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Encyclopedia > The Confederacy
Confederate States of America
3rd flag of the Confederate States of America Confederate States of America Seal
(3rd Flag of the Confederacy) (Confederate Seal)
Motto:
Deo Vindice
(Latin: With God As Our Vindicator)
Anthem:
God Save the South (unofficial)
Dixie (popular)
Image:CSAlocation2.png
Capital Montgomery, Alabama
February 4, 1861May 29, 1861
Richmond, Virginia
May 29, 1861April 9, 1865
Danville, Virginia
April 3April 10, 1865
Largest city New Orleans
February 4, 1861May 1, 1862 (captured)
Richmond
May 1, 1862–surrender
Official language
English de facto nationwide

Various European and Native American languages regionally Third National Flag of the Confederate States of America. ... Seal of the Confederate States of America, Public Domain File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The following are the flags used by the Confederate States of America. ... Confederate Seal The Confederate Seal was the seal of the Confederate States of America. ... A motto is a phrase or a short list of words meant to formally describe the general motivation or intention of a social group or organization. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... God is the term used to denote the Supreme Being ascribed by monotheistic religions to be the creator, ruler and/or the sum total of, existence. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is formally recognized by a countrys government as their states official national song. ... A rare music cover illustration, published by the composer, C. T. De Cœniél, in Richmond, Virginia. ... Sheet music, c. ... Author:Age234 Licence: This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... In politics, a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... Montgomery is the capital of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (150th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the United States of America. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (150th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Danville is an independent city located in Virginia, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina. ... April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the United States of America. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... An official language is a language that is given a unique legal status in a country, state, or other territory. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Most of the many indigenous languages of Europe belong to the Indo-European language family. ... Native American languages are the indigenous languages of the Americas, spoken by Native Americans from the southern tip of South America to Alaska and Greenland. ...

Government
President
Vice President
Federal republic
Jefferson Davis
Alexander Stephens
Area
 - Total
 - % water
(excl. MO & KY)
1,995,392 km²
5.7%
Population
 - 1860 Census

 - Density
(excl. MO & KY)
9,103,332
(including 3,521,110 slaves)
4.5/km²
Independence
 - Declared
 - Recognized
 
 - Surrender
see Civil War
February 4, 1861
only by the Duchy of
Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
April 9, 1865
Currency CSA dollar (only notes issued)
US dollar

The Confederate States of America—also referred to as the Confederate States, CSA, the Confederacy and Dixie (colloquially)—was a country that existed between 1861 and 1865 in North America, comprising states that seceded from the United States of America. The territory of the CSA consisted of most of the southeastern portion of today's United States. As its existence was contested by the United States for the whole of its brief history, there was never a definitive delineation of Confederate States' northern boundary. Its southern land boundary was with Mexico. It was otherwise bounded by the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. The Federal Republic of Germany and its sixteen Bundesländer A federal republic is a state which is both a federation and a republic. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician, most famous for serving as the first and only President of the Confederate States, leading the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. ... Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812–March 4, 1883) was Vice President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. ... -1... Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... The American Civil War (1861–1865) was fought in North America within the United States of America, between twenty-four mostly northern states of the Union and the Confederate States of America, a coalition of eleven southern states that declared their independence and claimed the right of secession from the... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A duchy is a territory, fief, or domain ruled by a duke or duchess. ... Capital Coburg Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg-Gotha or Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria and Thuringia... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The currency used by the Confederate States of America resembled the US dollars. ... This article is about general United States currency. ... DIXIES LAND, 1904 postcard Dixie is a nickname for the Southern United States. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere bordered on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west by the... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...


For most of its life the Confederacy was engaged in a war of independence against the United States, with the vast majority of combat taking place in Southern territory. However, the Army of Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee, also made limited incursions onto Union soil. A confederacy can refer to: A form of government formed as a union of political organizations, though it differs from a republic in that the separate political units retain a greater degree of sovereignty over themselves. ... The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. ... Robert E. Lee portrait by Julian Vannerson, 1863 Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ...

Contents


History

Main articles: American Civil War, and [[{{{2}}}]], and [[{{{3}}}]], and [[{{{4}}}]], and [[{{{5}}}]]

The Confederate States were formed on February 4, 1861, by six Southern states (South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana) after confirmation of the election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States. Jefferson Davis was selected as its first President the next day. The American Civil War (1861–1865) was fought in North America within the United States of America, between twenty-four mostly northern states of the Union and the Confederate States of America, a coalition of eleven southern states that declared their independence and claimed the right of secession from the... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Southern United States. ... The term state may refer to: a sovereign political entity, see state unitary state nation state a non-sovereign political entity, see state (non-sovereign). ... State nickname: Palmetto State Official languages English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Senators Lindsey Graham (R) Jim DeMint (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 6 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012,012 51. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Official languages English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush (R) Senators Bill Nelson (D) Mel Martinez (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 22nd 170,451 km² 17. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 30th 52,423 mi²/135,775 km² 190 mi/306 km 330 mi/531 km 3. ... State nickname: Pelican State Official languages English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last official government census, but probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Senators Mary Landrieu (D) David Vitter (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 31st 134,382 km² 16 Population  - Total... The President of the United States (fully, President of the United States of America; unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician, most famous for serving as the first and only President of the Confederate States, leading the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. ... The President of the Confederate States was the Head of State of the short-lived republic of the Confederate States of America which seceded from the United States. ...


