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Encyclopedia > The Da Vinci Code (film)
The Da Vinci Code

Teaser poster for The Da Vinci Code
Directed by Ron Howard
Produced by Brian Grazer
John Calley
Written by Dan Brown (novel)
Akiva Goldsman (screenplay)
Starring Tom Hanks
Audrey Tautou
Sir Ian McKellen
Paul Bettany
Jean Reno
Alfred Molina
Music by Hans Zimmer
Cinematography Salvatore Totino
Editing by Daniel P. Hanley
Mike Hill
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date(s) May 19, 2006
Running time 149 min (Extended Edition — 168 min)
Language English / French
Budget $125 million
Gross revenue $758,239,851
Followed by Angels and Demons
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

The Da Vinci Code is a 2006 feature film, which is based on the bestselling 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown. It was one of the most anticipated films of 2006, and was previewed at the opening night of the Cannes Film Festival on May 17, 2006. The Da Vinci Code then entered major release in many other countries on May 18, 2006 with its first showing in the United States on May 19 2006. The name The Da Vinci Code may refer to: The Da Vinci Code, the original 2003 novel by Dan Brown Criticisms of The Da Vinci Code, criticism and controversy around the novel The Da Vinci Code (film), the 2006 film based on the novel The Da Vinci Code (video game... The Da Vinci Code movie poster This is a copyrighted promotional image. ... Ronald William Howard (born March 1, 1954 in Duncan, Oklahoma) is an American actor, and an Academy Award winning film director, and producer, known for his roles on sitcoms, movies and television. ... Brian Grazer (born July 12, 1951, in Los Angeles, California) is a Jewish-American film and television producer who founded Imagine Entertainment with partner Ron Howard. ... This article is about the writer. ... Akiva Goldsman (born July 7, 1962) is an American screenwriter, producer, and occasional actor in the motion picture industry. ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956[1]) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist, writer, and movie producer. ... Audrey Tautou (IPA: ; , born August 9, 1976) is a French film actress, known to worldwide audiences for playing the title character in the award-winning French film Amélie (2001, Le Fabuleux Destin dAmélie Poulain) and also Sophie Neveu in The Da Vinci Code (2006). ... Sir Ian McKellen takes a day out at Universal Studios, Hollywood, April 2000. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jean Reno (born Juan Moreno y Herrera Jiménez (Spanish) [1][2] while French sources spell it as Don Juan Moreno y Herrera Jimenez [3]. on July 30, 1948) is a French actor. ... Alfred Molina (born May 24, 1953) is an English actor of both the stage and screen. ... Hans Florian Zimmer (born September 12, 1957) is an Academy Award, Grammy, and Golden Globe award-winning film score composer from Germany. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Angels and Demons is the upcoming feature film based on the 2000 novel of the same name by Dan Brown. ... // Please note that following the tradition of the English language film industry, these are the top grossing films that were first released in the United States and Canada in 2006; because they may have made most of their income in a later year, they may not be the top-grossing... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... This article is about the writer. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Because of some controversial interpretations of Christian history in both the book and movie, they were criticized by the Roman Catholic Church. Some bishops even urged members to boycott the film.[2] Many of the early showings were accompanied by protesters outside the movie theaters, and early critical reviews were decidedly mixed. However, in its opening weekend, the film earned over US$224 million worldwide, second only to the opening of 2005's Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. It is the second highest grossing movie of 2006 worldwide — having reached US$758,239,851 as of November 2 2006.[3] The film's soundtrack, composed by Hans Zimmer, was nominated for the 2007 Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score. Catholic Church redirects here. ... Look up Boycott in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hans Florian Zimmer (born September 12, 1957) is an Academy Award, Grammy, and Golden Globe award-winning film score composer from Germany. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... For the main article see Golden Globe Awards. ...

Contents

Plot summary

The film opens with a man (later revealed to be Jacques Saunière) being pursued by a mysterious hooded character carrying a handgun through one of the Grand Gallery in the Louvre. While trying to evade the man, he is confronted by him and the man reveals himself as Silas. Silas demands the location of the Priory's clef de voûte or "keystone." Under threat of death, Saunière finally confesses the keystone is kept in the sacristy of Church of Saint-Sulpice, "beneath the Rose." Silas thanks him, and then shoots him in the stomach. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Jacques Saunière is a character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ... This article is about the museum. ... Paul Bettany as Silas. ... Keystone could mean: Keystone (train) Keystone (architecture) Keystone Aircraft Corporation Keystone (software) - A parser and front-end for ISO C++ Keystone, Colorado - a town and ski resort Keystone Resort - ski resort in Keystone, Colorado Keystone Studios - movie studio, also see Keystone Kops Keystone (beer) - a Coors product This is a... The interior of the Church Saint-Sulpice () is a famous Parisian church on the east side of the Place Saint-Sulpice, in the Luxembourg Quarter of the VIe arrondissement. ...


Meanwhile, American symbologist Robert Langdon (Tom Hanks), who is in Paris as a guest lecturer on Symbols and the sacred feminine, is contacted by the French police, and summoned to the Louvre to view the crime scene. He discovers the dying Saunière had created an intricate display using black light ink and his own body and blood. Captain Bezu Fache (Jean Reno) asks him for his interpretation of the puzzling scene. The word “symbology” appears in several English dictionaries. ... Robert Langdon (June 22, 1964 in Exeter, New Hampshire, United States) is a fictional professor of religious iconology and symbology at Harvard University who appeared in the Dan Brown novels Angels and Demons (2000) and The Da Vinci Code (2003). ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956[1]) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist, writer, and movie producer. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Lecturer is a term of academic rank. ... The sacred feminine refers to the mythic representation of the mother goddess symbolized through images and events connected with fertility and reproduction from the earliest times. ... The National Police (Police Nationale) is one of two national police forces and the main civil law enforcement agency of France, with primary jurisdiction in cities and large towns. ... A crime scene is a location where an illegal act took place such as molestation, rape or illegal turnip smoking, and comprises the area from which most of the physical evidence is retrieved by [[forensics|forensic scientists] for example the reknowned criminal investigator and skilled forensic scientist, who is unfortunately... For other uses, see Ink (disambiguation). ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Jean Reno as Bezu Fache in the 2006 film The Da Vinci Code Bezu Fache is a fictional character in the popular 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code and the 2006 film based on it. ... Jean Reno (born Juan Moreno y Herrera Jiménez (Spanish) [1][2] while French sources spell it as Don Juan Moreno y Herrera Jimenez [3]. on July 30, 1948) is a French actor. ...


Silas calls a mysterious man known as The Teacher, revealing that he has killed all four protectors of the keystone and that all confirmed the same location. He dons a metal cilice on his thigh and proceeds to flagellate himself with a whip for the sins of murder. Facilitated by Bishop Manuel Aringarosa, Silas then travels to Saint-Sulpice and is admitted by an elderly nun; left alone, he excavates beneath the floor of the church to find a stone saying only JOB 38:11. He confronts the nun, who quotes the passage: "Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further." Realizing that he has been deceived, Silas is enraged and kills the nun. The Teacher is a character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code He is a shadowy figure who drives the plot of the story. ... It has been suggested that hairshirt be merged into this article or section. ... Flagellants mortifying the flesh, at the time of the Black Death Mortification of the flesh literally means putting the flesh to death. The term is primarily used in religious and spiritual contexts. ... For other uses, see Whip (disambiguation). ...

