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Encyclopedia > The Blues Brothers (movie)
The Blues Brothers

IMDB 7.8/10 (40,125 votes)
Directed by John Landis
Produced by Bernie Brillstein
George Folsey Jr.
David Sosna
Robert K. Weiss
Written by Dan Aykroyd
John Landis
Starring John Belushi
Dan Aykroyd
Music by Elmer Bernstein
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) 20 June 1980
10 October 1980
26 December 1980
28 March 1981
Running time 133 min.
(extended:148 min.)
Country US
Language English
Budget $27 million[1]
Gross revenue $115,229,890
Followed by Blues Brothers 2000
Official website
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

The Blues Brothers is a 1980 musical comedy directed by John Landis and starring John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd as "Joliet" Jake and Elwood Blues, characters developed from a "Saturday Night Live" musical sketch. It features musical numbers by R&B and soul legends James Brown, Cab Calloway, Aretha Franklin and Ray Charles, and epic car chase scenes. Image File history File links Bluesbrothersmovieposter. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... John Landis (born August 3, 1950 in Chicago) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ... Bernie Brillstein (b. ... Robert K. Weiss is an American film and television producer. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) is an Academy Award-nominated Canadian comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ... John Adam Belushi (January 24, 1949 – March 5, 1982) was an Emmy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer, most notable for his work on Saturday Night Live, National Lampoons Animal House and The Blues Brothers. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) is an Academy Award-nominated Canadian comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ... Elmer Bernstein (pronounced Bern-steen[1]) (April 4, 1922 – August 18, 2004) was an Academy and two-time Golden Globe award winning film score composer. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 361st in leap years. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan_(bordered). ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Much like American popular music, American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Blues Brothers 2000 is a 1998 musical/comedy film and sequel to the highly successful 1980 film The Blues Brothers. ... // Events April 30 - The Roger Daltrey film, McVicar, opens in London. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... Airplane! is considered by some critics to be one of the funniest movies of all time. ... John Landis (born August 3, 1950 in Chicago) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ... John Adam Belushi (January 24, 1949 – March 5, 1982) was an Emmy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer, most notable for his work on Saturday Night Live, National Lampoons Animal House and The Blues Brothers. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) is an Academy Award-nominated Canadian comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City which has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... Rhythm and blues (also known as R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006),[3] commonly referred to as The Godfather of Soul and The Hardest Working Man in Show Business, was an American entertainer recognized as one of the most influential figures in 20th century popular music. ... Cab Calloway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907–November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American soul, R&B, and gospel singer, songwriter, and pianist born in Memphis, Tennessee, but raised in Detroit, Michigan, USA. She has been called for many years The Queen Of Soul, but many also call her Lady Soul, as well as... Ray Charles was the stage name of Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The story is a tale of redemption for paroled convict Jake and his brother Elwood, who take on "a mission from God" to save the Roman Catholic orphanage in which they grew up from closure. To do so they must re-form their rhythm and blues band, the Blues Brothers, and organize a performance to earn $5,000 to pay the tax assessor. Along the way they are targeted by a destructive "mystery woman," Neo-Nazis, and a country and western band – all while being relentlessly pursued by the police, and eventually the military and a SWAT team. Parole can have different meanings depending on the area and judiciary system. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... An orphanage (historically an orphans asylum before the latter word took on its modern insane asylum connotation) is an institution dedicated to caring for orphans (children who have lost their parents) and abused, abandoned, and neglected children. ... Rhythm and blues (also known as R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


The film is set in and around Chicago, Illinois, and also features non-musical supporting performances by John Candy, Carrie Fisher and Henry Gibson. Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Carrie Frances Fisher (born October 21, 1956) is an American actress, screenwriter and novelist, best known for her role as Princess Leia Organa in the original Star Wars trilogy. ... Henry Gibson (born September 21, 1935 in Germantown, Pennsylvania) is an American actor who was famous as a cast member of Rowan and Martins Laugh-In. ...

Contents

Plot

"Joliet" Jake Blues is released from Joliet Prison into his brother Elwood's custody after serving a sentence for armed robbery. Jake is irritated at being picked up in a former Mount Prospect police car, a 1974 Dodge Monaco, instead of the Cadillac the brothers used to own. Jake is somewhat mollified when Elwood says he traded the Caddy for a microphone, and then demonstrates the "new" Bluesmobile's powers by vaulting it over an open drawbridge. Joliet Correctional Center (colloquially known as Joliet Prison) was a prison in Joliet, Illinois, United States from 1858 to 2002. ... Mount Prospect, part of Elk Grove Township, is a village located in Cook County, Illinois about 22 miles northwest of downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Dodge Monaco was a fullsize automobile built and sold by the Dodge division of the Chrysler Corporation (now DaimlerChrysler) between 1965 to 1978 and 1990 to 1992. ... Cadillac is a brand of luxury vehicles, part of General Motors, produced and mostly sold in the United States and Canada. ... A microphone, sometimes referred to as a mike or mic (both IPA pronunciation: ), is an acoustic to electric transducer or sensor that converts sound into an electrical signal. ... The Blues Brothers and their Dodge Monaco The Bluesmobile is a 1974 Dodge Monaco sedan that was prominently featured in the 1980 film, The Blues Brothers . ... Drawbridge at the fort of Ponta da Bandeira; Lagos, Portugal A drawbridge is a type of movable bridge typically associated with the entrance of a castle, but the term is often used to describe all different types of movable bridges, like bascule bridges and lift bridges. ...


Over Jake's vehement protests, their first stop is the inner-city Roman Catholic orphanage that was their childhood home. They learn it is to be shut down unless $5,000 in back property taxes on the building is paid within a short time. Jake indicates they can quickly obtain the funds, but the orphanage director, a strict nun known as "The Penguin", emphatically refuses to accept any "filthy, stolen money" from the brothers. They flee her wrath, and she tells them not to come back until they redeem themselves. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... An orphanage (historically an orphans asylum before the latter word took on its modern insane asylum connotation) is an institution dedicated to caring for orphans (children who have lost their parents) and abused, abandoned, and neglected children. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...

Congregation members dance to the tune of The Old Landmark. James Brown is at the pulpit at the center of the frame.

At the prompting of Curtis, the elderly orphanage worker who introduced the brothers to the blues, a visit to a lively evangelical church service gives the duo an epiphany: they can legitimately raise the necessary funds by re-forming their legendary rhythm and blues band. The brothers are convinced they've been given a "mission from God." Image File history File links BluesBrotherschurch. ... Image File history File links BluesBrotherschurch. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on the use of the blue notes and a repetitive pattern that most often follows a twelve-bar structure. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


As they drive home, Elwood's reckless driving (along with massive amounts of unpaid parking tickets) attracts the unwanted attention of two Illinois State Police troopers named Daniel and Mount; Elwood proceeds to both escape and earn the pursuing officers' undying enmity by driving through a shopping mall. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... McArthur Glen Designer Outlet, Swindon, England, a shopping mall built within a disused railway engine works. ...

The Bluesmobile races through the mall while being chased by State Troopers.