Texas joined the Confederacy on March 2 and then replaced its governor, Sam Houston, when he refused to take an oath of allegiance to the Confederacy. These seven states seceded1 from the United States and took control of military/naval installations, ports, and custom houses within their boundaries, triggering the American Civil War. Official language(s) None. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... Sam Houston Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793 – July 26, 1863) 19th century statesman, politician and soldier; was a key figure in the history of Texas, and, as of 2005, the only person in U.S. history to have been the governor of two different states — Tennessee and Texas. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... The American Civil War (1861–1865) was fought in North America within the United States of America, between twenty-four mostly northern states of the Union and the Confederate States of America, a coalition of eleven southern states that declared their independence and claimed the right of secession from the...


A month after the Confederacy was formed, on March 4, 1861, Abraham Lincoln was sworn in as President of the United States. In his inaugural address, he argued that the Constitution was a more perfect union than the earlier Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, that it was a binding contract, and called the secession "legally void". He stated he had no intent to invade southern states, but would use force to maintain possession of federal property and collection of various federal taxes, duties and imposts. His speech closed with a plea for restoration of the bonds of union. March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The President of the United States (fully, President of the United States of America; unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority or power. ... The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, formed the first governing document of the United States of America. ...


On April 12 South Carolina troops fired upon the Federal troops stationed at Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina until the troops surrendered. Following the Battle of Fort Sumter, Lincoln called for all remaining states in the Union to send troops to recapture Sumter and other forts, defend the capital, and preserve the Union. Most Northerners believed that a quick victory for the Union would crush the nascent rebellion, and so Lincoln only called for volunteers for 90 days. This resulted in four more states voting to secede: Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina joined the Confederacy for a total of 11. Once Virginia seceded, the Confederate capital was moved from Montgomery, Alabama to Richmond, Virginia April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... Before the attack Map detailing the location of Fort Sumter Model of Fort Sumter as it appeared in 1861 before the attack Smaller Union Flag used after the larger one had ripped 1861, inside the fort flying the Confederate Flag Fort Sumter, South Carolina, viewed from a sandbar in Charleston... Charleston, South Carolinas oldest city Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat Nickname: The Holy City, The Palmetto City Founded 1670 Incorporated County Berkeley and Charleston Counties Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr. ... The Battle of Fort Sumter (April 12–13, 1861), a relatively minor military engagement at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, began the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 29th 137,732 km² 385 km 420 km 2. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Official languages English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen (D) Senators Bill Frist (R) Lamar Alexander (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 2. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State; Old North State Official languages English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley (D) Senators Elizabeth Dole (R) Richard Burr (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 28th 139,509 km² 9. ... Montgomery is the capital of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the United States of America. ...


Kentucky was a border state during the American Civil War and for a time had two state governments, one supporting the Confederacy and one supporting the Union. Fittingly, the Presidents of both the United States (Abraham Lincoln) and the Confederate States (Jefferson Davis) during the Civil War were born in Kentucky. The original government of Kentucky remained in the Union after a short-lived attempt at neutrality, but a rival faction from that state was also accepted as members of the Confederacy. A more complex situation surrounds the Missouri Secession, but in any event Missouri was also considered a member of the Confederate States. With Kentucky and Missouri, the number of Confederate states is thus sometimes considered to be 13. State nickname: Bluegrass State Official languages English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 1. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician, most famous for serving as the first and only President of the Confederate States, leading the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Official languages English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 1. ... The Missouri Secession controversy refers to the disputed status of the state of Missouri during the American Civil War. ...


The five tribal governments of the Indian Territory—which became Oklahoma in 1907—also mainly supported the Confederacy. The southern part of New Mexico Territory (including parts of the Gadsden Purchase) joined with the Confederacy as Arizona Territory. These first settlers petitioned the Confederate government for annexation of their lands, prompting an expedition in which territory south of the 34th parallel was governed by the Confederacy. Arizona troops were also officially recognized within the armies of the Confederacy. Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Territory in 1891 Indian Territory, also known as Indian Country, Indian territory or the Indian territories, was the land set aside within the United States for the use of American Indians (Native Americans). The general borders were set by the Indian Intercourse Act of 1834. ... Oklahoma is a state in the southern United States, lying mostly in the lower Great Plains, and its U.S. postal abbreviation is OK; others abbreviate the states name Okla. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Gadsden Purchase (shown with present-day state boundaries and cities) The Gadsden Purchase is a 29,640 mi² (77,700 km²) region of what is today southern Arizona and New Mexico that was purchased by the United States from Mexico in 1853. ... Territories in Arizona and New Mexico in 1863. ...


Preceding his New Mexico Campaign, General Sibley issued a proclamation to the people of New Mexico his intentions of taking possession of the territory in the name of the Confederate States. Confederate troops briefly occupied the territorial capital of Santa Fe between March 13 and April 8, 1862. The New Mexico Campaign was a military operation of the American Civil War in February-March 1862 in which the Confederate Brigadier General Henry Hopkins Sibley invaded the northern New Mexico Territory in an attempt to gain control of the southwest, including the gold fields of Colorado and the ports... Henry Hopkins Sibley was a brigadier general during the American Civil War fighting on the side of the Confederate States of America in the New Mexico Territory. ... State nickname: Land of Enchantment Official languages English and Spanish Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Governor Bill Richardson (D) Senators Pete Domenici (R) Jeff Bingaman (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 5th 315,194 km² 0. ... Santa Fe (Spanish, Holy Faith) (full form: La Villa Real de la Santa Fe de San Francisco de Asís, English: Royal City of the Holy Faith of St. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Not all jurisdictions where slavery was still legal joined the Confederacy. In 1861 martial law was declared in Maryland (the state which borders the U.S. capital, Washington, D.C., on three sides) to block attempts at secession. Delaware, also a slave state, never considered secession, nor did the capital of the U.S., Washington, D.C.. In 1861, during the war, a unionist rump legislature in Wheeling, Virginia seceded from Virginia, claiming 48 counties, and joined the United States in 1863 as the state of West Virginia, with a constitution that would have gradually abolished slavery[1]. Similar attempts to secede from the Confederacy in parts of other states (notably in eastern Tennessee) were held in check by Confederacy declarations of martial law[2][3]. Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Official languages None Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Senators Paul Sarbanes (D) Barbara Mikulski (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 42nd 32,160 km² 21 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 19th 5,296,486 165/km² (5th) Admission into... State nickname: The First State Official languages None Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Governor Ruth Ann Minner (D) Senators Joseph R. Biden, Jr. ... Map showing Washington, D.C.s location in relation to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia Washington, D.C. is the capital city of the United States of America. ... A rump state is the remnant of a once-larger government, left with limited powers or authority after a disaster, invasion or military occupation. ... Wheeling is a city located in West Virginia, in the United States. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... State nickname: Mountain State Official languages English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Governor Joe Manchin (D) Senators Robert Byrd (D) Jay Rockefeller (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 41st 62,809 km² 0. ...


The surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia by General Lee at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865 is generally taken as the end of the Confederate States. President Davis was captured at Irwinville, Georgia on May 10 and the remaining Confederate armies surrendered by June 1865. The last Confederate flag was hauled down on CSS Shenandoah on November 6, 1865. Robert E. Lee portrait by Julian Vannerson, 1863 Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... McLean house where General Lee surrendered. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... The CSS Shenandoah, formerly Sea King, was an iron-framed, teak-planked, full-rigged vessel with auxiliary steam power, under Captain James Waddell, CSN, a North Carolinian with twenty years service in the Federal navy. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Government and politics

Constitution

Jefferson DavisPresident (1861-1865)
Enlarge
Jefferson Davis
President (1861-1865)

The Confederate States Constitution provides much insight into the motivations for secession from the Union. Based to a certain extent on both the Articles of Confederation and on the United States Constitution, it reflected a stronger philosophy of states' rights, curtailing the power of the central authority, and also contained explicit protection of the institution of slavery, though international slave trading was prohibited. It differed from the US Constitution chiefly by addressing the grievances of the secessionist states against the federal government of the United States. For example, the Confederate government was prohibited from instituting protective tariffs, making southern ports more attractive to international traders. Most southerners regarded protective tariffs as a measure that enriched the northern states at the expense of the south. The Confederate government was also prohibited from using revenues collected in one state for funding internal improvements in another state. At the same time, however, much of the Confederate constitution was a word-for-word duplicate of the US one. Image File history File links Jefferson Davis File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Jefferson Davis File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician, most famous for serving as the first and only President of the Confederate States, leading the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. ... The Confederate States Constitution The Constitution of the Confederate States of America was the supreme law of the Confederate States of America, as adopted on March 11, 1861 and in effect through the conclusion of the American Civil War. ... The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, formed the first governing document of the United States of America. ... The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (i. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... A protective tariff is a tariff imposed to protect domestic firms from import competition. ... The notion of internal improvements or public works is a concept in economics and politics. ...


At the drafting of the Constitution of the Confederacy, a few radical proposals such as allowing only slave states to join and the reinstatement of the Atlantic slave trade were turned down. The Constitution specifically did not include a provision allowing states to secede, since the southerners considered this to be a right intrinsic to a sovereign state which the United States Constitution had not required them to renounce, and thus including it as such would have weakened their original argument for secession.


The President of the Confederacy was to be elected to a six-year term and could not be reelected. The only president was Jefferson Davis; the Confederacy was defeated by the federal government before he completed his term. One unique power granted to the Confederate president was the ability to subject a bill to a line item veto, a power held by some state governors. The Confederate Congress could overturn either the general or the line item vetoes with the same two thirds majorities that are required in the US Congress. Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician, most famous for serving as the first and only President of the Confederate States, leading the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. ... In government, the line-item veto is the power of an executive to veto parts of a bill, usually budget appropriations. ... The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... Congress in Joint Session. ...


Printed currency in the forms of bills and stamps was authorized and put into circulation, although by the individual states in the Confederacy's name. The government considered issuing Confederate coinage. Plans, dies and 4 "proofs" were created, but a lack of bullion prevented any public coinage.


Although the preamble refers to "each State acting in its sovereign and independent character", it also refers to the formation of a "permanent federal government". Also, although slavery was protected in the constitution, it also prohibited the importation of new slaves from outside the Confederacy (except from slaveholding states or territories of the United States).


Capital

Virginia State HouseServed as Confederate Capitol
Virginia State House
Served as Confederate Capitol

The capital of the Confederacy was Montgomery, Alabama, from February 4, 1861, until May 29, 1861, when it was moved to Richmond, Virginia (named the new capital on May 6, 1861). Shortly before the end of the war, the Confederate government evacuated Richmond with plans to relocate further south to Atlanta, Georgia, or to Columbia, South Carolina, but little came of this before Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House and Danville, Virginia, served from April 3 to April 10, 1865, as the last capital of the Confederacy. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Virginia State Capitol Building at Richmond, Virginia Virginia State Capitol is a building in Richmond, the city which is the third State Capital of Virginia. ... Montgomery is the capital of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (150th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the United States of America. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Atlanta is the capital of and largest city in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Aerial view of Columbia Motto: Where Friendliness Flows Nickname: The Capital of Southern Hospitality, The Metro, Met-Town Founded March 22, 1786 Incorporated 1854 County Richland and part of Lexington Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Bob Coble Area  - Total  - Water 324. ... McLean house where General Lee surrendered. ... Danville is an independent city located in Virginia, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina. ... April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


