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Encyclopedia > The Clash
The Clash
The Clash live in Oslo, 1980.
The Clash live in Oslo, 1980.
Background information
Origin Ladbroke Grove, London, England
Genre(s) Punk rock
Rock
Years active 1976–1986
Label(s) CBS
Associated acts The 101ers, London SS, Big Audio Dynamite, Havana 3am, The Latino Rockabilly War, The Pogues, The Mescaleros, Carbon/Silicon, The Good, the Bad and the Queen
Website www.theclashonline.com
Former members
Joe Strummer
Mick Jones
Paul Simonon
Topper Headon
Keith Levene
Terry Chimes
Rob Harper
Pete Howard
Nick Sheppard
Vince White

The Clash were an English punk rock band, active from 1976 to 1986, part of the original wave of UK punk rock in the late 1970s.[1][2][3][4] Although a punk rock band, the band experimented with reggae, funk, rap, dub, rock and roll and rockabilly in their music.[5][6] The band were formed by Joe Strummer (lead vocals, rhythm guitar), Mick Jones (lead guitar, backing vocals) and Paul Simonon (bass guitar, backing vocals). During this time they had a revolving drumming position, including Terry Chimes who featured on the band's eponymous first album, The Clash, despite the fact that by this point of time he had already chosen to leave the band. Needing a stable drummer, they were finally joined in 1977 by Jones' friend Nicky "Topper" Headon (drums, percussion).[7] Until the untimely departure of Headon in 1982 and Jones in 1983 due to internal friction, this is the lineup from the band's peak with the largest recorded output, and was the lineup inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The band disbanded in the early days of 1986, largely due to lack of creative control and the loss of Jones and Headon who were together half the skill of the band. The late Strummer has apologised for the firing of these two members and he admitted that it was a huge mistake to make, both creatively and progressively for the band. The Clash is the first album-length recording released by the English punk band The Clash. ... The Clash was a British punk rock group that existed from 1976 to 1985. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the capital of Norway. ... Ladbroke Grove is a road in West London, and is also the name given to the immediate area surrounding the road. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... The 101ers were a pub rock band from the 1970s, notable only as being the band that gave Joe Strummer (later of The Clash) his initial start as a musician. ... London SS was Mick Jones and Paul Simonons band prior to joining up with Joe Strummer and Terry Chimes to form The Clash. ... Big Audio Dynamite (later known as Big Audio Dynamite II and Big Audio, and often abbreviated BAD) was a British musical group formed in 1984 by the ex-guitarist and singer of The Clash, Mick Jones. ... Havana 3am was the short-lived post-Clash band of bassist Paul Simonon. ... The Latino Rockabilly War was a backing band most notably for one-time The Clash frontman Joe Strummer. ... The Pogues are a band of mixed Irish and English background, playing traditional Irish folk with influences from the English punk rock movement. ... Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros. ... Carbon/Silicon (left to right): William Blake, Danny The Red, Mick Jones and Tony James Carbon/Silicon is a rock band formed in 2004 by two punk rock legends: Mick Jones of The Clash and Tony James of Generation X. Similar in many respects to Jones earlier work in Big... The Good, the Bad and the Queen is the debut album by an unnamed alternative rock band fronted by Damon Albarn released in January 2007. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... Keith Levene (born Julian Keith Levene) (born July 18 1957, London) is an English guitarist and songwriter, best known as a member of Public Image Limited. ... Chimes on stage drumming with The Clash at the 100 Club Punk Festival. ... Rob Harper is a British musician noted for being an early drummer for The Clash from December 1976-January 1977. ... Sheppard (right) with The Clash. ... Vince White was, along with Nick Sheppard, one of the guitarists recruited by the Clash to replace Mick Jones when he left the band in 1983. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... RAP may mean: the IATA airport code for Rapid City Regional Airport Rassemblement pour lalternative progressiste, a Québecois political party. ... For other uses, see Dub. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... Chimes on stage drumming with The Clash at the 100 Club Punk Festival. ... The Clash is the first album-length recording released by the English punk band The Clash. ... Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ...


The Clash were a major success in the UK from the release of their first album in 1977 named 'The Clash', and became popular in the US in 1980. Their third album, the late 1979 release London Calling is an influential album in the history of rock and alternative music; it was released in the US in January 1980, and a decade later Rolling Stone magazine declared it the best album of the 1980s.[8] Rolling Stone also placed it at #8, The Clash at #77, and Sandinista! at #404 on their 2003 list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[9] This article is about the album. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The Clash is the first album-length recording released by the English punk band The Clash. ... Sandinista! is the fourth album by the punk rock band The Clash. ...


The Clash's attitude and style, as much as their music, influenced many other bands from the 1980s. Epic Records A&R director dubbed them "The Only British Band That Matters," which fans later adapted into the well known title "The Only Band That Matters".[10] They are one of the most prominent and prolific punk rock bands and their influence is far reaching.[11] In January 2003 they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[12] The band wanted to play at the event, but Joe Strummer's untimely death in December 2002, prevented this. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked The Clash #30 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[13][14] The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


In March 2008 a new live performance documentary The Clash Live: Revolution Rock will debut on US public television as well as being released on DVD.[15] Produced by long time visual collaborator Don Letts, who contributed his own footage for the project, the DVD will also contain two interviews filmed in 1981.[16] Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ...

Contents

History

Formation and first years: 1975–1977

Most of the band's founding members were already active in the local music at the time of The Clash's formation. John Graham Mellor a/k/a Joe Strummer had previously played in the pub rock act The 101'ers (his stage name at this point was Woody Mellor; soon he renamed himself "Joe Strummer", a reference to his rudimentary strumming skills on the ukulele as a busker in the London Underground). Mick Jones and Paul Simonon were briefly in legendary proto-punk band London SS. For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... The 101ers were a pub rock band from the 1970s, notable only as being the band that gave Joe Strummer (later of The Clash) his initial start as a musician. ... The London Underground is an underground railway system - also known as a rapid transit system - that serves a large part of Greater London, United Kingdom and some neighbouring areas. ... London SS was Mick Jones and Paul Simonons band prior to joining up with Joe Strummer and Terry Chimes to form The Clash. ...


Jones, Simonon, guitarist Keith Levene and "whoever we could find really to play the drums"[17] spent much of 1976 in rehearsals. At the behest of their manager Bernie Rhodes,[18] Jones, Levene, and Simonon recruited the slightly older Strummer from the 101'ers.[4] The recruitment took place in the Portobello market when Paul Simonon and Mick Jones bumped into Strummer and told him they didn't like the 101'ers but thought he had punk potential.[19] This episode was recounted by Strummer, in their 1978 song "All the Young Punks (New Boots and Contracts)".[20][21][22][23][24][25] As Simonon later said, "[o]nce we had Joe on board it all started to come together."[17] Keith Levene (born Julian Keith Levene) (born July 18 1957, London) is an English guitarist and songwriter, best known as a member of Public Image Limited. ... Bernie Rhodes was the manager of legendary English punk rock band The Clash. ... Portobello Road Portobello Road is a road in the Notting Hill district of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in west London. ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ...


Paul Simonon came up with the band's name, The Clash, after they had considered alternatives including "The Weak Heartdrops" and "The Psychotic Negatives".[2][18] Simonon explained how he came up with the name, "It really came to my head when I start reading the newspapers and a word that kept reoccurring was the word 'clash', so I thought 'the Clash, what about that,' to the others. And they and Bernard they went for it."[18] After deciding on a name, the band found a stable drummer in Terry Chimes. Chimes on stage drumming with The Clash at the 100 Club Punk Festival. ...


The Clash had their first gig on July 4, 1976, supporting the Sex Pistols at the Black Swan in Sheffield.[3][4][26] By that autumn the band had signed a contract with CBS Records.[4][27] In early September, Levene was kicked out for never showing up to practice.[4] On September 21, 1976 the band performed at the 100 Club Punk Festival, sharing the bill with the Sex Pistols, Siouxsie and the Banshees and Subway Sect.[3][28] Chimes left in late November, briefly replaced by Rob Harper for the Anarchy Tour in December 1976, but was soon drafted back to record their debut album.[29] is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 100 Club Punk Festival was a two day event held at the 100 Club, a (usually) jazz-oriented venue in Oxford Street, London, England on the 20th and 21st of September 1976. ... Siouxsie and the Banshees are a British gothic rock band. ... One of the original (and best) British punk bands, Subway Sects posthumous reputation has suffered because of their comparatively small output. ... Rob Harper is a British musician noted for being an early drummer for The Clash from December 1976-January 1977. ...


