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Encyclopedia > The Day the Earth Stood Still
The Day the Earth Stood Still

Original 1951 Film Poster
Directed by Robert Wise
Produced by Julian Blaustein
Written by Edmund H. North
Story by Harry Bates (Farewell to the Master)
Starring Michael Rennie
Patricia Neal
Hugh Marlowe
Sam Jaffe
Music by Bernard Herrmann
Cinematography Leo Tover
Editing by William H. Reynolds
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date(s) September 28, 1951
Running time 92 min.
Language English
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

The Day the Earth Stood Still is a 1951 black-and-white science fiction film that tells the story of a humanoid alien who comes to Earth to warn its leaders not to take their conflicts into space, or they will face devastating consequences. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (528x768, 140 KB) Movie poster advertisement for The Day the Earth Stood Still - © 1951 20th Century Fox For an article about a film, the original theatrical advertisement poster is one of the most important images that could be included. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... Julian Blaustein (May 30, 1913 - June 20, 1995) was a movie producer. ... Harry Bates (1900-1981) was an American science fiction editor. ... Michael Rennie (25 August 1909—10 June 1971) was an English film, television and stage actor best known for his starring role as the benevolent space visitor Klaatu in the 1951 classic science fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still. ... Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... Marlowe in Night and the City (1950) Hugh Marlowe was a film, television, stage and radio actor. ... Sam Jaffe (1891-1984) Sam Jaffe (March 8, 1891 – March 24, 1984) was an American actor, teacher and engineer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Leo Tover (1902-1964) was an American cinematographer. ... William H. Reynolds (1910 - 1997) was an American Academy Award-winning film editor. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... See also: 1950 in film 1951 1952 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film Events Sweden - May Britt is scouted by Italian film-makers Carlo Ponti and Mario Soldati Top grossing films North America David and Bathsheba Show Boat tie The Great Caruso and An... Black-and-white or black and white) can refer to a general term used in photography, film, and other media (see black-and-white). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Produced in the aftermath of World War II, the start of the Cold War, and the development and use of the first atomic bombs, the film strongly and iconically reflected the cultural fears of the time related to violence, politics, and the fear of global annihilation. Blended into the nuclear war scare are strong allusions to a Second Coming motif. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... American cultural icons. ... For other uses, see Second Coming (disambiguation). ...


The film stars Michael Rennie, Patricia Neal, and Sam Jaffe. The supporting cast includes noted journalist Drew Pearson. Edmund H. North adapted Harry Bates's short story "Farewell to the Master" for the film, with Robert Wise directing. The score was composed by Bernard Herrmann and is notable for its use of two theremins. Michael Rennie (25 August 1909—10 June 1971) was an English film, television and stage actor best known for his starring role as the benevolent space visitor Klaatu in the 1951 classic science fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still. ... Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... Sam Jaffe (1891-1984) Sam Jaffe (March 8, 1891 – March 24, 1984) was an American actor, teacher and engineer. ... Drew Pearson Drew Pearson (December 13, 1897–September 1, 1969), born in Evanston, Illinois was one of the most prominent American newspaper and radio journalists of his day. ... Film adaptation is the transfer of a written work to a feature film. ... Harry Bates (1900-1981) was an American science fiction editor. ... Farewell to the Master is a science fiction short story written by Harry Bates. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Léon Theremin playing an early theremin The theremin (originally pronounced but often anglicized as [1]), or thereminvox, is one of the earliest fully electronic musical instruments. ...

Contents

Plot

Klaatu (Michael Rennie) arrives in a flying saucer-like spaceship and lands on the Ellipse in President's Park, Washington, DC. He declares he has come in peace on a mission of goodwill; he holds up and activates a small device that opens with a snap. Before he can explain what it is, Klaatu is shot and wounded by a nervous soldier, who assumes the device is a weapon. In response, a large robot called Gort steps out of the spaceship and melts all weapons present without harming the soldiers, until the wounded Klaatu orders him to cease. Klaatu explains the "weapon" was a gift to the President and could have been used to study the other planets. Klaatu is one of the principal characters in the classic science fiction movie The Day the Earth Stood Still. ... UFO redirects here. ... Ariane 5 lifts off with the Rosetta probe on 2nd of March, 2004. ... Presidents Park, located in Washington, D.C., includes the White House, a visitor center, Lafayette Park, and the Ellipse. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... For other uses, see robot (disambiguation). ... Gort is a fictional robot in the movie The Day the Earth Stood Still, played by 77 tall actor Lock Martin. ... Ariane 5 lifts off with the Rosetta probe on 2nd of March, 2004. ...