International diplomacy and legal status

The legal status of the Confederate Government was a subject of extensive debate throughout its existence and for many years after the war. During its existence, the Confederate government conducted negotiations with several European powers (including France and the United Kingdom). The UK came close to recognizing the Confederacy during the Trent Affair and began preparations to offer mediation along with France (due to Emperor Napoleon III's project, the Mexican Empire), but both nations backed away after the Battle of Antietam and Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. Throughout the war most European powers adopted a policy of neutrality, meeting informally with Confederate diplomats but withholding diplomatic recognition. In its place, they applied international law principles that recognized the Northern and Southern sides of the war as belligerents. Canada allowed both Confederate and Union agents to work openly within its borders and some state governments in northern Mexico negotiated regional agreements to cover trade on the Texas border. Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ... The Trent Affair was an international diplomatic incident that occurred during the American Civil War. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (20 April 1808, Paris, France - 9 January 1873, Chislehurst, Kent, England) was President of France from 1849 to 1852, and then Emperor of the French under the name Napoléon III from 1852 to 1870. ... The Mexican Empire was the name of Mexico on two non-consecutive occasions in the 19th century when it was ruled by an Emperor. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee Strength 87,000 men 45,000 men Casualties 2,108 killed, 9,549 wounded, 753 captured/missing 1,512 killed, 7,816 wounded, 1,844 captured/missing The Battle of Antietam (known as the... This article describes the 1862 United States proclamation freeing slaves in some parts of the U.S. For the 1834 act banning slavery in the colonies of the British Empire, see British emancipation. ... A belligerent in warfare is one of the sovereign power or, at times an insurgent force to the conflict; that is, one of the powers at war, in contrast to neutral countries and non-belligerents. ...


For the four years of its existence, the Confederacy asserted its independence and appointed dozens of diplomatic agents abroad. The Northern government, by contrast, asserted that the southern states were provinces in rebellion and refused any formal recognition of their status. Telling of this dispute, the Confederate Government responded to the hostilities by formally declaring war on the United States while the Union Government conducted its war efforts under a proclamation of blockade and rebellion by President Lincoln. Mid-war negotiations between the two sides occurred without formal political recognition, though the laws of war governed military relationships. The Union blockade refers to the naval actions between 1861 and 1865, during the American Civil War, in which the United States Navy maintained a massive effort on the Atlantic and Gulf Coast of the Confederate States of America designed to prevent the passage of trade goods, supplies, and arms... The laws of war (Jus in bello) define the conduct and responsibilities of belligerent nations, neutral nations and individuals engaged in warfare, in relation to each other and to protected persons, usually meaning civilians. ...


Four years after the war the United States Supreme Court ruled in Texas v. White that secession was unconstitutional and legally null. The court's opinion was rendered by Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase, the former Treasury Secretary under Lincoln. Chase's opinion was immediately attacked and remains controversial to this day. Critics such as Jefferson Davis and Alexander Stephens penned subsequent legal arguments in favor of secession's legality, most notably Davis' Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America. ... Texas v. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Chief Justice of the United States and previously as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ...


Confederate flags

Main articles: Flags of the Confederate States of America, and [[{{{2}}}]], and [[{{{3}}}]], and [[{{{4}}}]], and [[{{{5}}}]]

The official flag of the Confederacy, and the one actually called the "Stars and Bars", has seven stars, for the seven states that initially formed the Confederacy. This flag was sometimes hard to distinguish from the Union flag under battle conditions, so the Confederate battle flag, the "Southern Cross", became the one more commonly used in military operations. The Southern Cross has 13 stars, adding the four states that joined the Confederacy after Fort Sumter, and the two states of Kentucky and Missouri (See Missouri Secession) with competing unionist and secessionist governments that were admitted to the Confederacy. As a result of its depiction in 20th century popular media, the "Southern Cross" is a flag commonly associated with the Confederacy today. The actual "Southern Cross" is a square-shaped flag, but the more commonly seen rectangular flag is actually the flag of the First Tennessee Army, also known as the Naval Jack because it was first used by the Confederate Navy. Flag ratio: 10:19 Stars and stripes redirects here. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Official languages English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 1. ... State nickname: The Show Me State Official languages English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City (largest metropolitan area is Saint Louis) Governor Matt Blunt (R) Senators Kit Bond (R) Jim Talent (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 21st 69,709 mi²; 180,693 km² 1. ... The Missouri Secession controversy refers to the disputed status of the state of Missouri during the American Civil War. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


Political leaders of the Confederacy

Executive

OFFICE NAME TERM
President Jefferson Davis 1861–1865
Vice President Alexander Stephens 1861–1865
Secretary of State Robert Toombs 1861
  Robert M.T. Hunter 1861–1862
  Judah P. Benjamin 1862–1865
Secretary of the Treasury Christopher Memminger 1861–1864
  George Trenholm 1864–1865
Secretary of War Leroy Pope Walker 1861
  Judah P. Benjamin 1861–1862
  George W. Randolph 1862
  Gustavus Smith (acting) 1862
  James Seddon 1862–1865
  John C. Breckinridge 1865
Secretary of the Navy Stephen Mallory 1861–1865
Postmaster General John H. Reagan 1861–1865
Attorney General Judah P. Benjamin 1861
  Thomas Bragg 1861–1862
  Thomas H. Watts 1862–1863
  George Davis 1864–1865


