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Encyclopedia > The City of God
The City of God, opening text, created c. 1470
The City of God, opening text, created c. 1470

The City of God (Latin: De Civitate Dei, also known as De Civitate Dei contra Paganos: The City of God against the Pagans) is a book written in Latin by Augustine of Hippo in the early 5th century, dealing with issues concerning God, martyrdom, Jews, and other Christian philosophies. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (534x760, 848 KB) Folio 1r from a manuscript of Augustines, City of God (De Civitate Dei) (New York Public Library, Spencer Collection MS 30) from 1470. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (534x760, 848 KB) Folio 1r from a manuscript of Augustines, City of God (De Civitate Dei) (New York Public Library, Spencer Collection MS 30) from 1470. ... Events May 15 - Charles VIII of Sweden who had served three terms as King of Sweden dies. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... For the first Archbishop of Canterbury, see Saint Augustine of Canterbury. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 - 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is becoming very long. ... The Death of Socrates, by Jacques-Louis David (1787) depicts the philosopher Socrates carrying out his own execution. ...


Augustine wrote the treatise to explain Christianity's relationship with competing religions and philosophies, and to the Roman government with which it was increasingly intertwined. It was written soon after Rome was sacked by the Visigoths in 410. This event left Romans in a deep state of shock, and many saw it as punishment for abandoning the pagan religion. It was in this atmosphere that Augustine set out to provide a consolation of Christianity, writing that it was the City of God that would ultimately triumph — symbolically, Augustine's eyes were fixed on heaven, a theme repeated in many Late Antiquity Christian art forms. The Roman Empire is the name given to both the imperial domain developed by the city-state of Rome and also the corresponding phase of that civilization, characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... The Visigoths, originally Tervingi, or Vesi (the noble ones), one of the two main branches of the Goths (of which the Ostrogothi were the other), were one of the loosely-termed Germanic peoples that disturbed the late Roman Empire. ... Events Alaric I deposes Priscus Attalus as Roman Emperor. ... Paganism (from Latin paganus, meaning a country dweller or civilian) is a term which, from a western perspective, has come to connote a broad set of spiritual or religious beliefs and practices of natural or polytheistic religions. ...


Despite Christianity's designation as the official religion of the empire, Augustine declared its message to be spiritual rather than political. Christianity, he argued, should be concerned with the mystical, heavenly City of Jerusalem (the New Jerusalem) rather than with Earthly politics. His theology supported and even helped to define the separation of Church and State that characterised Western European politics through the Middle Ages and beyond (unlike the Byzantine East where Earthly politics and spiritual affairs were one and the same institution). Panoramic view from Mt. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In the West, the separation of church and state during the medieval period went through a number of developments, roughly from the end of the Roman Empire through to the beginning of the Reformation. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Motto: Βασιλεύς Βασιλέων Βασιλεύων Βασιλευόντων (Greek: King of Kings Ruling Over Rulers)[] Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ...


The book presents human history as being a conflict between what Augustine calls the City of God and the City of Man (a conflict that is destined to end in victory for the former). The City of God is marked by people who forego earthly pleasure and dedicate themselves to the promotion of Christian values. The City of Man, on the other hand, consists of people who have strayed from the City of God. The two cities are not meant to represent any actual places or organisations, though Augustine clearly thought that the Christian Church was at the heart of the City of God. HIStory: Past, Present and Future – Book I is a two-disc album by Michael Jackson released in 1995 by the Epic Records division of Sony BMG. The first disc (HIStory Begins) is a fifteen-track greatest hits (later released as Greatest Hits - HIStory Volume I), while the second disc (HIStory...


While the book is framed by discussion of these themes, it is largely made up of various digressions on philosophical subjects and presentations of flaws in pagan religions upon which Augustine wished to comment.


See also

Pirates and Emperors, Old and New: International Terrorism in the Real World is a book by Noam Chomsky, titled after an observation by St. ...

External links

Text of The City of God

Marcus Dods (April 11, 1834 - April 26, 1909) was a Scottish divine and biblical scholar. ... The Latin Library is a website that collects public domain Latin texts. ...

Texts about The City of God

  • An introduction to The City of God by James J. O'Donnell

  Results from FactBites:
 
The City of God - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (443 words)
The City of God (Latin: De Civitate Dei, also known as De Civitate Dei contra Paganos: The City of God against the Pagans) is a book written in Latin by Augustine of Hippo in the early 5th century, dealing with issues concerning God, martyrdom, Jews, and other Christian philosophies.
The City of God is marked by people who forego earthly pleasure and dedicate their lives to the promotion of Christian values.
The two cities are not meant to represent any actual places or organisations, though Augustine clearly thought that the Christian Church was at the heart of the City of God.
City of God by Augustine (8895 words)
But let this city bear in mind, that among her enemies lie hid those who are destined to be fellow-citizens, that she may not think it a fruitless labor to bear what they inflict as enemies until they become confessors of the faith.
The City of God we speak of is the same to which testimony is borne by that Scripture, which excels all the writings of all nations by its divine authority, and has brought under its influence all kinds of minds, and this not by a casual intellectual movement, but obviously by an express providential arrangement.
God is in the midst of her, she shall not be moved." From these and similar testimonies, all of which it were tedious to cite, we have learned that there is a city of God, and its Founder has inspired us with a love which makes us covet its citizenship.
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