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Encyclopedia > The Catholic University of America

The Catholic University of America

Image:Us_cua.gif Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Motto Deus Lux Mea Est (God Is My Light)
Established 1887
Type Private
Religious Affiliation Roman Catholic
Chancellor Archbishop Donald W. Wuerl
President The Very Rev. David M. O'Connell, C.M.
Students 5,510
Undergraduates 2,587
Postgraduates 2,923
Location Washington, District of Columbia, USA
Address 620 Michigan Ave, Washington, DC, 20064
Telephone 202-319-5000
Campus Urban
Colors Athletic = Red & Black Academic = Gold & Silver
Nickname CUA
Mascot Cardinal
Website http://www.cua.edu

The Catholic University of America (abbreviated "CUA"), located in Washington, D.C., is unique as the national university of the Roman Catholic Church and as the only higher education institution founded by U.S. Roman Catholic bishops. Established in 1887 following approval by Pope Leo XIII as a graduate and research center, the university began offering undergraduate education in 1904. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Donald William Wuerl (born November 12, 1940) is the the sixth Roman Catholic Archbishop of Washington, DC. From 1988 to 2006, he served as the 11th Bishop of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Very Rev. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... Black cat, thought by some to cause bad luck Black is both a color and the shade of objects that do not reflect light in any part of the visible spectrum. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... Silver is the metallic shade of the color gray closest to that of polished silver. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A mascot, originally a fetish-like term for any person, animal, or thing supposed to bring luck, is now something—typically an animal or human character—used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team (the name often corresponds with the mascot... Binomial name Cardinalis cardinalis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a member of the cardinal family of birds in North America. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (also known as the USCCB) is the official governing body of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Pope Leo XIII (March 2, 1810 – July 20, 1903), born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci, was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, having succeeded Pope Pius IX (1846–78) on February 20, 1878 and reigning until his death in 1903. ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Programs emphasize the liberal arts, professional education, and personal development. The American Cardinals Dinner is put on by the residential US Cardinals each year to raise scholarship funds for CUA. It also has a long history of working with the Knights of Columbus. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... The American Cardinals Dinner is an annual fundrasier to benefit The Catholic University of America. ... The Knights of Columbus and The Catholic University of America have a history of working together that dates back almost to the founding of the university. ... Knights of Columbus emblem The Order of the Knights of Columbus is the worlds largest Catholic fraternal service organization. ...

Contents

The University

History

See main article History of The Catholic University of America The history of The Catholic University of America dates back to the 19th century when it was a small graduate school in a remote corner of Washington, D.C. for American Catholic priests. ...



The proposal to create a national Catholic university in America reflected the rising size and influence of nation’s Catholic population and also an ambitious vision of the Church’s role in American life during the 19th century. Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...


In 1882 Bishop John Lancaster Spalding went to Rome to obtain Pope Leo XIII's support for the University and persuaded family friend Mary Gwendoline Caldwell to pledge $300,000 to establish it. The original mission of the university was to teach Catholicism and human nature together at the graduate level. By developing new leaders and new knowledge, the University would strengthen and enrich Catholicism in the United States. From the Catholic Encyclopedia: Rt. ... Pope Leo XIII (March 2, 1810 – July 20, 1903), born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci, was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, having succeeded Pope Pius IX (1846–78) on February 20, 1878 and reigning until his death in 1903. ... Mary Gwendoline Caldwell bestowed the first donation to the Third Plenary Council of American Bishops that initiated the founding of The Catholic University of America. ... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic - from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1] - is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or... See also : Human nature (disambiguation) Human nature is the fundamental nature and substance of humans, as well as the range of human behavior that is believed to be invariant over long periods of time and across very different cultural contexts. ...


Many of the founders of the CUA held a vision that included both a sense of the Church’s special role in United States and also a conviction that scientific and humanistic research, informed by the Faith, would only strengthen the Church. They sought to develop an institution like a national university that would promote the Faith in a context of religious freedom, spiritual pluralism, and intellectual rigor. For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... Humanism is a system of thought that defines a socio-political doctrine (-ism) whose bounds exceed those of locally developed cultures, to include all of humanity and all issues common to human beings. ... Institutions are structures and mechanisms of social order and cooperation governing the behavior of two or more individuals. ... Freedom of religion is the individuals right or freedom to hold whatever religious beliefs he or she wishes, or none at all. ...


When the University first opened for classes in the fall of 1888, the curriculum consisted of lectures in mental and moral philosophy, English literature, the Sacred Scriptures, and the various branches of theology. At the end of the second term, lectures on canon law were added and the first students were graduated in 1889. In 1904, an undergraduate program was added and it quickly established a reputation for excellence. A survey conducted in 1912 by the federal Bureau of Education placed CUA among the best institutions in the nation at preparing undergraduates for graduate studies. Ethics is a general term for what is often described as the science (study) of morality. In philosophy, ethical behavior is that which is good or right. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογια, logia, words, sayings, or discourse) is reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Canon law is the term used for the internal ecclesiastical law which governs various churches, most notably the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion of churches. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ...