The President of the Confederate States was the Head of State of the short-lived republic of the Confederate States of America which seceded from the United States. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician, most famous for serving as the first and only President of the Confederate States, leading the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. ... Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812–March 4, 1883) was Vice President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. ... Robert Augustus Toombs (July 2, 1810 – December 15, 1885) was a American political leader and a Confederate general in the Civil War. ... Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter (April 21, 1809 - July 18, 1887), American statesman, was born in Essex County, Virginia. ... Judah P. Benjamin Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811–May 6, 1884) was a British-American politician and lawyer, who served as a representative in the Louisiana State Legislature, as U.S. Senator for Louisiana, in three successive cabinet posts in the government of the Confederate States of America, and... Christopher Gustavus Memminger (January 9, 1803–March 7, 1888) was a prominent Confederate political leader. ... Leroy Pope Walker of Alabama was the Secretary of War for the Confederate States of America. ... Judah P. Benjamin Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811–May 6, 1884) was a British-American politician and lawyer, who served as a representative in the Louisiana State Legislature, as U.S. Senator for Louisiana, in three successive cabinet posts in the government of the Confederate States of America, and... George Wythe Randolph (March 10, 1818–April 3, 1867), the Secretary of War for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War, was born in Charlottesville, Virginia at Monticello to Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. ... Gustavus Woodson Smith (November 30, 1821 – June 24, 1896), more commonly known as G.W. Smith, was a career U.S. Army officer who fought in the Mexican War, a civil engineer, and a major general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... In law, when someone is said to be acting in a position it can mean one of three things. ... James Seddon James Alexander SeddonBorn 9/1/1988 James seddon is a pupil at sutton high and isnt a very good one. ... John C. Breckinridge John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821–May 17, 1875) was a lawyer, U.S. Representative, Senator from Kentucky, the fourteenth Vice President of the United States, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... Stephen Russell Mallory (c. ... John Henninger Reagan (October 8, 1818 - March 6, 1905), was an Nineteenth Century Texan Democratic politician and postmaster general of the Confederacy. ... Judah P. Benjamin Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811–May 6, 1884) was a British-American politician and lawyer, who served as a representative in the Louisiana State Legislature, as U.S. Senator for Louisiana, in three successive cabinet posts in the government of the Confederate States of America, and... Categories: Stub | 1810 births | 1872 deaths | Governors of North Carolina | United States Senators ... Thomas Hill Watts (January 3, 1819–September 16, 1892) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1863 to 1865, during the Civil War. ... George Davis (born March 1, 1820; died February 23, 1896) was a U.S.-Confederate political figure and the last Confederate Attorney General 1864-1865. ...


Legislative

The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... The Provisional Confederate Congress was the body which drafted the Confederate Constitution, elected Jefferson Davis President of the Confederacy, and designed the first Confederate flag. ... The First Confederate Congress was the first regular session of the legislature of the Confederate States of America. ... The Second Confederate Congress was the second and last regular session of the legislature of the Confederate States of America. ...

Judicial

A judicial branch of the government was outlined in the C.S. Constitution but the would-be Supreme Court of the Confederate States was never created or seated because of the ongoing war.[4] Some lower district courts were, however, established within some of the individual states of the Confederacy; namely, AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, TN, TX & VA (and possibly others). At the end of the war, U.S. district courts resumed jurisdiction.[5] The state and local courts generally continued to operate as they had been, simply recognizing the CSA rather than the USA as the national government.[6] The Confederate States Constitution The Constitution of the Confederate States of America was the supreme law of the Confederate States of America, as adopted on March 11, 1861 and in effect through the conclusion of the American Civil War. ...


Geography

Map of the states and territories claimed by the Confederate States of America

The Confederate States had a total of 2,919 miles (4,698 kilometers) of coastline. A large portion of its territory lay on the sea coast, and with level and sandy ground. The interior portions were hilly and mountainous and the far western territories were deserts. The lower reaches of the Mississippi River bisected the country, with the western half often referred to as the Trans-Mississippi. The highest point (excluding Arizona and New Mexico) was Guadalupe Peak in Texas at 8,750 feet (2,667 meters). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x911, 946 KB)Created by Nicholas Forte File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x911, 946 KB)Created by Nicholas Forte File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This page is about the river in the United States; there is also a Canadian Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Trans-Mississippi was a name applied to a region of the United States in the 19th century. ... Guadalupe Peak is the highest point in Texas. ... Official language(s) None. ...


Most of the area of the Confederate States had a humid subtropical climate with mild winters and long, hot, humid summers. The climate varied to semiarid steppe and arid desert west of longitude 96 degrees west.


The Confederate States was less urbanized than the northern states, with only New Orleans showing up in the list of top 10 U.S. cities in the 1860 census. Only 15 cities (excluding those in Kentucky and Missouri) ranked among the top 100 US cities in 1860. The population of Richmond swelled after it became the national capital, reaching an estimated 128,000 in 1864.
New Orleans (local pronunciations: , , or ) (French: La Nouvelle-Orléans, pronounced in standard French accent) is a major U.S. port city and historically the largest city in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the United States of America. ...

# City 1860 Population US Rank
1. New Orleans, Louisiana 168,675 6
2. Charleston, South Carolina 40,522 22
3. Richmond, Virginia 37,910 25
4. Mobile, Alabama 29,258 27
5. Memphis, Tennessee 22,623 38
6. Savannah, Georgia 22,292 41
7. Petersburg, Virginia 18,266 50
8. Nashville, Tennessee 16,988 54
9. Norfolk, Virginia 14,620 61
10. Wheeling, Virginia 14,083 63
11. Alexandria, Virginia 12,652 74
12. Augusta, Georgia 12,493 77
13. Columbus, Georgia 9,621 97
14. Atlanta, Georgia 9,554 99
15. Wilmington, North Carolina 9,553 100