Next on the scene in the Louvre is Sophie Neveu (Audrey Tautou), cryptologist with the French police. She discreetly informs Langdon that he is in danger, and must get away without arousing suspicions. Langdon, in confusion, excuses himself and heads to the men's washroom, where Sophie meets him and warns that he was bugged with a tracking device by Bezu Fache on the way into the Louvre. Sophie tells him to get rid of it, which he manages by placing it in a bar of soap and throwing it through the window onto a passing truck. The police on the scene are alerted of Langdon's attempted escape and begin pursuing the truck. Sophie begins explaining that Fache had erased a line of black light ink text which appeared to incriminate Langdon, and that Fache believes Langdon to be the murderer. Image File history File links Picsony2006-15. ... Image File history File links Picsony2006-15. ... Audrey Tautou (IPA: ; , born August 9, 1976) is a French film actress, known to worldwide audiences for playing the title character in the award-winning French film Amélie (2001, Le Fabuleux Destin dAmélie Poulain) and also Sophie Neveu in The Da Vinci Code (2006). ... Robert Langdon and Sophie Neveu (Tom Hanks and Audrey Tautou) in the 2006 film The Da Vinci Code Sophie Neveu is a fictional character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956[1]) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist, writer, and movie producer. ... Robert Langdon (June 22, 1964 in Exeter, New Hampshire, United States) is a fictional professor of religious iconology and symbology at Harvard University who appeared in the Dan Brown novels Angels and Demons (2000) and The Da Vinci Code (2003). ... Robert Langdon and Sophie Neveu (Tom Hanks and Audrey Tautou) in the 2006 film The Da Vinci Code Sophie Neveu is a fictional character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... Audrey Tautou (IPA: ; , born August 9, 1976) is a French film actress, known to worldwide audiences for playing the title character in the award-winning French film Amélie (2001, Le Fabuleux Destin dAmélie Poulain) and also Sophie Neveu in The Da Vinci Code (2006). ... Pre-19th century Leone Battista Alberti, polymath/universal genius, inventor of polyalphabetic substitution (see frequency analysis for the significance of this -- missed by most for a long time and dumbed down in the Vigenère cipher), and what may have been the first mechanical encryption aid. ... Spectrum of a fluorescent black light source. ...


However, Sophie also believes that Saunière, who, it transpires, is her grandfather, wanted to pass a hidden message on to her, and that he had wanted to bring Langdon into the equation so that he could help her crack the code. A hidden message is information that is not immediately noticeable, and that must be discovered or uncovered and interpreted before it can be known. ... In telecommunication, the term decrypt has the following meanings: 1. ...


Having bought some time by removing the tracking device, the pair begin exploring the Louvre, finding more anagram messages that Saunière had left behind. Many of these relate to Leonardo Da Vinci's art, and the pair find a key with a Fleur-de-lis behind Madonna of the Rocks. “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... The Virgin of the Rocks and Madonna of the Rocks are terms used to describe two different paintings with almost identical compositions. ...


When the police stop the truck carrying the tracking device, they realize their mistake and immediately head back to the Louvre. Upon arrival, Robert and Sophie evade agents and are pursued by the French Police. Sophie tells Robert that she can continue with the investigation and that if they get to the American embassy then they can safely fly Langdon back to the United States. Investigation is the process of inquiring into a matter through research, follow-up, study, or formal procedure of discovery. ... - Seal on the building of German Embassies. ...


But at the front gates of the American embassy, the French authorities are already waiting for them. Sophie manages to drive into a narrow alleyway created by two moving trucks. Both of them abandon the car and head into the Bois de Boulogne where Langdon closely inspects the key. He notices an inscription on the side -- an address. The address directs them to the Depository Bank of Zurich where the key is used for a safety deposit box. The upper lake, with rowboats The Bois de Boulogne is a park located along the western edge of the 16ème arrondissement of Paris, near the suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt. ... Inscriptions are words or letters written, engraved, painted, or otherwise traced on a surface and can appear in contexts both small and monumental. ... The Depository Bank of Zurich is a fictional Geldschrankbank (secure depository facility) appearing in the 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown. ... A safe deposit box (or safety deposit box) is a type of safe usually located in groups inside a vault or in the back of a bank or post office. ...


When they enter the bank, both now appear as wanted criminals on French television. One of the security guards recognizes them and informs the police shortly after both enter into a bank vault. They discover that Saunière had a safety deposit box, which requires a 10-digit code for them to access. Langdon then remembers Fibonacci numbers which were found previously on Jacques Saunière. When arranged in the correct order, it becomes 1123581321. for other uses please see Crime (disambiguation) A crime is an act that violates a political or moral law. ... TV redirects here. ... A security officer guards a construction site in the Peoples Republic of China. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A tiling with squares whose sides are successive Fibonacci numbers in length A Fibonacci spiral, created by drawing arcs connecting the opposite corners of squares in the Fibonacci tiling shown above – see golden spiral In mathematics, the Fibonacci numbers form a sequence defined by the following recurrence relation: That is... Jacques Saunière is a character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ...

Silas (Paul Bettany), the albino killer.

The code opens the safety deposit box to reveal a rosewood container, which contains a cryptex: a cylindrical container with five alphabetical dials which must be arranged in the correct sequence to spell out a 5-letter code word, in order to open and access the parchment message inside. Using force to open the cryptex would break a vial of vinegar inside, which would dissolve the parchment and destroy the message. Image File history File links Silas_DaVinci. ... Image File history File links Silas_DaVinci. ... Paul Bettany as Silas. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Rosewood refers to a number of richly hued timbers, brownish with darker veining. ... Replica Cryptex Prize from Google Da Vinci Code Quest Contest The word cryptex is a neologism coined by the author Dan Brown for his 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code, denoting a portable vault used to hide secret messages. ... German parchmenter, 1568 Parchment is a material for the pages of a book or codex, made from fine calf skin, sheep skin or goat skin. ... Pharmaceutical ampoule, a type of vial. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ...


The manager, Andre Vernet of the bank then walks into the vault only to tell them that the police have arrived and that they must leave. The manager assists them in escaping by offering to take them as passengers in an armoured truck to escape the routine checks of the police. To distract the policeman that is conducting searches the manager tells him that he must quickly deliver the 'precious cargo' or he will be fired. The policeman reluctantly lets him off. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In the back of the truck Langdon and Neveu have a lengthy discussion about the cryptex and Neveu says that her grandfather often played games with her involving cryptexes. Langdon says that the cryptex might hold valuable information or another clue about what they are trying to discover. Eventually, they come to a sudden stop, and Langdon fears that it might be another check by the French police. Instead it is Vernet opening the rear door and pointing a gun towards both Langdon and Neveu.


He says that he has been waiting 20 years for someone to open that specific safety deposit box, and now that Langdon and Neveu have the cryptex, he would like it back. He threatens to kill them if they do not return it and shoots a bullet into the wall to prove how far he is willing to go. Langdon begins to approach Vernet to hand him the cryptex, when he notices the spent shell casing and subtly slips into the door's railing with his foot, all the while handing over the cryptex. When Vernet goes to close the door, yet is unsuccessful due to the spent bullet shell lodging in the door rail, Langdon shoves through pushing Vernet to the ground, quickly disarming and grabbing a hold of the cryptex. He assists Neveu out of the truck, and they hop into the front, leaving Vernet to fend for himself in the forest, where he has triggered the GPS device, hidden under the truck.