Debut & Rope: 1977-1979

The band released their first single ("White Riot/1977") and first album (The Clash) in 1977 to considerable success in the UK. CBS initially declined to release either in the United States, waiting until 1979 before releasing a modified version of the first album in the US, after the UK original had become the best-selling import album of all time in the United States.[25] At the time Chimes had left the band, so only Simonon, Jones and Strummer were featured on the album's cover, and Chimes was credited as "Tory Crimes". In the documentary Westway to the World, Mick Jones referred to him as one of "the best drummers around".[4] But Chimes, who had no great wish to make a career from music, said, "The point was that I wanted one kind of life – they wanted another, and why are we working together, if we want completely different things?" A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... White Riot was the first single put out by seminal punk band The Clash, in 1977. ... The Clash is the first album-length recording released by the English punk band The Clash. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ...


The band experienced a period of changing drummers.[7] After some time with Mick Jones handling drum duties, the band finally recruited Topper Headon, nicknamed "Topper" by Simonon, because he resembled the famous comic's cartoon cover star, "Mickey the Monkey". Headon had excellent musical skills, being able to play other instruments such as piano, bass and guitar. He was originally planning to stay briefly and gain a name for himself, before finding a better band. Realizing the band's potential he changed his plans and stayed in the band. In Westway To The World Strummer noted, "If we hadn't found Topper, I don't think we'd have got anywhere".[4] Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... The Topper was a UK comic that ran from (issues dates) 7 February 1953 to 15 September 1990, when it merged with The Beezer. ...


With Topper Headon on drums, the Clash recorded Give 'Em Enough Rope in 1978, produced by Sandy Pearlman, whose previous credits included the American heavy metal band Blue Öyster Cult. Rude Boy, a 1980 film about the Clash, contained studio recording sessions of Give 'Em Enough Rope, and concert sequences that demonstrate why they should be considered as one of the greatest rock live acts.[4][12][30] Give Em Enough Rope was The Clashs second album. ... Sandy Pearlman was the original producer, manager and a songwriter for the Blue Öyster Cult. ... Blue Öyster Cult is an American rock band formed in New York in 1967 and still active in 2007. ... Rude Boy is a 1980 film about a roadie for the punk band The Clash. ... Give Em Enough Rope was The Clashs second album. ...


London Calling, Sandinista! and Combat Rock: 1979-1982

The Clash then recorded London Calling. Produced by Guy Stevens, who had previously worked with Mott the Hoople and others, the double album was a mix of punk rock, rockabilly, reggae, rock and roll, ska and other elements[31][32] that recalled the band's earlier days, but also had greater maturity and production polish, and is regarded as one of the greatest rock & roll albums ever recorded.[33] The album contained 2 LPs and ended with a hidden track not noted in the song list. Called "Train in Vain", it received the most airplay on album-oriented rock (AOR) FM stations in the US[4] This article is about the album. ... Guy Stevens was born in East Dulwich, London, on April 13, 1943. ... Mott the Hoople were a 1970s English rock and roll and glam rock band with strong R&B roots. ... A double album is an audio album of sufficient length that two units of the medium in which it is sold (especially records and compact discs) are necessary to contain the entirety of it. ...


The Clash planned to record and release a single every month in 1980. Their record label, CBS, balked at this idea, and these efforts resulted in the album Sandinista!. Containing elements of rock, punk, reggae (including extended dubs), ska, jazz, and disco, unified by a heavily echoed sound,[34] this 3-LP, 36-song album was their most controversial to date, both politically and musically.[27] The album fared well in America, charting at #24,[12] even though it had no catchy single and, in the increasingly conservative environment of AOR FM radio in the US, received minimal airplay.[4] Sandinista! is the fourth album by the punk rock band The Clash. ...


The band recorded their fifth album Combat Rock, which was originally planned as a double album with the title Rat Patrol from Fort Bragg, but the idea was scrapped after wrangling within the group. Mick Jones had produced the first cut, but the other members were dissatisfied and producing duties were handed to Glyn Johns at which point the album became a single LP. The original cut has since been bootlegged. Simpler and more straightforward than Sandinista!, the album contained the single "Should I Stay or Should I Go" which received heavy airplay in the US on AOR FM stations. The following single, "Rock the Casbah", a song about the Iranian clampdown on imports of Western music, was a Top 40 hit in the US, with heavy rotation on MTV.[4] Combat Rock is a 1982 album released by The Clash. ... For the song Combat Rock by Sleater-Kinney, see One Beat. ... Glyn Johns (born February 15, 1942 in Epsom, Surrey, England) is a recording engineer and record producer. ... Sandinista! is the fourth album by the punk rock band The Clash. ... Should I Stay or Should I Go is a song by The Clash, released as a 7 single and featured on their album Combat Rock. ... Music sample The Clash - Rock the Casbah Problems? See media help. ...


Disintegration: 1982-1984

After Combat Rock, the Clash began to disintegrate. Topper Headon was asked to leave the band just prior to the release of the album, due to his heroin addiction, which was hurting his health and drumming.[4][35] The band's original drummer, Terry Chimes, was brought back for the next few months.[19] The loss of Headon brought much friction, as he was an essential part of the band and well-liked by the others. Jones and Strummer began to feud. The band opened for The Who on a leg of their final tour in the U.S, playing New York's Shea Stadium.[4] Though the band continued to tour, relationships within the band continued to fracture.[4] For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ...


The band continued to tour, but by 1983, the years of constant touring and recording took their toll. They were growing as musicians and individuals, but they were not able to cope with the tension and stress. Chimes left the band after the 1982-1983 Combat Rock tour, due to the in-fighting and turmoil.


In 1983, drummer Pete Howard joined the band for the US Festival in San Bernardino, California, of which The Clash were, along with David Bowie and Van Halen, co-headliners. The crowd of roughly half a million was by far the biggest of the Clash's career. This was Jones' last appearance with The Clash. In September 1983, Jones was fired due to his problematic behaviour and divergent musical aspirations.[19] Jones went on to found Big Audio Dynamite (BAD) with Don Letts. Strummer later tried to contact Jones to reform The Clash, but Jones was too busy with Big Audio Dynamite.[36] The US Festivals were two early 1980s music and culture festivals sponsored by Steve Wozniak of Apple Computer, and broadcast live on Pay Per View TV. The first was held Labor Day weekend in September 1982 and the second was Memorial Day weekend in May 1983. ... San Bernardino is the county seat of San Bernardino County, California, United States. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... This article is about the band Van Halen. ... Big Audio Dynamite (later known as Big Audio Dynamite II and Big Audio, and often abbreviated BAD) was a British musical group formed in 1984 by the ex-guitarist and singer of The Clash, Mick Jones. ... Don Letts is a British film director and musician. ...


The band picked Nick Sheppard, formerly of the Bristol-based Cortinas, and Vince White as the band's new guitarists. Howard continued to be the drummer. The band played its first shows in January 1984 with a batch of new material and launched into a self-financed tour, dubbed the "Out of Control" tour, and they toured heavily over the winter and into early summer. At a striking miners' benefit show ("Scargill's Christmas Party") in December 1984, they announced that a new record would be released early in the new year. Sheppard (right) with The Clash. ... This article is about the English city. ... The band in 1977, from a New Musical Express interview. ... Vince White was, along with Nick Sheppard, one of the guitarists recruited by the Clash to replace Mick Jones when he left the band in 1983. ...


Cut the Crap and posthumous recognition: 1985-1999

The recording sessions for Cut the Crap were chaotic, with manager Bernie Rhodes and Strummer working in Munich, Germany. Most of the instruments were played by studio musicians, with Sheppard and later White flying in to come up with guitar parts. Struggling with Rhodes for control of the band, Strummer returned home. The band went on a busking tour, playing in public spaces in cities throughout the UK where they played acoustic versions of their hits and popular cover tunes. Cut the Crap is The Clashs final album. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München pronunciation) is the state capital of the German Bundesland of Bavaria. ... Busking is the practice of doing live performances in public places to entertain people, usually to solicit donations and tips. ...