He is taken to Walter Reed Hospital and quickly recovers. While there, Klaatu meets the President's secretary, Mr. Harley, but is unable to convince him to organize a meeting of world leaders. Klaatu suggests the United Nations, but is told not all the world's countries are represented there, and later, that world leaders cannot even agree on a meeting place for such a momentous occasion. When Klaatu makes known his wish to live amongst ordinary people, to understand them better, Mr. Harley rebuffs him and implies that the alien patient is a prisoner. Later, Klaatu easily escapes into the night. Walter Reed Army Medical Center is a hospital run by the United States Army. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


He goes to a boarding house and tells those living there his name is "Carpenter", taking the name from a laundry label on a suit he has taken. Among the residents are Helen Benson (Patricia Neal), an employee of the United States Department of Commerce, and her son Bobby (Billy Gray). Helen is a widow; her husband was killed at Anzio during World War II. The next morning, Klaatu listens to the radio commentator and breakfast table banter of the boarders. They wonder whether the spaceship is from outer space or perhaps the work of the Soviets. When Helen's boyfriend, Tom Stephens (Hugh Marlowe), plans a day-trip getaway for the two of them, Klaatu offers to take care of Bobby. Boarding House is a privately owned house,in which individuals or families on vaccation, holidays, deputition,transfered on temporary duties, on some particular training,short&mediun tenure visitors,working professionals & lodgers,rent one or more rooms sets for one or more nights,sometimes for extended periods of weeks, months and... The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... Billy Gray (born 1938) is an American actor best known as a child actor during the 1950s. ... Combatants United States, United Kingdom Germany Commanders Harold Alexander Mark W. Clark John P. Lucas Lucian Truscott Albert Kesselring Eberhard von Mackensen Strength 22 Jan 1944: 36,000 soldiers and 2,300 vehicles End May:150,000 soldiers and 1,500 guns 22 Jan 1944: 20,000 soldiers End May... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Ariane 5 lifts off with the Rosetta probe on 2nd of March, 2004. ... CCCP redirects here. ... Marlowe in Night and the City (1950) Hugh Marlowe was a film, television, stage and radio actor. ...


Bobby gives Klaatu a tour of Washington, D.C., including a visit to the grave of his father in Arlington National Cemetery, where Klaatu learns with dismay that most of those buried there were killed in wars. The two next visit the Lincoln Memorial and the heavily guarded spaceship where Gort stands motionless. Klaatu, impressed by the inscription of Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address, is hopeful that there may be minds on Earth wise enough to understand his message. When he asks Bobby to name the greatest person in the world today, Bobby mentions a leading American scientist, Professor Barnhardt (Sam Jaffe), who lives nearby. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential memorial built to honor 16th President Abraham Lincoln. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Bobby takes Klaatu to Barnhardt's home. The professor is absent, but Klaatu goes into his study and helps solve an advanced mathematical n-body problem written on a blackboard, before leaving his address with the housekeeper. Later, government agents escort Klaatu to see Barnhardt. Klaatu warns the professor that the people of the other planets know that human beings have developed atomic power and will not allow this to endanger them. Barnhardt offers Klaatu the opportunity to speak at an upcoming meeting of world scientists he is organizing; Klaatu accepts. Barnhardt is stunned when Klaatu declares that if his message is rejected by the leaders of the nations, "Planet Earth will be eliminated." The professor soberly pleads that Klaatu first provide a minor demonstration of his power as a warning. This article is about the problem in classical mechanics. ... This article is about applications of nuclear fission reactors as power sources. ...

Klaatu gives his message, while Gort looms in the background.