As Langdon begins to drive off, Neveu attempts to solve the code and open the cryptex, but it proves futile. Langdon then says that he has a friend, Leigh Teabing, he doesn't live too far off the highway, suggesting that they could go to him for assistance as to opening the cryptex. After answering several questions, they meet Leigh Teabing, who is an enthusiastic seeker of the Holy Grail. He explains to Sophie that the Grail is not actually a cup. Instead, it was Mary Magdalene, the wife of Christ, who was driven away because Jesus's followers didn't want to follow a woman after their leader was killed. Mary was pregnant at the time, and Teabing tells Sophie that the a secret society was formed to protect the descendents of Jesus. Jacques Saunière was believed to be a part of this society and Teabing suspects that he was training Sophie to join it also. Silas, meanwhile, breaks into Teabing's mansion and attempts to steal the cryptex. Teabing uses his cane to strike Silas in the leg where the cilice dug into it and knocks the albino out. Taking the butler, Remy Jean, and Silas with them, the trio plan to escape in Teabing's plane, first to Zürich then to London when they find a clue on the cryptex's box which leads them there. Sir Leigh Teabing portrayed by Sir Ian McKellen in The Da Vinci Code. ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ...


Somewhere later in the movie, Langdon is betrayed by Teabing, who actually is the Teacher. And in a situation where he was forced to crack the code or let Sophie get shot, he cracked the code, secretly. The code was 'Apple'. The police arrests Teabing, and at the very end, Langdon accidentally cuts himself, and a rose red line of blood on the sink reminds him of the Rose Line, and finds the location of the Holy Grail, buried under the pyramid in the Louvre. Meridian Room (or Cassini Room) at the Paris Observatory. ...


Cast

  • Jürgen Prochnow as André Vernet
  • Etienne Chicot as Lt. Jérôme Collet
  • Jean-Yves Berteloot as Remy Jean (Rémy Legaludec in the novel)
  • Jean-Pierre Marielle as Jacques Saunière
  • Hugh Mitchell as Young Silas
  • Seth Gabel as Michael the Cleric
  • Marie-Françoise Audollent as Sister Sandrine

Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956[1]) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist, writer, and movie producer. ... Robert Langdon (June 22, 1964 in Exeter, New Hampshire, United States) is a fictional professor of religious iconology and symbology at Harvard University who appeared in the Dan Brown novels Angels and Demons (2000) and The Da Vinci Code (2003). ... Audrey Tautou (IPA: ; , born August 9, 1976) is a French film actress, known to worldwide audiences for playing the title character in the award-winning French film Amélie (2001, Le Fabuleux Destin dAmélie Poulain) and also Sophie Neveu in The Da Vinci Code (2006). ... Robert Langdon and Sophie Neveu (Tom Hanks and Audrey Tautou) in the 2006 film The Da Vinci Code Sophie Neveu is a fictional character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... Sir Ian McKellen takes a day out at Universal Studios, Hollywood, April 2000. ... Sir Leigh Teabing is a character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Paul Bettany as Silas. ... Jean Reno (born Juan Moreno y Herrera Jiménez (Spanish) [1][2] while French sources spell it as Don Juan Moreno y Herrera Jimenez [3]. on July 30, 1948) is a French actor. ... Jean Reno as Bezu Fache in the 2006 film The Da Vinci Code Bezu Fache is a fictional character in the popular 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code and the 2006 film based on it. ... Alfred Molina (born May 24, 1953) is an English actor of both the stage and screen. ... Bishop Manuel Aringarosa is a character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... This article is about the disciple of Jesus. ... Bold textItalic text Jürgen Prochnow as Duke Leto Atreides in David Lynchs Dune Jürgen Prochnow [IPA: jʏrgɛn prɔxnɔv] (June 10, 1941 in Berlin) is a German actor. ... André Vernet is a character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... Lieutenant Jérôme Collet is a fictional character in the popular 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code and the 2006 film based on it. ... Jean-Yves Berteloot (born 1958) is a French actor. ... Rémy Legaludec is a character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... Rémy Legaludec is a character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... Jean-Pierre Marielle Jean-Pierre Marielle (born April 12, 1932 in Dijon) is a French actor. ... Jacques Saunière is a character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... Hugh Mitchell (born Hugh William Mitchell on September 7, 1989 in Winchester, England) is an actor, most famous for playing Colin Creevey in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... Seth Gabel (born March 2, 1981 in Hollywood, Florida) is an American actor // Gabel drew attention for his portrayal of Adrian Moore, the Oedipal, sexually confused son of Ava Moore (portrayed by Famke Janssen) on the FX series Nip/Tuck. ... Marie-Françoise Audollent is an actress. ...

Soundtrack

Further information: The Da Vinci Code (soundtrack)

Composed by acclaimed, Oscar-winning film composer Hans Zimmer, The Da Vinci Code soundtrack underscored the 2006 film of the same name. ...

Filming

The film rights were purchased from Dan Brown for $6,000,000. Filming had been scheduled to start in May 2005; however, some delays caused filming to begin on June 30, 2005. is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Location

Permission to film on the premises was granted to the film by the Louvre (although, since the crew was not permitted to shine light on the Mona Lisa, a replica was used instead, whilst the film crew used the Mona Lisa's chamber as a storage room), while Westminster Abbey denied the use of its premises, as did Saint-Sulpice. The Westminster Abbey scenes were instead filmed at Lincoln Cathedral and Winchester Cathedral, both belonging to the Church of England. For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... The interior of the Church Saint-Sulpice () is a famous Parisian church on the east side of the Place Saint-Sulpice, in the Luxembourg Quarter of the VIe arrondissement. ... Lincoln Cathedral (in full The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, or sometimes St. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close View along the nave of Winchester Cathedral to the west door A plan published in 1911 View of Winchester Cathedral Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, said to be the second longest, and with... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


Lincoln reportedly received £100,000 in exchange for the right to film there, with filming there occurring between 15 and 19 August 2005, mainly within the cloisters of the cathedral. The Cathedral's bell "Great Tom", which strikes the hour, was silent for the first time since World War II during that time. Although it remained a closed set, protesters led by the 61-year-old Roman Catholic nun Sister Mary Michael from Our Lady's Community of Peace and Mercy in Lincoln demonstrated against the filming, spending 12 hours praying on her knees outside the cathedral in protest against what she sees as the blasphemous use of a holy place to film a book which she considers to contain heresy.[4] is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Great Tom is the bell that hangs in Tom Tower (designed by Christopher Wren) in Christ Church, University of Oxford, England. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... For other uses, see Heresy (disambiguation). ...


Meanwhile Winchester answered criticism by using its location fee to fund an exhibition, lecture series and campaign to debunk the book.[5] The scenes for the Pope's summer residence, Castel Gandolfo were filmed on location at Belvoir Castle in Leicestershire. Belvoir Castle in the late 19th century. ...


Filming also took place elsewhere in the UK (London, including the concert hall in the Fairfield Halls, Croydon, the Temple Church, and Burghley House) and in France and Germany. London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... Fairfield Halls, ready to receive Tony Hadley and Cindarella on Ice Fairfield Halls is an arts centre in Croydon, London and opened in 1962. ... For other uses, see Croydon (disambiguation). ... The Temple Church. ... Burghley House Burghley House is a grand 16th-century English country house near the town of Stamford in Lincolnshire. ...


