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Encyclopedia > The Dakota
Dakota Apartments
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
Southeast view of the Dakota from Central Park West
Southeast view of the Dakota from Central Park West
Location: New York, NY
Coordinates: 40°46′35.74″N, 73°58′35.44″W
Built/Founded: 1880
Architect: Hardenbergh,Henry J.
Architectural style(s): Renaissance
Designated as NHL: December 8, 1976[1]
Added to NRHP: April 26, 1972[2]
NRHP Reference#: 72000869
Governing body: Private

The Dakota, constructed from October 25, 1880 to October 27, 1884,[3] is an apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in New York City. The architectural firm of Henry Janeway Hardenbergh was commissioned to do the design for Edward Clark, head of the Singer Sewing Machine Company whose firm also designed the Plaza Hotel.[4] Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 710 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2583 × 2181 pixel, file size: 1. ... Central Park West is an avenue in New York City. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Central Park West is an avenue in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Henry Janeway Hardenbergh (February 6, 1847 - March 18, 1918) was a U.S.-american architect, best known for having designed The Dakota luxury-apartment building and the Plaza Hotel, both near Central Park in Manhattan in New York City. ... Edward Clark (d. ... A Singer treadle sewing machine Singer Corporation is a United States of America manufacturer of sewing machines, first established as I.M. Singer & Co. ... The Plaza Hotel as seen from the corner of 5th Avenue and 59th Street in Manhattan For the music festival PlazAid, click here The Plaza Hotel in New York City is a landmark 19-story luxury hotel on the corner of Fifth Avenue and Central Park South in Manhattan, currently...


The building's high gables and deep roofs with a profusion of dormers, terracotta spandrels and panels, niches, balconies and balustrades give it a North German Renaissance character, an echo of a Hanseatic townhall. Nevertheless, its layout and floor plan betray a strong influence of French architectural trends in housing design that had become known in New York in the 1870s. The House of the Seven Gables, Salem, Massachusetts, showing four gables in this view. ... A dormer is a window set vertically in a structure projecting from a sloping roof. ... A spandrel is originally a term from Architecture, but has more recently been given an analogous meaning in Evolutionary biology. ... Florentine Renaissance painter Filippo Lippi placed his Madonna of the 1440s within a simulated shell-headed niche The niche in classical architecture is an exedra or an apse that has been reduced in size, retaining the half-dome heading usual for an apse. ... A page of fanciful balusters from A Handbook of Ornament, Franz S. Meyer, 1898 A baluster (through the French balustre, from Italian balaustro, from balaustra, pomegranate flower [from a resemblance to the post], from Lat. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Carta marina of the Baltic Sea region (1539). ... Floor plan (floorplan, floor-plan) in its original meaning is an architecture term, a diagram of a room, a building, or a level (floor) of a building as if seen from the above (i. ... // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ...


According to popular legend, the Dakota was so named because at the time it was built, the Upper West Side of Manhattan was sparsely inhabited and considered as remote as the Dakota Territory. However, the earliest recorded appearance of this account is in a 1933 newspaper story. It is more likely that the building was named "The Dakota" because of Clark's fondness for the names of the new western states and territories.[5] High above the 72nd Street entrance, the figure of a Dakota Indian keeps watch. The Dakota was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, and was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976.[1],[6],[7] The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Dakota Territory was the name of the northernmost part of the Louisiana Purchase of the United States. ... The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... // List of Registered Historic Places in New York County, New York (Manhattan): See also: List of Registered Historic Places in New York ADMIRAL DEWEY (tugboat) African Burial Ground AMBROSE (lightship) American Stock Exchange American Thread Building Astor Place Subway Station (IRT) Bank of New York Building Battery Park Control House... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...

Contents

Features

The Dakota in the 1880s
The Dakota in the 1880s
Entrance.
Entrance.