Klaatu returns to his spaceship that night to implement the professor's suggestion. Bobby trails him and is amazed to see his new friend enter the ship. When Tom Stephens and Helen Benson return from their evening out, Bobby tells them that Mr. Carpenter is the spaceman. They do not believe him at first, but when Bobby goes upstairs to bed, they notice that his shoes are soaking wet. Their suspicions grow when Tom finds an expensive diamond in Mr. Carpenter's room. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


The following day, Tom takes the diamond to a jeweler, who claims that it could not have come from Earth. Meeting Helen at work, Klaatu insists on speaking to her. While riding in an elevator, it stops. A series of montage scenes show that Klaatu has suppressed electric power all over the world (with exceptions for critical systems, such as hospitals, planes in flight etc.). This has literally brought the entire world to a standstill. During the blackout, Klaatu enlists Helen's aid. Tom intends to turn Klaatu in to the authorities, which will make him rich and famous. Helen rejects her boyfriend, but despite her efforts to get him to a safe place, Klaatu is fatally shot. Before he dies, Klaatu tells Helen that she must go to Gort and say to him, "Klaatu barada nikto." Electricity (from New Latin Ä“lectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Conquering her fear, Helen does as asked. The robot carries her into the spaceship, then retrieves Klaatu's corpse and brings him back to the spaceship where, using equipment on board, Klaatu is miraculously brought back to life. Klaatu steps out of the spaceship and speaks to the assembled scientists. He tells them Earth's penchant for violence and first steps into space have drawn the attention of other spacefaring worlds. These worlds have created a race of robot enforcers like Gort, and given them absolute power to deal with any outbreak of violence. He warns that the people of Earth can either abandon warfare and peacefully join other spacefaring nations – or be destroyed. "The decision rests with you." He then enters the spaceship and departs.


Cast

* Not credited on-screen. Michael Rennie (25 August 1909—10 June 1971) was an English film, television and stage actor best known for his starring role as the benevolent space visitor Klaatu in the 1951 classic science fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still. ... Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... Marlowe in Night and the City (1950) Hugh Marlowe was a film, television, stage and radio actor. ... Sam Jaffe (1891-1984) Sam Jaffe (March 8, 1891 – March 24, 1984) was an American actor, teacher and engineer. ... Billy Gray (born 1938) is an American actor best known as a child actor during the 1950s. ... Frances Bavier (December 14, 1902 – December 6, 1989) was an Emmy Award winning American character actress, best remembered for her role as Aunt Bee on The Andy Griffith Show in the 1960s. ... Lock Martin (1916-1959) was the stage name of American actor Joseph Lockard Martin Jr. ... Hans von Kaltenborn (July 9, 1878 - 14 June 1965) was an American radio commentator. ... Elmer Davis Elmer Davis (born January 13, 1890 - May 18, 1958 was prominent newsreporter, the Director of the United States Office of War Information during World War II and a Peabody Award Recipient. ... Drew Pearson Drew Pearson (December 13, 1897–September 1, 1969), born in Evanston, Illinois was one of the most prominent American newspaper and radio journalists of his day. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


Critical reaction

The film was attacked from some quarters, due to Sam Jaffe's participation in the film and his politics.[1] In spite of the images that have passed into popular culture and become clichés — a race of killer robots, a spaceman in a silver suit, a flying saucer etc. — the film's explicit message of peace, in combination with its dark outlook regarding human society, has earned the film lasting critical acclaim. The movie is ranked seventh in Arthur C Clarke's List of the best Science-Fiction films of all time, just above Clarke's own 2001: A Space Odyssey. In 1995, this film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant". Arthur C. Clarke, considered by many to be a grand master of science fiction and communication satellites Sir Arthur Charles Clarke (born December 16, 1917) is a British author and inventor, probably most famous for his science fiction novel 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Differences from the short story

In the short story, Klaatu is killed immediately after greeting those present when he first emerges from his ship, so there is no Professor Barnhardt or Helen Benson and no "Klaatu barada nikto." Instead, a picture reporter named Sutherland deals with the robot (named Gnut, not Gort). Also, in Bates' "Farewell to the Master", the ship appears instantaneously on the ground rather than landing from space, leaving unanswered where it came from. Finally, in the film, Klaatu states that Gort's race was created and given absolute power to enforce the peace. The relationship between Klaatu and Gnut in the short story is much different. At the end, when Gnut starts to leave, Sutherland insists that it make clear to its master that Klaatu's killing had been an accident. The reporter receives a surprising response: Farewell to the Master is a science fiction short story written by Harry Bates. ...

"You misunderstand," the mighty robot had said. "I am the master."

