of story arcs. ... The 2005 series revival of the long-running British science fiction television programme Doctor Who features several tie-in websites produced by the BBC website team that viewers can access on the Internet. ... The United Nations Intelligence Taskforce (also known as UNIT) is a fictional military organization from the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Aerodynamics is a branch of fluid dynamics concerned with the study of gas flows, first analysed by George Cayley in the 1800s. ... A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ... For the eponymous fictional institute, see Torchwood Institute. ... Everything Changes is an episode in the British science fiction television series Torchwood, which was first broadcast on 22 October 2006. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ...

Production

  • The working title for this story was "Captain Jax".[4] On the back of the packaging for the basic DVD it was released on, this episode is erroneously called "The Doctor Dance's".
  • The climatic scene of the episode at the alien crash site was filmed on Barry Island, Wales, which was also the primary location for the shooting of the Seventh Doctor serial Delta and the Bannermen (1987). Several scenes of this story were filmed at the Vale of Glamorgan Railway sites at Plymouth Road on Barry Island in January 2005.
  • In the DVD commentary for this episode, writer Steven Moffatt reveals that up until a very late stage, the nanogenes in this story were called "nanites". However, script editor Helen Raynor decided this name sounded too much like similar nanotechnological devices in Star Trek: The Next Generation.
  • The scene where the Child surprises the Doctor, Rose, and Jack in Room 802 was voted television's "Golden Moment of 2005" by viewers, as part of the BBC's 2005 TV Moments programme.[5]

DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... Barry Island (Welsh: Ynys y Barri) is a peninsula forming part of the town of Barry in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... The Seventh Doctor is the name given to the seventh incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Delta and the Bannermen is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from November 2 to November 16, 1987. ... The Vale of Glamorgan Railway is a heritage railway based at Barry in the Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales. ... Barry Island (Welsh: Ynys y Barri) is a peninsula forming part of the town of Barry in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales. ... Script Editor is a program included with Mac OS that allows AppleScripts to be written, debugged, and ran. ... Helen Raynor (born March 27, 1972) is a British television and theatre writer and script editor. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ...

Outside references

Fusion cuisine combines elements of various culinary traditions whilst not fitting specifically into any. ... Hammersmith is an urban centre in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in West London, England, approximately 5 miles (8km) west of Charing Cross on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Russell T Davies, interviewed for the documentary series Doctor Who Confidential in 2005. ...

Historical details

  • Anachronistically, Jamie's voice is recorded on tape. While compact magnetic tape recorders were developed in Germany in the 1930s, the technology did not make its way to the rest of the world until after World War II. Wire recording was used by the BBC during this period, but recording gramophones, using wax discs as a medium, were more common. Steven Moffatt acknowledges this mistake in the DVD commentary for The Doctor Dances, but jokily suggests that an ancestor of Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart stole the machine from Germany to help with the war effort.

Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Methods and media for sound recording are varied and have undergone significant changes between the first time sound was actually recorded for later playback until now. ... Wire recording is a type of analogue audio storage in which the recording is made onto thin steel or stainless steel wire. ... Edison cylinder phonograph ca. ... Nicholas Courtney as Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart. ... Alton Glenn Miller (March 1, 1904 — presumably December 15, 1944), was an American jazz musician and bandleader in the swing era. ... This article is about the big band-era song popularized by Glenn Miller. ... Moonlight Serenade is Carly Simons fourth standards album. ...

References

  1. ^ Hugo and Campbell Awards Winners. Locus Online (2006-08-26). Retrieved on 2006-08-27.
  2. ^ http://www.whoisdoctorwho.co.uk
  3. ^ http://www.unit.org.uk/
  4. ^ http://www.shannonsullivan.com/drwho/serials/2005ij.html
  5. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/tvmoments/winners.shtml
  6. ^ http://www.restaurantsomh.com/l33.htm

Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (240th in leap years), with 126 days remaining. ...

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Doctor: Information from Answers.com (8773 words)
The Fourth Doctor's long waistcoat and trailing scarf added to his bohemian image; the Fifth's cricketer's outfit suited his youthful, aristocratic air (with a stick of celery on the lapel for an eccentric touch); and the Sixth's multicoloured jacket, with its cat-shaped lapel pins, reflected the excesses of 1980s fashion.
The Doctor Who novels have suggested that these may have been faces of the Other, a figure from Gallifrey's ancient past and the genetic predecessor of the Doctor (although being from the tie-in novels, the canonicity of this character is debatable).
As the Doctor had a granddaughter, it was implicit from the beginning that he probably had had, at some point, romantic or at least sexual relations with someone (in Fear Her (2006), he states that he was once a father).
The Empty Child / The Doctor Dances (6056 words)
The TARDIS materialises in an alleyway, and the Doctor and Rose emerge, unaware that they’re being observed.
The Doctor is put out by Rose’s assumption that he never dances, and Rose, amused, turns up the volume on the radio and invites him to show her his moves.
When Jack mentions the destruction of Pompeii, the Doctor is appalled at his frivilousness about such a horrific event in history; this is probably linked to The Fires of Vulcan, where the Seventh Doctor was convinced that he would lose his TARDIS in the volcanic eruption and be trapped on Earth forever.
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