Studio shoots

The filmmakers also shot many of the internal scenes at Pinewood Studios:[6] the film's opening sequence was filmed in the cavernous Albert R. Broccoli's 007 Stage at Pinewood Shepperton, where the interior of the Louvre was recreated, away from the priceless paintings in the actual museum in France.[7] The gatehouse at Pinewood Studios Pinewood Studios is a major British film studio situated in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire. ... Albert R. Broccolis 007 Stage (formerly 007 Stage) is one of the largest sound stages in the world, and certainly the most famous. ...


In the film's opening sequence, Robert Langdon, played by Tom Hanks, is taken by French police to the Louvre, where a dead body has been discovered. David White of Altered States FX, a prosthetics and special makeup effects company which is based at London's Shepperton Studios was tasked with creating a naked photo-realistic silicone body for the scene. (Lighting effects, however, were utilized to obscure the body's genitalia, a technique also used on television programmes such as NCIS).[8] Shepperton Studios, located in Shepperton, Middlesex, England is a film studio with a long history of film making. ... NCIS is a CBS network show about a team of special agents from the Naval Criminal Investigative Service of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps. ...


Pinewood's state-of-the-art Underwater Stage was used to film underwater sequences.[6] The stage opened in 2005 after four years of planning and development. The water in the tank is filtered using an ultra violet system which creates crystal clear water, and the water is maintained at 30°C (87°F) to create a comfortable environment to work in for both cast and crew. Since the tank does not use much chlorine due to its optical properties, it must always be drained and refilled after several days.[9] The Underwater Stage, of Pinewood Shepperton studios (merged 2001), is a permanently filled and heated underwater filming stage. ...


Alternate versions of Paul Bettany's nude flagellation scenes were shot, in which he wears a black loincloth. Clips of these versions appear in the History Channel's "Opus Dei Unveiled" documentary, aired in summer 2006. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The History Channel is a cable television channel, dedicated to the presentation of historical events and persons, often with frequent observations and explanations by noted historians as well as reenactors and witnesses to events, if possible. ...


Pre-release reactions

The Vatican

At a conference on April 28, 2006, the secretary of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, a Vatican curial department formerly known as the Holy Office, Archbishop Angelo Amato, specifically called for a boycott of the film version of The Da Vinci Code; he said the movie is "full of calumnies, offences, and historical and theological errors."[10] is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. ... A congregation is a type of dicastery of the Roman Curia, the central administrative organism of the Catholic Church. ...


Cardinal Francis Arinze, in a documentary called "The Da Vinci Code: A Masterful Deception," urged unspecified legal action against the makers of the film. "Those who blaspheme Christ and get away with it are exploiting the Christian readiness to forgive and to love even those who insult us. There are some other religions which if you insult their founder they will not be just talking. They will make it painfully clear to you," Arinze said. He is Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments in the Vatican. Francis Cardinal Arinze. ... The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments (Congregatio de Cultu Divino et Disciplina Sacramentorum) is the congregation of the Roman Curia that handles most affairs relating to liturgical practices of the Latin Catholic Church as distinct from the Eastern Catholic Churches and also some technical matters...


Opus Dei

Stating that it does not intend to organize any boycotts, Opus Dei (the Catholic organization that is featured prominently in the novel and the film) released a statement on February 14, 2006 asking Sony Pictures to consider editing the soon-to-be-released film based on the bestseller, so that it would not contain references that it felt might be hurtful to Catholics. The statement also said Brown’s book offers a "deformed" image of the church and that Opus Dei will use the opportunity of the movie’s release to educate about the church. For other uses, see Opus Dei (disambiguation). ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is the television and film production unit of Japan-based corporate giant Sony. ...


On Easter, April 16, 2006, Opus Dei published an open letter by the Japanese Information Office of Opus Dei mildly proposing that Sony Pictures consider including a disclaimer on the film adaptation as a "sign of respect towards the figure of Jesus Christ, the history of the Church, and the religious beliefs of viewers." The organization also encouraged the studio to clearly label the movie as fictitious "and that any resemblance to reality is pure coincidence." This article is about the Christian festival. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is the television and film production unit of Japan-based corporate giant Sony. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Reality (disambiguation). ... Coincidence is the noteworthy alignment of two or more events or circumstances without obvious causal connection. ...


According to a statement by Manuel Sánchez Hurtado, Opus Dei Press Office Rome,[11] in contrast to Sony Corporation’s published "Code of Conduct" the company has announced that the film will not include such a disclaimer.


American Catholic bishops

US Catholic bishops launched a website refuting the key claims in the novel that were about to be brought to the screen. The bishops are concerned about errors and serious misstatements in The Da Vinci Code. The film has also been rated morally offensive – by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office for Film and Broadcasting, which denounced its depiction of both the Jesus-Mary Magdalene relationship and that of Opus Dei as "deeply abhorrent." The Office for Film and Broadcasting of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops maintains a motion picture rating system . ...


Peru

The Peruvian Episcopal Conference (CEP) declared the movie—and the book—as part of a "systematic attack on the Catholic Church".[12]Furthermore, the Archbishop of Lima, a Cardinal and member of Opus Dei, Juan Luis Cipriani urged his community not to see the film: "If someone goes (to see the movie), they are giving money to those who hurt the faith. It's not a problem of fiction; if truth is not respected, what arises we could call white glove terrorism."[13] In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... For other uses, see Lima (disambiguation). ... Juan Luis Cipriani Thorne Juan Luis Cipriani Thorne (born in Lima, 28 December 1943) is a Cardinal Priest and Archbishop of Lima in the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Cannes film festival

During a preview for movie critics in Cannes, the main climax of the film, when Robert Langdon (Tom Hanks) discloses to Sophie Neveu (Audrey Tautou) that she is "without a doubt" the "last living descendant of Jesus Christ," was met with thunderous laughter. Nearing the end of the screening, the conclusion of the movie was met with boos instead of the usual applause.[14]


NOAH

The National Organization for Albinism and Hypopigmentation (NOAH) has expressed concern about Silas' character giving people with albinism a bad name. However, the filmmakers did not change his appearance. See also evil albino. Albino redirects here. ... Hypopigmentation is the loss of skin color. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


People's Republic of China

Although the Da Vinci code was passed by Chinese censors, it was abruptly removed from public view in Mainland China, by order of the Chinese government, after "a remarkable run in China, grossing over $13 million".[15] No explanation was given. Its last screening was made on 9 June 2006. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Faroe Islands

The biggest cinema in the Faroe Islands, Havnar Bio, decided to boycott the film, effectively blocking it from the other smaller cinemas, who rely on second-hand films from this source, because it seems to be blasphemous in their point of view.[16] Havnar Bio is privately owned, and their decision is based on their own private opinion. Look up Boycott in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


A private initiative by the individual Herluf Sørensen has arranged the movie to be played, despite the boycott by Havnar bio. The movie opened at the Nordic House in the Faroe Islands on the 5 June 2006. The Nordic House (in Faroese Norðurlandahúsið) is the most important cultural institution in the Faroe Islands. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Philippines

Initial reactions The Philippine Alliance Against Pornography (PAAP) appealed to Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo to stop the showing of The Da Vinci Code in the Philippines. They branded the film as "the most pornographic and blasphemous film in history" and also requested the help of Pope Benedict XVI, the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) and other religious groups to stop the showing of the film.[1] In addition, they compared Dan Brown to Adolf Hitler.


