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Encyclopedia > The Devil and Daniel Webster (short story)
Title The Devil and Daniel Webster
Author Steven Vincent Benét
Country United States
Language English
Genre(s) Fantasy short story
Publisher Farrar & Rinehart
Released 1937
Media type Print (Hardback)
Pages xiii, 61 pp
ISBN NA
Daniel argues while the Devil whispers in the judges ear.

"The Devil and Daniel Webster" is a short story by Steven Vincent Benét. This retelling of the classic German Faust tale centers on a New Hampshire farmer who sells his soul to the Devil and is defended by Daniel Webster. Stephen Vincent Benét (July 22, 1898–March 13, 1943) was a United States author, poet, short story writer and novelist, best known for his narrative poem of the American Civil War, John Browns Body, published in 1928. ... In political geography and international politics a country is a geographical entity, a territory, most commonly associated with the notions of state or nation. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other definitions of fantasy see fantasy (psychology). ... This article is in need of attention. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Farrar and Rinehart was a publishing company founded by John Chipman Farrar, Stanley M. Rinehart and Frederick R Rinehart in New York in 1929. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The barcode of an ISBN . ... Image File history File links Daniel_Webster_and_the_Devil_argue_in_court. ... Image File history File links Daniel_Webster_and_the_Devil_argue_in_court. ... Stephen Vincent Benét (July 22, 1898–March 13, 1943) was a United States author, poet, short story writer and novelist, best known for his narrative poem of the American Civil War, John Browns Body, published in 1928. ... Faust depicted in an etching by Rembrandt van Rijn (circa 1650) Faust or Faustus (pronounced with the same au sound as in house) is the protagonist of a popular German legend in which a mediæval scholar makes a pact with the Devil. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... Satan frozen at the center of Cocytus, the ninth circle of Hell in Dantes Inferno. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ...


The story was published in 1937 by Farrar & Rinehart. In 1938, it appeared in The Saturday Evening Post and won an O. Henry award that same year. The author would adapt it in 1938 into a folk opera with music by Douglas Stuart Moore. Benét also worked on the screenplay adaptation for the 1941 film. See also: 1936 in literature, other events of 1937, 1938 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Farrar and Rinehart was a publishing company founded by John Chipman Farrar, Stanley M. Rinehart and Frederick R Rinehart in New York in 1929. ... See also: 1937 in literature, other events of 1938, 1939 in literature, list of years in literature. ... A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903 The Saturday Evening Post was a weekly magazine published in the United States from August 4, 1821 to February 8, 1969. ... The O. Henry Awards are yearly prizes given to short stories of exceptional merit. ... Douglas Stuart Moore (August 10, 1893 - July 25, 1969) was an American composer, educator, and author. ...

Contents

Plot summary

The story is about a New Hampshire farmer, Jabez Stone, who is plagued with unending bad luck. It is set in 1841. 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Stone swears that "it's enough to make a man want to sell his soul to the devil!" When Satan, disguised as "Mr. Scratch", arrives the next day, he makes such an offer, and Stone reluctantly agrees to the deal.


Stone enjoys seven years of prosperity, and later bargains for three more years, but as the "mortgage falls due," he convinces famous lawyer and orator Daniel Webster to argue his case with the Devil. Mortgage loan is the generic term for a loan secured by a mortgage on real property; the mortgage refers to the legal security, but the terms are often used interchangeably to refer to the mortgage loan. ...


At midnight of the appointed date, Mr. Scratch arrives and is greeted by Daniel Webster presenting himself as Stone's attorney. Mr. Scratch tells Daniel, "I shall call upon you, as a law-abiding citizen, to assist me in taking possession of my property," and so begins the argument. It goes poorly for Daniel since the signature and the contract are clear, and Mr. Scratch will not agree to a compromise.