The Dakota is built in a square-shape around a central courtyard, accessible through the arched passage of the main entrance, a porte cochère large enough that horse-drawn carriages could pass through, letting their passengers disembark sheltered from the weather. In the Dakota multi-story stable building on Columbus Avenue, elevators lifted carriages to upper floors: the building was still in operation as a garage, until February 2007, but is now slated to be developed by the Related Companies into a multimillion dollar condominium project. Download high resolution version (781x1343, 72 KB)The Dakota building on a photograph from the 1880s. ... Download high resolution version (781x1343, 72 KB)The Dakota building on a photograph from the 1880s. ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2448 × 3264 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2448 × 3264 pixel, file size: 1. ... A typical 19th century porte-cochère A porte-cochere (French porte-cochère, literally coach door, also called a carriage porch) is the architectural term for a porch or portico-like structure at a main or secondary entrance to a building, through which it is possible for a horse... Columbus Avenue is an avenue in New York Citys Upper West Side and is named after Christopher Columbus. ...


The general layout of the apartments is also in the French style of the period, with all major rooms not only connected to each other en filade in the traditional way, but also accessible from a hall or corridor, an arrangement that allowed a natural migration for guests from one room to another, especially on festive occasions, yet gave service staff discreet separate circulation patterns that offered service access to the main rooms. The principal rooms such as parlors or the master bedroom face the street, while the dining room, the kitchen, and other auxiliary rooms are oriented on the courtyard. Apartments are thus aired from two sides, which was a relative novelty in New York at the time. (In the Stuyvesant building, which was built in 1869, a mere ten years earlier, and which is considered New York's first apartment building in the French style, many apartments have windows to one side only.) Some of the drawing rooms were 49 ft. (about 15 m) long, and many of the ceilings are 14 ft. high (more than 4 m); the floors are inlaid with mahogany, oak, and cherry (although in the apartment of Clark, the building's founder, some floors were famously inlaid with sterling silver). The dining room at Chatsworth House, Derbyshire, England A dining room is a room for consuming food. ... Stuyvesant can refer to: In Manhattan, New York Peter Stuyvesant, last governor of New Netherland. ... A red brick apartment block in central London, England, on the north bank of the Thames An apartment building, block of flats or tenement is a multi-unit dwelling made up of several (generally four or more) apartments (US) or flats (UK). ... An example of Mahogany The name mahogany is used when referring to numerous varieties of dark-colored wood, originally the wood of the species Swietenia mahagoni, known as West Indian or Cuban Mahogany. ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ... “Cherry tree” redirects here. ... Sterling silver is an alloy of silver containing 92. ...

Elevation (south front)
Elevation (south front)

Originally, the Dakota had 65 apartments with four to twenty rooms, no two alike. These apartments are accessed by staircases and elevators placed in the four corners of the courtyard. Separate service stairs and elevators serving the kitchens are located in mid-block. Built to cater for the well-to-do, the Dakota featured many amenities and a modern infrastructure that was exceptional for the time. The building has a large dining hall; meals could also be sent up to the apartments by dumbwaiters. Electricity was generated by an in-house power plant, and the building has central heating. Besides servants' quarters, there was a playroom and a gymnasium under the roof. (In later years, these spaces on the tenth floor were—for economic reasons—converted into apartments, too.) The lot of the Dakota also comprised a garden and private croquet lawns and a tennis court behind the building between 72nd and 73rd Streets. The stables for the tenant's horses and carriages were located on Columbus Avenue in a building that survives as a garage. Image File history File links Dakota_Elevation. ... Image File history File links Dakota_Elevation. ... Dumbwaiter can refer to: a small elevator used to transport food or other items between floors of a building, see Dumbwaiter an American independent rock band, see Dumbwaiters (band) See also: The Dumb Waiter, a one-act play by Harold Pinter, written in 1957. ... For the Grand Central Records albums, see Central Heating (Grand Central album) and Central Heating 2. ... For the Smalltalk based 3D software platform, see Croquet project. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Columbus Avenue is an avenue in New York Citys Upper West Side and is named after Christopher Columbus. ...