Walking up to the door of the flophouse Elwood calls home, the brothers are attacked by a "Mystery Woman", who fires a volley of bazooka rockets at them, then drives off. The brothers survive unscathed and go up to sleep in Elwood's tiny room, located right next to a busy elevated train track. The next morning, with the assistance of parole officer Burton Mercer, the troopers track the brothers down to the flophouse. Just as the three police are about to move in for the arrest, the Mystery Woman reappears and blows up the building via remote control. Miraculously, the brothers climb out of the smoking rubble unhurt and depart, still wanted by the police. Image File history File links Blues_Brothers_car_chase. ... Image File history File links Blues_Brothers_car_chase. ... A flophouse or dosshouse is a place that offers very cheap lodging, generally by providing only minimal services. ... For other uses, see Bazooka (disambiguation). ... The L[1], variously, if perhaps incorrectly, styled L, El, EL, or L, is the rapid transit system that serves Chicago, Illinois in the United States. ...


The brothers begin tracking down members of their old band and convincing them to re-join. The core rhythm section of the group is found playing at a nearly-empty Holiday Inn lounge under the name "Murph and Magic Tones"; they are quickly convinced they were happier playing with the brothers. Another member, trumpet player "Mr. Fabulous", is maître d' at Chez Paul, a high-class French restaurant. He is harder to convince to rejoin, but Jake and Elwood gleefully proceed to make a ghastly spectacle of themselves, swilling the restaurant's food and drink and harassing the other patrons. When they threaten to return for every single meal and repeat this performance, Mr. Fabulous gives in. Holiday Inn is a brand name applied to hotels within the InterContinental Hotels Group. ... For Trumpet Winsock, see Winsock. ... The maître d (short for maître dhôtel, literally master of the hall) in a suitably staffed restaurant is the person in charge of assigning customers to tables in the establishment, and dividing the dining area into areas of responsibility for the various servers on duty. ... French cuisine is considered to be one of the worlds most refined and elegant styles of cooking, and is renowned for both its classical (haute cuisine) or grande cuisine and provincial styles. ...


En route to meet guitar player Matt Murphy and saxophone player Lou Marini, the brothers disrupt the neo-Nazi rally of the American Socialist White People's Party ("The Illinois Nazis")[2] by driving across the bridge the group is parading on, forcing them to jump into the water and adding another bitter enemy to the brothers' rapidly-growing list. The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ...

The Blues Brothers at Ray's Music Exchange

Murphy and Marini are at a soul food restaurant on Maxwell Street, which Matt owns along with his wife. Against her emphatic advice, Matt and Lou walk out and rejoin the band. The reunited group then obtains instruments and equipment from a pawn shop, Ray's Music Exchange. Image File history File links Bluesbrothersraycharles. ... Image File history File links Bluesbrothersraycharles. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... West Maxwell Street, is a short street in Chicago, Illinois, near Halsted Street and Roosevelt Road. ... Modern pawnbroker storefront A Pawnbroker is a person who offers loans to individuals who use their personal property as collateral. ...


The group then drives to a parking lot outside a shopping center and the brothers go to make a phone call to their old booking agent friend Maury Sline to see if he can land them a gig. All of a sudden, the mystery woman turns up again and attempts to kill them again with a flamethrower. It ignites the giant gas tank next to the phonebooth Jake and Elwood are in and the explosion sends it hurtling into the air. The mystery woman drives off again, and then the phone booth falls from the sky with the two brothers as usual unharmed. Meanwhile, the Illinois Nazis are plotting their revenge. Riverboat of the U.S. Brownwater Navy shooting ignited napalm from its mounted flamethrower during the Vietnam war. ...


Having been unable to make the call to Maury to land a gig, Jake is forced to lead the skeptical band out into the countryside hoping to by luck alone find something, and they stumble into a bar called Bob's Country Bunker, which features both country and western music. Jake decides to pose the Blues Brothers as the band that is actually meant to play and steal their gig. After first drawing boos for playing their usual rhythm and blues standards, they are able to win over the rowdy, bottle-tossing crowd with the theme from Rawhide and "Stand By Your Man". At the end of the evening, not only do they discover that they drank so much beer that their bar tab is greater than the pay for the gig and they have lost money rather than earned it, but the band that was actually meant to play turns up: a group from Nashville called the Good Ol' Boys, led by Tucker McElroy. Jake stalls them long enough to make an escape, and the Bunker's owner Bob and The Good Ol' Boys chase the Blues Brothers in Bob's pickup truck. The pursuers are thwarted when they collide with a police cruiser driven by State Troopers Daniel and Mount. Country music, once known as Country and Western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... The theme music of a radio or television program is a piece that is written specifically for that show and usually played during the title sequence and/or end credits. ... Rawhide was a television western series about cattle drives that aired on CBS from 1959-1966, which starred Eric Fleming and launched the career of Clint Eastwood, who played Rowdy Yates. ... Tammy Wynettes Stand by Your Man album, Epic Records, 1968 Stand by Your Man was a 1968 song, cowritten by Tammy Wynette and Billy Sherrill and sung by Tammy Wynette. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ...


The Blues Brothers meet with and blackmail their booking agent friend Maury Sline to land their big gig – a performance at the Palace Hotel Ballroom, located north of Chicago on the shore of Lake Wazzapamani. After being driven all over the Chicago area promoting the concert, the Bluesmobile runs out of gas, making Jake and Elwood late for the show. The ballroom is packed, the concert-goers being joined by the Good Ol' Boys, troopers Daniel and Mount, parole officer Mercer, and scores of other police officers. To settle the restless crowd, Curtis appears and performs a literally magical version of "Minnie the Moocher" with the band. Jake and Elwood manage to sneak into the venue and perform two songs. With the timely help of a record executive, they receive the money they need for the orphanage taxes and slip through the police cordon. Cab Calloway and His Orchestra, from the opening credits of Max Fleischers Minnie the Moocher, which included a recording of the titular Calloway song. ...


As the brothers make their way out of the hotel via some grimy service tunnels, they are confronted by the Mystery Woman, whereupon it is finally revealed she is Jake's brutally-jilted ex-fiancée. She attempts to kill them with an M-16, but Jake begs for mercy, offers a litany of excuses and then charms her by "making eyes" at her (the only time either of the brothers is seen without their sunglasses). He takes the woman in his arms and kisses her, then unceremoniously drops her in the mud, and the two brothers escape back to the Bluesmobile. An engagement is an agreement by a couple to enter into marriage at some future time, usually accompanied by a formal or informal announcement to friends and family. ... M16 (more formally United States Rifle, Caliber 5. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The brothers hit the road back to Chicago with the entire "Illinois law enforcement community" in close pursuit. They elude them all, leaving massive pileups of police cars in their wake. The Good Ol' Boys' recreational vehicle plows into a lake after its accelerator pedal is sprayed with epoxy by Elwood. With the help of their Bluesmobile the Blues Brothers also escape the Illinois Nazis, who drive their Ford Pinto off an unfinished freeway ramp and crater into the street far below. A camper built on a light truck chassis. ... Epoxy or polyepoxide is a thermosetting epoxide polymer that cures (polymerizes and crosslinks) when mixed with a catalyzing agent or hardener. Most common epoxy resins are produced from a reaction between epichlorohydrin and bisphenol-A. The first commercial attempts to prepare resins from epichlorohydrin occurred in 1927 in the United... The Ford Pinto was an American subcompact car manufactured by the Ford Motor Company, first introduced in 1971, and built through the 1980 model year. ...