In desperation Daniel thunders, "Mr. Stone is an American citizen, and no American citizen may be forced into the service of a foreign prince. We fought England for that in '12 and we'll fight all hell for it again!" To this Mr. Scratch insists on his citizenship citing his presence at the worst events of America, concluding that "though I don't like to boast of it, my name is older in this country than yours." Combatants United States Great Britain Canada Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other...


A trial is then demanded by Daniel as the right of every American. Mr. Scratch agrees after Daniel says that he can pick the judge and jury, "so it is an American judge and an American jury!" A jury of the damned then enters, "with the fires of hell still upon them." They had all done evil, and had all played a part in America:

After five other unnamed jurors enter, the Judge (John Hathorne) enters last. He had presided at the Salem witch trials. for other men named Walter Butler, see Walter Butler Walter Butler ( 1752 – 30 October 1781 ) was a British Loyalist officer during the American Revolution. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Simon Girty (1741–February 18, 1818) was a British subject, born in what is now the United States, who served as a liaison between the British and their Native American allies during the American Revolution. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Metacomet (died August 12, 1676), also known as King Philip or Metacom, was a war chief or sachem of the Wampanoag Indians and their leader in King Philips War. ... Sir Thomas Dale was a British naval commander and colonial deputy-governor of Virginia. ... Thomas Morton (c 1576-1647) was an early American colonist from Devonshire, England, a lawyer, writer and social reformer, famed for founding the Merrymount Colony and his work studying the Native American culture. ... Plymouth is a city of 243,795 inhabitants (2001 census) in the south-west of England, or alternatively the West Country, and is situated within the traditional and ceremonial county of Devon at the mouths of the rivers Plym and Tamar and at the head of one of the world... Pilgrims is the name commonly applied to early settlers of the Plymouth Colony, MA. Their leadership came from a religious congregation who had fled religious persecution in the East Midlands of England for the relative calm of Holland in the Netherlands. ... Blackbeard (1680? – November 22, 1718) was the nickname of Edward Teach alias Edward Thatch, a notorious English pirate who had a short reign of terror in the Caribbean Sea between 1716 and 1718. ... John Hathorne (August 5, 1641 - May 10, 1717) was one of the associate magistrates in the Salem witch trials, and later, the only one not to repent of his actions. ... 1876 illustration of the courtroom; the central figure is usually identified as Mary Walcott The Salem witch trials, which began in 1692 (also known as the Salem witch hunt and the Salem witchcraft episode), resulted in a number of convictions and executions for witchcraft in both Salem Village and Salem...


The trial goes against Daniel in every unfair way. Finally he is on his feet ready to rage, without care for himself or Stone. Before speaking he sees in their eyes that they all wanted him to act out against his better nature. He calms himself, "for it was him they'd come for, not only Jabez Stone."


Daniel begins speaking of simple and good things -- "the freshness of a fine morning...the taste of food when you're hungry...the new day that's every day when you're a child" -- and how "without freedom, they sickened." He speaks passionately of how wonderful it is to be a man, and to be an American. He admits the wrongs done in America, but argues that something new and good had grown from it, "and everybody had played a part in it, even the traitors." Mankind "got tricked and trapped and bamboozled, but it was a great journey" that no "demon ever foaled" could ever understand. St. ...


The jury announces its verdict: "We find for the defendant, Jabez Stone." They admit that, "even the damned may salute the eloquence of Mr. Webster." The judge and jury disappear with the break of dawn. Mr. Scratch congratulates Daniel and the contract is torn up.


Daniel then grabs the stranger and twists his arm behind his back, "for he knew that once you bested anybody like Mr. Scratch in fair fight, his power on you was gone." Daniel makes him agree "never to bother Jabez Stone nor his heirs or assigns nor any other New Hampshire man till doomsday!" Look up doomsday in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Major themes

Patriotism

Patriotism is the main theme in the story: Webster claims that the Devil cannot take the soul because he cannot claim American citizenship. "And who with better right?" the devil replies, going on to list several wrongs done in America, thereby demonstrating his presence in America. The Devil says "I am merely an honest American like yourself - and of the best descent - for, to tell the truth, Mr. Webster, though I don't like to boast of it, my name is older in this country than yours." This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


Webster insists on a jury trial as an American right, with Americans for the jury. The Devil then provides the worst examples of Americans for the judge and jury. In Daniel's speech "He was talking about the things that make a country a country, and a man a man" rather than legal points of the case. For Webster, freedom and independence defines manhood: "Yes, even in hell, if a man was a man, you'd know it."