However, Cecille Guidote Alvarez, Philippine Presidential Adviser on Culture and the Arts, said Malacañang will not interfere in controversy about the film and leaves the decision to the Movie and Television Classification Board's (MTRCB) rating.[2] Eventually, MTRCB decided to give The Da Vinci Code an R-18 rating (restricted to those under 18 years of age) despite PAAP's opposition for showing it.[3]



Philippine Catholic Bishops reactions Jaro Archbishop Angel Lagdameo, president of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP), expressed through a pastoral letter that even though The Da Vinci Code is a work of fiction, it "shapes the imagination, stirs emotions and forms mental associations" and added that "Brown has created the impression that his fiction is historical fact."[4] Before the pastoral letter was written, Lipa City Archbishop Ramon Arguelles, CBCP senior member, wrote Consoliza Laguardia, chairperson of the Movie and Television Classification Board (MTRCB), and requested her to prohibit the film's showing in the Philippines, where the majority are Christians, because of its "sacrilegious" and "blasphemous" nature.


Gaudencio Cardinal Rosales, archbishop of Manila, said that the film is a "vicious attack on the divinity of Jesus Christ". He also added that "not since the time of the Presbyter Arius was there an attack on the divinity of Jesus Christ, which was as vicious and as momentarily profitable as this venture of Dan Brown and Sony Film Productions."[5] Although, the CBCP and Cardinal Rosales didn't categorically demand for a ban of the film, they have issued guidelines for Filipino Catholics on watching the film.


Just like MTRCB's rating, Fr. Mario Sobrejuanite, vice chairman of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines-Catholic Initiative for Enlightened Movie Appreciation (CBCP-Cinema), rated The Da Vinci Code as R-18 and stated that the film is something that Catholics should not be afraid of.[6] However, the CBCP-Cinema rated the moral assessment on the film as "disturbing."



Sentiment of a Filipino Muslim The Moro Islamic Liberation Front Deputy Chairman Khaled Musa appealed to the MTRCB to ban the film, arguing that the film is blasphemous not only to Catholics but also to Muslims because Jesus Christ is considered one of the Prophets of Islam. Musa recalled Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy with regards to this film and further explained that freedom of expression should not "invade" freedom of religion.[7]



Banning in Manila The City Councilors of Manila passed a resolution to ban the film, labeling it as "offensive and contrary to established religious beliefs which cannot take precedence over the right of the persons involved in the film to freedom of expression."[8] The Councilors who concur to the resolution cited the Revised Penal Code of the Philippines stating that showing a film which offends a religion is a crime, while Councilors who opposed to the resolution stated that the film is only fiction and for entertainment. Those cinema owners who will not heed to the ban has to face a one-year jail term and a Php 5,000 fine and those persons who will be caught selling pirated DVD or VCD copies of the film could be fined Php 3,000 and jailed for up to six months. It was not banned in any of the other cities in Metro Manila, making the film easily accessible to citizens living in Manila.



Banning in SM Malls The SM Supermalls, the largest chain of shopping malls in the Philippines, prohibited the showing of The Da Vinci Code in all of their movie theaters throughout the country. This decision is in line with their policy for not showing films that were rated by MTRCB as R-18.[9]


Although, The Da Vinci Code was banned in Manila and SM Malls, it was still shown in other cinemas all over the Philippines. [1]



Proposed abolition of MTRCB Despite The Da Vinci Code's R-18 rating by the MTRCB, Filipino Congressman Bienvenido Abante Jr. rallied to abolish the MTRCB for allowing the film to be shown.[10] Abante, who is also the president of the Metropolitan Baptist Church of the Philippines and called the film as demonic and diabolical, filed House Bill 3269 that seek to abolish the television and film board.


In Cebu City, city moralist Rene Josef Bullecer said that the law that created the MTRCB does not allow the showing of the movie.[2] Success in philippines


Success in philippines with the controversies it has made,it just gave them a P30million in its first day of viewing in cinemas such as robinsons malls,ayala malls and other malls except from sm malls.In the end it gross of 3million us dollars


See The Da Vinci Code in the Philippines // The Philippine Alliance Against Pornography (PAAP) appealed to Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo to stop the showing of The Da Vinci Code in the Philippines. ...


Thailand

Christian groups in this mostly Buddhist country protested the film and called for it to be banned. On May 16, 2006, the Thai Censorship Committee issued a ruling that the film would be shown, but that the last 10 minutes would be cut. Also, some Thai subtitles were to be edited to change their meaning and passages from the Bible would also be quoted at the beginning and end of the film. Thailands population is relatively homogeneous. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


However, the following day, Sony Pictures appealed the ruling, saying it would pull the film if the decision to cut it was not reversed. The censorship panel then voted 6-5 that the film could be shown uncut, but that a disclaimer would precede and follow the film, saying it was a work of fiction.[17][18] This last-minute decision caused the premiere, opening-day showing of the movie to be delayed or cancelled in some provincial theatres as the updated film reels were shipped from Bangkok. Location within in Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governor Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ...


Singapore

The National Council of Churches of Singapore (NCCS) wrote to Information, Communications and the Arts Minister to register their "strongest objection" to the release of the film and requested that it be banned. The Media Development Authority, however, passed the unedited version of the movie, albeit with a NC16 rating, a restriction for children below the age of 16.[19]


Samoa

The film was banned outright in Samoa after church leaders watching a pre-release showing filed a complaint to film censors.[20]


India

There was a huge outcry in many states by the Christian minorities to ban the film from screening in India for the perceived anti-Christian message. This issue had even brought the minister responsible to view the film along with the senior Catholic representatives.


In the end, the movie was allowed to release without any cuts but with an A (Adults Only) certification from the Central Board for Film Certification and a 15-second Disclaimer added at the end stating that the movie was purely a tale of fiction. However the movie was delayed by a week by which time the grey market was flooded with pirated copies of the movie.


The screening of the film Da Vinci Code has been banned in Punjab, Goa, Nagaland, Meghalaya and Andhra Pradesh.[21][22] Later, the Andhra Pradesh High Court quashed the State Government's order banning the screening of the film in the state.[23] The Indian censor board however had cleared the movie for release on Friday, 2 June. The Supreme Court of India also rejected petitions calling for a ban on the film, saying the plot which suggested Jesus was married was fictional and not offensive. [24] , This article is about the Indian state of Punjab. ... For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... , Nagaland   is a hill state located in the far north-eastern part of India. ... , Meghalaya   is a small state in north-eastern India. ... Andhra redirects here. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Cast/crew response

Leading actor Tom Hanks has publicly denounced those who wish to boycott the film based on its biblical and historical inaccuracies. While admitting to the Evening Standard that those involved with the movie "always knew there would be a segment of society that would not want this movie to be shown," he adds that the film's story "is loaded with all sorts of hooey and fun kind of scavenger-hunt-type nonsense." Hanks went on to diminish the critical value of The Da Vinci Code bashers by saying that if they "are going to take any sort of movie at face value, particularly a huge-budget motion picture like this, (they'd) be making a very big mistake." While not downplaying the movie itself, Hanks stated that "all it is, is dialogue," adding that dialogue "never hurts." He also stated at the Cannes Film Festival that he and his wife saw no contradiction between their faith and the film, as "My heritage, and that of my wife, suggests that our sins have been taken away, not our brains."[25] The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ...