The Dakota was a huge social success from the very start (all apartments were rented before the building opened), but a long-term drain on the fortune of Clark (who died before it was completed) and his heirs. For the high society of New York, it became fashionable to live in such a building, or to rent at least an apartment as a secondary city residence, and the Dakota's success prompted the construction of many other luxury apartment buildings in New York City.


Today, the building is best known as the home of former Beatle John Lennon starting in 1973, and as the site of his murder on December 8, 1980. As of 2007, Lennon's widow, Yoko Ono, still has an apartment in the building. The Strawberry Fields memorial was laid out in memory of Lennon in Central Park directly across Central Park West. Every year, Ono marks the anniversary of Lennon's death with a now-public pilgrimage to the memorial. [8] However, the Dakota has throughout its history housed a veritable who's who of the great and famous particularly in the Arts and Business, including Andrew Carnegie. The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko (ONO Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Flowers and a card left at the Strawberry Fields Memorial in Central Park, NYC The Strawberry Fields memorial is the name given to a garden in New Yorks Central Park, dedicated to the memory of musician John Lennon, and named after one of his songs, Strawberry Fields Forever. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Andrew Carnegie (last name pronounced , )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ...


In popular culture

  • Gene Simmons of Kiss sought residency in the Dakota in the late 1970's, but his request was turned down by the building's co-op board.
  • John Lennon was shot in front of the Dakota on December 8, 1980 by Mark David Chapman.
  • Billy Joel sought residency in the Dakota, but his request for residency was turned down by the co-op board on September 25, 1977.
  • Christine Lavin wrote and performs a song called "The Dakota". In it she recounts her feelings about John Lennon's murder and how she is compelled to think of the incident every time she passes the building.
  • Brand New mentions the Dakota in their song "Play Crack the Sky" from the album Deja Entendu.
  • Fictional character Windsor Horne Lockwood III, from a series of novels by Harlan Coben, lives in the Dakota.
  • In the popular book series, The Baby-Sitters Club, Stacey Mcgill's ex-best friend Laine Cummings and her family lives in the Dakota.
  • The band O.A.R. wrote a song titled "Dakota" about the murder of John Lennon at The Dakota, it was released in 2005.
  • In the Book The Hard Way by Lee Child some of the foes reside in the Dakota.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x735, 145 KB) Historic American Buildings Survey Dakota Building File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Dakota Talk:Neo-Renaissance ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x735, 145 KB) Historic American Buildings Survey Dakota Building File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Dakota Talk:Neo-Renaissance ... Roman Polański (born August 18, 1933) is an Academy Award winning film director, writer, actor, producer. ... Rosemarys Baby is an Academy Award-winning 1968 horror film directed by Roman Polanski based on the Ira Levin novel of the same name. ... Jack Finney (October 2, 1911 - November 16, 1995) was an American author. ... Time and Again is a 1970 illustrated novel by Jack Finney. ... Lee Child accepting Barry Award Lee Child (born 1954, Coventry, England) is a British thriller writer currently living in New York City with his wife Jane, daughter Ruth, and a dog named Jenny. ... Jack Reacher, commonly known simply as Reacher, is a fictional character created by author Lee Child. ... Dr. Aloysius X. L. Pendergast is a fictional character appearing in novels by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. ... Douglas Preston (born 1956 in Cambridge, Massachusetts) is an author of several techno-thriller and horror novels with Lincoln Child. ... Lincoln Child (born 1957) is an author of techno-thriller and horror novels. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ... Vanilla Sky is a 2001 film which has been variously characterized by published film critics as an odd mixture of science fiction, romance, and reality warp [2], part Beautiful People fantasy, part New Age investigation of the Great Beyond[3] a love story, a struggle for the soul, or an... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Nas (disambiguation). ... Thiefs Theme is a single by Nas, taken from his double album, Streets Disciple. The UK edition of Streets Disciple features a remix of Thiefs Theme featuring Rising Son, a British rapper who beat off over 5000 entries in a competition held by Sony Records for the... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chaim Witz (חיים וויץ), (born August 25, 1949 in Haifa, Israel), better known by his stage name Gene Simmons, is an Israeli-American hard rock bass guitarist and vocalist. ... Kiss is an American rock band formed in New York City in 1973. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Mark David Chapman (born May 10, 1955 in Fort Worth, Texas) is the man who shot and killed musician John Lennon on December 8, 1980. ... William Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American singer, pianist, songwriter, composer and musician. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Christine Lavin is a New York City based singer, songwriter, and promoter of contemporary folk music. ... For other uses, see Brand New (disambiguation). ... Deja Entendu is the second album from Long Island based band Brand New, released in 2003. ... Harlan Coben, 2006 Harlan Coben (born January 4, 1962) is an American, Jewish author of mystery novels. ... The Baby-sitters Club is a series of childrens books, written by Ann M. Martin and published by Scholastic between 1986-2000, which sold over 175 million copies. ... The Hard Way can refer to: The Hard Way a showbiz drama starring Ida Lupino The Hard Way a 213 album The Hard Way a Clint Black album The Hard Way a 1991 comedy/action movie with James Woods and Michael J. Fox The Hard Way, the eighth trade paperback... Lee Child accepting Barry Award Lee Child (born 1954, Coventry, England) is a British thriller writer currently living in New York City with his wife Jane, daughter Ruth, and a dog named Jenny. ...