Jake and Elwood facing police officers, the National Guardsmen, and firefighters

Jake and Elwood arrive at the Richard J. Daley Center, where the battered Bluesmobile literally falls to pieces. They make their way up to the office of the Cook County Assessor, only to discover a sign saying "Back in 5 minutes". As they wait, the building is stormed by hundreds of police, firefighters, and Illinois National Guardsmen. Fortunately an assessor clerk finally appears, and the brothers pay the tax bill. Just as their receipt is stamped, handcuffs go on their wrists and they turn around to face a sea of law officers, all of whom are pointing weapons at them. As the film ends, Jake, Elwood and the rest of the band are seen in prison, where they play "Jailhouse Rock" for their fellow inmates. Image File history File links Bluesbrotherend. ... Image File history File links Bluesbrotherend. ... Richard J. Daley Center is Chicagos premier civic center and features a massive sculpture by Pablo Picasso. ... Cook County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Hiatts Speedcuffs in holster, as used by UK police A model wearing handcuffs, waist chain, and thumbcuffs Old handcuffs Handcuffs are restraints designed to secure an individuals wrists close together. ... Jailhouse Rock is a song written by Leiber and Stoller that first became a hit for the American singer Elvis Presley. ...

Spoilers end here.

Cast

Cab Calloway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907–November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader. ... An Oregon-based blues, R&B, and classic soul musician. ... Carrie Frances Fisher (born October 21, 1956) is an American actress, screenwriter and novelist, best known for her role as Princess Leia Organa in the original Star Wars trilogy. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American soul, R&B, and gospel singer, songwriter, and pianist born in Memphis, Tennessee, but raised in Detroit, Michigan, USA. She has been called for many years The Queen Of Soul, but many also call her Lady Soul, as well as... Ray Charles was the stage name of Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004). ... James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006),[3] commonly referred to as The Godfather of Soul and The Hardest Working Man in Show Business, was an American entertainer recognized as one of the most influential figures in 20th century popular music. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Kathleen Freeman Kathleen Freeman (February 17, 1919 - August 23, 2001) was an American film, television, and stage character actress. ... Francis of Assisi, an early stigmatic. ... Henry Gibson (born September 21, 1935 in Germantown, Pennsylvania) is an American actor who was famous as a cast member of Rowan and Martins Laugh-In. ... Steve Lawrence (born July 8, 1935) is an American singer, perhaps best known as a member of a duo with his wife Eydie Gormé. The two have appeared together since appearing regularly on Steve Allens The Tonight Show in the mid 1950s[1][2]. Lawrence is an actor as... Twiggy (born Lesley Hornby September 19, 1949) is an English supermodel, actress, and singer, now also known by her married name of Twiggy Lawson. ... Richard Frank Oznowicz (born May 25, 1944), better known as Frank Oz, is an English film director, actor and puppeteer. ... Jeff Morris (born September 20, 1934 in St. ... Charles Napier in Miami Blues Charles Napier (born April 12, 1936 in Scottsville, Kentucky, USA) is an American character actor, known for his portrayals of square-jawed tough guys and military types. ... Steven Williams (born January 7, 1949, in Memphis, Tennessee, USA) is an African-American actor who has starred in many films and many television shows. ... Chaka Khan (born Yvette Marie Stevens on March 23, 1953 in Great Lakes, Illinois) is an American singer best known for her 1984 cover of Princes I Feel For You, for her smash hit Im Every Woman and as a member of the funk band Rufus, with whom... John Lee Hooker (August 22, 1917 – June 21, 2001) was an influential American post-war blues singer, guitarist, and songwriter born in Coahoma County near Clarksdale, Mississippi. ... John Landis (born August 3, 1950 in Chicago) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ... Stephen Bishop (born November 14, 1951 in San Diego, California) is an American singer and guitarist. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Paul Reubens (b. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ...

The Band

The band playing Jailhouse Rock in prison.
Main article: The Blues Brothers

Image File history File links Bluesbrothersjail. ... Image File history File links Bluesbrothersjail. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... John Adam Belushi (January 24, 1949 – March 5, 1982) was an Emmy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer, most notable for his work on Saturday Night Live, National Lampoons Animal House and The Blues Brothers. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) is an Academy Award-nominated Canadian comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Steve The Colonel Cropper (born Stephen Lee Cropper, on October 21, 1941) is a guitarist, songwriter, producer, and soul musician. ... Rhythm guitar is a guitar that is primarily used to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment for a singer or for other instruments in an ensemble. ... Donald Duck Dunn (born November 24, 1941, in Memphis, Tennessee, USA) is a bass guitarist, record producer, and songwriter. ... Fender Precision Bass Bass Guitar is a commonly spoken phrase used to refer to the electric bass and horizontal acoustic basses, a stringed instrument similar in design to the electric guitar, but larger in size, commonly fretted and sometimes fretless and with a lower range. ... Murphy Dunne (b. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... The classic Hammond electronic organ, invented in the 1930s and popular for decades thereafter. ... Willie Hall is an American drummer. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is mostly a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... Tom Malone is an American jazz musician specializing in trombone. ... The trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... The tenor saxophone is a medium-sized member of the saxophone family, a group of instruments invented by Adolphe Sax. ... Blue Lou Marini is an American saxophone player. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The tenor saxophone is a medium-sized member of the saxophone family, a group of instruments invented by Adolphe Sax. ... Matt Guitar Murphy is a blues guitarist. ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ... Alan Rubin (born February 11, 1953), also known as Mr. ... For Trumpet Winsock, see Winsock. ...

Production

Origins

See also: The Blues Brothers

The characters, Jake and Elwood Blues, were developed by John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd in performances on Saturday Night Live. The fictional back story of blood brothers Jake and Elwood is related in the liner notes of the band's debut album, Briefcase Full of Blues, having them growing up in an orphanage, learning the blues from a janitor named Curtis and sealing their brotherhood by cutting their middle fingers with a steel string said to come from the guitar of Elmore James.[3] This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... John Adam Belushi (January 24, 1949 – March 5, 1982) was an Emmy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer, most notable for his work on Saturday Night Live, National Lampoons Animal House and The Blues Brothers. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) is an Academy Award-nominated Canadian comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City which has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... A blood brother is a male who swears loyalty to another male. ... Briefcase Full of Blues was the first album by The Blues Brothers, released in 1978 by Atlantic Records. ... An orphanage (historically an orphans asylum before the latter word took on its modern insane asylum connotation) is an institution dedicated to caring for orphans (children who have lost their parents) and abused, abandoned, and neglected children. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Elmore James (January 27, 1918 – May 24, 1963) was an American blues singer and guitarist. ...