This page is currently under construction and only has the first 100 US MSAs, but it will soon list ALL of the MSAs ranked in order of population. ... New Orleans (local pronunciations: , , or ) (French: La Nouvelle-Orléans, pronounced in standard French accent) is a major U.S. port city and historically the largest city in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Charleston, South Carolinas oldest city Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat Nickname: The Holy City, The Palmetto City Founded 1670 Incorporated County Berkeley and Charleston Counties Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr. ... Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the United States of America. ... Motto: Nickname: The Azalea City Location in Alabama Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 County Mobile County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Sam Jones Area  - Total  - Water 412. ... Memphis is a city in Shelby County, Tennessee, of which it is the county seat. ... Nickname: The Coastal Empire or The Hostess City Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: Savannah, Georgia Location Government County Chatham Mayor Otis S. Johnson Geographical characteristics Area 202. ... Petersburg is an independent city located in Virginia. ... The Nashville skyline Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Norfolk is a city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States of America. ... Wheeling is a city located in West Virginia, in the United States. ... Old Town Alexandria, viewed from the west, as seen from the observation deck of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. ... Augusta is a city located in the state of Georgia. ... Columbus is a city located in Muscogee County, Georgia. ... Atlanta is the capital of and largest city in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... For other places called Wilmington, see Wilmington Wilmington is a city located in New Hanover County, North Carolina. ...


Economy

Main articles: Economy of the Confederate States of America, and [[{{{2}}}]], and [[{{{3}}}]], and [[{{{4}}}]], and [[{{{5}}}]]

The Confederate States had an agrarian-based economy that relied heavily on slavery plantations. The main products of the CSA were cotton, rice, tobacco and sugar cane, with some cattle and much grain. The states that formed the CSA (excluding Missouri and Kentucky) produced $155 million in manufactured goods in 1860; their main products were flour and meal, lumber, processed tobacco, cotton goods and naval stores. The CSA adopted a free trade policy, but this was undermined by the Union blockade. The lack of adequate financial resources led the Confederacy to finance the war through printing money, which in turn led to high inflation. The Confederate States of America had an agrarian-based economy that relied heavily on slavery plantations for the production of cotton for export to Europe and the northern US states. ... Picking cotton in Georgia Cotton is a soft fiber that grows around the seeds of the cotton plant, a shrub native to the tropical and subtropical regions of both the Old World and the New World. ... Species Oryza glaberrima Oryza sativa Rice refers to two species (Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima) of grass, native to tropical and subtropical southeastern Asia and to Africa. ... Species N. glauca N. longiflora N. rustica N. sylvestris N. tabacum Ref: ITIS 30562 as of August 26, 2005 Tobacco (, L.) refers to a genus of broad-leafed plants of the nightshade family indigenous to North and South America, or to the dried and cured leaves of such plants. ... Species Ref: ITIS 42058 as of 2004-05-05 Sugarcane is one of six species of a tall tropical southeast Asian grass (Family Poaceae) having stout fibrous jointed stalks whose sap at one time was the primary source of sugar. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle (called cows in vernacular usage) are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... The word grain has several meanings, most being descriptive of a small piece or particle. ... State nickname: The Show Me State Official languages English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City (largest metropolitan area is Saint Louis) Governor Matt Blunt (R) Senators Kit Bond (R) Jim Talent (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 21st 69,709 mi²; 180,693 km² 1. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Official languages English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 1. ... Look up flour on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Naval Stores is a broad term which originally applied to the resin-based components used in building and maintaining wooden sailing ships, a category which includes cordage, mask, turpentine, resin and tar. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... A blockade is any effort to prevent supplies, troops, information or aid from reaching an opposing force. ...


Armed Forces

The military armed forces of the Confederacy comprised the following three branches:

The Confederate military leadership included many veterans from the United States Army and U.S. Navy who had resigned their federal commissions and had been appointed to senior positions in the Confederate armed forces. Many others had served in the Mexican War (such as Jefferson Davis, and still others had little or no military experience (such as Leonidas Polk, who attended West Point but did not graduate.) The Confederate officer corps was composed in part of young men from slave owning families, but many came from non-owners. The Confederacy appointed junior and field grade officers by election from the enlisted ranks. Although no Army service academy was established for the Confederacy, many colleges of the south (such as the Virginia Military Institute) maintained cadet corps that were seen as a training ground for Confederate military leadership. A naval academy was established in 1863 but no midshipmen had graduated by the time the Confederacy collapsed. Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February, 1861, to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven southern states seceded from the United States (with four more to follow). ... CSN Jack CSS Alabama, a ship of the Confederate States Navy The Confederate States Navy was the branch of the Confederate States armed forces responsible for naval operations during the American Civil War. ... The Confederate States Marine Corps was a branch of the Confederate Navy, tasked with shore operations. ... US Army Seal HHC, US Army Distinctive Unit Insignia The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces that has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician, most famous for serving as the first and only President of the Confederate States, leading the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. ... Leonidas Polk, The Fighting Bishop Leonidas Polk (April 10, 1806 – June 14, 1864) was a Confederate general who was once a planter in Maury County, Tennessee, and a cousin of President James K. Polk. ... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States and the only classical state military college: all VMI students are cadets. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


The rank and file of the Confederate armed forces consisted of white males with an average age between 16 and 28. The Confederacy adopted conscription in 1862, but opposition was widespread. Depleted by casualties and desertions, the military suffered chronic manpower shortages. Towards the end of the Civil War, boys as young as 12 were fighting in combat roles and the Confederacy began an all-black regiment with measures underway to offer freedom to slaves who voluntarily served in the Confederate military. 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Military leaders of the Confederacy

Robert E. Lee, for many, the face of the Confederate army
Robert E. Lee, for many, the face of the Confederate army