This theme of American patriotism, freedom and independence is the explanation for Webster's victory: The jury is damned to hell, but they are American and therefore so independent that they can resist the Devil. Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is an afterlife of suffering where the wicked or unrighteous dead are punished. ...


Slavery

In his speech, Webster briefly acknowledges Slavery and Racism as evil, but then virtually ignores them, even saying that suffering through them made America a stronger country. This makes for a condemnation of both slavery and Daniel Webster. Benét acknowledges the evil by having the devil say: "When the first wrong was done to the first Indian, I was there. When the first slaver put out for the Congo, I stood on her deck." Benét has Daniel Webster affirm racism, giving him the line: "For if two New Hampshiremen aren't a match for the devil, we might as well give the country back to the Indians." Slave sale in Easton, Maryland The history of slavery in the United States began soon after Europeans first settled in what became the United States. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In religion and ethics, evil refers to the morally or ethically objectionable behaviour or thought; behavior or thought which is hateful, cruel, excessively sexual, or violent, devoid of conscience. ...


The real Daniel Webster was willing to compromise on slavery in favor of keeping the Union together, disappointing many abolitionists. Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Abolition is the act of formally destroying something through legal means, either by making it illegal, or simply no longer allowing it to exist in any form. ...


At the end of the story during the Devil's fortune telling, he says: "But the last great speech you make will turn many of your own against you ... They will call you Ichabod; they will call you by other names. Even in New England some will say you have turned your coat and sold your country, and their voices will be loud against you till you die." This doesn't bother Webster; only keeping the union together mattered to him. Fortune teller redirects here. ... Ichabod, in the Bible, is the son of Phinehas. ... ...


Treatment of the Indians

On the treatment of the Indians/Native Americans, the story is in many ways self-contradictory. As noted, Webster states "If two New Hampshiremen aren't a match for the devil, we might as well give the country back to the Indians" - which implies that as long as white people are united and sure of themselves, they need not give back the land and were justified in taking it away from the Indians in the first place. Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ...


The stranger/Satan remarks that "When the first wrong was done to the first Indian, I was there"; which implies a recognition that the Indians were wronged. Yet "King Philip, wild and proud as he had been in life, with the great gash in his head that gave him his death wound" is among the notorious villains of American history which the stranger produces for his jury -though King Philip's "villainies" were arguably no more than a reaction to the wrongs done to his people. {Furthermore King Philip died from a gunshot to the heart and not a gash to the head!} Metacomet (died August 12, 1676), also known as King Philip or Metacom, was a war chief or sachem of the Wampanoag Indians and their leader in King Philips War. ...


Yet later on, Daniel Webster's appeal to the jury on "what it means to be American" completely and unreservably includes King Philip among "the Americans" (which is an anachronism as the historical Daniel Webster would have been unlikely to express such an opinion). The narrator also expresses sympathy for King Philip when he tells us that one juror "heard the cry of his lost nation" in Webster's eloquent appeal.


These ambiguities seem to reflect the ambiguous perception of this aspect of American history at the time of writing (rather than at the time when the story is supposed to take place).


The Devil

The devil is portrayed as polite and refined. When the devil arrives he is described as "a soft-spoken, dark-dressed stranger," who "drove up in a handsome buggy." Benét named the devil Mr. Scratch but often referred to him as the stranger, writing passages such as "The stranger looked a little embarrassed." The Devil never threatens, and always acts politely, even shaking hands with Webster in the end. In fact it is Webster who attacks the Devil, literally twisting his arm.