Also at Cannes, Sir Ian McKellen was quoted as saying — "While I was reading the book I believed it entirely. Clever Dan Brown twisted my mind convincingly. But when I put it down I thought, 'What a load of ... [eloquent pause] potential codswallop."[26] During a May 17, 2006 interview on The Today Show with the Da Vinci Code cast and director, Matt Lauer posed a question to the group about how they would have felt if the film had borne a prominent disclaimer that it is a work of fiction, as some religious groups wanted. (Some high ranking Vatican cabinet members had called for a boycott of the film.[27]) McKellen[28] responded, "I've often thought the Bible should have a disclaimer in the front saying 'This is fiction.' I mean, walking on water? It takes. . . an act of faith. And I have faith in this movie—not that it's true, not that it's factual, but that it's a jolly good story." He continued, "And I think audiences are clever enough and bright enough to separate out fact and fiction, and discuss the thing when they've seen it." The word codswallop, primarily a British English term meaning nonsense, is of uncertain origin; there are two main schools of thought. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Today, commonly referred to as The Today Show to avoid ambiguity, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on the NBC television network. ... Matthew Todd Lauer (December 30, 1957)[1] is an American television personality, best known as a co-host of NBCs The Today Show (since 1994)[1] after being a news anchor in New York [2] and a local talk-show host in Boston, Philadelphia, Providence, and Richmond. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...


Marketing campaign

Alternate poster of the film
Alternate poster of the film

The film's teaser trailer was released in the summer of 2005, a full year before the film's worldwide release. It was released before a single frame of the movie had been shot. It features crevices with some hidden symbols and was later revealed as an image of Da Vinci's most famous painting, the Mona Lisa. (In reality, the painting plays a very little role in the film and is shown only for a few seconds.) Image File history File links Download high resolution version (807x1200, 264 KB) Summary The final poster of The Da Vinci Code. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (807x1200, 264 KB) Summary The final poster of The Da Vinci Code. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Trailer (film). ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ...


The court case brought against Dan Brown by Richard Leigh and Michael Baigent, the authors of the non-fiction book Holy Blood, Holy Grail, has added to the film's publicity. For other people named Richard Leigh, see Richard Leigh. ... Author Michael Baigent Reuters Michael Baigent, born March 1948 in Christchurch, New Zealand, is an author and conspiracy theorist who co-wrote (with Richard Leigh) a number of books that question mainstream perceptions of history and many commonly-held versions of the life of Jesus. ... Holy Blood, Holy Grail is a controversial New York Times bestselling book by authors Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln, which was published in 1982 by Dell (ISBN 055212138) in London. ...


A cross-promotion also appeared on The Amazing Race 9, where one team earned a trip to the movie's premiere in Hollywood, California. The prize was awarded to the first team to arrive at the Pit Stop bearing two parchments and demonstrating that, when combined, they revealed a picture of Leonardo Da Vinci's Vitruvian Man and a coded message; the first team to arrive at the Pit Stop did show the message and were awarded the prize. The Amazing Race 9 was the ninth installment of the popular American reality television show, The Amazing Race. ...


Press screenings

To limit exposure in the age of blogs and constant leaks, both Sony and Imagine Entertainment, decided to forgo test screenings, a form of market research usually considered critical to fine-tuning a picture. According to the studio representative, the strategy is to preserve a climate of mystery and excitement around the movie, despite the fact that anyone who is interested probably already knows the plot through having already read the book.[citation needed] Even theater owners saw the 2 1/2 hour film only 5 days before the film festival, which by exhibition standards is as last minute as it gets.[29] Imagine Entertainment is a film and television production company founded in 1986 by director Ron Howard and producer Brian Grazer. ... Market research is the process of systematic gathering, recording and analyzing of data about customers, competitors and the market. ...


Promotional puzzles

As part of the lead up to the movie, various encrypted clues are being placed in movie trailers and interviews. In mid-April, two such clues appeared in the Da Vinci Code interviews on Entertainment Tonight and The Insider, as highlighted letters in the names of interviewees. This article is about a series of web-based challenges. ... Entertainment Tonight is a daily television entertainment news show that is syndicated by CBS Paramount Domestic Television throughout the United States, Canada, on the Nine Network in Australia and on UBC Inside in Thailand. ...


In February, Sony, in cooperation with Grace Hill Media, launched The Da Vinci Dialogue (aka The Da Vinci Challenge), a fairly comprehensive web site which is intended to defuse Christian opposition to the movie. The site mixes some mild criticisms with movie promotional material.


Reactions to the film

Several of the changes made in the film, notably those of Langdon's views on the subject, appear to be intended to counterpoint or soften some of the viewpoints expressed in the novel.


Protests

There have been protesters at several movie theaters across the United States on opening weekend protesting the themes of the film, citing it as blasphemy and claiming that it shames both the Catholic Church, and Jesus Christ himself. More than 200 protesters also turned out in Athens, Greece to protest the film's release shortly before opening day. In Manila the movie was banned from all theaters and the set by the local MTRCB as an R18 movie for the Philippines.[30] In Pittsburgh, protesters also showed up at a special screening of the film the day before its widespread release.[31] Protests also occurred at the filming sites, but only a monk and a nun stood in a quiet protest at the Cannes premiere.[32] In Chennai, India, the film was banned for a two month period to appease local Christian and Muslim groups.[33] For the black metal band, see Blasphemy (band). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ...


Critics' response

Critical response to 'The Da Vinci Code' was mostly negative. The film received only a 25% rating on the site Rotten Tomatoes, an especially low score for a heavily promoted blockbuster film.[34] Many critics described the film as boring, full of absurd plot twists, and excessively anti-Christian and unhistorical. The film was not well received at the Cannes Film Festival, where it debuted.[35] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ...


The critic Michael Medved gave the film two stars (out of four) saying, ". . .all the considerable acting talent in the film is wasted . . ." and "the plot twists and sudden reverses . . . seem silly, arbitrary, and entirely contrived – never growing organically out of the story-line or the thinly sketched characters."[36] Anthony Lane of The New Yorker addressed the concerns of Catholics in his film review, stating of the film, "It is self-evident, spirit-lowering tripe that could not conceivably cause a single member of the flock to turn aside from the faith."[37] Michael Medved (born October 3, 1948) is a Jewish-American, neoconservative radio talk show host, film critic, and author. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ...


In his Movie Guide, Leonard Maltin calls the film "a letdown in every respect."[38] Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ...


Critics were said to laugh out loud at some of the lines in the movie despite their serious delivery. These included "you are the last descendant of Jesus Christ" and "quick, we must find a library!".


Director Ron Howard noted that the overwhelmingly negative reviews were "frustrating" to him.[39]


Some critics, however, did like the film. Roger Ebert gave the film three out of four stars and stated, "the movie works; it's involving, intriguing and constantly seems on the edge of startling revelations."[40] Lawrence Toppman of The Charlotte Observer, who also liked the film, gave it three and a half out of four stars and noted, "unlike most Hollywood blockbusters, this one assumes audience members will be smart."[41] Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The film went on to receive a Razzie Nomination for Worst Director (Ron Howard). On the "Worst Movies of 2006" episode of the television show Ebert & Roeper (January 13, 2007), guest critic Michael Phillips (sitting in for the recovering Roger Ebert) listed the film at #2. The Golden Raspberries or Razzies were created by John Wilson in 1980, intended to complement the Academy Awards by dishonoring the worst acting, screenwriting, songwriting, directing, and films that the film industry had to offer. ... Ronald William Howard (born March 1, 1954 in Duncan, Oklahoma) is an American actor, and an Academy Award winning film director, and producer, known for his roles on sitcoms, movies and television. ... At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper is a movie review television program featuring film critic Roger Ebert and columnist Richard Roeper, both of the Chicago Sun-Times. ... Michael Phillips is a film critic for the Chicago Tribune newspaper. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ...


