FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > The Daily Cardinal

Type Daily newspaper
Format Tabloid

Owner Independent
Editor Jill Klosterman
Founded 1892
Political allegiance Moderate, leaning Liberal
Headquarters Madison, WI, U.S.

Website: www.dailycardinal.com

The Daily Cardinal is the fifth oldest student newspaper in the United States, located at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It began publishing in 1892 and is financially and editorially independent. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1412x194, 98 KB) Summary The Daily Cardinal banner. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (737x1151, 380 KB) Summary The front page of The Daily Cardinal on February 17, 2006. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Wisconsin State Capitol Madison is the capital of Wisconsin, a state of the United States of America. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... A student newspaper is a newspaper run by students of a university, high school, or middle school. ... The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


The Cardinal's motto, printed at the bottom of every front page and taken from an 1894 declaration by the university's Board of Regents, is "...the great state University of Wisconsin should ever encourage that continual and fearless sifting and winnowing by which alone the truth can be found." 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

The Cardinal Today

The Daily Cardinal is distributed throughout the campus community, with a daily circulation of about 10,000, and is published Monday through Friday during the academic year in both a tabloid print format and in electronic form on the Web. It employs roughly 200 undergraduate and graduate students. Its daily sections include News, Liberal Opinion, Arts and Sports, and its weekly sections are Features, Food and Science. In both 2005 and 2006, the Cardinal was the recipient of the Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence award for best daily college newspaper of the year in Region 6 (Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin).[1] [2] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (or the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents that runs over the Internet. ... For other uses, see News (disambiguation). ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... In pattern recognition, features are the individual measurable heuristic properties of the phenomena being observed. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... SPJ logo, taken from a cropped photo of a sign at the Region 10 SPJ Conference, March 2006 The Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) is one of the oldest organizations representing journalists in the United States, debuting in 1909. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked...


History

The Beginning of Sifting and Winnowing: 1892-1932

The Daily Cardinal was founded by Monroe, Wisconsin natives William Wesley Young, the University of Wisconsin’s first journalism student, and William Saucerman to be a rival to the monthly student paper Aegis. Four hundred free copies of the paper were made available to Wisconsin students on April 4, 1892. For the first month of production, Young would ride his horse down State Street to the offices of the Madison Democrat, which printed the Cardinal. Monroe, known as the Swiss Cheese capital of the USA, is the county seat of Green County, Wisconsin, United States. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Located in downtown Madison, Wisconsin, United States, near the Wisconsin State Capitol, State Street hosts a variety of shops, bars and restaurants and is known for its small town appeal and street musicians and jugglers and other types of busking, making it a common tourist attraction. ...


The name was decided by a vote of university students. "Cardinal" was for the red color associated with the university.


While against World War I at its outset, the Cardinal developed favorable attitudes toward the war, especially following the Nov. 11, 1918, armistice. The Cardinal did not initially support the Second World War either, but later added special military sections to help coordinate the war effort. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Front page of the New York Times on Armistice Day, 11 November 1918 The armistice treaty between the Allies and Germany was signed in a railway carriage in Compiègne Forest on November 11, 1918, and marked the end of the First World War on the Western Front. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Making an Impression: 1932-1960

The Great Depression was when the Cardinal first earned its reputation for radicalism. Disagreeing with a policy of mandatory military training for male undergraduates to prepare for the impending World War II and running a letter to the editor signed by Junior Women discussing free love led U.S. Senate nominee John B. Chapple to declare that the Cardinal was controlled by “Reds, Atheists and free love advocates.” The UW Board of Regents revoked the Cardinal’s title as “official University newspaper” following this discourse and threatened closing the paper down until a compromise added a faculty member and a regent to the Cardinal board. The Great Depression was a time of economic down turn, which started after the stock market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... A letter to the editor (sometimes abbreviated LTTE or LTE) is a letter sent to a publication about issues of concern to its readers. ... The term free love has been used since at least the nineteenth century to describe a social movement that rejects marriage, which is seen as a form of social bondage, especially for women. ...


In 1940, the Cardinal moved out of its office east of Memorial Union to a building on University Avenue, on the land that Vilas Communication Hall today sits on. In 1956, the Cardinal board donated the land to the university in an agreement stipulating that the Cardinal would enjoy rent-free tenancy in the new building. The Cardinal’s offices remain in Vilas Hall today. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Memorial Union, also known as the Union or the Terrace, is located on the shore of Lake Mendota on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1942, Cardinal founder Young returned to edit the paper for a day. The New York Times wrote on the occasion, “Despite annual changes in student staffs, a few college newspapers in the country have acquired a definite character. One of these is the Daily Cardinal of the University of Wisconsin. The Cardinal is proud of its liberal tradition. Because it fights cleanly and with a sense of responsibility, its youthful passion for righteousness does not burn less brightly.” 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...