When it was decided the act could be made into a movie by Universal Pictures, Aykroyd set about writing the script. He had never written a screenplay before, he said in the 1998 documentary, Stories Behind the Making of The Blues Brothers, and he put together a very descriptive volume that explained the characters' origins and how the band members were recruited. It was 324 pages, which was three times longer than a standard screenplay. To soften the impact, Aykroyd made a joke of the thick script and had it bound with the cover of the Los Angeles Yellow Pages directory for when he turned it in to producer Robert K. Weiss. John Landis was given the task of editing the script into a usable screenplay.[4] Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Robert K. Weiss is an American film and television producer. ... John Landis (born August 3, 1950 in Chicago) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ...


The premise underlying plot, that a church-owned orphanage would have to pay a property tax bill, has been questioned — in Illinois, and generally elsewhere in the US, church-owned property is exempt from taxes. However, at the time of writing of the film, a legislative proposal to tax such property was under consideration. The proposal was never enacted into law.[5]


Location

Much of the film was shot on location in and around Chicago, Illinois between July and October of 1979.[6] Made with the cooperation of Mayor Jane M. Byrne, it is credited for putting Chicago on the radar as a venue for filmmaking. Mayor Richard J. Daley had all but prevented movies from being produced there up until his death in 1976. This is alluded to in a line by Mr. Fabulous, when he said, "No, sir, Mayor Daley no longer dines here. He's dead, sir." Since then, nearly 200 movies have been filmed in Chicago. Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Richard M. Daley is the current mayor of Chicago. ... Jane Margaret Byrne (born May 24, 1934) was the first female Mayor of Chicago, Illinois. ... Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was the longest-serving mayor of Chicago. ... The Blues Brothers (1980) Ferris Buellers Day Off (1986 The Fugitive (1993) ...


"Chicago is one of the stars of the movie. We wrote it as a tribute," Dan Aykroyd told the Chicago Sun-Times in an article written to mark the film's 25th anniversary DVD release.[7] The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ...


The first traffic stop was in Park Ridge, Illinois. The mall car chase was filmed in the real, albeit abandoned, Dixie Square Mall in Harvey.[8] The bridge jump was filmed on an actual drawbridge, the 95th Street bridge over the Calumet River, on the southeast side of Chicago. The main entrance to Wrigley Field makes a brief appearance when the "Illinois Nazis" visit it after Elwood falsely registers the ballfield's location, 1060 West Addison, as his home address. Other chase scenes included Lower Wacker Drive and Richard J. Daley Center. Filming was done on selected Sundays in 1979, with the downtown area cordoned off.[9] The City of Park Ridge The city of Park Ridge is an affluent suburb of Chicago in Cook County in the United States. ... McArthur Glen Designer Outlet, Swindon, England, a shopping mall built within a disused railway engine works. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Front cover of mall directory. ... Harvey is a city located in Cook County, Illinois. ... The Calumet River refers to a system of heavily industrialized rivers in the region around South Chicago and Gary, Indiana. ... Wrigley Field is a baseball stadium in Chicago that has served as the home ballpark of the Chicago Cubs since 1916. ... All three levels of Wacker Drive, east of Columbus Drive, including a ramp between the upper and lower (middle) levels Wacker Drive is a major street in Chicago, Illinois, United States, running along the downtown side of the Chicago River. ... Richard J. Daley Center is Chicagos premier civic center and features a massive sculpture by Pablo Picasso. ...


In the final car chase scene, the production actually dropped a Ford Pinto, representing the one driven by the "Illinois Nazis," from a helicopter at an altitude of more than a mile — and had to gain a special "air-unworthiness" certificate from the Federal Aviation Administration to do it.[10] The FAA was concerned that the car could prove too aerodynamic in a high-altitude drop, and pose a threat to nearby buildings. The shot leading up to the car drop, where the "Illinois Nazis" drive off a freeway ramp, was shot in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on the Hoan Bridge, an unfinished freeway ramp at the time, that wasn't completed until more than a decade later.[11] Several Milwaukee skyscrapers are visible in the background as the Bluesmobile flips over, notably the U.S. Bank Center. The Ford Pinto was an American subcompact car manufactured by the Ford Motor Company, first introduced in 1971, and built through the 1980 model year. ... “FAA” redirects here. ... Aerodynamics is a branch of fluid dynamics concerned with the study of gas flows, first analysed by George Cayley in the 1800s. ... Nickname: Location of Milwaukee in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Coordinates: County Milwaukee Government  - Mayor Tom Barrett Area  - City  97 sq mi (251. ... The Hoan Bridge The Daniel Hoan Memorial Bridge is a tied arch bridge that connects Interstate 794 in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin to the Lake Freeway across the inner harbor. ... The Blues Brothers and their Dodge Monaco The Bluesmobile is a 1974 Dodge Monaco sedan that was prominently featured in the 1980 film, The Blues Brothers . ... U.S. Bank Center U.S. Bank Center is a high-rise located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, noted for being the tallest building in the state. ...


The "Palace Hotel Ballroom," where the band performs its climactic concert, was at the time of filming a country club, but later became the South Shore Cultural Center, named after the Chicago neighborhood in which it is located. The interior concert scenes were filmed in the Hollywood Palladium.[12] The South Shore Cultural Center, in Chicago, Illinois, is a cultural facility located at 71st Street and South Shore Drive, in the citys South Shore neighborhood. ... Media:Example. ...


The Bluesmobile

The film used 13 different cars to depict the Bluesmobile, a 1974 Dodge Monaco, some formatted for speed and others for jumps, depending on the scene. For the large car chases, filmmakers purchased 60 police cars at $400, and most were destroyed at the completion of the filming.[13] More than 40 stunt drivers were hired and the crew kept a 24-hour body shop to repair cars.[13] The Blues Brothers and their Dodge Monaco The Bluesmobile is a 1974 Dodge Monaco sedan that was prominently featured in the 1980 film, The Blues Brothers . ... The Dodge Monaco was a fullsize automobile built and sold by the Dodge division of the Chrysler Corporation (now DaimlerChrysler) between 1965 to 1978 and 1990 to 1992. ...


For the scene when the Blues Brothers finally arrive at the Richard J. Daley Center, a mechanic took several months to rig the car to literally fall apart to pieces.[13] At the time of the film's release, it held the world record for the most cars destroyed in one film until it was surpassed by its own sequel.[13]