Box office response

Opening weekend

Despite the protests and poor pre-release reviews, the film still opened with an estimated $29 million in box office sales on its opening day, averaging $7764 per screen.[42] During its opening weekend, moviegoers spent an estimated $77 million in America, and $224 million worldwide, according to Sony Pictures. The Da Vinci Code is the best domestic opening for both Tom Hanks and Ron Howard.[43]


It also enjoyed the 3rd biggest opening weekend for the year to date (after Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest and X-Men: The Last Stand, and the second biggest worldwide opening weekend ever, just behind 2005's Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith.[44]) This has led some critics, particularly in the UK, to moot the idea of the 'critic-proof film'.[45] Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ...


Ranking and gross

  • Number 1 movie at the USA box office during its first week grossing more than $111 million.[46] Fifth highest gross of 2006 in the USA, and grossed $758 million worldwide in 2006 — the 2nd highest of 2006.[47]
  • On June 20, 2006, it became only the 2nd movie of the year to pass the $200 million mark in the USA.[48]
  • In the Netherlands, the film was released on May 18, 2006 in 127 cinemas. The film debuted at number 1 grossing over 2,249,322 in its first week, the highest debut in 2006. In its second week, it topped the Boxoffice Top 10 again, grossing over €1,996,735 in that week. The two following weeks, it remained on the top position. As of July 12, 2006, the film has grossed a total of € 6.746.406.[49]

is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five nations that form the European Union (and four outside it, as well as Montenegro and Kosovo), which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

DVD

The Special Edition Giftset

The film was released on DVD on November 14, 2006.[50] in three editions:
Image File history File links Dvcode_giftset_box. ... Image File history File links Dvcode_giftset_box. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. A Three-Disc release in both Widescreen and Fullscreen, along with a History Channel Documentary.
  2. A Two-disc release in both widescreen and fullscreen.
  3. A "Special Edition Giftset" which includes a two-disc DVD set, working cryptex, and replica Robert Langdon Journal.[50][51][52]

All DVD sets include an introduction from director Ron Howard, ten featurettes, and other bonus features.


In Australia, New Zealand and Latin America (DVD region code 4), the two disc set also included an extended edition of the film, including over twenty-five minutes of extra footage, bringing the running time to almost three hours. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Region 1, Region 2 and Region 3 redirect here. ...


In Hong Kong and Korea (Region 3), the extended cut was also released on DVD in a two-disc set. Two gift sets were also released, with working cryptex replica, repliaca journal, and more. The French Region 2 disc also received a special gift set.


Miscellaneous

  • The Dome of the Rock is clearly visible in the background in the scene where Mary Magdalene is leaving Jerusalem. The Dome of the Rock was actually constructed in the seventh century AD, several centuries after her death.
  • There is a quick shot of a poster advertising an opera based on Les Miserables. According to documents, its author, Victor Hugo, is the twenty-fourth Grand Master of the Priory of Sion, serving from 1844 to 1885, though these documents are considered forgeries.
  • When Langdon first enters the Louvre, the is a poster for the Caravaggio painting Boy in Well, a reference to Langdon's traumatic childhood experience.
  • Dan Brown is listed as one of the film's executive producers, as well as the writer (along with Anna Kulp) of "additional codes" for the film. He is also credited with writing and performing one of the film's songs, "Phiano," courtesy of his DBG Records label.
  • In the film, Sir Leigh Teabing refers to the phenomenon of peoples' minds interpreting the same thing differently ("seeing what it wants to see") as scotoma. In reality, it's called pareidolia. Scotoma is the natural "blind spot" inherent in the eyes of most mammals with good vision. This reference appears in the novel as well on pg. 252 (illustrated edition)
  • On the bus, the mobile phone Langdon uses to look up A. Pope is a Sony Ericsson W850i, a model which had not debuted in the UK until well after May 2006.
  • Local residents of east London in the UK, especially Tower Hamlets, will recognise Rotherhithe Tunnel when Robert Langdon and Sophie Neveu are in the Swiss bank van.
  • The Latin pronunciation used in the film is the Anglophone Reconstruction of what scholars think was the pronunciation of Latin used in the late Roman Republic (often called the Classical pronunciation). It seems understandable for the character of the `teacher` to use this pronunciation but is very abnormal to hear that character of the Monk using it as it is quite different from the pronunciation that tends to be taught in Catholic Seminaries (often called the Ecclesiatical pronunciation). The fact that the Monk used this pronunciation for Latin actually implies that the character holds Anti-Catholic feelings and is least likely to be in the service of the Church.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Les Misérables is an 1862 novel by the famous French novelist Victor Hugo, set in the Parisian underworld. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (IPA: (26 February 1802 — 22 May 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Prieuré de Sion, usually rendered in English translation as Priory of Sion or even Priory of Zion, is an elusive protagonist in many works of both non-fiction and fiction. ... Jan. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The word scotoma is derived from the Greek word for darkness. ... The term pareidolia (pronounced or ), referenced in 1994 by Steven Goldstein,[1] describes a psychological phenomenon involving a vague and random stimulus (often an image or sound) being perceived as significant. ... The Sony Ericsson W850i is the first 3G sliding form-factor phone for Sony Ericsson, introduced in 2006, and is a member of their successful Walkman line. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The London Borough of Tower Hamlets is the London borough to the east of the City of London, north of the River Thames in East London. ... The Rotherhithe entrance of the Rotherhithe Tunnel, 1909 The same entrance (as at February 2006) The Rotherhithe Tunnel is a road tunnel crossing beneath the River Thames in East London. ...

Cameos

  • Brown and his wife can be seen in the (out of focus) background of one of the book signing scenes.[citation needed]
  • The authors of the book The Templar Revelation, a major source of information on the Priory of Sion myth, Lynn Picknett and Clive Prince, make a brief appearance as characters on a bus.[citation needed]

The Templar Revelation: Secret Guardians of the True Identity of Christ is a book written by Lynn Picknett and Clive Prince and published in 1997. ...