After a gig in Athens, Strummer went to Spain to clear his mind. While Strummer was gone, the first single from Cut the Crap, "This Is England" was released to mostly negative reviews at the time.[36] However, respected critic Dave Marsh later championed "This Is England" as one of the top 1001 rock singles of all time, in his book "The Heart of Rock & Soul",[37] and the single has also received retroactive praise from Q Magazine and others. "CBS had paid an advance for it so they had to put it out. I just went, 'Well fuck this', and fucked off to the mountains of Spain to sit sobbing under a palm tree, while Bernie had to deliver a record", said Joe Strummer later in an interview [36]. Dave Marsh (born 1950) is an American music critic. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ...


"This Is England", much like the rest of the album that came out later that year, had been drastically re-engineered by Rhodes, with synths, drum machines, and football-style chants being added to Strummer's incomplete recordings. For the remainder of his life Strummer publicly disowned the album,[35] although he did express the sentiment that "This Is England" was the last good Clash single. Other songs played on the tour remain unreleased to this day, including "Jericho" and "Glue Zombie," while a live version of "(In the) Pouring Rain" finally saw release in 2007 on the soundtrack to Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten, a documentary about Joe Strummer. Although Howard was an adept drummer, virtually all of the percussion tracks were produced by drum machines. The Clash were effectively disbanded in early 1986, and the members went on to other projects.[32] This is England is the 19th single by influential British rock band The Clash. ...


On 2 March 1991, The Clash scored their first #1 UK single with the reissue of “Should I Stay or Should I Go”. Joe Strummer reportedly cried and was very distraught when the band's hit and its title "Rock the Casbah" were used while bombing Iraq the same year[citation needed]. is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


Late reunions: 1999-present

In 1999, Strummer, Jones and Simonon cooperated in the compiling of the live album From Here to Eternity and video documentary Westway to the World. On 15 November 2002, Jones and Strummer shared the stage, performing three Clash songs during a London benefit show by Joe Strummer and the Mescaleros.[12] In January 2003 they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[12] The band wanted to play, but the death of Strummer in December 2002 prevented the potential reunion. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked The Clash[13] #30 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[14] From Here to Eternity: Live is a compilation album of live material released by The Clash in 1999. ... A documentary film about the British punk rock band The Clash. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


In 2007, the late Joe Strummer was featured in a documentary directed by Julien Temple, called Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten. It comprises archive footage of him spanning his life, and interviews with friends, family, and other celebrities along with extensive interviews by Jones, Headon, Simonon and Terry Chimes. It debuted at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival. [38][39][40] Julien Temple (born November 26, 1953 in London) is an English film, documentary and music video director. ...


On January 11, 2008, Carbon/Silicon, the new band of Mick Jones, Tony James, Leo Williams and Dominic Greensmith, played a show at the Carbon Casino Club, The Inn on the Green, 3-5 Thorpe Close, Portobello Green, London. Headon joined the band on stage during The Clash's "Train in Vain (Stand by Me)". An encore followed with Headon playing drums on "Should I Stay or Should I Go". This performance marked the first time since 1982 that Headon and Jones had performed together on stage.[41][42][43] is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Carbon/Silicon (left to right): William Blake, Danny The Red, Mick Jones and Tony James Carbon/Silicon is a rock band formed in 2004 by two punk rock legends: Mick Jones of The Clash and Tony James of Generation X. Similar in many respects to Jones earlier work in Big... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Tony James on stage with Carbon/Silicon Tony James (born on 12 April 1958) is a British musician, best known as a bassist of Generation X and Sigue Sigue Sputnik. ... Leo Williams, also known as E-zee-kill, is a British bass guitarist. ... Dominic Greensmith was drummer for the English band Reef from 1993 to 2003. ... For the port in Panama, see Portobelo, Panama. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Train in Vain (Stand by Me) is a song off the album London Calling, (1979) by the U.K. punk/rock band The Clash. ... Should I Stay or Should I Go is a song by The Clash, released as a 7 single and featured on their album Combat Rock. ...


Politics

The band's music was often charged by a leftist political ideology.[6] They are credited with pioneering the advocacy of radical politics in punk rock, and were known as the "Thinking Man's Yobs" by many simply for voicing a political slant other than anarchism. They were never driven entirely by money; even at their peak, tickets to shows and souvenirs were reasonably priced.[25] The group insisted that CBS sell their double and triple album sets London Calling and Sandinista! for the price of a single album each (then £5), succeeding with the former and compromising with the latter by agreeing to sell it for £5.99 and forfeit all their royalties on its first 200,000 sales.[4][7] These "VFM" (Value For Money) principles meant that they were constantly in debt to CBS, and only started to break even around 1982.[8] In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... An ideology is a collection of ideas. ... For other uses, see Money (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Debt (disambiguation). ...


Like many early punk bands, The Clash protested against monarchy and aristocracy. However, unlike many early punk bands, The Clash rejected the overall sentiment of nihilism.[25] Instead, they found solidarity with a number of contemporary liberation movements. The Clash's political views, especially those of Joe Strummer, were very leftist. Their politics were expressed explicitly in their lyrics, in early recordings such as "White Riot", which encouraged disaffected white youths to become politically active like their black counterparts, "Career Opportunities," which expressed discontent about the alienation of low-paid, production line style employment and the lack of alternatives, and "London's Burning", about the bleakness and boredom of life in the inner city.[32] For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... Aristocrat redirects here. ... This article is about the philosophical position. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... See Career Opportunities (film) for the movie of this same title. ...


They were also involved directly with the Anti-Nazi League, and heading Rock Against Racism concert in in London's Victoria Park for 80,000 people in April 1978,[4][44] where Strummer wore a controversial t-shirt bearing the words "Brigate Rosse" with the Red Army Faction (Baader-Meinhof) insignia in the middle. He later said in an interview that he wore the shirt not to support the left-wing terrorist factions in Germany and Italy, but to bring attention to their existence. Strummer and Jones were arrested for a string of offences from vandalism to stealing a pillowcase.[11] Caroline Coon stood up for what The Clash were doing during this period: "Those tough, militaristic songs were what we needed as we went into Thatcherism".[1] Anti-Nazi League logo The Anti-Nazi League (ANL) was an organisation set up on the initiative of the Socialist Workers Party with some sponsorship (and a few small financial donations) from some trade unions and the endorsement of a list of prominent people in 1977 to oppose the rise... Rock Against Racism (RAR) was a campaign set up by Red Saunders, Roger Huddle and others in winter 1976. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Red Brigades (Brigate Rosse) is a militant group located in Italy. ... Red Army Faction Insignia - a Red Star and a Heckler & Koch MP5 The Red Army Faction or RAF (German Rote Armee Fraktion) (in its early stages commonly known as Baader-Meinhof Group [or Gang]), was one of postwar West Germanys most active and prominent militant left-wing groups. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Caroline Coon is a British artist, journalist and political activist, born in 1945. ...


The group also supported other musicians' charity concerts, most notably at the December 1979 Concerts for the People of Kampuchea, presented by Paul McCartney. The benefit album released from the concerts features one song by The Clash, "Armagideon Time." The Clash offered some support to the Sandinista and other Marxist movements in Latin America (hence the title of their 1980 album, Sandinista!). By the time of the December 1979 album London Calling, the Clash were trying to maintain punk energy while developing musically. They were especially wary of their own emerging stardom: they always welcomed fans backstage after shows and showed open-mindedness, genuine interest and compassion in their relationships with them. Concerts for the People of Kampuchea was a series of concert and also is a double album from Wings, The Who, Queen, Elvis Costello, The Pretenders, The Clash and many more artists of the higlights from series of concerts in Hammersmith Odeon to raise money for the victims of Pol... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, entrepreneur, painter, record producer, film producer and animal-rights activist. ... Concerts for the People of Kampuchea is a double album from Wings, The Who, Queen, Elvis Costello, The Pretenders, The Clash and many more artists of the highlights from the Concerts for the People of Kampuchea held at the Hammersmith Odeon in London, England to raise money for the victims... Marxism is both the theory and the political practice (that is, the praxis) derived from the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Sandinista! is the fourth album by the punk rock band The Clash. ... This article is about the album. ...