Religious Allegory

While it is possible to infer religious allegory into The Day the Earth Stood Still, it should be noted that the examples of this cited in the screenplay are common devices used in many stories throughout the history of science fiction writing. There is Klaatu's death and subsequent resurrection (and "ascension" -via his spacecraft). Klaatu adopts the Earthly name "John Carpenter" (in the New Testament Jesus Christ is sometimes called the "carpenter's [Joseph's] son."). These allusions are attributed to North by the film's producer in a 1995 interview. Blaustein claimed that the studio "Breen office" balked at the portrayal of Klaatu's resurrection. At their behest, a line was added when Helen asks Klaatu if Gort has unlimited power over life and death, and Klaatu explains that he has only been revived temporarily by advanced medical science and explicitly states that the power of resurrection is "reserved to the Almighty Spirit."[1] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Joseph Ignatius Breen (October 14, 1890–December 5, 1965) was an American film censor. ...


Production

Principal outdoor photography for The Day the Earth Stood Still was shot on 20th Century Fox sound stages and its studio backlot (now Century City), with a second unit shooting background plates and other scenes in Washington, D.C. The film's stars never traveled to Washington for the making of the film.[1] Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Century City is the name of: A neighborhood in Los Angeles, California, USA. See: Century City, Los Angeles, California. ...


In a DVD commentary track, interviewed by fellow director Nicholas Meyer,[Cite] director Robert Wise stated that he wanted the film to appear as realistic and believable as possible, in order to drive home the work's core message against armed conflict in the real world. Nicholas Meyer at the Paramount Pictures lot in 2002. ...


Wise's background in directing horror (his solo directorial debut had come with producer Val Lewton some five years before) lent itself to a "haunted house" feel to the movie's spookier scenes, with a stark use of deep shadow, often patterned to resemble the bars of a cage (his hospital room, the wallpaper and balustrade of the boarding house, the elevator). Both high and low angles are used to create the film's pervasive sense of Klaatu's literal and figurative alienation from the warlike people of Earth, or to highlight the unlimited power he represents.[original research?] Val Lewton Vladimir Ivan Leventon (7 May, 1904-14 March, 1951) was an American screenwriter and producer who was born in what is now Yalta, Ukraine. ... Stairs, staircase, stairway, flight of stairs are all names for a construction designed to bridge a large vertical distance by dividing it into smaller vertical distances, called steps. ...


Producer Julian Blaustein set out to make a film that illustrated the fear and suspicion that characterized the early Cold War and Atomic Age. He reviewed over 200 science fiction short stories and novels in search of a storyline that could be used, as the genre was well suited for a metaphorical discussion of such grave issues. Studio head Darryl F. Zanuck green-lighted the project, and Blaustein contracted Edmund North to draft a screenplay based on elements from the Bates story.[1] The Atomic Age was a phrase used for a time in the 1950s in which it was believed that all power sources in the future would be atomic in nature. ... Darryl Francis Zanuck (September 5, 1902–December 22, 1979) was a producer, writer, actor and director who played a major part in the Hollywood studio system as one of its longest survivors (the length of his career being rivalled only by that of Adolph Zukor). ...


Although the film contains its share of dramatic special effects scenes, such as the destruction of military hardware by the robot Gort, special effects were also used more subtly.[original research?] For example, the aerial shots of crowd scenes surrounding Klaatu's spaceship were achieved with a combination of optical printing or matte work (to include the Washington D.C. skyline) and a "held take" approach, where the same film is run through the camera for multiple exposures of the same crowd standing in different locations on the studio backlot in order to give the appearance of a much larger crowd.[citation needed]


Other examples of special effects work include rear projection or "traveling matte" work in the scenes depicting Bobby and Klaatu's tour of the Arlington National Cemetery and Lincoln Memorial, and the taxi chase sequence at the film's climax when Helen and Klaatu are chased by the military. According to the DVD commentary,[Cite] Wise carefully prepared his shooting list from storyboards so that his second unit would return with "background plate" footage with appropriate action (an MP calling on a radio, an increasing number of military vehicles) for each rapid cut in the complex finished sequence. Rear projection was devised by Farciot Edouart in 1933 - at the time, he was working for Paramount Studios. ... Mattes are used in photography and special effects filmmaking to combine two or more image elements into a single, final image. ...