Casting

In addition to recognized soul and rhythm and blues stars James Brown, Cab Calloway, Ray Charles, and Aretha Franklin, the members of the Blues Brothers band are notable for their musical accomplishments as well. Steve Cropper and Donald Dunn are architects of the Stax Records sound and were half of Booker T. & the M.G.'s. Horn players Lou Marini, Tom Malone, and Alan Rubin had all played in Blood, Sweat & Tears and the Saturday Night Live band. Drummer Willie Hall had played in the Bar-Kays and backed Isaac Hayes. Matt Murphy is a veteran blues guitarist. Blues performers were featured in the cast as well, with John Lee Hooker backed by harmonica player Big Walter Horton and pianist Pinetop Perkins, playing "Boom Boom" on Maxwell Street. James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006),[3] commonly referred to as The Godfather of Soul and The Hardest Working Man in Show Business, was an American entertainer recognized as one of the most influential figures in 20th century popular music. ... Cab Calloway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907–November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader. ... Ray Charles was the stage name of Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004). ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American soul, R&B, and gospel singer, songwriter, and pianist born in Memphis, Tennessee, but raised in Detroit, Michigan, USA. She has been called for many years The Queen Of Soul, but many also call her Lady Soul, as well as... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... Steve The Colonel Cropper (born Stephen Lee Cropper, on October 21, 1941) is a guitarist, songwriter, producer, and soul musician. ... Donald Duck Dunn (born November 24, 1941) is a bassist, producer, and songwriter. ... Stax Records is an American record label, originally based out of Memphis, Tennessee. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Blue Lou Marini is an American saxophone player. ... Tom Malone is an American jazz musician specializing in trombone. ... Alan Rubin (born February 11, 1953), also known as Mr. ... Blood, Sweat & Tears (a. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City which has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... Willie Hall is an American drummer. ... The Bar-Kays are a popular soul, R&B, and funk group which began performing in 1966 and continue to perform today, although with only one original member. ... For the American arctic explorer, see Isaac Israel Hayes Isaac Lee Hayes (born August 20, 1942, in Covington, Tennessee) is an actor, soul singer, Academy Award-winning songwriter, musician, and arranger. ... Matt Guitar Murphy is a blues guitarist. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... John Lee Hooker (August 22, 1917 – June 21, 2001) was an influential American post-war blues singer, guitarist, and songwriter born in Coahoma County near Clarksdale, Mississippi. ... Big Walter Horton (born April 6, 1918 - died December 8, 1981) was an African American blues harmonica player. ... Pinetop Perkins (born Joe Willie Perkins in 1913) is an American blues musician from Mississippi. ... West Maxwell Street, is a short street in Chicago, Illinois, near Halsted Street and Roosevelt Road. ...


As the band developed at Saturday Night Live, pianist Paul Shaffer was part of the act and was cast in the film. However, due to contractual obligations with "SNL," he was unable to participate. So actor-musician Murphy Dunne (whose father, George Dunne, was a city employee) was hired to take his role.[4] Paul Shaffer Paul Allen Wood Shaffer (born November 28, 1949 in Fort William (now Thunder Bay), Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian-American musician, actor, voice actor, author, comedian and composer currently seen as the bandleader on the Late Show with David Letterman. ... Murphy Dunne (b. ...


Carrie Fisher, Kathleen Freeman, Henry Gibson, and John Candy were cast in non-musical supporting roles. The movie is also notable for the number of cameo appearances by established celebrities and entertainment industry figures, including Steve Lawrence as a booking agent, Frank Oz as a corrections officer, Twiggy as a "chic lady" in a Jaguar convertible whom Elwood propositions at a gas station, and Steven Spielberg as the Cook County Assessor's clerk. John Landis plays a state trooper in the mall chase. Paul Reubens (pre-Pee-wee Herman) has a small role as a waiter in the Chez Paul. Carrie Frances Fisher (born October 21, 1956) is an American actress, screenwriter and novelist, best known for her role as Princess Leia Organa in the original Star Wars trilogy. ... Kathleen Freeman Kathleen Freeman (February 17, 1919 - August 23, 2001) was an American film, television, and stage character actress. ... Henry Gibson (born September 21, 1935 in Germantown, Pennsylvania) is an American actor who was famous as a cast member of Rowan and Martins Laugh-In. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Martin Scorsese appears briefly in an uncredited role in this scene from his feature film Taxi Driver. ... Steve Lawrence (born July 8, 1935) is an American singer, perhaps best known as a member of a duo with his wife Eydie Gormé. The two have appeared together since appearing regularly on Steve Allens The Tonight Show in the mid 1950s[1][2]. Lawrence is an actor as... Richard Frank Oznowicz (born May 25, 1944), better known as Frank Oz, is an English film director, actor and puppeteer. ... Twiggy (born Lesley Hornby September 19, 1949) is an English supermodel, actress, and singer, now also known by her married name of Twiggy Lawson. ... A 1963 Series 1 3. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... John Landis (born August 3, 1950 in Chicago) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ... Paul Reubens (b. ... Paul Reubens as Pee Wee Herman. ...


The character portrayed by Cab Calloway is named Curtis as an homage to Curtis Salgado, a Portland, Oregon, blues musician who inspired the Blues Brothers characters.[14] An Oregon-based blues, R&B, and classic soul musician. ... Nickname: Location in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: Country United States State Oregon County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter Area  - City  145. ...


Over 200 National Guardsmen, 100 state and city police officers, and 15 horses were used in filming of the blockade on the building.[15] Additionally, three Sherman tanks, three helicopters, and three fire engines were used. Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... WWII foreign variants and use: Lend-Lease Sherman tanks Post-WWII foreign variants and use: Postwar Sherman tanks The Medium Tank M4 was the primary tank produced by the United States for its own use and the use of its Allies during World War II. Production of the M4 Medium... A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more horizontal rotors consisting of two or more rotor blades. ... A fire apparatus, fire engine or fire truck or fire appliance usually refers to a vehicle designed to fight fires. ...


Reception

The Blues Brothers is the second-highest grossing "Saturday Night Live" adaptation.

Image File history File links The_Blues_Brothers_DVD_Cover. ... Image File history File links The_Blues_Brothers_DVD_Cover. ...

Box office

The Blues Brothers opened on June 20, 1980 with a release in 594 theaters. It took in $4,858,152, ranking sixth for that week and 10th for the entire year. But over the years it has gained a following through television and home video. The film in total grossed $57,229,890 domestically and $58,000,000 in foreign box offices for a total of $115,229,890.[16] By genre, it is the sixth-highest grossing musical and the eighth-highest earner among comedy road movies. It ranks second, between Wayne's World and Wayne's World 2 (which, coincidentally, also take place in the greater Chicago metropolitan area), among films adapted from Saturday Night Live sketches.[16] The Blues Brothers was also the first American film to gross more money overseas than it did in the United States.[7] June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Road Movie is a 2002 South Korean film about a love triangle among a woman, a man who loves her, and a gay man who loves him. ... Waynes World is a 1992 comedy film starring Mike Myers as Wayne Campbell and Dana Carvey as Garth Algar, hosts of a cable access television show (called Waynes World) from Aurora, Illinois. ... Waynes World 2 is a 1993 comedy film starring Mike Myers and Dana Carvey as hosts of a cable access television show from Aurora, Illinois. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City which has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ...


Critical reception

The movie has a 90% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[17] It won the Golden Reel Award for Best Sound Editing and Sound Effects,[18] is No. 14 on Total Film Magazine's List of the 50 Greatest Comedy Films of All Time[19] and is No. 69 on Bravo's "100 Funniest Movies".[20] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The MPSE Golden Reel Award is an award presented by the organization of Motion Picture Sound Editors in categories related to the craft of audio post production, such as Sound Editing, Music Editing, Dialog Editing, and Sound Effect Editing. The award was first presented in 1953 and has continued into... In 2000, readers of the British film magazine Total Film voted on the 50 greatest comedy films of all time. ... This article is about the U.S. cable network. ...


Leonard Maltin gave the film 3 stars out of a possible 4, and described it as "Off the wall from start to finish, with some fine music woven in." Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ...