The title of London Calling evokes American radio newsman Edward R. Murrow's catchphrase during World War II, and the title song announces that "...war is declared and battle come down..." It warns against expecting them to be saviours — "... now don't look to us / Phoney Beatlemania has bitten the dust..." — draws a bleak picture of the times — "The ice age is coming, the sun's zooming in / Engines stop running, the wheat is growing thin" — but calls on their listeners to come out and take up the fight without constantly looking to London, or to The Clash themselves, for cues — "Forget it, brother, we can go it alone... Quit holding out and draw another breath... I don't want to shout / But while we were talking I saw you nodding out..." — finally asking, "After all this, won't you give me a smile?" Edward R. Ed Murrow (April 25, 1908 – April 27, 1965) was an American journalist and media figure. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Beatles arrival at Americas JFK Airport in 1964 has proved a particularly enduring image of Beatlemania. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Sol redirects here. ...


Post-Clash careers

Joe Strummer

Joe Strummer in NYC 2002
Joe Strummer in NYC 2002

In 1986, Joe Strummer collaborated with ex-bandmate Jones on BAD's second album, No. 10 Upping St., co-producing the album and co-writing seven of its songs. Strummer acted in a few movies, notably Alex Cox's Walker, and Jim Jarmusch's Mystery Train, as well as a cameo in Aki Kaurismäki's I hired a Contract Killer, in which he sings "Burning Lights/Afro-Cuban Be-Bop". He did songs for movie soundtracks (notably "Love Kills" for the film Sid and Nancy), and he co-produced the Grosse Pointe Blank soundtracks with John Cusack. As well, he experimented with different backing bands with limited success. In 1989, he released the first of his solo albums, Earthquake Weather, which was neither a commercial nor critical success. He toured with a new backing band, The Latino Rockabilly War, which contributed five songs to the soundtrack of the movie Permanent Record, including an instrumental and the song "Trash City", which was also released as a single. In 1991/92 Strummer joined The Pogues after their split with former frontman Shane MacGowan for a series of concerts across Europe. In the late 1990s, Strummer formed a backing band he called The Mescaleros. In 1996 Strummer recorded with Black Grape (band of vocalist Shaun Ryder, ex Happy Mondays) their football anthem "England's Irie", which became a Top Ten hit. In 2002 Joe Strummer & the Mescaleros performed a benefit gig for the striking Firefighters of London (FBU) at the Acton Town Hall, London (later referred to as "The Last Night London Burned"). For the encores, Mick Jones joined the band. They were: "Bankrobber", "White Riot" and "London’s Burning". His final gig was at Liverpool Academy on 22 November 2002. For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... The Latino Rockabilly War was a backing band most notably for one-time The Clash frontman Joe Strummer. ... The Pogues are a band of mixed Irish and English background, playing traditional Irish folk with influences from the English punk rock movement. ... Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... No. ... Alexander Morton Cox (b. ... Jim Jarmusch Jim Jarmusch (born January 22, 1953 in Akron, Ohio) is a noted American independent film director. ... Mystery Train is a 1989 anthology film written and directed by independent film director Jim Jarmusch and set in Memphis, Tennessee. ... Aki Olavi Kaurismäki ( ) (born April 4, 1957 in Orimattila, Finland) is a Finnish script writer and film director. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... Sid and Nancy, originally titled Love Kills, is a 1986 film directed by Alex Cox. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... This article is about the actor. ... Earthquake Weather is a 1989 record by former Clash frontman Joe Strummer with his then-backing band The Latino Rockabilly War. ... The Latino Rockabilly War was a backing band most notably for one-time The Clash frontman Joe Strummer. ... Permanent Record is a 1988 American film, starring Keanu Reeves. ... The Pogues are a band of mixed Irish and English background, playing traditional Irish folk with influences from the English punk rock movement. ... Shane Patrick MacGowan (born December 25, 1957 in Tunbridge Wells, United Kingdom) is best known as the original singer and songwriter with The Pogues, and is considered one of the most important and poetic Irish songwriters of the last thirty years, often echoing his influences such as Irish playwright Brendan... Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


On 22 December 2002 Joe Strummer died suddenly of a congenital heart defect at the age of 50. The Mescaleros’ album he was working on at the time, Streetcore, was released posthumously to critical acclaim in 2003. Jones commented in the press that, after the brief reunion on Westway to the World in 1999, the foursome were considering reuniting for a tour. is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Streetcore was the third and final album by Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


In 2007, a film has been made about Strummer's life, called Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten. The documentary film, directed by Julien Temple, premiered January 20, 2007 at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival.[45] 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to both the 2004 summer movie season and several film franchises which premiered or had installments released in 2004, which appear again this year: Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Julien Temple (born November 26, 1953 in London) is an English film, documentary and music video director. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The 2007 Sundance Film Festival will be held from January 18 to January 28, 2007. ...

Mick Jones in 1987
Mick Jones in 1987

Mick Jones For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ...

After his expulsion from The Clash, Mick Jones formed Big Audio Dynamite (often shortened to B.A.D.) in 1984 with film director Don Letts who directed various Clash videos and Westway to the World. For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Big Audio Dynamite (later known as Big Audio Dynamite II and Big Audio, and often abbreviated BAD) was a British musical group formed in 1984 by the ex-guitarist and singer of The Clash, Mick Jones. ... Carbon/Silicon (left to right): William Blake, Danny The Red, Mick Jones and Tony James Carbon/Silicon is a rock band formed in 2004 by two punk rock legends: Mick Jones of The Clash and Tony James of Generation X. Similar in many respects to Jones earlier work in Big... Big Audio Dynamite (later known as Big Audio Dynamite II and Big Audio, and often abbreviated BAD) was a British musical group formed in 1984 by the ex-guitarist and singer of The Clash, Mick Jones. ... A documentary film about the British punk rock band The Clash. ...


The band's debut album, This is Big Audio Dynamite, was released the following year with the song "E=MC²" receiving heavy rotation in dance clubs. The next album, No. 10 Upping St., reunited Jones with Strummer. Jones released three more albums with Big Audio Dynamite before reshuffling the line-up and renaming the band Big Audio Dynamite II. The band was later renamed Big Audio in the mid-1990s because they found that it was much more suitable for the type of genre they were influenced by at that particular time. This is Big Audio Dynamite album cover This Is Big Audio Dynamite was the debut album by the 1980s band Big Audio Dynamite, lead by former Clash band member Mick Jones. ... E=MC² is a song written by Mick Jones, the guitarist and singer of The Clash and performed by his post-Clash band Big Audio Dynamite. ... No. ...


Jones featured on the two studio albums by The Libertines as producer and also produced the debut Babyshambles album. Jones is currently touring and recording with his new band, Carbon/Silicon. The Libertines were an English rock band that gained notoriety[1] in the early 2000s, part of what was described as the garage rock revival movement of that time. ... Babyshambles are an English indie rock band established in London. ... Carbon/Silicon (left to right): William Blake, Danny The Red, Mick Jones and Tony James Carbon/Silicon is a rock band formed in 2004 by two punk rock legends: Mick Jones of The Clash and Tony James of Generation X. Similar in many respects to Jones earlier work in Big...


Paul Simonon

Paul Simonon at the Eurockéennes 2007
Paul Simonon at the Eurockéennes 2007
Main articles: Paul Simonon, Havana 3am, and The Good, the Bad and the Queen

Following the break-up of The Clash, Paul Simonon formed a group called Havana 3am, which recorded only one album in Japan and quickly folded. Then Simonon returned to his roots as a visual artist, mounting several art-gallery shows and contributing the cover for Jones' third BAD album, Tighten Up Vol. 88. Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... The Eurockéennes de Belfort is one of Frances largest rock music festivals. ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... Havana 3am was the short-lived post-Clash band of bassist Paul Simonon. ... The Good, the Bad and the Queen is the debut album by an unnamed alternative rock band fronted by Damon Albarn released in January 2007. ... Havana 3am was the short-lived post-Clash band of bassist Paul Simonon. ...


Simonon's reluctance to play music again has largely been cited as the reason why The Clash were one of the few 1970s British punk bands that did not reform to cash in on the punk-nostalgia craze of the late 1990s. Simonon was quoted in Westway to the World as saying that The Clash are over and that "suits him fine".