== Headline text ==Link title == [[freaking queer wat a mother fuc]]ker ==The forebearing use of power does not only form a touchstone, but the manner in which an individual enjoys certain advantages over others, is a test of a true gentleman. ... == Headline text ==Link title == [[freaking queer wat a mother fuc]]ker ==The forebearing use of power does not only form a touchstone, but the manner in which an individual enjoys certain advantages over others, is a test of a true gentleman. ... Robert E. Lee portrait by Julian Vannerson, 1863 Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... Albert Sidney Johnston Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Official languages English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 1. ... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... Joseph E. Johnston Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer and one of the most senior generals in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... Braxton Bragg Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State; Old North State Official languages English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley (D) Senators Elizabeth Dole (R) Richard Burr (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 28th 139,509 km² 9. ... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (BO-rih-gahrd) (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893), best known as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, was also a writer, civil servant, and inventor. ... State nickname: Pelican State Official languages English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last official government census, but probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Senators Mary Landrieu (D) David Vitter (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 31st 134,382 km² 16 Population  - Total... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... General Samuel Cooper Samuel Cooper (June 12, 1798 – December 3, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and, although little-known today, the highest ranking Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... Official language(s) None defined, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 47th 22,608 km² 110 km 240 km 14. ... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... James Longstreet James Longstreet (January 8, 1821 – January 2, 1904) was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War, and later enjoyed a successful post-war career working for the government of his former enemies, as a diplomat and administrator. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Official languages English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Senators Lindsey Graham (R) Jim DeMint (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 6 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012,012 51. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... For the 1960s country music artist, see Stonewall Jackson (musician); for the submarine, see USS Stonewall Jackson (SSBN-634). ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 – September 4, 1864) was a Confederate general and cavalry officer in the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Official languages English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 1. ... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... Ambrose Powell Hill (November 9, 1825 _ April 2, 1865), was a Confederate States of America general in the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... John Bell Hood John Bell Hood (June 1, 1831 – August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... Official language(s) None. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... There were three men in American history -- grandfather, father, and son -- called Wade Hampton: Wade Hampton (1754—1835), captain in the War of Independence and brigadier-general in the War of 1812; Wade Hampton (1791—1858), one of the wealthiest planters in the South; and Wade Hampton (1818—1902), Confederate... State nickname: Palmetto State Official languages English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Senators Lindsey Graham (R) Jim DeMint (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 6 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012,012 51. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Nathan Bedford Forrest Nathan Bedford Forrest (July 13, 1821 – October 29, 1877), was a Confederate general and perhaps the American Civil Wars most highly regarded cavalry and partisan ranger (guerrilla leader). ... State nickname: Volunteer State Official languages English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen (D) Senators Bill Frist (R) Lamar Alexander (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 2. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... James Ewell Brown Stuart (February 6, 1833 – May 12, 1864) was an American soldier from Virginia and a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... For the museum administrator, see Edward P. Alexander. ... United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Franklin Buchanan Franklin Buchanan (September 13, 1800—May 11, 1874) was an officer in the U.S. Navy who became an admiral in the Confederate Navy during the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Official languages None Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Senators Paul Sarbanes (D) Barbara Mikulski (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 42nd 32,160 km² 21 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 19th 5,296,486 165/km² (5th) Admission into... Admiral is a word from the Arabic term Amir-al-bahr (Lord of the bay). ... Raphael Semmes (September 27, 1809 – August 30, 1877) was an officer in the United States Navy from 1826 to 1860 and the Confederate States Navy from 1860 to 1865. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Official languages None Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Senators Paul Sarbanes (D) Barbara Mikulski (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 42nd 32,160 km² 21 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 19th 5,296,486 165/km² (5th) Admission into... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... French Forrest (1796-1866) was an American naval officer. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Official languages None Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Senators Paul Sarbanes (D) Barbara Mikulski (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 42nd 32,160 km² 21 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 19th 5,296,486 165/km² (5th) Admission into... Commodore Josiah Tattnall (14 June 1794 - 14 June 1871) was an officer in the United States Navy during the War of 1812, the Second Barbary War, and the Mexican-American War. ... The military rank of Commodore is used in some navies for officers whose position exceeds that of a Captain, but is less than that of a flag officer. ... Stand Watie (12 December 1806-9 September 1871) (also known as Degataga standing together as one, or stand firm and Isaac S. Watie) was a leader of the Cherokee Nation and a brigadier general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Territory in 1891 Indian Territory, also known as Indian Country, Indian territory or the Indian territories, was the land set aside within the United States for the use of American Indians (Native Americans). The general borders were set by the Indian Intercourse Act of 1834. ... Oklahoma is a state in the southern United States, lying mostly in the lower Great Plains, and its U.S. postal abbreviation is OK; others abbreviate the states name Okla. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Leonidas Polk, The Fighting Bishop Leonidas Polk (April 10, 1806 – June 14, 1864) was a Confederate general who was once a planter in Maury County, Tennessee, and a cousin of President James K. Polk. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Official languages English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen (D) Senators Bill Frist (R) Lamar Alexander (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 2. ... State nickname: Pelican State Official languages English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last official government census, but probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Senators Mary Landrieu (D) David Vitter (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 31st 134,382 km² 16 Population  - Total... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... Jubal Anderson Early (November 3, 1816 – March 2, 1894) was a lawyer and Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ...