The presence of CUA attracted other Catholic institutions to the area—including colleges, religious orders, and national service organizations. Between 1900 and 1940 more than 50 international Catholic institutions rented or owned property in neighboring Brookland which gave the neighborhood the nickname 'Little Rome.' The period after World War II saw the rise of Catholic visibility in America, and particular prominence for CUA. During the first post-war years, Catholic University experienced a dynamic expansion in enrollment thanks to the G.I. Bill of Rights. Map of Washington, D.C., with Brookland highlighted in red Brookland is a neighborhood in the Northeast quadrant of Washington, D.C., historically centered along 12th Street NE. Brookland is bounded by 9th Street NE to the west, Rhode Island Avenue NE to the south, and South Dakota Avenue to... The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans as well as one-year of unemployment compensation. ...


Today there are over 6,000 students on campus from all 50 states and from around the world. The University boasts a world class faculty and in recent years has welcomed King Abdullah II of Jordan, former Polish president Aleksander Kwaśniewski, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and actor Ben Stein to speak. As-Sayyid Muhammad Abdullah II bin al-Hussein al Hashimi, King of Jordan (Arabic: ‎) (born January 30, 1962 in Amman, Jordan), is the current King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. ... Aleksander KwaÅ›niewski ( ; born November 15, 1954) is a Polish politician who served as the President of Poland from 1995 to 2005. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... Benjamin Jeremy Stein (born November 25, 1944 in Washington, D.C.) is an American lawyer, economist, law professor, actor, comedian, and former White House speechwriter. ...


Student Life

There are over 100 registered student clubs and organizations at CUA for a wide variety of interests including athletics, academics, social, greek life, service, political and religious. The office of University Center, Student Programs and Events maintains an up to date directory of student organizations.


Although the Catholic University states that it does not have any Greek Life on campus it infact has two social greek organizations and one service greek organization. Catholic University Greek Life includes Alpha Delta Gamma the National Catholic Social Fraternity- Kappa chapter, Kappa Tau Gamma the local Chirstian Social-Service Sorority, and Alpha Phi Omega the National Service Fraternity- Zeta Mu chapter which is co-ed. List of Social Fraternities and Sororities: Alpha Delta Gamma- National Catholic Social Fraternity- Kappa chapter Kappa Tau Gamma- Catholic Social-Service Sorority- local Delta Sigma Theta- National African-American Sorority Service Fraternities and Sororities: Alpha Phi Omega- National Co-Ed Service Fraternity- Zeta Mu chapter Educational Fraternities and Sororities: Delta... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development. ...


Student Government includes the Undergraduate Student Government with its Legislative, Academic, Judicial and Treasury branches and the Graduate Student Association. Annual events include weeklong Homecoming celebrations, the Mr. CUA competition and a number of dances including the Beaux Arts Ball, the Mistletoe Ball and the Athletes Ball. In addition to the radio station WCUA other campus media outlets include CUA-TV, the campus television station, The Tower, the campus' main weekly newspaper, and CRUX, a literary magazine. WCUA is the college radio station broadcast from The Catholic University of America. ...


While the University welcomes students of all faiths, 84% of undergraduates and 59% of graduate students self-identify as Catholic. Campus Ministry has two groups of student ministers, the Resident Ministers who live in residence halls and minster primarily to upperclassmen and The House members, whose focus of ministry is freshmen. An upperclassmen, in standard four year American high schools and colleges, is a senior. ... Freshmen can refer to multiple things: For the comic book, see Freshmen_(comics). ...


The Friday Night Planning Committee works with The House members to plan activities for Friday nights that are alcohol free. Campus Ministry also coordinates university liturgies, plans and runs retreats, provides faith formation including R.C.I.A., and operates the online Prayernet. The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (often abbreviated RCIA) is the process through which interested adults are gradually introduced to the Roman Catholic Faith and way of life. ...


There are numerous plays and concerts put on by both students and professional artists. The DuFour Athletic Center has hosted The Alarm, Black 47, Gavin DeGraw, Brandi Carlile, They Might Be Giants, Howie Day, and The Ataris. Comedic acts include Ben Stein and Big Al Goodwin. The Alarm are a Welsh alternative rock band, who were most popular in the 1980s. ... Black 47 is an American-Celtic rock band made up of Irish expatriates, formed in New York City by Larry Kirwan and Chris Byrne in 1989. ... Gavin DeGraw (born February 4, 1977) is an American Soul/Pop/Rock musician who achieved recognition in 2003 after his track I Dont Want to Be was chosen as the title theme to the CW (formerly the WB) television show One Tree Hill. ... Brandi Carlile live at The Parish in Austin, TX - 2006 (Photo by Ron Baker). ... They Might Be Giants (commonly abbreviated to TMBG) is an American alternative rock duo consisting of John Linnell and John Flansburgh that formed in 1982. ... Howie Kern Day (born January 15, 1981 in Bangor, Maine) is an American singer-songwriter. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Benjamin Jeremy Stein (born November 25, 1944 in Washington, D.C.) is an American lawyer, economist, law professor, actor, comedian, and former White House speechwriter. ...


Several off-campus bars and establishments are well-known and loved by alumni and students alike. Johnny K's (formerly known as Kitty O'Shea's and now renamed "The Library" but students still refer to it as "K's"), Colonel Brooks Tavern, Ellis Island, and the new Cardinal's Nest are the four main bars in the neighboring Brookland area.