He is currently collaborating with Damon Albarn, of Blur, Simon Tong of The Verve, and Tony Allen, main founder of the afrobeat and drummer of Fela Kuti to form The Good, the Bad and the Queen. Their first gig took place on the 26 October 2006 at the Roundhouse. Damon Albarn, (born March 23, 1968 in Leytonstone, London), is an English singer-songwriter who gained fame as the lead singer and keyboard player of rock band Blur. ... Blur are an English rock band formed in Colchester in 1989. ... Simon Tong a British a musican, a school friend of Richard Ashcroft, Simon Jones and Peter Salisbury played with the The Verve on Urban Hymns and replaced Nick McCabe. ... Not to be confused with The Verve Pipe. ... Tony Allen may refer to: Tony Allen, a basketball player for the Boston Celtics. ... Afrobeat is a combination of Yoruba music, jazz, Highlife, and funk rhythms, fused with African percussion and vocal styles, popularized in Africa in the 1970s. ... Fela Anikulapo Kuti (born Olufela Olusegun Oludotun Ransome-Kuti, October 15, 1938 - August 2, 1997), or simply Fela, was a Nigerian multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, pioneer of Afrobeat music, human rights activist, and political maverick. ... The Good, the Bad and the Queen is the debut album by an unnamed alternative rock band fronted by Damon Albarn released in January 2007. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roundhouse in 1909, turntable in the front Roundhouse in Uster, Switzerland Steam locomotives sit in the Chicago and North Western Railway roundhouse at the Chicago, Illinois freight yards, December 1942. ...


After a seven year gap Simonon is exhibiting paintings again. He will be having a show at Thomas Williams Fine Art on Bond St from the 17th April 2008.


Topper Headon

Main article: Topper Headon

By 1982, Topper Headon had been dismissed by the rest of the band due to the heroin addiction. His addiction eventually landed him in jail for supplying an addict who later overdosed and died. Except for forming a short-lived R&B band (in 1986 he recorded a LP called Waking Up as well as a 12" E.P. titled Drumming Man), Headon disappeared from the music business until the filming of Letts' retrospective documentary about The Clash, Westway to The World, where he sincerely apologised for his addiction. Headon also attended a subsequent presentation to Strummer, Jones, Simonon, and Headon of a Lifetime Achievement British Music Award. After many years of rehabilitation, he has overcome his addiction, and is performing live again. Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... R&B redirects here. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... A documentary film about the British punk rock band The Clash. ...


On January 11, 2008, Headon shared the stage with Mick Jones during a Carbon/Silicon gig at the Carbon Casino Club, The Inn on the Green, 3-5 Thorpe Close, Portobello Green, London. Headon played together with Jones and Carbon/Silicon two Clash's song, "Train in Vain (Stand by Me)" and "Should I Stay or Should I Go". This performance marked the first time since 1982 that Headon and Jones had performed together on stage.[46][47][48][49] is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Carbon/Silicon (left to right): William Blake, Danny The Red, Mick Jones and Tony James Carbon/Silicon is a rock band formed in 2004 by two punk rock legends: Mick Jones of The Clash and Tony James of Generation X. Similar in many respects to Jones earlier work in Big... For the port in Panama, see Portobelo, Panama. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Train in Vain (Stand by Me) is a song off the album London Calling, (1979) by the U.K. punk/rock band The Clash. ... Should I Stay or Should I Go is a song by The Clash, released as a 7 single and featured on their album Combat Rock. ...


Members

1976
Original line-up
1977
  • Joe Strummer – lead vocals, rhythm guitar
  • Mick Jones – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Paul Simonon – bass guitar, backing vocals
  • Terry Chimes – drums, percussion
1977-1982
Classic line-up
  • Joe Strummer – lead vocals, rhythm guitar
  • Mick Jones – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Paul Simonon – bass guitar, backing vocals
  • Topper Headon – drums, percussion
1982-1983
  • Joe Strummer – lead vocals, rhythm guitar
  • Mick Jones – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Paul Simonon – bass guitar, backing vocals
  • Terry Chimes – drums, percussion
1983
  • Joe Strummer – lead vocals, rhythm guitar
  • Mick Jones – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Paul Simonon – bass guitar, backing vocals
  • Pete Howard – drums, percussion
1983-1986
Final line-up
  • Joe Strummer – lead vocals, rhythm guitar
  • Nick Sheppard – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Vince White – lead guitar
  • Paul Simonon – bass guitar, backing vocals
  • Pete Howard – drums, percussion

For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... Rhythm guitar is a guitar that is primarily used to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment for a singer or for other instruments in an ensemble. ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ... A backup vocalist is a vocalist that sings in harmony with the lead vocalist, with other backup vocalists, or alone but in the background of a song. ... Keith Levene (born Julian Keith Levene) (born July 18 1957, London) is an English guitarist and songwriter, best known as a member of Public Image Limited. ... An electric guitar An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... Chimes on stage drumming with The Clash at the 100 Club Punk Festival. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set - the latter an old-fashioned term) is a collection of drums, cymbals and other percussion instruments arranged for convenient playing by a sole percussionist (drummer), usually for jazz, rock, or other types of contemporary music. ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... Sheppard (right) with The Clash. ... Vince White was, along with Nick Sheppard, one of the guitarists recruited by the Clash to replace Mick Jones when he left the band in 1983. ...

Discography

Main article: The Clash discography
  1. The Clash – (April 8, 1977) #12 UK, #126 US[50][51]
  2. Give 'Em Enough Rope – (November 10, 1978) #2 UK, #128 US #79 AUS
  3. London Calling (2LP) – (December 14, 1979) #9 UK, #27 US #16 AUS
  4. Sandinista! (3LP) – (December 12, 1980) #19 UK, #24 US
  5. Combat Rock – (May 14, 1982) #2 UK, #7 US
  6. Cut the Crap – (November 4, 1985) #16 UK, #88 US

The Clash - UK Version Give Em Enough Rope This page includes discography of the rock band The Clash, with chart placings in the UK and US. // London Calling Sandinista! Combat Rock London Calling Single Rock The Casbah Single Categories: | ... The Clash is the first album-length recording released by the English punk band The Clash. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Give Em Enough Rope was The Clashs second album. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the album. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Sandinista! is the fourth album by the punk rock band The Clash. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Combat Rock is a 1982 album released by The Clash. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Cut the Crap is The Clashs final album. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

Filmography

Rude Boy is a 1980 film about a roadie for the punk band The Clash. ... A documentary film about the British punk rock band The Clash. ... Don Letts is a British film director and musician. ... The Essential Clash is a career-spanning greatest hits album by The Clash first released in 2003. ... Julien Temple (born November 26, 1953 in London) is an English film, documentary and music video director. ...

Bibliography

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  • Clash, The; Nick Crispin [2004] (2005). The Clash: The Complete Chord Songbook, 3rd edition, London: Music Sales. ISBN 0711932093. OCLC 57485240. 
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  • Gruen, Bob; Chris Salewicz [2001] (2004). The Clash, 3rd edition, London: Omnibus. ISBN 1903399343. OCLC 69241279. 
  • Johnstone, Nick (2006-05-31). The Clash "Talking". London: Omnibus Press. ISBN 1846094003. OCLC 64555766. 
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  • Knowles, Chris (12 2003). Clash City Showdown. PageFree Publishing. ISBN 1589611381. “A collection featuring the best of the acclaimed clash City Showdown website and new material focusing on the true legacy of the legendary Punk Rock Band. Featuring biographical and historical information, reviews and in-depth analysis lavishly illustrated with cartoons and rare photographs.” 
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  • Letts, Don; Rick Elgood, Joe Strummer, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon, Topper Headon, Terry Chimes, The Clash, Sex Pistols, Ramones. (2006). Punk Icons the Ultimate Collection [Documentary, Biographical film]. New York, NY: Music Reviews. Retrieved on 2007-11-26. OCLC 135434654. "3 videodiscs: Disc 3: The Clash."
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  • Zaccagnini, Paolo (1982). Clash (in Italian). Roma: Lato side. OCLC 13398671. 