Soundtrack

The Day the Earth Stood Still
The Day the Earth Stood Still cover
Film score by Bernard Herrmann
Released 1993
Recorded August, 1951
Genre Soundtracks, Film music
Length 63:41
Label Fox
Producer Nick Redman
Professional reviews

The soundtrack was composed in August of 1951 and was Bernard Herrmann's first soundtrack after he moved to Hollywood. Herrmann chose unusual instrumentation the film including electric violin, electric bass, two theremins (played by Dr Samuel Hoffman and Paul Shure), test oscillators, vibraphone, four pianos, four harps and approximately 30 brass instruments. Unusual overdubbing and tape-reversal techniques were used, as well. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see August (disambiguation). ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Soundtracks can mean: The plural of soundtrack The Can album, Soundtracks This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... A film score is the background music in a film, generally specially written for the film and often used to heighten emotions provoked by the imagery on the screen or by the dialogue. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... This article is about the animal. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 4. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ... Léon Theremin playing an early theremin The theremin (originally pronounced but often anglicized as [1]), or thereminvox, is one of the earliest fully electronic musical instruments. ...


Track listing

  1. "Twentieth Century Fox Fanfare" – 0:12
  2. "Prelude/Outer Space/Radar" – 3:45
  3. "Danger" – 0:24
  4. "Klaatu" – 2:15
  5. "Gort/The Visor/The Telescope" – 2:23
  6. "Escape" – 0:55
  7. "Solar Diamonds" – 1:04
  8. "Arlington" – 1:08
  9. "Lincoln Memorial" – 1:27
  10. "Nocturne/The Flashlight/The Robot/Space Control" – 5:58
  11. "Elevator/Magnietic Pull/The Study/The Conference/The Jewelry Store" – 4:32
  12. "Panic" – 0:42
  13. "Glowing/Alone/Gort's Rage/Nikto/The Captive/Terror" – 5:11
  14. "The Prison" – 1:42
  15. "Rebirth" – 1:38
  16. "Departure" – 0:52
  17. "Farewell" – 0:32
  18. "Finale" – 0:30

Remake

Twentieth Century Fox has signed Keanu Reeves to play Klaatu in a remake.[2] Jennifer Connelly has signed on to play Helen Benson, while Kathy Bates is in negotiations. Scott Derrickson will direct a screenplay written by Ryne Douglas Pearson and David Scarpa. Filming will begin in Vancouver in December 2007.[3] It is due for release on December 12, 2008.[4]
Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their... Keanu Charles Reeves (pronounced in IPA: ) is an actor, born September 2, 1964 in Beirut, Lebanon, and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Jennifer Lynn Connelly (born December 12, 1970) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former child model. ... Kathleen Doyle Bates (born June 28, 1948) is an Academy Award-winning American theatrical, film, and television actress, and a stage and television director. ... Scott Derrickson is a screenwriter, producer, and director. ... David Scarpa is an American screenwriter. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d Julian Blaustein, Robert Wise, Patricia Neal, Billy Gray. (1995). Making the Earth Stand Still [LaserDisc; DVD]. Fox Video; Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment. Retrieved on 2007-07-22.
  2. ^ Michael Fleming. "Keanu Reeves lands on 'Earth'", Variety, 2007-08-27. Retrieved on 2007-08-27. 
  3. ^ Tatiana Siegel, Michael Fleming. "'Earth' welcomes Jennifer Connelly", Variety, 2007-11-05. Retrieved on 2007-11-06. 
  4. ^ Pamela McClintock. "'Transformers' sequel sets 2009 date", Variety, 2007-09-26. Retrieved on 2007-10-05. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ...

Further reading

  • North, Edmund H. (1951-02-21). The Day the Earth Stood Still. Original Script. ScifiScripts.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  • Leroy W. Dubeck, Suzanne E. Moshier, and Judith E. Boss (1994). "The Day the Earth Stood Still", Fantastic Voyages: Learning Science Through Science Fiction Films. Springer, 249–252. ISBN 1-56396-195-4. 

Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Harry Bates (1900-1981) was an American science fiction editor. ... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Google Video logo Google Video is a free video sharing and video search engine service from Google that allows anyone to upload video clips to Googles web servers as well as make their own media available free of charge; some videos are also offered for sale through the Google... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Day the Earth Stood Still (776 words)
The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) Directed by Robert Wise.
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The Day the Earth Stood Still (2077 words)
The Day the Earth Stood Still is certainly quintessential; a movie that helped to lay the ground works for the genre, providing many of its archetypes and conventions.
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