Athletics

The Cardinals were originally known as the Red and Black, after the colors they wore, and came to be known as the Cardinals (often the Flying Cardinals, occasionally the Fighting Cardinals) in the mid-1920's. The first recorded football game was played against Mount Saint Mary's College on November 28, 1895 but records indicate earlier track and field events.


CUA sponsors 21 NCAA Division III sports teams. The school competes in football in the Old Dominion Athletic Conference, and in men´s baseball, softball, women's volleyball and field hockey, and both men's and women's teams in cross country, soccer, basketball, swimming, lacrosse, tennis, and both indoor and outdoor track and field, in the Landmark Conference. Students also field club teams in sports including horseback riding, ice hockey, and rugby. Student also row on the club crew team. CUA competed in Division I, where they won a national championship in boxing (1938), the baseball team advanced to the NCAA Division I Tournament in 1977, and the football team appeared in two major bowl games (the 1936 Orange Bowl, which they won and the 1940 Sun Bowl, which they tied), until the academic year of 1981-82, when they decided to move to Division III. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Old Dominion Athletic Conference is an NCAA Division III athletic conference. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... Softball is a team sport in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world; it is the second most popular team sport after football (soccer)[]. Its official name and the one by which it is usually known is hockey [1][2... The Minnesota State High school Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with either ten players (men field) six players (men box,indoor) or twelve players (women), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a very hard rubber ball with the aim of... A tennis net Tennis is a game played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). Players use a stringed racquet to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponents court. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... The Landmark Conference is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Member institutions are located in the eastern United States in the States of Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Washington, D.C.. Catholic University of America Drew University Goucher College Juniata College Moravian College... horse, see Horse (disambiguation). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... A BCRFC match at Boston College Rugby football, often just referred to as rugby, refers to sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School in England. ... The Catholic University of America Rowing Association is a rowing club established at the beginning of the spring semester 1990 by Laurie McGuane, an architecture major from Denver who transferred to CUA after her freshman year at Loyola Marymount in Los Angeles. ... Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Domínguez (left) versus Rafael Ortíz Boxing, called pugilism (from Latin), prizefighting (when referring to professional boxing) or the sweet science[1] is a sport and martial art in which two participants of similar weight fight each other with their fists in a series... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... The Brut Sun Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played usually at the end of December in El Paso, Texas. ...

CUA's Mascot, the Cardinal
CUA's Mascot, the Cardinal

Since then, the men's basketball team won the 2001 NCAA Division III National Championship and was the only program in Division III to reach the Sweet Sixteen five consecutive seasons, from 1998-2002. They also reached the postseason in 1993 and 1996. The football team has made three consecutive trips to the Division III playoffs. The track & field team has produced three national champions, while the swimming program has two individual national titles as well. The volleyball team made its first NCAA tournament appearance in 2001 and followed it up in 2002, while the field hockey team advanced to the 2001 ECAC Southern Region championship game. The men's swim team has won four Capitol Athletic Conference titles and three National Catholic Division III championships, while women's swimming has won a Catholic Division III title and softball has an ECAC Southern Region title. Image File history File links CUA_Cardinal. ... Image File history File links CUA_Cardinal. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The NCAA holds an annual tournament to determine the Division III Mens Basketball Championship. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


Wally Pipp, A.B. 1914, played for the New York Yankees and lost his position as starting firstbaseman to Lou Gehrig at the beginning of Gehrig's streak of 2,130 consecutive games. Ripley's Believe It or Not! once featured Edward Lynch, LL.B. 1924, for making 98 tackles in a single football game. Wally Pipp Walter Clement Pipp (February 17, 1893 - January 11, 1965) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball, now best remembered as the man who lost his starting role to Lou Gehrig at the beginning of Gehrigs streak of 2,130 consecutive games. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was one of the most outstanding American baseball players of the twentieth century, setting more than a score of Major League and American League records and voted the greatest first baseman of all-time by the... // Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a franchise which deals in bizarre events and items so strange and unusual that readers might question the claims. ...


Campus

CUA from the air, with the dome of the National Shrine in the foreground
CUA from the air, with the dome of the National Shrine in the foreground

The CUA campus is located in the residential community of Brookland in Northeast Washington, DC; its main entrance is located at 620 Michigan Ave., NE. The campus is bound by Monroe Avenue to the South, North Capitol Street to the West, Hawaii Avenue to the North, and John McCormick Road to the East and is 3 miles north of the U.S. Capitol Building. Image File history File links CUA_Aerial. ... Image File history File links CUA_Aerial. ... View of the east side of the basilica. ... Brookland is a neighborhood in the Northeast quadrant of Washington, DC, historically centered along 12th Street NE. It has been nicknamed the Little Vatican or Little Rome by some for the many Catholic institutions clustered around The Catholic University of America (CUA). ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ...


The tree lined campus is 193 acres in size. Romanesque and modern design dominate among the university’s 55 major buildings. Between McMahon and Gibbons Halls and along side the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception runs The Mall, a large strip of grass that is often the site of kickball games and sunbathers. Conte Circle is in the middle of Centennial Village, a cluster of 8 residential houses. Romanesque St. ... View of the east side of the basilica. ... Silvio Ottavio Conte (November 9, 1921 – February 8, 1991) was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from January 3, 1959 until his death. ...