The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Tony Fletcher is a music journalist best known for his extensive biographies of drummer Keith Moon and alt rock superstars R.E.M.. Born in Yorkshire in 1964, Fletcher was inspired by the righteous fire of London punk rock and started a fanzine as a thirteen-year-old schoolboy which... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Aurum Press is an independent English publishing house located in London. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Don Letts is a British film director and musician. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Bob Gruen (born 1946) is an American photographer known for his rock n roll photographs. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Guitarist, composer and writer Lenny Kaye was a member of the Patti Smith Group and has been Smiths most frequent collaborator. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Chris Knowles was an on-air personality, most recently with the Fox News Channel (FNC), from 2001 - 2007. ... Don Letts is a British film director and musician. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... Chimes on stage drumming with The Clash at the 100 Club Punk Festival. ... Sony Music Entertainment is a major global record label controlled by the Sony Corporation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Don Letts is a British film director and musician. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... Chimes on stage drumming with The Clash at the 100 Club Punk Festival. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Ray Lowry is an English cartoonist, illustrator and satirist. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Barry Miles (commonly known as, and called, simply Miles) is an author who has written biographies of Paul McCartney, William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg as well as books about John Lennon, the Beatles and Frank Zappa. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Kris Needs is a British journalist and author, primarily known for his writings on the music scene from the 1970s onwards. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... David Quantick (born 1961, Wortley, South Yorkshire) is a freelance journalist, writer and critic who specialises in music and comedy. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Pennie Smith is a renowned rock photographer born in London in 19??. Smith attended Twickenham Art school in the late 1960s, studying graphics and fine art. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Barry Miles (commonly known as, and called, simply Miles) is an author who has written biographies of Paul McCartney, William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg as well as books about John Lennon, the Beatles and Frank Zappa. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Keith Topping (born 1963 in Tyneside) is a writer most associated with his work relating to the BBC Television series Doctor Who, and also for writing several unnofficial guide books to a variety of television and film series. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... James Madison Wells was an elected Unionist Governor of Louisiana during Reconstruction. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ...

See also

The Clash - UK Version Give Em Enough Rope This page includes discography of the rock band The Clash, with chart placings in the UK and US. // London Calling Sandinista! Combat Rock London Calling Single Rock The Casbah Single Categories: | ... Rude Boy is a 1980 film about a roadie for the punk band The Clash. ... A documentary film about the British punk rock band The Clash. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b Gilbert, Pat [2004] (2005). Passion Is a Fashion: The Real Story of The Clash, 4th edition, London: Aurum Press. ISBN 1845131134. OCLC 61177239. 
  2. ^ a b Topping, Keith [2003] (2004). The Complete Clash, 2nd ed., Richmond: Reynolds & Hearn. ISBN 1903111706. OCLC 63129186. 
  3. ^ a b c Gray, Marcus [1995] (2005). The Clash: Return of the Last Gang in Town, 5th rev. ed., London: Helter Skelter. ISBN 1905139101. OCLC 60668626. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Letts Don; Joe Strummer, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon, Topper Headon, Terry Chimes, Rick Elgood, The Clash. (2001). The Clash, Westway to the World [Documentary]. New York, NY: Sony Music Entertainment; Dorismo; Uptown Films. Retrieved on 2007-11-26. Event occurs at 10:00–11:40; 17:30; 20:00–21:00; 28:00–30:00; 32:30–34:00; 37:00–39:00; 41:00–49:00; 49:30–67:00; 67:30–end. ISBN 0738900826. OCLC 49798077.
  5. ^ The Clash: Biography. Artists. RollingStone. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. “Their music was roots-based but future-visionary; their experiments with funk, reggae, and rap never took them far from a three-minute pop song.”
  6. ^ a b The Clash (JHTML). MTV. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. “a) From the outset, the band was more musically adventurous, expanding its hard rock & roll with reggae, dub, and rockabilly among other roots musics.
    b) Where the Pistols were nihilistic, the Clash were fiery and idealistic, charged with righteousness and a leftist political ideology.”
  7. ^ a b c (March 16, 1991) "The Uncut Crap - Over 56 Things You Never Knew About The Clash". NME 3. London: IPC Magazines. ISSN 0028-6362. OCLC 4213418. Retrieved on 2007-12-11. “a, b) There were 204 drummers auditioned before The Clash settled for Nicky 'Topper' Headon.
    c) They signed a record contract that didn't have a clause for tour support. As a result, they lost tons of money when punk rockers trashed concert halls during their first shows. Also, they insisted that "Sandinista' and "London Calling" were issued at budget price, meaning they didn't make any money out of them.”

    Related news articles:
  8. ^ a b Clash star Strummer dies (STM). Entertainment. BBC News World Edition (2002-12-27). Retrieved on 2007-11-20. “a) Rolling Stone voted London Calling, their classic 1980 album (released in 1979 in the UK) as the best album of the Eighties.
    b) The Clash had huge record sales, but had signed a deal with their record company that denied them huge profits. They wore this as a badge of pride, claiming it ensured they still kept to their punk ideals.”
  9. ^ The RS 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Special Collectors Issue. Rolling Stone (2003-11-18). Retrieved on 2007-11-18.
  10. ^ Epic Records' Director of A&R, Bruce Harris, came up with the phrase. He is credited with convincing the company to release The Clash in the USA. His wife, Marion (Bernstein) Harris, was the product manager. She is credited with convincing Joe Strummer to include lyrics in the sleeve.
  11. ^ a b Strummer's lasting culture Clash (STM). Entertainment. BBC News World Edition (2002-12-23). Retrieved on 2007-11-20. “a) The band went on to be firm fixtures on the music scene in the late 70s and early 80s, having 13 UK top 40 hits and, with the Pistols, the Jam and the Specials, producing the soundtrack of an era.
    b) Throughout their careers, The Clash were active in social causes, headlining Rock Against Racism concerts, while Strummer and bandmate Mick Jones were arrested for a string of offences from vandalism to stealing pillowcases.”
  12. ^ a b c d e The Clash. Induction. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum (2003-03-10). Retrieved on 2007-11-19. “a) Quite simply, the Clash were among the most explosive and exciting bands in rock and roll history.
    b) The film Rude Boy, a 1980 film about the Clash and their punk-rock milieu, contained concert sequences that demonstrate why they were considered one of rock’s greatest live acts.
    c) The Clash followed London Calling with Sandinista!, another multi-sided opus. The Clash agreed to a diminished royalty rate so that the triple album could be affordably retailed. Despite the enormous body of material, song quality remained high throughout Sandinista!, which included the Clash classics “The Magnificent Seven” The Call Up,” “Police on My Back,” and ”Washington Bullets.” London Calling and Sandinista! both fared well in America, charting at #27 and #24, respectively - impressive showings for a double and triple album.
    d) The three founding members - Strummer, Jones and Simonon - cooperated in the compiling of a live album (From Here to Eternity) and video documentary (Westway to the World), released in 1999. If not exactly a reunion, it was a rapprochement. On November 15, 2002, Jones and Strummer shared the stage for the first time in nearly 20 years, performing three Clash songs during the encore of a London benefit show by Joe Strummer and the Mescaleros. This raised hopes for a Clash reunion, which were dashed when Strummer died of a heart attack on December 22, 2002.”
  13. ^ a b The Clash by The Edge. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone (2004-04-15). “The Clash, more than any other group, kick-started a thousand garage bands across Ireland and the UK. For U2 and other people of our generation, seeing them perform was a life-changing experience. There's really no other way to describe it.”
  14. ^ a b The Immortals: The First Fifty. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone (2004-03-24).
  15. ^ Rare Clash footage out 'The Clash Live: Revolution Rock' DVD
  16. ^ a b THE CLASH LIVE: REVOLUTION ROCK. Pressroom. PBS. Retrieved on 2008-01-24.
  17. ^ a b Rowley, Scott (October 1999). "Paul Simonon's first ever bass interview". Bassist Magazine (10). Retrieved on 2008-01-08. “BM: Were you aware of punk at this point?
    Simonon: well, it hadn’t really started. The Pistols were doing their occasional shows, but punk was something that really came about after the Grundy thing. Then it was called ‘punk’ y’know. So after probably about a year in rehearsals with just me and Mick and whoever we could find really to play the drums, and we had Keith Levene with us, we were just trying to build the group up and the Pistols were just starting to do their shows at that time, and it was only that later when we saw Strummer in the 101’ers that we thought, ‘we’ll nick him for our group’. An we did and that was the start of The Clash, really. Once we had Joe on board it all started to come together.”