Education

The Dakota residents are assigned to schools in the New York City Department of Education. The Official Seal of the City of New York The New York City Department of Education is the branch of municipal government in New York City that manages the citys public school system. ...


The Dakota is zoned to P.S. 87 William Sherman. The Dakota is unzoned for middle school; residents may contact Region 10 to determine the middle school assignments. Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ...


Famous residents

The remote Central Park West location, circa 1884
The remote Central Park West location, circa 1884
Archival photograph of the South entrance
Archival photograph of the South entrance

Well-known residents of the Dakota building have included: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x812, 136 KB) Historic American Buildings Survey Dakota Building File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Dakota ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x812, 136 KB) Historic American Buildings Survey Dakota Building File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Dakota ... Central Park West is an avenue in New York City. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x750, 139 KB) Historic American Buildings Survey Dakota Building File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Dakota ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x750, 139 KB) Historic American Buildings Survey Dakota Building File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Dakota ... HABS photograph: First Bank of the United States, Philadelphia HABS drawing: James Madisons Montpelier HAER photograph: Tacoma Narrows Bridge HALS drawing: Hale O Pi Ilani Heiau, Maui This article is about the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), a program of the U.S. National Park Service. ...

Betty Joan Perske (born on September 16, 1924), better known as Lauren Bacall, is a Golden Globe– and Tony Award–winning, as well as Academy Award–nominated, American film and stage actress. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Constance Yu-Hwa Chung Povich (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; born August 20, 1946) is an American journalist who has appeared on many USA television news networks. ... For other persons of the same name, see Ambrose Clark. ... José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintrón (January 8, 1909 – January 26, 1992), was an Academy Award-winning Puerto Rican actor and film director, born in the Santurce district of San Juan, Puerto Rico. ... Roberta Flack Roberta Flack (born February 10, 1937 in Asheville, North Carolina) is an American singer. ... Charles Henri Ford (February 10, 1913 - September 27, 2002) was an American novelist, poet, filmmaker, photographer, and collage artist best known for his brilliant editorship of the Surrealist magazine View in New York City in the 1940s, and as the partner of the artist Pavel Tchelitchew. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an Oscar-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921–June 7, 1965) was an Academy Award and Tony Award-winning American actress. ... William Motter Inge (May 3, 1913 – June 10, 1973) was an American playwright and novelist, whose works feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. ... Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt) (London, November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969) was an English actor, who immigrated to Canada in the 1910s, best known for his roles in horror films and the creation of Frankensteins monster in 1931s Frankenstein. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Sean Taro Ono Lennon (aka Sean Ono Lennon, born October 9, 1975) is an American singer, songwriter, musician and actor. ... John Earl Madden (born April 10, 1936) is a former National Football League player, head coach, and a Pro Football Hall-of-Famer. ... Carson McCullers, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1959 Carson McCullers (February 19, 1917 – September 29, 1967) was an American writer. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko (ONO Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Maurice Richard Maury Povich (born January 17, 1939 in Washington, D.C.) is an American TV talk show personality who currently hosts his self-titled talk show Maury which has earned him national recognition due to the paternity tests that are often aired. ... Gilda Susan Radner (28 June 1946 – 20 May 1989) was an American comedienne and actress, best known for her five years as part of the original cast of the NBC comedy series Saturday Night Live. ... Rex Taylor Reed (born October 2, 1938 in Fort Worth, Texas) is an American movie critic and was co-host of the syndicated television show At the Movies. ... Edgar J. Scherick (October 24, 1924 – December 2, 2002) was one of the most prolific producers of television miniseries, made-for-television films, and theatrical motion pictures. ... Neil Sedaka 2005 Neil Sedaka (born March 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American pop singer, pianist, and songwriter often associated with the Brill Building. ...

References

  • Birmingham, S.: Life at the Dakota, Syracuse University Press. Reprint edition, 1996. ISBN 0-8156-0338-X. Originally published by Random House, 1979, ISBN 0-394-41079-3.
  • Schoenauer, N.: 6000 Years of Housing, 3rd ed., pp. 335 - 336, W.W. Norton & Co., 2001. ISBN 0-393-73120-0.
  • Alpern, A.: "New York's fabulous luxury apartments: with original floor plans from the Dakota, River House, Olympic Tower, and other great buildings." New York: Dover Publications, 1987, c1975. (Avery Reserves and Reference AA 7860 AL 741) Exterior views and sample floor plans as well brief historical synopsis, each with architect, builder, date built, and when applicable, date razed.
  • Van Pelt, D:Leslie's History of the Greater New York, Volume III" New York: Arkell Publishing Company 110 Fifth Avenue, c1898, The L A Williams Publishing and Engraving Company. Volume III Encyclopedia of Biography and Genealogy, pp. 656.
  1. ^ a b Dakota Apartments. National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service (2007-09-11).
  2. ^ National Register Information System. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2006-03-15).
  3. ^ Historic American Buildings Survey, The Dakota (Apartments), 1 West 72nd Street, Central Park West, New York, New York County, NY, page 2. URL last accessed 2006-10-24.
  4. ^ The superintendent of the construction of the Dakota Building was George Henry Griebel, born and trained in Berlin, Prussia, and Karl Jacobson, who were hired as architects for the project. "Griebel also designed and supervised buildings for the Clark Estate for a period of eighteen years after building the Dakota Building including the Singer Manufacturing Company Office Building on Third Avenue and Sixteeth Street, fourteen houses on West Eighty-fifth St, a row of houses on West Seventy-fourth Street; both being near Columbus Ave,the Barnett Store, Columbus and Seventy-fourth St and many others."
  5. ^ Gray, Christopher. New York Streetscapes. Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 326-328. ISBN 0810944413. 
  6. ^ ["Dakota Apartments", by Carolyn Pitts.PDF (660 KB) National Register of Historic Places Inventory]. National Park Service (1976-08-10).
  7. ^ [Dakota Apartments-Accompanying Photos, exterior, undated.PDF (935 KB) National Register of Historic Places Inventory]. National Park Service (1976-08-10).
  8. ^ The Dakota www.travelgoat.com, accessed July 18, 2007.

Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... George H Griebel (13 August, 1846–March 1933) was a prominent Berlin-born and trained architect who resided in New York City. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gossamer. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... “PDF” redirects here. ...

External links

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