The Blues Brothers has been criticized for its simplistic plot and being overly reliant on car chases. Among the reviewers at the time of the movie's release who held that opinion was Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times. But, he also praised it for its energetic musical numbers and said the car chases were "incredible".[21] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ...


Janet Maslin of the New York Times criticized the film for shortchanging viewers on more details about Jake and Elwood's affinity for African-American culture. She also took director Landis to task for "distracting editing", mentioning the Soul Food diner scene in which saxophonist Lou Marini's head is cut off as he dances on the counter. In the documentary, Stories Behind the Making of The Blues Brothers, Landis acknowledges the criticism, and Marini recalls the dismay he felt at seeing the completed film. [22] Janet Maslin is a book critic for the daily New York Times. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Blue Lou Marini is an American saxophone player. ...


As with the Blues Brothers act in general, music critics derided the film, saying it was demeaning to the rhythm and blues performers. In his book, Sweet Soul Music, critic Peter Guralnick calls the film "an almost unmitigated disaster" for the "great black artists involved," though he does praise Aretha Franklin's performance on her musical number, "Think," as "an on-screen explosion."[23] This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... Rhythm and blues (also known as R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ... Peter Guralnick is a music critic and historian of American popular music. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American soul, R&B, and gospel singer, songwriter, and pianist born in Memphis, Tennessee, but raised in Detroit, Michigan, USA. She has been called for many years The Queen Of Soul, but many also call her Lady Soul, as well as... Think is the name of a hit single released by American R&B/soul musician Aretha Franklin in 1968, from her Aretha Now album. ...


Cult-film status

The Blues Brothers has become a staple of late-night cinema, even slowly morphing into an audience participation show in its regular screenings at the Valhalla Cinema, in Melbourne, Australia.[24] John Landis acknowledged the support of the cinema and the fans by a phone call he made to the cinema at the 10th anniversary screening, and later invited regular attendees to make cameo appearances in Blues Brothers 2000. The fans act as the members of the crowd during the performance of "Ghost Riders in the Sky".[25] The Valhalla Cinema was a repertory and arthouse cinema in Melbourne, Australia. ... Melbournes CBD has grown to straddle the Yarra River in three major precincts. ... Blues Brothers 2000 is a 1998 musical/comedy film and sequel to the highly successful 1980 film The Blues Brothers. ...


In August 2005, there was a 25th anniversary celebration for The Blues Brothers at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles.[26] Attendees included Landis, former Universal Studios executive Thom Mount, movie editor George Folsey Jr., and cast members James Brown, Henry Gibson, Charles Napier, Steve Cropper, and Stephen Bishop (he's among the policemen who utter the line, "They broke my watch!"). It featured a press conference, a panel discussion where Dan Aykroyd joined via satellite, and a screening of the original theatrical version of the film. The panel discussion was broadcast directly to many other cinemas around the country. For other uses, see August (disambiguation). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Universal Studios (sometimes called Universal Pictures or Universal City Studios), a subsidiary of NBC Universal, is one of the major American film studios that has production studios and offices located at 100 Universal City Plaza Drive in Universal City, California, an unincorporated area of Los Angeles County between Los Angeles... Thom Mount (born May 28, 1948) is the former President of Universal Pictures and one of Americas most well-known independent producers. ... James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006),[3] commonly referred to as The Godfather of Soul and The Hardest Working Man in Show Business, was an American entertainer recognized as one of the most influential figures in 20th century popular music. ... Henry Gibson (born September 21, 1935 in Germantown, Pennsylvania) is an American actor who was famous as a cast member of Rowan and Martins Laugh-In. ... Charles Napier in Miami Blues Charles Napier (born April 12, 1936 in Scottsville, Kentucky, USA) is an American character actor, known for his portrayals of square-jawed tough guys and military types. ... Steve The Colonel Cropper (born Stephen Lee Cropper, on October 21, 1941) is a guitarist, songwriter, producer, and soul musician. ... Stephen Bishop (born November 14, 1951 in San Diego, California) is an American singer and guitarist. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) is an Academy Award-nominated Canadian comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ...

See also: The Blues Brothers in popular culture

This article cites very few or no references or sources. ...

Alternate versions

Extended scenes

When the film was first developed for a preview audience, a producer demanded that director John Landis cut twenty-five minutes of scenes.[27] After trimming fifteen minutes, it was released in theaters at 133 minutes. The film's original length was restored to 148 minutes for the "Collector's Edition" DVD release in 1998. The 25th anniversary DVD release in 2005 includes both the theatrical cut and the extended version. The full-length version includes:

  • A longer opening scene, showing the prison guards having to use their nightsticks to wake Jake up.
  • A scene with Sister Mary Stigmata ("The Penguin") where as she lists what missions she might be sent to if the orphanage is closed.
  • A scene in which Jake and Elwood discuss whether or not to enter the Triple Rock Church.
  • Elwood is shown parking the Bluesmobile inside an electrical substation that powers the Chicago Transit Authority's "L" trains. In the documentary, "Stories Behind the Making of The Blues Brothers", Dan Aykroyd explained that the Bluesmobile would get charged from the substation, enabling it to do impressive stunts. But, in the same documentary, director Landis said he originally cut the scene because he considered it unnecessary: the Bluesmobile is simply a "magic car."
  • A scene showing Elwood (without his trademark sunglasses) on his last day at his job in an aerosol-spray can manufacturing company. He is shown removing some cans from the assembly line and putting them in his briefcase. He then goes to his boss and explains that he has to quit because he's joining the priesthood. This scene explains where Elwood obtained the spray epoxy ("This is glue ... strong stuff.") that he used to sabotage the Good Ol' Boys' Winnebago and to improvise a blowtorch in the elevator of the Cook County building.
  • An extension to the scene in which Elwood discusses why Jake committed the gas station robbery.
  • Longer versions of some of the musical numbers, most notably the Maxwell Street blues band scene with John Lee Hooker, showing Hooker and Pinetop Perkins getting into an argument over who wrote "Boom Boom."
  • Bob gives the list of songs to the band prior to their performance at Bob's Country Bunker.
  • Curtis tells the band that Jake and Elwood will use the gate receipts from the Palace Hotel gig to pay the taxes on the orphanage.
  • Jake accidentally blows up the gas station by tossing a cigarette into a puddle of spilled gasoline.
  • Another aerosol can is used to spray a substance into the tires of police cars outside the Palace Hotel Ballroom, which makes the tires explode and causes a jam-up of the police, thus enabling the Blues Brothers to get a head start on their pursuers.
  • Additional footage of Jake and Elwood waiting for the Cook County Assessor's Office clerk to return from his break.
  • An extended ending just before the closing credit scroll: as the Blues Brothers continue to perform "Jailhouse Rock," it appears that the prison guards are about to use force to control the audience.
Spoilers end here.