A Radical Reputation: 1960-1988

In the 1960s, the Cardinal developed a nationwide reputation for its vehement left-wing politics, strongly protesting the Vietnam War and supporting Civil Rights in its editorials. In 1969, a group of conservative UW students, frustrated by the Cardinal’s unrelenting liberalism, founded The Badger Herald as a right-wing alternative. While both papers have largely shed their ideological rigidity, the Cardinal is still generally perceived to be the more liberal campus paper and the Herald the more conservative. UW remains the only university with two competing daily school newspapers. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... An editorial is a statement or article by a news organization (generally a newspaper) that expresses an opinion rather than attempting to simply report news. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... The Badger Herald is one of the nations first and most successful independent daily student newspapers. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ...


The 1970s saw the Cardinal maintain its strong issue advocacy, but opinion began to shift to more campus, rather than national, angles. In the last half of the decade, the paper continually attacked the university for its reported holdings in corporations that participated in apartheid in South Africa. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ...


In 1985 the Cardinal survived a hostile takeover attempt by the Herald. The same year, it became free, and has remained so until this day. 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Strife and Shutdown: 1988-1995

In the beginning of the difficult stretch for the Cardinal, in 1988 the university announced it would shut down the paper’s presses, then located in Vilas Hall. Luckily for the Cardinal, the university decided to sell the presses to UW Extension, which remained the Cardinal’s printer for the next five years. Today, the Cardinal is printed at Capital Newspapers. 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Capital Newspapers is a partnership between Lee Enterprises and The Capital Times Company that operates 27 publications and several web sites in Wisconsin. ...


In 1995, the paper’s stunned editors were informed that the Cardinal did not have the financial means to continue printing. The Cardinal suffered through a seven-month shutdown until the necessary funds were secured to return. 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Cardinal Reborn: 1995-

The Cardinal returned to campus later that year with a cover depicting a cardinal rising from ashes like a phoenix. Genera Periporphyrus Saltator Caryothraustes Parkerthraustes Rhodothraupis Cardinalis Pheucticus Cyanocompsa Guiraca Passerina Spiza The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds living in North and South America. ... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ...


In 2000, the Cardinal broke the story that university officials had digitally inserted a black student’s face into a photograph of white Badger football fans. The image had been used on the cover of Wisconsin’s 2001-02 undergraduate application. The story received the National Story of the Year award for student journalism, awarded by the Los Angeles Times. 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Los Angeles Times (also known as the LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ...


Today, the Cardinal continues to be distributed 5 days a week on the UW campus and its surrounding neighborhoods.


Notable Alumni

[3]

Lowell Bergman was a television producer for the CBS news magazine 60 Minutes and is best known for investigating the tobacco industry, and specifically utilizing scientist Jeffrey Wigand of Brown & Williamson as a source. ... 60 Minutes is an investigative television newsmagazine on United States television, which has run on CBS News since 1968. ... The Insider is a 1999 film which tells the true story of a 60 Minutes television series exposé of the tobacco industry, as seen through the eyes of a real tobacco executive, Jeffrey Wigand. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... NBC News endcap, used from 2002 to 2007. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pron. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... John Darnton (born 1941 in New York City) is an American journalist and author. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Scott Dikkers is a United States comedy writer and filmmaker. ... The Onion is a parody newspaper published weekly in print and online. ... Jims Journal is a comic strip written and drawn by Scott Dikkers, co-founder of The Onion. ... The Wisconsin State Journal is a newspaper printed in Madison, Wisconsin. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physiology or Medicine and Economics. ... The Los Angeles Times (also known as the LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... The Capital Times is a daily Monday - Saturday newspaper published in Madison, Wisconsin by Capital Newspapers. ... Ben Karlin (born c. ... It has been suggested that List of awards won by The Daily Show be merged into this article or section. ... Andy Katz is a senior college basketball journalist for ESPN.com. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... The Wisconsin State Journal is a newspaper printed in Madison, Wisconsin. ... John Kovalic (born November 24, 1962, in England) is a cartoonist and illustrator. ... Dork Tower, the comic written by John Kovalic, chronicles the lives of a group of geeks living in the fictional town of Mud Bay, Wisconsin. ... The Onion is a parody newspaper published weekly in print and online. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Edwin Newman (born January 25, 1919) is a journalist and writer. ... NBC (a former acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Anchorman may refer to: News anchor, someone who works in radio who hosts a regular news program Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy, a 2004 American comedy movie This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Monster. ... Richard Warren Schickel (b. ... Time, (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Paul Soglin (born April 22, 1945 in Chicago, Illinois) is a politician and activist based in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Wisconsin State Capitol Madison is the capital of Wisconsin, a state of the United States of America. ... One cool cat. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... The Onion is a parody newspaper published weekly in print and online. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...