Quotes

Daniel, in response to Jabez Stone's imploration to depart while there is still time

"I'm obliged to you, Neighbor Stone. It's kindly thought of. But there's a jug on the table and a case in hand. And I never left a jug or a case half finished in my life."

Daniel asks the Devil's name

“I’ve gone by a good many... Perhaps Scratch will do for the evening. I’m often called that in these regions.”

Daniel on jury selection The phrase voir dire derives from Middle French; in modern English it is interpreted to mean speak the truth and generally refers to the process by which prospective jurors are questioned about their backgrounds and potential biases before being invited to sit on a jury. ...

"Let it be any court you choose, so it is an American judge and an American jury! Let it be the quick or the dead ; I'll abide the issue!"

The jury enters The Quick and the Dead is a film directed by Sam Raimi, released in 1995. ...

One and all, they came into the room with the fires of hell still upon them, and the stranger named their names and their deeds as they came, till the tale of twelve was told. Yet the stranger had told the truth - they had all played a part in America.
"Are you satisfied with the jury, Mr. Webster?" said the stranger mockingly, when they had taken their places.
The sweat stood upon Dan'l Webster's brow, but his voice was clear.
"Quite satisfied," he said. "Though I miss General Arnold from the company."
" Benedict Arnold is engaged upon other business," said the stranger, with a glower.

The trial Benedict Arnold Benedict Arnold (January 14, 1741 – June 14, 1801) was a general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. ...

Dan'l Webster had faced some hard juries and hanging judges in his time, but this was the hardest he'd ever faced, and he knew it. They sat there with a kind of glitter in their eyes, and the stranger's smooth voice went on and on. Every time he'd raise an objection, it'd be "Objection sustained," but whenever Dan'l objected, it'd be "Objection denied." Well, you couldn't expect fair play from a fellow like this Mr. Scratch.

The Jury's verdict

Walter Butler: Perhaps 'tis not strictly in accordance with the evidence, but even the damned may salute the eloquence of Mr. Webster.

The ending

They say whenever the devil comes near Marshfield, even now, he gives it a wide berth. And he hasn't been seen in the state of New Hampshire from that day to this. I'm not talking about Massachusetts or Vermont.

Film adaptations

Two film adaptations have been made: an award-winning 1941 film starring Edward Arnold as Daniel, and a less well-known film starring Anthony Hopkins, which was made in 2001, but has taken until 2007 to receive a wide release. The Devil and Daniel Webster is a 1941 film adaptation of the novel of the same name. ... The Devil and Daniel Webster was a 2001 film adaptation of the classic short story. ... Arnold in City That Never Sleeps Edward Arnold (February 18, 1890 - April 26, 1956) was an American character actor. ... Sir Philip Anthony Hopkins CBE (IPA: ) (born 31 December 1937) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning Welsh film, stage and television actor. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ...