See also

Look up mystery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... This article is about a series of web-based challenges. ... The Da Vinci Code is a video game for PlayStation 2, Xbox and Microsoft Windows based on the novel by Dan Brown. ... Composed by acclaimed, Oscar-winning film composer Hans Zimmer, The Da Vinci Code soundtrack underscored the 2006 film of the same name. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10509652/site/newsweek/
  2. ^ BBC News: Cardinal urges Da Vinci action
  3. ^ Boxofficemojo.com: The Da Vinci Code
  4. ^ TimesOnline: Nun protests over cathedral filming of Da Vinci Code
  5. ^ Guardian Unlimited: Location fee funds Da Vinci Code rebuttal
  6. ^ a b Gordon Brown Opens Underwater Stage at Pinewood Studios, 19 May 2005
  7. ^ WHAS11news: Fire chars British set of new Bond movie, Katie Fretland, 30 July 2006
  8. ^ American Cinematographer: Secret History
  9. ^ http://www.pinewoodgroup.com/gen/z_sys_infoFacility.aspx?intFacilityId=57&intFacilityTypeId=4&Folder=2
  10. ^ "Reaffirm the Resurrection, Pope urges faithful", Catholic World News, May 1, 2006. 
  11. ^ Sánchez Hurtado, Manuel. "The Other Code", Opus Dei Press Office, May 17, 2006. 
  12. ^ http://www.rpp.com.pe/portada/religion/37699_1.php
  13. ^ http://www.arzobispadodelima.org/dialogo/2006/d_130506.htm
  14. ^ http://www.canada.com/topics/entertainment/story.html?id=2ca605b1-79e2-43d8-9a53-7f0f77b21ab5&k=55649
  15. ^ http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Movies/06/08/vincicode.china/index.html
  16. ^ http://www.playfuls.com/news_000971_Da_Vinci_Code_Movie_Not_To_Be_Screened_On_Faroe_Islands_.html
  17. ^ http://www.nationmultimedia.com/2006/05/17/headlines/headlines_30004223.php
  18. ^ http://www.manager.co.th/IHT/ViewNews.aspx?NewsID=9490000064856
  19. ^ http://www.todayonline.com/articles/119077.asp
  20. ^ http://www.nzherald.co.nz/search/story.cfm?storyid=00077629-C13F-1471-9B8883027AF1010E
  21. ^ http://sify.com/movies/tamil/fullstory.php?id=14218772
  22. ^ http://www.hindu.com/2006/06/02/stories/2006060220780100.htm
  23. ^ http://www.hindu.com/2006/06/22/stories/2006062211990100.htm
  24. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060612/ennew_afp/afpentertainmentfilmdavinciindiacourt_060612131941
  25. ^ http://film.guardian.co.uk/cannes2006/story/0,,1777404,00.html
  26. ^ http://film.guardian.co.uk/cannes2006/story/0,,1777404,00.html
  27. ^ Philip Pullella, "Boycott Da Vinci Code film", Reuters 28 April 2006. Accessed 20 May 2006.
  28. ^ Larry Carroll: Ian McKellen Sticks Up For Evil In 'Da Vinci Code,' 'X-Men' [1], MTV News May 15, 2006
  29. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/16/movies/16code.html
  30. ^ "Hundreds of Greek Orthodox march to protest Da Vinci Code movie", Deutsche Presse-Agentur, May 16, 2006. 
  31. ^ "Locals Protest 'Da Vinci Code' Movie", KDKA News, May 19, 2006. 
  32. ^ http://film.guardian.co.uk/cannes2006/story/0,,1777404,00.html
  33. ^ http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/009200606291967.htm
  34. ^ http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/da_vinci_code/
  35. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12822855/
  36. ^ http://www.michaelmedved.com/pg/jsp/eot/home.jsp
  37. ^ Anthony Lane, HEAVEN CAN WAIT: The Da Vinci Code, The New Yorker, 29 May 2006
  38. ^ Maltin, Leonard. Leonard Maltin's 2008 Movie Guide. New American Library, 319. 
  39. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12861318/
  40. ^ http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060518/REVIEWS/60419009
  41. ^ http://ae.charlotte.com/entertainment/ui/charlotte/movie.html?id=204819&reviewId=20803&startDate=NEXT7
  42. ^ "'Da Vinci Code' opens with estimated $29 million", CNN, May 20, 2006. 
  43. ^ CNN "'Da Vinci Code' a hot ticket"
  44. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060521/ap_on_en_mo/box_office;_ylt=AlSAKnJl2Lfj2PWmUhwX.Qes0NUE;_ylu=X3oDMTA2Z2szazkxBHNlYwN0bQ--
  45. ^ http://arts.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,,1781874,00.html
  46. ^ The Da Vinci Code (2006). Box Office Mojo (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-16.
  47. ^ The Da Vinci Code (2006). Box Office Mojo (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-16.
  48. ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=davincicode.htm
  49. ^ Boxoffice NL
  50. ^ a b amazon.com Widescreen Edition listing
  51. ^ amazon.com Fullscreen Edition listing
  52. ^ amazon.com Special Edition Giftset listing

is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources

The following are reference sources, repeated in alphabetic order:

  • Larry Carroll: "Ian McKellen Sticks Up For Evil In Da Vinci Code, X-Men" [6], MTV News, May 15, 2006.
  • Catholic World News, "Reaffirm the Resurrection, Pope urges faithful," Catholic World News, May 1, 2006.
  • CNN, "'Da Vinci Code' a hot ticket," CNN, May 21, 2006 (webpage expired).
  • CNN, "'Da Vinci Code' opens with estimated $29 million," CNN, May 20, 2006 (webpage expired).
  • DPA, "Hundreds of Greek Orthodox march to protest Da Vinci Code movie," Deutsche Presse-Agentur, May 16, 2006.
  • Fretland, Katie, "Fire chars British set of new Bond movie" 30 July 2006, webpage: WHAS11-DVC: Louvre interior set filmed at Pinewood.
  • Sánchez Hurtado, Manuel, The Other Code, Opus Dei Press Office, May 17, 2006.
  • KDKA News, "Locals Protest 'Da Vinci Code' Movie," KDKA News, May 19, 2006.
  • Leonardo Da Vinci, Mona Lisa (La Gioconda) painting, 1503-1507, in Louvre Museum.
  • Pinewood Shepperton studios, "Gordon Brown Opens Underwater Stage at Pinewood Studios," 19 May 2006, webpage: PinewoodShep-Stage.
  • Philip Pullella, "Boycott Da Vinci Code film," Reuters, 28 April 2006, web: ScotsmanVatDVC, Accessed 22 August 2006.
  • US Weekly, "Ian McKellen Unable to Suspend Disbelief While Reading the Bible," US Weekly, 17 May 2006: (has Video clip).

is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ... This article is about the museum. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Film Portal
  • The Da Vinci Code at the Internet Movie Database
  • The Da Vinci Code at Rotten Tomatoes
  • Official site by Sony
  • Official "secret" site
  • The Da Vinci Code — Facts and Fiction MalGo Media Services
  • Slant Magazine: The Da Vinci Code Review
Preceded by
Mission Impossible III
Box office number-one films of 2006 (USA)
May 21, 2006
Succeeded by
X-Men: The Last Stand

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Da Vinci Code - Film-Flam (6711 words)
In the film, there is no second cryptex inside the first as there is in the novel, and, in the film, the solution to the cryptex is the same as that for the second cryptex in the novel.
In the film, Langdon tells Sophie that since the tomb of Mary Magdalene was apparently lost with the death of Saunière, it would not be possible to prove that Sophie is the last descendant of Jesus Christ and it may not necessarily be important or right to prove the bloodline.
The film's opening sequence was filmed in the cavernous Albert R. Broccoli's 007 Stage at Pinewood where the interior of the Louvre was recreated, away from the priceless paintings in the actual museum in France.
The Da Vinci Code (film) at AllExperts (6786 words)
The film opens with a man (later revealed to be Jacques Saunière) being pursued by a mysterious hooded character carrying a handgun through one of the Grand Gallery in the Louvre.
In the film, Aringarosa is a sinister member of a secret council of priests, called the Council of Shadows, dedicated to the destruction of the Sangreal and the living descendents of Christ, instead of the desperate leader of Opus Dei dealing with the Vatican's desire to sever ties with it.
The film's opening sequence was filmed in the cavernous Albert R. Broccoli's 007 Stage at Pinewood where the interior of the Louvre was recreated, away from the priceless paintings in the actual museum in France.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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