The Edward J. Pryzbyla University Center was opened in the spring of 2003, bringing student dining services, the campus bookstore, student organization offices, an 800 person ballroom, a convenience store and more student services all under one roof. The John K. Mullen Library completed a $6,000,000 renovation in 2004, significantly improving the lighting and aesthetics of the interior and allowing the classical architecture to better shine through.


The Columbus School of Law is located on the main campus and is self contained in its own building with mock courtrooms, a library, chapel, classrooms and offices. On the Pryzbyla Center side of the building is the Law School Lawn, where the Ultimate Frisbee team can often be found. Theological College, the United States' national seminary, is located across Michigan Avenue from the main campus and sits between the Dominican House of Studies, a seminary for the Order of Preachers, and offices for the Oblates of Mary Immaculate. The Columbus School of Law is the law school of The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. It was established in 1897. ... The Dominican House of Studies is a Priory of the Province of St. ... The Dominican Order, (its formal name, Ordo praedicatorum or the Order of Preachers, is less common in English; in England and some other countries the Dominicans are referred to as Blackfriars on account of the black cowl or cloak they wear over their white habits. ... Seal of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, a religious order of the Roman Catholic Church. ...

The Mall, with the National Shrine in the background
The Mall, with the National Shrine in the background

In April of 2004, the University purchased 49 acres of land from the Armed Forces Retirement Home. The parcel is the largest plot of open space in the District and makes CUA the largest university in DC by land area. There are currently no plans for the parcel other than to secure the property for future growth. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x603, 165 KB) Summary The CUA Mall, with the National Shrine in the background Licensing Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x603, 165 KB) Summary The CUA Mall, with the National Shrine in the background Licensing Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... View of the east side of the basilica. ... Armed Forces Retirement Home is an independent establishment in the executive branch of the federal government of the United States. ...


The Campus is served by the Brookland-CUA station on the Red Line of the Washington Metro. Union Station, Capitol Hill and the Smithsonian museums are only a few minutes ride away. Nearby campus is the Pope John Paul II Cultural Center, the Franciscan Monastery, Trinity University and the offices of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Brookland-CUA station, showing the platforms slight curve. ... The Red Line of the Washington Metro consists of 27 subway stations from Shady Grove to Glenmont. ... The Washington Metro, or simply Metro, is the rapid transit system of Washington, D.C., and neighboring suburban communities in Maryland and Virginia, both inside and outside the Capital Beltway. ... Union Station is the grand ceremonial train station designed to be the entrance to Washington, D.C. when it opened in 1907. ... Capitol Hill is the name of a district in the following cities: Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado Capitol Hill, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Capitol Hill, Seattle, Washington Capitol Hill, Washington, DC It is also a common nickname for the United States Congress and the politicians who serve it (e. ... The Smithsonian castle, as seen through the garden gate. ... The Pope John Paul II Cultural Center is a museum and think tank in Washington, D.C. The Center displays art from the Vatican Museums and interactive museum exhibits about religious faith. ... Franciscan Monastery is a wonderful refuge in NE Washington, D.C. It includes wonderful gardens and a fantastic replica of the catacombs. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (also known as the USCCB) is the official governing body of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. ...


A map is available to locate the buildings on campus. Also see the List of buildings at The Catholic University of America. The following is a list of buildings at The Catholic University of America. ...


Academics

Catholic University has 11 schools and the Metropolitan College in addition to 21 research centers and facilities. The 11 schools offer Doctor of Philosophy degrees (or appropriate professional degrees) in 41 programs and Master's Degrees in 90 programs. Undergraduate degrees are awarded in 83 programs by six schools: architecture and planning, arts and sciences, engineering, music, nursing and philosophy. Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate (or graduate) course of one to three years in duration. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organised sounds and silence. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... This article is 58 kilobytes or more in size. ...


Undergraduates combine a liberal arts curriculum in arts and sciences with courses in their major fields of study. Metropolitan College provides programs for adults who wish to earn baccalaureate degrees or participate in continuing education and certificate programs. In education, a curriculum (plural curricula) is the set of courses and their contents offered by an institution such as a school or university. ... A baccalaureate is an educational qualification. ...


Catholic University is the only U.S. university with an ecclesiastical faculty of Canon law and is one of the few U.S. universities with ecclesiastical faculties of philosophy and sacred theology. Theological College, the university seminary, has prepared men for the priesthood in many dioceses of the United States. This article should be transwikied to wiktionary Ecclesiastical means pertaining to the Church (especially Christianity) as an organized body of believers and clergy, with a stress on its juridical and institutional structure. ... Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... This article is 58 kilobytes or more in size. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογια, logia, words, sayings, or discourse) is reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... A seminary or theological college is a specialized and often live-in higher education institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in philosophy, theology, spirituality and the religious life, usually in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... A priesthood is a body of priests, shamans, or oracles who are thought to have special religious authority or function. ... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ...


Over 98% of professors have doctoral or terminal degrees and 74% teach undergraduates. Of the full time faculty, 59% are Catholic. Faculty experts regularly appear in the news media.