A club, cudgel, truncheon, night stick, or bludgeon is among the simplest of all weapons. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Blues Brothers and their Dodge Monaco The Bluesmobile is a 1974 Dodge Monaco sedan that was prominently featured in the 1980 film, The Blues Brothers . ... Chicago Transit Authority, also known as CTA, is the operator of mass transit within the City of Chicago, Illinois. ... The L[1], variously, if perhaps incorrectly, styled L, El, EL, or L, is the rapid transit system that serves Chicago, Illinois in the United States. ... Aerosol, is a term derived from the fact that matter floating in air is a suspension (a mixture in which solid or liquid or combined solid-liquid particles are suspended in a fluid). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... . ... Epoxy or polyepoxide is a thermosetting epoxide polymer that cures (polymerizes and crosslinks) when mixed with a catalyzing agent or hardener. Most common epoxy resins are produced from a reaction between epichlorohydrin and bisphenol-A. The first commercial attempts to prepare resins from epichlorohydrin occurred in 1927 in the United... A camper built on a light truck chassis. ... West Maxwell Street, is a short street in Chicago, Illinois, near Halsted Street and Roosevelt Road. ... John Lee Hooker (August 22, 1917 – June 21, 2001) was an influential American post-war blues singer, guitarist, and songwriter born in Coahoma County near Clarksdale, Mississippi. ... Pinetop Perkins (born Joe Willie Perkins in 1913) is an American blues musician from Mississippi. ... Pneumatic tires or tyres (see spelling differences) are used on all types of vehicles, from cars to earthmovers to airplanes. ...

Television

US television airings of the film usually cut out most of the profanity from the dialogue. This is awkward in some scenes because John Belushi did not participate in the redubbing (due to his death two years after the film's release). His younger brother, actor James Belushi, recorded the overdubbed dialogue, and his voice is of a lower pitch. Some broadcasters avoid this by simply muting the offending words. Look up Profanity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In filmmaking, dubbing or looping is the process of recording or replacing voices for a motion picture. ...


The American Movie Classics network noticeably edits a scene in which Elwood disables an elevator by using an aerosol can and a Zippo lighter as an improvised blowtorch, which would be a very dangerous stunt to try in reality. AMC is a cable television network that primarily airs movies. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Elevator surfing. ... A Navy Zippo Lighter Zippo Black Crackle Lighter Closed Zippo Black Crackle Lighter Open Zippo Lighter Dismantled 133ml Zippo Lighter Fluid A Zippo lighter is a refillable, metal lighter manufactured by Zippo Manufacturing Company. ...


Soundtrack

The Blues Brothers: Music from the Soundtrack was released in June 1980 as the second album by the Blues Brothers Band, which also toured that year to promote the movie. "Gimme Some Lovin'" was a Top 40 hit. The album was a followup to their debut, the live album, Briefcase Full of Blues. Later that year they released a second live album, Made in America, which featured the Top 40 track, "Who's Making Love". It was the last Blues Brothers album to feature Belushi's Jake Blues. This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... Gimme Some Lovin is a song written by Steve Winwood, Spencer Davis and Muff Winwood, and originally performed by the Spencer Davis Group. ... Briefcase Full of Blues was the first album by The Blues Brothers, released in 1978 by Atlantic Records. ... Made in America is the third album by The Blues Brothers. ...


The songs on the movie soundtrack album are a noticeably different audio mix than in the film, with a prominent baritone saxophone in the horn line (also heard in the film during "Shake a Tailfeather," though no bari sax is present), and female backing vocals on "Everybody Needs Somebody to Love", though the band had no backup singers in the film. A number of regular Blues Brothers' members, including saxophonist Tom Scott and drummer Steve Jordan, perform on the soundtrack album but are not in the film. Audio mixing is used in sound recording, audio editing and sound systems to balance the relative volume and frequency content of a number of sound sources. ... The baritone saxophone, often called bari sax (to avoid confusion with the baritone horn, which is often referred to simply as baritone), is one of the larger and lower pitched members of the saxophone family. ... The album The Very Best of Tom Scott was released in March 2006 by Verve records. ... Jordan on the cover of his instructional program DVD. Steve Jordan is a multi-instrumentalist, songwriter and music producer from New York City. ...


Soundtrack album listing

The Blues Brothers: Music from the Soundtrack
Soundtrack by The Blues Brothers
Released June 20, 1980
Genre R&B, soul
Length 40:27
Label Atlantic
Producer(s) Bob Tischler
Professional reviews
The Blues Brothers chronology
Briefcase Full of Blues
(1978)
The Blues Brothers: Music from the Soundtrack
(1980)
Made in America
(1980)
  1. "She Caught The Katy" (Taj Mahal, Rachell) – 4:10
    • The Blues Brothers with lead vocals by Jake Blues
  2. "Peter Gunn Theme" (Mancini) – 3:46
    • The Blues Brothers Band
  3. "Gimme Some Lovin'" (S. Winwood, M. Winwood, Davis) – 3:06
    • The Blues Brothers with Jake Blues, lead vocals
  4. "Shake a Tail Feather" (Hayes, Williams, Rice) – 2:48
    • Ray Charles with the Blues Brothers (Jake and Elwood, backing vocals)
  5. "Everybody Needs Somebody To Love" (Wexler, Berns, Burke) – 3:21
    • The Blues Brothers (Jake Blues, lead vocals; Elwood Blues, harmonica and vocals)
  6. "The Old Landmark" (Brunner) – 2:56
  7. "Think" (White, Franklin) – 3:13
    • Aretha Franklin and the Blues Brothers with backing vocals by Brenda Corbet, Margaret Branch and Caroline Franklin (real-life sisters of Aretha) and Jake and Elwood
  8. "Theme From Rawhide" (Tiomkin) – 2:37
    • Elwood and Jake and the Blues Brothers Band
  9. "Minnie the Moocher" (Calloway, Mills) – 3:23
  10. "Sweet Home Chicago" (Johnson) – 7:48
  11. "Jailhouse Rock" (Leiber, Stoller) – 3:19
    • Jake Blues and the Blues Brothers (Over the closing credits in the film, verses are sung by James Brown, Cab Calloway, Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin and "crew".)