Trivia

  • All the predictions the devil makes are based on actual events of Daniel Webster's life: He did have ambitions to become President, his sons died in war, and as a result of a speech he gave denouncing abolitionists, many in the North considered him a traitor.
  • This story was parodied in the first segment of The Simpsons' special Halloween episode, "Treehouse of Horror IV," entitled "The Devil and Homer Simpson". In their version, the Devil is played by Ned Flanders, and Homer sells his soul not for better luck, but for one doughnut. Lacking an oratorical heavyweight like Daniel Webster, it is up to incompetent attorney Lionel Hutz to win Homer's freedom from Hell.
  • A 2005 biopic about cult musician Daniel Johnston was entitled The Devil and Daniel Johnston in reference to the story.
  • The story is referenced in the Magnetic Fields song "Two Characters in Search of a Country Song," from the 1994 album The Charm of the Highway Strip ("You were Jesse James, I was William Tell/ You were Daniel Webster, I was The Devil Himself").
  • This story was also parodied in the Tiny Toons special, Night Ghoulery, with Plucky Duck in the role of Daniel Webster.
  • In several non-English speaking countries, the story is included in textbooks for teaching English to students who are often baffled by the references to events of 19th century American history[citation needed].
  • The story was parodied in an episode of "Tripping the Rift". In this episode entitled "The Devil and a guy named Webster", Chode McBlob sells his soul to save himself, and by extension his crew, from a black hole. His crew in an attempt to save his soul, decide to go back in time and bring Daniel Webster to the future to act as Chode's attorney. Instead of returning with Daniel Webster, they come back with Emmanuel Lewis from the TV sitcom Webster. After seeing how good Lewis is with contracts, he is hired. The jury for the trial consisted of Attila the Hun, Adolf Hitler and Richard Nixon. Lewis is quick to get the Devil to admit he had created a fake black hole to force the deal. Chode is awarded with a "Get Out of Hell Free" card, which he uses immediately.
  • The Superman novel Miracle Monday mentions the events of the story without naming the characters, except for the Devil, who is revealed not to be the Devil himself, but rather Saturn, an agent of his. The climax of the novel, where Saturn must grant Superman a wish after having been defeated by his nobility, is also likely inspired by this story.
  • The story was adaptated by Warner Bros. in A Pinky and the Brain Halloween, in which Pinky gives his soul to "Mister Itch" so that Brain's dream of world domination is realized (with Snowball reduced to his court jester). But Brain soon misses Pinky and travels to Hell to get him back (leaving Snowball behind to seize his throne). In the end, however, the contract between Pinky and Mister Itch is declared null and void because Itch was never able to provide Pinky with a "radish-rose whatsamawhosits" he requested being given at the beginning of the episode.
  • The story and title were also adapted in an episode of the 1960s television series, The Monkees entitled "The Devil and Peter Tork." In the episode, Peter unwittingly signs a contract and sells his soul to the devil ("Mr. Zero" - played by Monte Landis) in order to own a harp he found at a pawn shop. Peter plays beautifully, and the Monkees automatically become an overnight success because of it. But when Mr. Zero finally comes and reveals himself to the Monkees, he convinces Peter that the only reason he could play was because of the power the devil had given him...and that since he sold his soul, he only had a few hours before he would be sent to hell. As a result, the Monkees sue, and bring the matter to court to prove the contract was null and void (Witnesses included Billy the Kid, Blackbeard the Pirate, and Atilla the Hun). However, when the Monkees are called up to the stand, Michael makes a speech on the importance of love, and because of Peter's love for playing the harp, that he didn't need the devil's help to play it at all. In the end, Peter proved the devil wrong, and the Monkees win the case.
  • Nelvana created an animated made-for-television special called "The Devil and Daniel Mouse" based on the story. In the program, Daniel Mouse is a musician whose partner sells her soul to the Devil in exchange for fame.
  • John Fogerty wrote his famous hit, "Bad Moon Rising", based on this book.
  • The plotline is used in a Chick Publications tract, The Contract! [1]
  • In his order rejecting plaintiff's motion to proceed in forma pauperis in the lawsuit United States ex rel. Gerald Mayo v. Satan and His Staff, 54 F.R.D. 282 (1971), Judge Gerald J. Weber cited this story as the sole, though "unofficial," precedent touching on the jurisdiction of United States courts over Satan.