Undergraduate Offerings

School of Architecture and Planning

  • Bachelor of Science
  • Dual Degree with Civil Engineering
  • Master in Architecture

School of Arts and Sciences

*Indicates areas of study that are also offered with Secondary Education Minor It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... Anthropology is the study of the anatomical and mental composition of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, cultural relationships, and racial classifications. ... The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... For a one-room apartment, see Apartment. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The span of recorded history is roughly 5,000-5,500 years, with cuneiform possibly being the oldest form of writing. ... Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Primary or elementary education consist of the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... History studies the past in human terms. ... This article or section may contain external links added only to promote a website, product, or service – otherwise known as spam. ... International economics is a branch of economics with two main subdisciplines international trade and international finance. ... International finance is the branch of economics that studies the dynamics of exchange rates, foreign investment, and how these affect international trade. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... Look up Management in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Management Information Systems (MIS), are information systems, typically computer based, that are used within an organization. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up marketing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... Media studies concerns the study of media content, institutions, and its role in society. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organised sounds and silence. ... This article is 58 kilobytes or more in size. ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe and their precise formulation in a mathematical framework. ... Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ... Psychology is an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes, emotion, personality, behavior, and relationships. ... Social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Chemical physics is a subdiscipline of physics that investigates physicochemical phenomena using techniques from atomic and molecular physics and condensed matter physics; it is the branch of physics that studies chemical processes from the point of view of physics. ... Chemistry - the study of atoms, made of nuclei (center particles) and electrons (outer particles), and the structures they form. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... This article or section may contain external links added only to promote a website, product, or service – otherwise known as spam. ... International economics is a branch of economics with two main subdisciplines international trade and international finance. ... International finance is the branch of economics that studies the dynamics of exchange rates, foreign investment, and how these affect international trade. ... Look up Management in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Management Information Systems (MIS), are information systems, typically computer based, that are used within an organization. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up marketing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... Category: Possible copyright violations ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe and their precise formulation in a mathematical framework. ...


School of Engineering

Benjamin T. Rome School of Music The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Environmental engineering is the application of science and engineering principles to improving the environment (air, water, and/or land resources), to provide healthful water, air and land for human habitation and for other organisms, and to investigate the possibilities for remediation of polluted sites. ... Mechanical engineers design and build engines and power plants. ...

School of Nursing A musical composition is a piece of original music designed for repeated performance (as opposed to strictly improvisational music, in which each performance is unique). ... Music education comprises the application of education methods in teaching music. ... A History of Western Music Seventh Edition by J. Peter Burkholder, Donald J. Grout, and Claude V. Palisca (affectioned called Grout) is one of several popular books used to teach Music History in North America. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany Modern style pipe organ at the concert hall of Aletheia University in Matou, Taiwan The organ is a keyboard instrument with one or more manuals, and usually a pedalboard. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... The word voice can be used to refer to: Sound: The human voice. ...

  • Bachelor of Science
  • B.S.N. Degree Completion Program for RNs

School of Philosophy

  • Program of Concentration
  • Pre-Law Program of Concentration

Pre-Professional Studies

A Dentist and Dental Assistant perform surgery on a patient. ... Lady Justice is a personification of the law. ... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... Veterinary medicine is the application of medical diagnostic and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals. ...

Graduate Offerings

School of Architecture and Planning

School of Arts and Sciences This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

  • Master of Fine Arts


School of Canon Law Anthropology is the study of the anatomical and mental composition of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, cultural relationships, and racial classifications. ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... History studies the past in human terms. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... A modern language is any human language that is used by societies in the world today. ... Open Directory Project: Literature World Literature Electronic Text Archives Magazines and E-zines Online Writing Writers Resources Libraries, Digital Cataloguing, Metadata Distance Learning Dictionary of the History of Ideas: Classicism in Literature The Universal Library, by Carnegie Mellon University Project Gutenberg Online Library Abacci - Project Gutenberg texts matched with Amazon... Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ... Psychology is an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes, emotion, personality, behavior, and relationships. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ... Written records of the ancient Egyptian language have been dated from about 3200 BC. Egyptian is part of the Afro-Asiatic group of languages and is related to Berber and Semitic (languages such as Arabic, Amharic, Tigrinya and Hebrew). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Chemistry education is an active area of research within both the disciplines of chemistry and education, focusing on learning and teaching of chemistry in schools, colleges and universities, with the goals of understanding how students learn chemistry, how best to teach chemistry, and how to improve learning outcomes by changing... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe and their precise formulation in a mathematical framework. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... History studies the past in human terms. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... A modern language is any human language that is used by societies in the world today. ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe and their precise formulation in a mathematical framework. ... Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ... Psychology is an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes, emotion, personality, behavior, and relationships. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ... Written records of the ancient Egyptian language have been dated from about 3200 BC. Egyptian is part of the Afro-Asiatic group of languages and is related to Berber and Semitic (languages such as Arabic, Amharic, Tigrinya and Hebrew). ...


School of Engineering Licentiate is the title of a person who holds an academic degree called a license. ... Canon law is the term used for the internal ecclesiastical law which governs various churches, most notably the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion of churches. ... Canon law is the term used for the internal ecclesiastical law which governs various churches, most notably the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion of churches. ...