References

  1. ^ Society of Professial Journalists. "SPJ Announces 2005 Region 6 Mark of Excellence Award Winners." April 3, 2006. http://www.spj.org/news.asp?ref=563
  2. ^ Society of Professial Journalists. "SPJ Announces 2006 Region 6 Mark of Excellence Award Winners." March 23, 2007. http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=656
  3. ^ The Daily Cardinal Alumni Association. "DCAA Award Winners." 1999-2005. http://dailycardinal.net/modules.php?name=Content&pa=list_pages_categories&cid=2
Images
University of Wisconsin-Madison

 Athletics  The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ... The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ...

Bucky • Basketball • Camp Randall • Crew • Field House • Football • Heartland Trophy • Kohl Center • Paul Bunyan's Axe • Wisconsin Badgers Bucky Badger Bucky Badger in person during a football game at Camp Randall Bucky Badger is the official mascot of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The Wisconsin Badgers mens basketball team is a NCAA Division I college basketball team competing in the Big Ten Conference. ... Camp Randall Stadium was built in 1917 and is the current home of the Wisconsin Badgers football team. ... The University of Wisconsin-Madison Badgers Crew team is one of the many collegiate sports teams at the University. ... University of Wisconsin Field House (commonly known as the UW Fieldhouse) is a 11,500 -seat multi-purpose arena in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Head Coach Bret Bielema 1st Year, 12-1 Home Stadium Camp Randall Stadium Capacity 80,321 - FieldTurf Conference Big Ten First Year 1889 Athletic Director Barry Alvarez Website UWBadgers. ... The Heartland Trophy is a brass bull that is presented to the winner of the Iowa-Wisconsin football game. ... The Kohl Center opened in 1998 in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Paul Bunyans Axe, named after the mythical giant lumberjack Paul Bunyan, is awarded to the winner of each college football game between Minnesota and Wisconsin. ... The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ...

 Campus  The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ...

Arboretum • Bascom Hill • Chazen Museum of Art • Geology Museum • Lake Mendota • Memorial Union • State Street • Washburn Observatory The University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum (1260 acres) is an arboretum operated by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and located at 1207 Seminole Highway, Madison, Wisconsin. ... Bascom Hall, at the top of Bascom Hill Bascom Hill is the main quad that forms the symbolic core of the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. ... The Chazen Museum of Art is a large museum of art located at the University of Wisconsin, in Madison, Wisconsin. ... The UW-Madison Geology Museum has the second highest attendance of any museum at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, exceeded only by the Chazen Museum of Art. ... Lake Mendota is the northernmost and largest of the four lakes in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Memorial Union, also known as the Union or the Terrace, is located on the shore of Lake Mendota on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Located in downtown Madison, Wisconsin, United States, near the Wisconsin State Capitol, State Street hosts a variety of shops, bars and restaurants and is known for its small town appeal and street musicians and jugglers and other types of busking, making it a common tourist attraction. ... The Washburn Observatory is located at the 1401 Observatory Drive on the University of Wisconsin at Madison. ...

 Colleges & Schools  The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ...

Agriculture & Life Science • Business • Education • Engineering • Human Ecology • International Studies • Journalism 
Law • Letters & Science • Library • Medicine & Public Health • Music • Nursing • Public Affairs • Social Work • Veterinary Medicine The University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Engineering, often referred to as just COE, is a highly ranked school within the Nation. ... The University of Wisconsin Law School is the professional school for the study of law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Madison, Wisconsin. ... The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health is the professional school for the study of medicine and public health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Madison, Wisconsin. ...

 History  The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ...