    Related news articles:
  18. ^ a b c MTV Rockumentary. Interviewer: Unknown; Presenter: Kurt Loder. MTV, London, England. Transcript.
    Related news articles:
    • MTV Rockumentary Part 1. londonsburning.org. Retrieved on 2007-12-06. “Joe Strummer: Bernie imagined the Clash and then he built it to fit the specifications of his vision. But the Clash wouldn't exist without Bernie's imagination.
      Kurt Loder: The group's new look definitely seemed to work now all they needed was a name.
      Mick Jones: One of the names that we had before we had the Clash was the Weak Heartdrops from the Big Youth song. Another I think was the Psychotic Negatives, but now neither of those worked.
      Paul Simonon: It really came to my head when I start reading the newspapers and a word that kept reoccurring was the word "clash", so I thought "the Clash, what about that," to the others. And they and Bernard they went for it.”
  19. ^ a b c Encoule, Jean (1 2003). Joe Strummer - 1952-2002. trakMARX.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. “a) Your group’s shit but you’re a top front man, come & join our band.
    b) By 1984 Topper’s smack habit had become so bad he could hardly hold a pair of sticks yet alone sit on a stool for an hour or so – he was duly fired & replaced for touring duties by old mate of the band, Tory Crimes.
    c) What followed next was traumatic: Bernie Rhodes was re-instated & duly sacked Mick Jones from the group for “rock star tendencies” & “losing touch with the original spirit of the band”.”
  20. ^ Transcript Portobello pub rock crawl (ASP). The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. “In punk psycho-geography, if not in reality, the Clash formed in the market when Mick Jones and Paul Simonon bumped into Joe Strummer and told him they didn’t like the 101’ers but thought he had punk potential. As recounted by Joe, in ‘All the Young Punks’, he was ‘hanging about down the market street… when I met some passing yobbos and we did chance to speak, I knew how to sing and they knew how to pose…’”
  21. ^ All the Young Punks Lyrics. Give 'Em Enough Rope Lyrics. londonsburning.org. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
  22. ^ Sferra, Raymond P.; Mark Davis. All the Young Punks Tablature. Tablature Page. londonsburning.org. Retrieved on 2008-01-18.
  23. ^ THE CLASH - ALL THE YOUNG PUNKS (NEW BOOTS AND CONTRACTS) LYRICS (NSF). sing365.com. Retrieved on 2008-01-18.
  24. ^ Davis, Evan (2003). Joe Strummer - Give 'Em Enough Rope - All the Young Punks (New Boots and Contracts). JoeStrummer.org. Retrieved on 2008-01-18.
  25. ^ a b c d Henke, James (April 3, 1980). "There'll Be Dancing In The Streets: The Clash". Rolling Stone: pp. 38-41. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
    Related news articles:
  26. ^ Loder, Kurt (2003-03-13). The Clash: Ducking Bottles, Asking Questions. MTV News. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. “The London SS changed their name to the Clash, and made their debut opening for the Sex Pistols at a gig on July 4, 1976.”
  27. ^ a b Jaffee, Larry (1987). The Politics of Rock. Popular Music and Society, pp. 19-30. 
    Related news articles:
  28. ^ The Clash Sex Pistols 100 Club Festival. blackmarketclash.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-27. “The Festival on the 20th & 21st in the tiny 100 Club in Oxford Street was a promotional showcase designed by Maclaren to impress record companies and the media that Punk was big enough to have a festival.”
  29. ^ 1976 – The Clash Live. blackmarketclash.com. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. “Terry Chimes quits prior, Rob Harper rejoins the band for the Tour...”
  30. ^ a b Hazan, Jack; David Mingay, Ray Gange, Joe Strummer, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon, Nicky Headon, Buzzy Enterprises, Epic Music Video. (2006). Rude Boy [Documentary, Rockumentary]. New York, NY, United States: Epic Music Video. Retrieved on 2008-01-09. ISBN 0738900826. OCLC 70850190. "2nd edition digitally restored and remastered sound."
  31. ^ Metzger, John (11 2004). The Clash London Calling 25th Anniversary Legacy Edition. The Music Box. Retrieved on 2007-11-19. “Overflowing with ideas, the songs effortlessly leapt from rockabilly to reggae to hard rock, while folding in elements of blues, jazz, R&B, and folk, and all of it was delivered with the pummeling fury of a tempest unleashed.”
  32. ^ a b c The Clash. Artist History. Aversion.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-20. “a) With the release of London Calling, the band had pushed punk in a hundred different directions. From the rockabilly cover of Vince Taylor’s "Brand New Cadillac," to the ska of "Wrong ‘Em Boyo," or "Spanish Bomb’s" classical guitar, the Clash proved punk was more than the simple "1-2-3-4! Go!" of its early days.
    b) Sandinista!, a three-record LP fusing punk with dub, gospel, reggae and soul, as well as with its more conventional roots.
    c) the remains of the Clash split; Cut the Crap was excommunicated from the band’s official discography, with all later retrospectives ignoring the Jones-less Clash.
    d) Songs on the band’s self-titled debut lash out at their world with a precision unmatched by other bands: "London’s Burning" denounces the dead-end London’s culture had backed itself into; "White Riot," urges whites to stand up against the status quo.”
  33. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. London Calling Review. allmusic.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-19. “The result is a stunning statement of purpose and one of the greatest rock & roll albums ever recorded.”
  34. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. Sandinista! Review. allmusic.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-19. “For its triple-album follow-up, Sandinista!, they tried to do everything, adding dub, rap, gospel, and even children's choruses to the punk, reggae, R&B, and roots rock they already were playing.”
  35. ^ a b Cromelin, Richard (January 31, 1988). "Strummer on Man, God, Law and the Clash". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved on 2007-11-19. “a) Headon had been fired because of his drug use, and Jones was given the boot in '83.
    b) There was one more album with a revamped lineup, 1985's Cut the Crap, but Strummer regretted that move, even referring to that band by a different name: the Clash Mark Two.
  36. ^ a b c Ex-Clash singer breaks ground. joestrummer.us. Retrieved on 2008-01-03. “a, b, c) After the disbandment, Strummer followed Mick Jones on holiday to ask him to reform the Clash. "I was trying to undo my mistake. But Big Audio Dynamite was taking off, so he just laughed at me." Nevertheless, Strummer and Jones did start to collaborate again, firstly on songs for Alex Cox's Sid Vicious biopic Sid and Nancy, then on material on the second BAD album, which Strummer co-produced.
    d, e) Finally, Strummer washed his hands of the album, Rhodes and the Clash. "CBS had paid an advance for it so they had to put it out. I just went, 'Well fuck this', and fucked off to the mountains of Spain to sit and sobbing under a palm tree, while Bernie had to deliver a record." Cut the Crap was issued in November 1985. Its music was as crass as it's cringe-making title - a bizarre cross between an attempt to get back to the Clash's punk roots and an assimilation of more contemporary trends, with its amateurish horn and synth overdubs, shot through with cartoonish (and somewhat Americanised) punk imagery and Sham 69-style terrace chanting.”
  37. ^ Marsh, Dave (1989). The Heart of Rock & Soul: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made. London: Penguin. ISBN 0140121080. OCLC 59149603. “#106 The Clash This is England” 
  38. ^ Orshoski, Wes (2006-11-07). Exclusive: Strummer Documentary To Premiere At Sundance (JSP). News. Bilboard.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-29. “"The Future is Unwritten," Julien Temple's new film on the life and career of late Clash frontman Joe Strummer, will have its US premiere in mid-January at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.”
  39. ^ BBC - Somerset - In Pictures - Joe Strummer (SHTML). Where I Live - Somerset - Celebrities and Events. bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-11-29. “Julien Temple's biopic of The Clash front man, entitled Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten, receives its premiere at The Palace in Bridgwater on Saturday, 5 May, 2007. This photo is of a campfire in Somerset.”
  40. ^ Kelly, Kevin (2007-01-26). Sundance Review: Joe Strummer: The Future is Unwritten. cinematical.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-29. “If you can imagine what it would be like to try to document the life of one of your closest friends after their death, and to assemble everything into feature film length, you can probably see how difficult the process might be.”
  41. ^ Harper, Simon (2008-01-12). The Carbon Casino – The Clash reunited! Pair jam after 25 years. Clash Music. Retrieved on 2008-01-15. “For the first night of their six-week residency in West London's Inn On The Green, Carbon/Silicon had promised surprises, but few had realised that meant the reunion of Mick Jones and the powerhouse drummer of The Clash, Topper Headon.”
  42. ^ Clash members Topper Headon and Mick Jones reunite on stage. Punknews.org (2008-01-13). Retrieved on 2008-01-15. “For the first time in 25 years, former Clash members Mick Jones and Topper Headon have shared the stage together. The reunion took place at Carbon/Silicon's "Carbon Casino" residency, and comes five years after Mick joined Joe Strummer on stage at the Brixton Academy.”
  43. ^ The Clash's Mick Jones and Topper Headon reunite after 25 years. NME News. NME.com (2005-01-14). Retrieved on 2005-01-15. “Clash drummer joins Carbon/Silicon at London show”
  44. ^ TRB Rock Against Racism. tomrobinson.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-20. “The most memorable Rock Against Racism event was the April 1978 Carnival against the Nazis. A huge rally of 100,000 people marched the six miles from Trafalgar Square through London's East End - the heart of National Front territory - to a Rock Against Racism concert in Victoria Park, Hackney. X-Ray Spex, The Clash, Steel Pulse, and the Tom Robinson Band were on the bill - a diverse selection of music for a diverse multi-cultural crowd.”
  45. ^ Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten (2007) - Release dates. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2008-03-13.
  46. ^ Harper, Simon (2008-01-12). The Carbon Casino – The Clash reunited! Pair jam after 25 years. Clash Music. Retrieved on 2008-01-15. “For the first night of their six-week residency in West London's Inn On The Green, Carbon/Silicon had promised surprises, but few had realised that meant the reunion of Mick Jones and the powerhouse drummer of The Clash, Topper Headon.”
  47. ^ Clash members Topper Headon and Mick Jones reunite on stage. Punknews.org (2008-01-13). Retrieved on 2008-01-15. “For the first time in 25 years, former Clash members Mick Jones and Topper Headon have shared the stage together. The reunion took place at Carbon/Silicon's "Carbon Casino" residency, and comes five years after Mick joined Joe Strummer on stage at the Brixton Academy.”
  48. ^ The Clash's Mick Jones and Topper Headon reunite after 25 years. NME News. NME.com (2005-01-14). Retrieved on 2005-01-15. “Clash drummer joins Carbon/Silicon at London show”
  49. ^ Gittins, Ian. "Carbon/Silicon", The Guardian, 2008-01-14. Retrieved on 2008-01-16. 
  50. ^ The 1979 USA release of the debut album was significantly different from the original 1977 UK release. For more details about those differences see The Clash.
  51. ^ All of The Clash's albums and singles were originally issued on CBS Records; subsequent re-issues and CD releases have been through Epic.
  52. ^ Clash, The; Johnny Green, Catherine Coon, Don Letts. The Clash: Up Close and Personal [DVD Video]. United States: Storm Bird. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. ISBN 1905431929. OCLC 123570261. "People close to punk rock legends the Clash talk frankly and honestly about their times with the band. Among the contributors are filmmaker Don Letts, publicist Catherine Coon, and road manager Johnny Green."