Columbus School of Law The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Engineering management is a field that bridges the gap between engineering and management. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Mechanical engineers design and build engines and power plants. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Engineering management is a field that bridges the gap between engineering and management. ... Mechanical engineers design and build engines and power plants. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Mechanical engineers design and build engines and power plants. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Mechanical engineers design and build engines and power plants. ... The Columbus School of Law is the law school of The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. It was established in 1897. ...


School of Library and Information Science Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin) is a degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree that allows someone to specialize in a particular area of law. ...

  • Post-Master's Certificate
  • Master of Science in Library Studies


Benjamin T. Rome School of Music A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information resources and services, organized for use, and maintained by a public body, institution, or private individual. ...


School of Nursing Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... See also string (disambiguation) Strings (as a sound (voice) in electronic musical instruments and synthesizers) is an imitation of classical string ensembles sound. ... The word voice can be used to refer to: Sound: The human voice. ... Musicology is reasoned discourse concerning music (Greek: μουσικη = music and λογος = word or reason). In other words: the whole body of systematized knowledge about music which results from the application of a scientific method of investigation or research, or of philosophical speculation and rational systematization to the facts, the processes and the... A music librarian is a librarian who specializes in the area of music. ... Musical composition is: a piece of music the structure of a musical piece the process of creating a new piece of music // A piece of music exists in the form of a written composition in musical notation or as a single acoustic event (a live performance or recorded track). ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany Modern style pipe organ at the concert hall of Aletheia University in Matou, Taiwan The organ is a keyboard instrument with one or more manuals, and usually a pedalboard. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... Pedagogy, the art or science of being a teacher, generally refers to strategies of instruction, or a style of instruction[1]. The word comes from the Ancient Greek παιδαγωγέω (paidagōgeō; from παῖς (child) and ἄγω (lead)): literally, to lead the child”. In Ancient Greece, παιδαγωγός was (usually) a slave who supervised the education... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Pedagogy, the art or science of being a teacher, generally refers to strategies of instruction, or a style of instruction[1]. The word comes from the Ancient Greek παιδαγωγέω (paidagōgeō; from παῖς (child) and ἄγω (lead)): literally, to lead the child”. In Ancient Greece, παιδαγωγός was (usually) a slave who supervised the education... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Religious music (also sacred music) is music performed or composed for religious use or through religious influence. ... Musical composition is: a piece of music the structure of a musical piece the process of creating a new piece of music // A piece of music exists in the form of a written composition in musical notation or as a single acoustic event (a live performance or recorded track). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Pedagogy, the art or science of being a teacher, generally refers to strategies of instruction, or a style of instruction[1]. The word comes from the Ancient Greek παιδαγωγέω (paidagōgeō; from παῖς (child) and ἄγω (lead)): literally, to lead the child”. In Ancient Greece, παιδαγωγός was (usually) a slave who supervised the education... Religious music (also sacred music) is music performed or composed for religious use or through religious influence. ... Musicology is reasoned discourse concerning music (Greek: μουσικη = music and λογος = word or reason). In other words: the whole body of systematized knowledge about music which results from the application of a scientific method of investigation or research, or of philosophical speculation and rational systematization to the facts, the processes and the...

  • Post-Master's Certificate
  • Masters of Science in Nursing
  • Doctor of Nursing Science


School of Philosophy

  • Master of Arts
  • Licentiate in Philosophy
  • Doctor of Philosophy


School of Theology and Religious Studies

  • Graduate Certificate
  • Master of Arts in the History of Religions (with the Consortium of Washington Universities)
  • Master of Arts/Master of Science