Parody of Back to the Future In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... Nedward Ned Flanders is a fictional character on The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... Homer Jay Simpson is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Doughnuts being glazed at a Krispy Kreme store in Sydney, Australia. ... For recurring characters who are associated with the Mafia, see Springfield Mafia. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A biographical film or biopic is a film about a particular person or group of people, based on events that actually happened. ... Daniel Dale Johnston (b. ... The Devil and Daniel Johnston is a 2005 documentary by Jeff Feuerzeig about the life and music of Daniel Johnston, which won the Directors Award at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. ... The Magnetic Fields is a band led by the New York City singer-songwriter Stephin Merritt. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... The Charm of the Highway Strip is the fourth studio album by The Magnetic Fields, released in 1994. ... Jesse Woodson James (September 5, 1847–April 3, 1882) was an American outlaw, the most famous member of the James-Younger gang. ... Statue of William Tell and his Son in Altdorf, Switzerland (Richard Kissling, 1895). ... Tiny Toon Adventures is an animated television series created by the Warner Bros. ... Plucky Duck Plucky Duck is a fictional anthropomorphic green duck who appeared in the 1990s animated series Tiny Toon Adventures. ... Parody of Back to the Future In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Tripping the Rift was a Canadian CGI science fiction comedy television show that aired on Sci Fi Channel in the United States and Space: The Imagination Station in Canada in March 2004, with roughly concurrent scheduling. ... Simulated view of a black hole in front of the Milky Way A black hole is an object with a gravitational field so powerful that a region of space becomes cut off from the rest of the universe – no matter or radiation (including light) that has entered the region can... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... Emmanuel Lewis (born March 9, 1971 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American actor. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Webster was a sitcom produced by Paramount Television which premiered on ABC on September 16, 1983, and ran on that network until September 11, 1987, but continued in first-run syndication until 1989. ... Attila (AD 406 - 453), also known as Attila the Hun was Khan of the Hun people from 434 until his death and leader of the Hunnic Empire. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Miracle Monday is a novel written by Elliot S! Maggin and based on the DC Comics character Superman. ... Warner Bros. ... Pinky and the Brain are cartoon characters from the animated television series Animaniacs. ... Pinky and the Brain are cartoon characters from the animated television series Animaniacs. ... The Monkees were a pop-rock quartet created and based in Los Angeles in 1965 for an NBC American television series of the same name. ... Nelvana Limited is a Canadian entertainment company, founded in 1971, that is well-known for its work in childrens animation, among many things. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... The Devil and Daniel Mouse is an animated Halloween television special, from Canadas Nelvana animation studio. ... John Cameron Fogerty (born May 28, 1945) is an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist, best known for his time with the swamp rock or roots rock band Creedence Clearwater Revival. ... Bad Moon Rising can refer to: Bad Moon Rising (song), by Creedence Clearwater Revival Bad Moon Rising (album), by Sonic Youth Bad Moon Rising (The West Wing), an episode of the television series BadMoonRising aka BMR (person)|BadMoonRising (Legend),some guy from Maryland who is legendary throughout the world. ... Chick Publications is an American publishing company run by Jack Chick which produces and markets Protestant fundamentalist pamphlets, DVDs, VCDs, videos, books, and posters. ... A court order is an official proclamation by a judge (or panel of judges) that defines the legal relationships between the parties before the court and requires or authorizes the carrying out of certain steps by one or more parties to a case. ... In Forma Pauperis is a legal term derived from the Latin phrase in the form of a pauper. ... United States ex rel. ... A United States federal judge is a judge appointed by the President of the United States and confirmed by the United States Senate in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ "In 'The Devil and Daniel Webster' by Stephen Vincent Benet, there is a character named the Reverend John Smeet. Was this a real person?"
    "Mrs. Stephen Vincent Benet (1960), in a letter to the New York Times Book Review, claimed that the good reverend was entirely imaginary. Mrs. Benet expalined that her husband occasionally used to insert imaginary people into his writings. Benet even quoted from a made-up person named John Cleveland Cotton. He went so far as to write an apocryphal biographal note about Cotton that ended up in Marion King's Books and People (King, 1954). In this Benet anticipated authors Tom Powers and James Blaylock, who created a poet named William Ashbless."
    From: Puzzles and Essays from "The Exchange" - Trick Reference Questions, by Charles R. Anderson; page 122.

References

  • Bleiler, Everett (1948). The Checklist of Fantastic Literature. Chicago: Shasta Publishers, 46-47. 

Everett Franklin Bleiler (born 1920) is an editor and bibliographer of science fiction and Fantasy. ...

External links

  • Electronic version of the Story
  • Criterion Collection essay by Tom Piazza

 
 

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