Aurum Press is an independent English publishing house located in London. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Keith Topping (born 1963 in Tyneside) is a writer most associated with his work relating to the BBC Television series Doctor Who, and also for writing several unnofficial guide books to a variety of television and film series. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Don Letts is a British film director and musician. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... Chimes on stage drumming with The Clash at the 100 Club Punk Festival. ... A documentary film about the British punk rock band The Clash. ... Sony Music Entertainment is a major global record label controlled by the Sony Corporation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Clash is the first album-length recording released by the English punk band The Clash. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
The Clash

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... For other persons named John Mellor, see John Mellor (disambiguation). ... For the Spooky Tooth and Foreigner guitarist, see Mick Jones (Foreigner). ... Paul Simonon (born December 15, 1955 in Brixton, London, England) is best known as the bass guitarist and vocalist for punk rock band The Clash. ... Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... Sheppard (right) with The Clash. ... Keith Levene (born Julian Keith Levene) (born July 18 1957, London) is an English guitarist and songwriter, best known as a member of Public Image Limited. ... Chimes on stage drumming with The Clash at the 100 Club Punk Festival. ... Vince White was, along with Nick Sheppard, one of the guitarists recruited by the Clash to replace Mick Jones when he left the band in 1983. ... Rob Harper is a British musician noted for being an early drummer for The Clash from December 1976-January 1977. ... The Clash is the first album-length recording released by the English punk band The Clash. ... Give Em Enough Rope was The Clashs second album. ... This article is about the album. ... Sandinista! is the fourth album by the punk rock band The Clash. ... Combat Rock is a 1982 album released by The Clash. ... Cut the Crap is The Clashs final album. ... Super Black Market Clash, is a compilation album released by The Clash in 1994 that contains b-sides and rare tracks not available on other albums. ... Not a bad collection. ... Clash on Broadway is a triple-disc, 64-song box set covering The Clashs entire career (except Cut the Crap). ... The Singles is a compilation album by The Clash. ... Super Black Market Clash, is a compilation album released by The Clash in 1994 that contains b-sides and rare tracks not available on other albums. ... From Here to Eternity: Live is a compilation album of live material released by The Clash in 1999. ... The Essential Clash is a career-spanning greatest hits album by The Clash first released in 2003. ... Singles Box is a compilation album by The Clash. ... Caroline Coon is a British artist, journalist and political activist, born in 1945. ... Tymon Dogg is a multi-talented singer, songwriter, fiddler/violinist, guitarist, pianist, and poet from England. ... Mikey Dread, 2006 Mikey Dread Michael Campbell (born 1954 in Port Antonio, Jamaica), better known as Mikey Dread, is a Jamaican singer, producer, and broadcaster. ... Ellen Foley (born 1951, St. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sandy Pearlman was the original producer, manager and a songwriter for the Blue Öyster Cult. ... Bill Price is a producer and engineer famed for his work with The Clash and The Sex Pistols. ... Guy Stevens was born in East Dulwich, London, on April 13, 1943. ... The Clash - UK Version Give Em Enough Rope This page includes discography of the rock band The Clash, with chart placings in the UK and US. // London Calling Sandinista! Combat Rock London Calling Single Rock The Casbah Single Categories: | ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The 101ers were a pub rock band from the 1970s, notable only as being the band that gave Joe Strummer (later of The Clash) his initial start as a musician. ... London SS was Mick Jones and Paul Simonons band prior to joining up with Joe Strummer and Terry Chimes to form The Clash. ... Public Image Ltd. ... Big Audio Dynamite (later known as Big Audio Dynamite II and Big Audio, and often abbreviated BAD) was a British musical group formed in 1984 by the ex-guitarist and singer of The Clash, Mick Jones. ... Havana 3am was the short-lived post-Clash band of bassist Paul Simonon. ... The Latino Rockabilly War was a backing band most notably for one-time The Clash frontman Joe Strummer. ... The Pogues are a band of mixed Irish and English background, playing traditional Irish folk with influences from the English punk rock movement. ... Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros. ... The Libertines were an English rock band that gained notoriety[1] in the early 2000s, part of what was described as the garage rock revival movement of that time. ... Carbon/Silicon (left to right): William Blake, Danny The Red, Mick Jones and Tony James Carbon/Silicon is a rock band formed in 2004 by two punk rock legends: Mick Jones of The Clash and Tony James of Generation X. Similar in many respects to Jones earlier work in Big... The Good, the Bad and the Queen is the debut album by an unnamed alternative rock band fronted by Damon Albarn released in January 2007. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
THE CLASH (1193 words)
In 1986 The Clash split permanently, Strummer went on to collaborate with Jones on BAD’s album ’10 Upping St’ and wrote and produced his own solo material, Simonon went on to form Havana 3am.
The Clash were never forgotten by fans and music pundits alike, constant speculation as to a re-union was always rife.
Their political and social ideals were always represented within their songs and never wavered, they were innovative and never afraid to embrace different styles or learn from music of the past and present.
The Clash - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3753 words)
From their earliest days as a band, The Clash stood apart from their peers with their musicianship, as well as their lyrics; the passionate, left wing political idealism in the lyrics of frontmen Joe Strummer and Mick Jones contrasted with the anarchic nihilism of the Sex Pistols and the basic simplicity of The Ramones.
Headon's contribution to The Clash was by no means limited to his drumming for the band; he composed and performed the music for "Ivan Meets G.I. Joe" and "Rock The Casbah" almost entirely by himself, the latter becoming the band's biggest hit in the U.S. when it reached #8 on the Billboard charts in 1982.
The Clash are generally credited with pioneering the advocacy of radical politics in punk rock, and were known as the "Thinking Man's Yobs" by many for their politically astute take on the world.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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