Alan Ameche • Charles R. Van Hise • Donna Shalala • Past Chancellors • Slab of Bacon • Sterling Hall bombing • Wisconsin Idea Lino Dante Alan Ameche (March 1, 1933 — August 8, 1988), nicknamed The Horse, was an American football player who played six seasons with the Baltimore Colts in the National Football League after winning the Heisman Trophy in college at the University of Wisconsin. ... Charles Richard Van Hise (May 29, 1857 – November 19, 1918) was an academic and president of the University of Madison from 1903 to 1918. ... Donna Esther Shalala (surname pronounced ; born February 14, 1941) is the current president of the University of Miami, a private university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... This is a list of presidents and chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Madison: * In 1963, Harrington reorganized the University of Wisconsin by creating one central administration, and separate administrations for each of the individual campuses (Madison, Milwaukee, and University Centers). ... The Slab of Bacon The Slab of Bacon was a traveling trophy that passed between the University of Wisconsin Badgers and University of Minnesota Golden Gophers football teams, given annually to the winning team immediately upon the conclusion of the game. ... Once home to the physics department at UW-Madison, it also housed the Army Mathematics Research Center which made it the target of student protests. ... The Wisconsin Idea is a philosophy embraced by the University of Wisconsin, which holds that the boundaries of the university should be the boundaries of the state, and that research conducted at the University of Wisconsin should be applied to solve problems and improve health, quality of life, the environment...

 Media & Publications  The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ...

The Badger Herald • The Daily Cardinal • Malt & Barley Editors • The Mendota Beacon • UW Press • Wisconsin Law Review • WSUM The Badger Herald is one of the nations first and most successful independent daily student newspapers. ... Emblem of the Malt & Barley Editor Society The Malt & Barley Editors (MBEs) are an appointed secret society within the Wisconsin Law Review at the University of Wisconsin Law School. ... The Mendota Beacon is a free, privately funded newspaper published every other week in Madison, Wisconsin which ran its first issue on February 12, 2005, Republican president Abraham Lincolns birthday. ... The University of Wisconsin Press (or UW Press), founded in 1936, is a university press that is part of the Graduate School of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The Wisconsin Law Review is the principal journal of legal commentary and analysis published by students at the University of Wisconsin Law School. ... WSUM 91. ...

 People  // Herbert Spencer Gasser, B.S. 1910, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1944 John Bardeen, B.S. 1928 and M.S. 1929, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1956 and 1972 Edward Lawrie Tatum, B.A. 1931, M.S. 1932, Ph. ...

Barry Alvarez • Bret Bielema • Mike Eaves • Michael Leckrone • Mark Johnson • Bo Ryan • Lisa Stone • John D. Wiley Barry Alvarez Barry Alvarez (born December 30, 1946, Langeloth, Pennsylvania) is a retired college football head coach and current Director of Athletics at the University of Wisconsin. ... Bret Bielema (b. ... Mike Eaves is a retired NHL player and a current coach. ... Michael (Mike) Leckrone is the current director of the University of Wisconsin Marching Band. ... For other persons named Mark Johnson, see Mark Johnson (disambiguation). ... William Bo Ryan (born December 20, 1947 in Chester, Pennsylvania, United States) is the current head coach of the University of Wisconsin-Madison mens basketball team. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... John D. Wiley is the current chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ...

 Research  The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ...

University Research Park • WiCell • Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation • WISCAPE WiCell is the nonprofit subsidiary of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation created in 1998 to license and promote research in human embryonic stem cells. ... WARF company logo The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation is the nonprofit technology transfer office of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... // The Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education (WISCAPE) was established in 2001 on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus to study the challenges confronting postsecondary education while bringing together university leaders, researchers, and policymakers to discuss issues and solutions. ...

 Student Life  The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ...

Grateful Red • Humorology • Marching Band • On, Wisconsin! • Undergraduate Projects Lab • Weinert Center • The Wisconsin Union The Grateful Red is the student section of the University of Wisconsin-Madisons NCAA mens basketball team. ... Humorology, or Humo for short, is an annual musical/variety show show that takes place at the Union Theater of the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. ... The University of Wisconsin Marching Band is the marching band for the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was formed with 11 members in the fall of 1885 to support the military battalion. ... On, Wisconsin! is the official state song of Wisconsin. ... The Undergraduate Projects Laboratory (UPL) is a computer laboratory in the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. ... The Weinert Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is home to the entrepreneurship specialization in the School of Business. ... The Wisconsin Union is a membership organization at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Daily Cardinal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (860 words)
The Daily Cardinal is distributed throughout the campus community, with a daily circulation of about 10,000, and is published Monday through Friday during the academic year in both tabloid format and in electronic form on the Web.
The Daily Cardinal was founded by William Wesley Young, UW-Madison’s first journalism student, to be a rival to the long-defunct Aegis.
In 1983 the Cardinal survived a hostile takeover attempt by the Herald.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m