National Catholic School of Social Service Titians The Pastoral Concert Pastoral refers to the lifestyle of shepherds and pastoralists, moving livestock around larger areas of land according to seasons and availability of water and feed. ... Biblical studies is the academic study of the Christian and Jewish Scriptures. ... Historical theology is a branch of theological studies that investigates the socio-historical and cultural mechanisms that give rise to theological ideas, systems, and statements. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may be refer to, or include, an elaborate... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... Ethics is a branch of philosophy dealing with right and wrong in human behaviour. ... Ethics (from the Ancient Greek Ä“thikos, the adjective of Ä“thos custom, habit), a major branch of philosophy, is the study of values and customs of a person or group and covers the analysis and employment of concepts such as right and wrong, good and evil, and responsibility. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Historical theology is a branch of theological studies that investigates the socio-historical and cultural mechanisms that give rise to theological ideas, systems, and statements. ... Biblical studies is the academic study of the Christian and Jewish Scriptures. ... Catholic Education is an important component of education in the United States. ... The United States Department of Education was created in 1979 (by PL 96-88) as a Cabinet-level department of the United States government, and began operating in 1980. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may be refer to, or include, an elaborate... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... Ethics is a branch of philosophy dealing with right and wrong in human behaviour. ... Ethics (from the Ancient Greek Ä“thikos, the adjective of Ä“thos custom, habit), a major branch of philosophy, is the study of values and customs of a person or group and covers the analysis and employment of concepts such as right and wrong, good and evil, and responsibility. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Historical theology is a branch of theological studies that investigates the socio-historical and cultural mechanisms that give rise to theological ideas, systems, and statements. ... Religious education teaches the doctrines of a religion. ... This article outlines the history of Christianity and provides links to relevant topics. ... Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate), generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... Library science or library and information science (abbreviated LIS) is the study of issues related to libraries and the information fields. ... The Hispanic world. ... // The term Latino is a linguistic identity that refers to an individual that has significant ancestry from a nation-state where a Latin derived language is spoken or is the offical language of the government. ... The term ministry can refer to the following: A ministry is a department of a government. ... Titians The Pastoral Concert Pastoral refers to the lifestyle of shepherds and pastoralists, moving livestock around larger areas of land according to seasons and availability of water and feed. ... Religious education teaches the doctrines of a religion. ... Titians The Pastoral Concert Pastoral refers to the lifestyle of shepherds and pastoralists, moving livestock around larger areas of land according to seasons and availability of water and feed. ... Biblical studies is the academic study of the Christian and Jewish Scriptures. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may be refer to, or include, an elaborate... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... Ethics is a branch of philosophy dealing with right and wrong in human behaviour. ... Ethics (from the Ancient Greek Ä“thikos, the adjective of Ä“thos custom, habit), a major branch of philosophy, is the study of values and customs of a person or group and covers the analysis and employment of concepts such as right and wrong, good and evil, and responsibility. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Historical theology is a branch of theological studies that investigates the socio-historical and cultural mechanisms that give rise to theological ideas, systems, and statements. ... Religious education teaches the doctrines of a religion. ... This article outlines the history of Christianity and provides links to relevant topics. ... Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate), generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... Biblical studies is the academic study of the Christian and Jewish Scriptures. ... Historical theology is a branch of theological studies that investigates the socio-historical and cultural mechanisms that give rise to theological ideas, systems, and statements. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may be refer to, or include, an elaborate... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... Ethics is a branch of philosophy dealing with right and wrong in human behaviour. ... Ethics (from the Ancient Greek Ä“thikos, the adjective of Ä“thos custom, habit), a major branch of philosophy, is the study of values and customs of a person or group and covers the analysis and employment of concepts such as right and wrong, good and evil, and responsibility. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Historical theology is a branch of theological studies that investigates the socio-historical and cultural mechanisms that give rise to theological ideas, systems, and statements. ...

Social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... Social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ...

Schools

  • School of Architecture and Planning
    • Randall Ott, Dean
  • School of Arts and Sciences
    • Lawrence R. Poos, Dean
  • School of Canon Law
    • Reverend Monsignor Brian E. Ferme, Dean
  • School of Engineering
    • Charles C. Nguyen, Dean
  • School of Library and Information Science
    • Martha Hale, Dean
  • Benjamin T. Rome School of Music
    • Murry Sidlin, Dean
  • School of Nursing
    • Nalini Jairath, Dean
  • School of Philosophy
    • Reverend Kurt Pritzl, O.P., Dean
  • National Catholic School of Social Service
    • James A. Zabora, Dean
  • School of Theology and Religious Studies
    • Reverend Monsignor Kevin W. Irwin, Dean
  • Metropolitan College
    • Sara Thompson, Dean

The Columbus School of Law is the law school of The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. It was established in 1897. ...

Research Centers and Facilities

Cell biology (also called cellular biology or formerly cytology, from the Greek kytos, container) is an academic discipline that studies cells. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Catholic Education is an important component of education in the United States. ... Anthem: Els Segadors Capital Barcelona Official language(s) Catalan, Spanish and Aranese Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 6th  32,114 km²  6. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Titians The Pastoral Concert Pastoral refers to the lifestyle of shepherds and pastoralists, moving livestock around larger areas of land according to seasons and availability of water and feed. ... Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate), generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... Value is a term that expresses the concept of worth in general, and it is thought to be connected to reasons for certain practices, policies or actions. ... Fourth-century inscription, representing Christ as the Good Shepherd. ... Environmental Stewardship is an agri-environment scheme run by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs in England. ... Telerehabilitation refers to remote delivery of rehabilitation services. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... Religious music (also sacred music) is music performed or composed for religious use or through religious influence. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Musical Arts Conference or MAC is a local circuit for marching band competitions, based in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts. ... Vitreous refers to a material in a glassy state. ...

Notable Faculty

The Columbus School of Law is the law school of The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. It was established in 1897. ... The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ... Clyde Lorrain Cowan Jr (1919–1974) was a captain in the United States Army Air Force. ... Neutrinos are elementary particles. ... The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. ... The Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts is part of the Roman Curia. ... The Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura is the administrative appellate tribunal of the Holy See and, consequently, the highest judicial authority of the Roman Catholic Church outside of the Pope himself. ... The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ... The International Theological Commission is a group of 30 Catholic theologians from around the world. ... The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. ... Oleg Danilovich Kalugin is a former KGB spy. ... Very Rev. ... The Congregation for Catholic Education is a dicastery of the Roman curia responsible for: (1) seminaries (except those regulated by the Congregations for the Evangelization of Peoples and for Oriental Churches) and houses of formation of religious and secular institutes; (2) universities, faculties, institutes and higher schools of study, either... The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ...