Significant dates

State Flag Secession ordinance Admitted C.S.A. U.S. Congress
representation restored
Local rule reestablished
South Carolina South Carolina December 20, 1860 February 4, 1861 July 9, 1868 November 28, 1876
Mississippi Mississippi January 9, 1861 February 4, 1861 February 23, 1870 January 4, 1876
Florida Florida January 10, 1861 February 4, 1861 June 25, 1868 January 2, 1877
Alabama Alabama January 11, 1861 February 4, 1861 July 14, 1868 November 16, 1874
Georgia Georgia January 19, 1861 February 4, 1861 July 15, 1870 November 1, 1871
Louisiana Louisiana January 26, 1861 February 4, 1861 July 4, 1868 January 2, 1877
Texas Texas February 1, 1861 March 2, 1861 March 30, 1870 January 14, 1873
Virginia Virginia April 17, 1861 May 7, 1861 January 26, 1870 October 5, 1869
Arkansas Arkansas May 6, 1861 May 18, 1861 June 22, 1868 November 10, 1874
North Carolina North Carolina May 20, 1861 May 16, 1861 July 4, 1868 February 2, 1871
Tennessee Tennessee June 8, 1861 May 16, 1861 July 24, 1866 October 4, 1869
Missouri (legally elected government) Missouri October 31, 1861 August 19, 1861 n/a n/a
Kentucky (Russellville government) Kentucky November 20, 1861 December 10, 1862 n/a n/a

NOTE: According to the New York Public Library Desk Reference, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina and South Carolina were all readmitted June 25, 1868, and Georgia was readmitted a second time on July 15, 1870. State nickname: Palmetto State Official languages English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Senators Lindsey Graham (R) Jim DeMint (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 6 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012,012 51. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Carolina. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mississippi. ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Official languages English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush (R) Senators Bill Nelson (D) Mel Martinez (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 22nd 170,451 km² 17. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Florida. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 30th 52,423 mi²/135,775 km² 190 mi/306 km 330 mi/531 km 3. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Alabama. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... State Flag of Georgia Ratio 3:5 430 × 260 pixels 2980 bytes File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: Pelican State Official languages English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last official government census, but probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Senators Mary Landrieu (D) David Vitter (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 31st 134,382 km² 16 Population  - Total... State Flag of Louisiana Ratio 2:3 388 × 260 pixels 8590 bytes ( File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) None. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Texas. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in Leap years). ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Alexandria, Virginia Virginia Wikipedia talk:WikiProject U.S. states Frederick County, Virginia Richmond, Virginia Norfolk, Virginia Montgomery County, Virginia Bedford, Virginia Roanoke, Virginia Hopewell, Virginia Greene County, Virginia Gloucester County, Virginia York County, Virginia Wythe County, Virginia Wise County, Virginia Westmoreland... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year (279th in Leap years). ... 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 29th 137,732 km² 385 km 420 km 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Arkansas. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: Tar Heel State; Old North State Official languages English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley (D) Senators Elizabeth Dole (R) Richard Burr (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 28th 139,509 km² 9. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 20 May is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: Volunteer State Official languages English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen (D) Senators Bill Frist (R) Lamar Alexander (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tennessee. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in Leap years). ... 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... State nickname: The Show Me State Official languages English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City (largest metropolitan area is Saint Louis) Governor Matt Blunt (R) Senators Kit Bond (R) Jim Talent (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 21st 69,709 mi²; 180,693 km² 1. ... State flag of Missouri. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Official languages English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 1. ... State Flag of Kentucky Ratio 10:19 491 × 260 pixels 7518 bytes File links The following pages link to this file: Kentucky Jim Bunning Mitch McConnell Ed Whitfield Ron Lewis Anne Northup Hal Rogers Flags of the U.S. states Flag of Kentucky Ben Chandler 2004 Little League World Series... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 30th 52,423 mi²/135,775 km² 190 mi/306 km 330 mi/531 km 3. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Official languages English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush (R) Senators Bill Nelson (D) Mel Martinez (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 22nd 170,451 km² 17. ... State nickname: Pelican State Official languages English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last official government census, but probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Senators Mary Landrieu (D) David Vitter (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 31st 134,382 km² 16 Population  - Total... State nickname: Tar Heel State; Old North State Official languages English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley (D) Senators Elizabeth Dole (R) Richard Burr (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 28th 139,509 km² 9. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Official languages English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Senators Lindsey Graham (R) Jim DeMint (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 6 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012,012 51. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


See also

In the United States, the Nullification Crisis was a sectional crisis during the presidency of Andrew Jackson over the issue of protective tariffs. ... The following are the flags used by the Confederate States of America. ... Confederate Seal The Confederate Seal was the seal of the Confederate States of America. ... The Military history of the Confederate States spans the period of when the Confederate States of America existed, during the American Civil War. ... 5c Jefferson Davis stamp This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the Confederate States of America. ... The origins of the American Civil War lay in the complex issues of political party politics, disagreements over the scope of state and federal powers,slavery, expansionism, sectionalism, and of the Antebellum Period. ... In this map: Blue — Union states Light blue — Union Territories Red — The border states Pink — Kansas stands in the path of the border states and was the site of Bleeding Kansas Brown — The Confederacy Light brown — Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories The term border states refers to five slave... Robert E. Lee portrait by Julian Vannerson, 1863 Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... <Italic textBold textBold textLink titlenowiki>Insert non-formatted text here</nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--12. ...

Reference

Primary Sources

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Confederacy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (133 words)
Confederacy of Independent Systems, a fictional Separatist movement in the Star Wars universe
A confederacy can also be a group of individuals operating for a common cause, generally perceived to be a negative term, as in the case of conspirators; see conspiracy
This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title.
Confederacy - definition of Confederacy in Encyclopedia (824 words)
The Confederate States of America (CSA, also known as the Confederacy) was the confederation formed by the southern states that seceded from the United States during the period of the American Civil War.
The Confederacy was formed on February 4, 1861, and Jefferson Davis was selected as its first President of the Confederate States the next day.
Unlike the U.S. president, the president of the Confederacy was to be elected to a six-year term and could not be reelected.
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