Notable alumni

For a more comprehensive list of alumni, see the List of notable CUA alumni. The following is a list of notable CUA alumni. ...


There are many notable alumni of The Catholic University of America, particularly in the arts, in the Church and in public service. Graduates include numerous cardinals, bishops, priests and nuns. The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official, usually a bishop, of the Roman Catholic Church, a member of the College of Cardinals which as a body elects a new pope. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... . ... Nun in cloister, 1930; photograph by Doris Ulmann A nun is a woman who has taken special vows committing her to a religious life. ...


Members of the United States House of Representatives and Senate, ambassadors, governors, state legislators, mayors, and judges have also attended CUA. Additionally, many notable actors, playwrights, and columnists are alumni in addition to film, theatrical and television producers. Others include CEOs, scholars and university presidents. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... State legislatures are the lawmaking bodies of the 50 states in the United States of America. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke while waiting between takes during location filming An actor or actress is a person who acts, or plays a role, in a dramatic production. ... Template:Unsourced A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is someone who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... A theatrical producer is the person ultimately responsible for overseeing all aspects of mounting a theatrical production. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ...


University Rectors and Presidents

  1. Bishop John J. Keane (18871896)
  2. Bishop Thomas J. Conaty (1896–1903)
  3. Bishop Denis J. O’Connell (1903–1909)
  4. Bishop Thomas J. Shahan (1909–1927)
  5. Bishop James Hugh Ryan (19281935)
  6. Bishop Joseph M. Corrigan (19361942)
  7. Bishop Patrick J. McCormick (19431953)
  8. Bishop Bryan J. McEntegart (1953–1957)
  9. Bishop William J. McDonald (1957–1967, last Rector)
  10. Clarence C. Walton, Ph.D. (19691978, first President)
  11. Edmund D. Pellegrino, M.D. (1978–1982)
  12. Rev. William J. Byron, S.J. (1982–1992)
  13. Brother Patrick Ellis, F.S.C. (1992–1998)
  14. Very Rev. David M. O'Connell, C.M., J.C.D. (1998–present)

John Joseph Keane (September 22, 1839 – June 22, 1918) was an American Roman Catholic archbishop, was born in Ballyshannon, Co. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Thomas James Conaty (August 1, 1847 - September 18, 1915) was the Bishop of the Diocese of Monterey-Los Angeles (now the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles) from 1903-1915. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... James Hugh Ryan (1886 - 1948) was a U.S. archbishop. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Clarence C. Walton, was the 10th president of The Catholic University of America and the first layman to hold the position. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Edmund D. Pellegrino, M.D., was the 11th president of The Catholic University of America and the last layman to hold the position. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rev. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Brother Patrick Ellis, F.S.C., a brother of the De La Salle order, was the 13th president of The Catholic University of America. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... Very Rev. ...

Board of Trustees

See main article Board of Trustees of The Catholic University of America. As of 2005, the Board of Trustees at The Catholic University of America was composed of: Carl A. Anderson, Supreme Knight of the Knights of Columbus Richard D. Banziger, B.A. 1981, Managing Director, Salomon Smith Barney Nancy J. Bidwill, owner, Arizona Cardinals Bertha S. Braddock, Alexandria, VA philanthropist Michael...


CUA was founded by the nation's bishops, and they continue to have a strong presence on the Board of Trustees to this day. Of the 51 trustees (includes President David M. O’Connell) 24 of them are bishops and 8 are cardinals. In addition, there is one nun and two priests making a majority of the board comprised of clergy or religious. Very Rev. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official, usually a bishop, of the Roman Catholic Church, a member of the College of Cardinals which as a body elects a new pope. ... Nun in cloister, 1930; photograph by Doris Ulmann A nun is a woman who has taken special vows committing her to a religious life. ... . ...


External links

  • The Catholic University of America – official site
  • Undergraduate Student Government – represents 3,050 undergraduate students
  • Campus Ministry – CUA Campus Ministry


Student Media: Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

  • The Tower – Independent Student Newspaper
  • CRUX Magazine for the Creative Arts – literary magazine
  • WCUA Radio – Internet radio station (CUA's Student Organization of the 2004-2005 Year)
  • The Cardinal – Undergraduate Student Yearbook


Student Government:

  • Graduate Student Association – advocates for 3,150 graduate and law students
  • Undergraduate Student Government – represents 3,050 undergraduate students


Student Organizations

  • CUA College Democrats – Represents and provides opportunities for students interested in Democratic Politics
  • CUA Knights of Columbus Council #9542 – CUA Knights of Columbus #9542
  • CUA RHA – Residence Hall Association
  • CUA Program Board – Program Board

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Catholic University of America (203 words)
The University Calendar is Catholic University’s institutional calendar.
It is intended to assist all members of the university community in planning and coordinating events of institution-wide importance.
The Calendar of Events is a comprehensive listing of activities sponsored by Catholic University and its various schools and offices.
Catholic University: Admissions Center (217 words)
Catholic University offers the resources of a major research university and the comfortable feel of a liberal arts college with more than 3,100 graduate students and 3,000 undergraduates.
The Catholic University of America encourages you to begin the application process as early as possible.
CUA is dedicated to the undergraduate experience and the exceptional education it offers students.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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