Image File history File links Bluesbrotherssoundtrack. ... // In film formats, the sound track is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label, and operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 3_stars. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... Briefcase Full of Blues was the first album by The Blues Brothers, released in 1978 by Atlantic Records. ... Made in America is the third album by The Blues Brothers. ... Taj Mahal. ... Yank Rachell (born James Rachell near Brownsville, Tennessee, March 16, 1910; d. ... Peter Gunn was an American private eye television series which aired on the NBC and later ABC television networks from 1958 to 1961. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... Gimme Some Lovin is a song written by Steve Winwood, Spencer Davis and Muff Winwood, and originally performed by the Spencer Davis Group. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Spencer Davis is an instrumentalist who founded the 1960s rock band Spencer Davis Group. ... Andre Williams in front of Paard, The Hague, The Netherlands, 2005 Andre Williams (born Zeffrey Williams in Bessemer, Alabama, in 1936) is American R&B and rock and roll musician. ... Ray Charles was the stage name of Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004). ... Jerome Jerry Wexler (born 10 January 1917) is a music journalist turned highly influential music producer, and is regarded as one of the major record industry players behind 1960s soul music. ... Bertrand Russell Berns (November 8, 1929 - December 30, 1967) (a/k/a Bert Russell and Bert Berns) was one of the great American songwriters and record producers of the 1960s. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006),[3] commonly referred to as The Godfather of Soul and The Hardest Working Man in Show Business, was an American entertainer recognized as one of the most influential figures in 20th century popular music. ... James Cleveland (December 5, 1932 - February 9, 1991) was a gospel singer, arranger, composer and, most significantly, the driving force behind the creation of the modern gospel sound, bringing the stylistic daring of hard gospel and jazz and pop music influences to arrangements for mass choirs. ... Chaka Khan (born Yvette Marie Stevens on March 23, 1953 in Great Lakes, Illinois) is an American singer best known for her 1984 cover of Princes I Feel For You, for her smash hit Im Every Woman and as a member of the funk band Rufus, with whom... Think is the name of a hit single released by American R&B/soul musician Aretha Franklin in 1968, from her Aretha Now album. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American soul, R&B, and gospel singer, songwriter, and pianist born in Memphis, Tennessee, but raised in Detroit, Michigan, USA. She has been called for many years The Queen Of Soul, but many also call her Lady Soul, as well as... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American soul, R&B, and gospel singer, songwriter, and pianist born in Memphis, Tennessee, but raised in Detroit, Michigan, USA. She has been called for many years The Queen Of Soul, but many also call her Lady Soul, as well as... Rawhide is a country song written by Ned Washington (lyrics) and composed by Dimitri Tiomkin in 1958. ... Dimitri Zinovievich Tiomkin (Russian: , Dmitrij Zinovevič Tëmkin, somtimes translated as Dmitri Tiomkin) (May 10, 1894 – November 11, 1979) was a film composer and conductor. ... Cab Calloway and His Orchestra, from the opening credits of Max Fleischers Minnie the Moocher, which included a recording of the titular Calloway song. ... Cab Calloway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907–November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader. ... Irving Mills (1894–1985) was a figure in jazz. ... Cab Calloway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907–November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader. ... Sweet Home Chicago is a popular blues standard in the twelve bar form. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Magic Sam was born Sam Maghett (February 2, 1937) in Grenada, Mississippi, USA (died December 12, 1969) and was a blues guitarist and singer. ... Jailhouse Rock is a song written by Leiber and Stoller that first became a hit for the American singer Elvis Presley. ... Jerry Leiber (born April 25, 1933) and Mike Stoller (born March 13, 1933) are among the most important songwriters and music producers in post-World War II popular music. ... Jerry Leiber (born April 25, 1933) and Mike Stoller (born March 13, 1933) are among the most important songwriters and music producers in post-World War II popular music. ...

Other songs in the film

The film's score consists of "God Music" by Elmer Bernstein, who previously had worked with John Landis on National Lampoon's Animal House. Other songs in the film include: Elmer Bernstein (pronounced Bern-steen[1]) (April 4, 1922 – August 18, 2004) was an Academy and two-time Golden Globe award winning film score composer. ... John Landis (born August 3, 1950 in Chicago) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Elmore James (January 27, 1918 – May 24, 1963) was an American blues singer and guitarist. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the American arctic explorer, see Isaac Israel Hayes Isaac Lee Hayes (born August 20, 1942, in Covington, Tennessee) is an actor, soul singer, Academy Award-winning songwriter, musician, and arranger. ... David Porter (February 1, 1780 – March 3, 1843) was an officer in the United States Navy and later the commander-in-chief of the Mexican Navy. ... Sam & Dave were an American soul duo, known as one of the best and earliest soul groups. ... Otis Ray Redding, Jr. ... Louis Jordan swinging on sax, Paramount Theatre, NYC, 1946 (Photo: William P. Gottlieb) Louis Jordan (July 8, 1908 – February 4, 1975) was a pioneering African-American blues, jazz and rhythm & blues musician and songwriter who enjoyed his greatest popularity from the late 1930s to the early 1950s. ... Ezio Pinza The Italian bass Ezio Pinza (18 May 1892 - 9 May 1957) was one of the outstanding opera singers of the first half of the 20th century. ... Quando, Quando, Quando is an Italian pop song dating from the early 1960s, written by Alberto Testa and Tony Renis (sometimes credited under his birth name Elio Cesari). ... Just the Way You Are is a love song from Billy Joels 1977 pop rock album, The Stranger. ... William Martin Joel (born May 9, 1949, in Bronx, New York, USA) an American singer, pianist, and songwriter . ... John Lee Hooker (August 22, 1917 – June 21, 2001) was an influential American post-war blues singer, guitarist, and songwriter born in Coahoma County near Clarksdale, Mississippi. ... John Lee Hooker (August 22, 1917 – June 21, 2001) was an influential American post-war blues singer, guitarist, and songwriter born in Coahoma County near Clarksdale, Mississippi. ... Big Walter Horton (born April 6, 1918 - died December 8, 1981) was an African American blues harmonica player. ... Pinetop Perkins (born Joe Willie Perkins in 1913) is an American blues musician from Mississippi. ... An electric piano (e-piano) is an electric musical instrument that is very mexican sounding. ... John Lee Hooker on Hastings Street. ... Your Cheatin Heart is a song written and recorded by the American country music singer and songwriter Hank Williams in 1952, but released after his death in 1953. ... It has been suggested that Audrey Williams be merged into this article or section. ... Kitty Wells (born Ellen Muriel Deason on August 30, 1919) is an American Country Music Singer. ... Tammy Wynettes Stand by Your Man album, Epic Records, 1968 Stand by Your Man was a 1968 song, cowritten by Tammy Wynette and Billy Sherrill and sung by Tammy Wynette. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was a country singer and songwriter. ... Billy Sherrill (born Campbell, Alabama, November 5, 1936) was a record producer and arranger who is most famous for his association with a number of country artists, most notably Tammy Wynette. ... Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928 in New Orleans, Louisiana), is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Arthur Rackhams illustration to the Ride of the Valkyries The Ride of the Valkyries (German: Walkürenritt) is the popular term for the beginning of Act III of Die Walküre by Richard Wagner. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is one of the major orchestras in the United States. ... The Girl from Ipanema (Garota de Ipanema) is a well known bossa nova song, and was a worldwide hit in the mid-1960s. ... Antônio Carlos Brasileiro de Almeida Jobim (January 25, 1927 in Rio de Janeiro – December 8, 1994 in New York City), or Tom Jobim (as he is fondly known in his home country), was a Brazilian composer, arranger, singer, pianist/guitarist and one of the primary forces behind the creation... Muzak Holdings LLC is a company, founded in 1934, that is best known for distribution of music to retail stores and other companies. ...

Sequel

Main article: Blues Brothers 2000

The 1998 sequel, Blues Brothers 2000, had similar traits to the original, including large car chase scenes and musical numbers. John Landis returned to direct the film and Dan Aykroyd reprised his role, joining John Goodman, Joe Morton, and 10-year-old J. Evan Bonifant as the new Blues Brothers. Aretha Franklin and James Brown were among the celebrities returning from the first film. There were also musical performances by Sam Moore, Wilson Pickett, Paul Shaffer, B. B. King and Eric Clapton, among others. Dozens of artists were packed into an all-star band called The Louisiana Gator Boys. The film was considered a box office failure, only generating a little over $14 million in box office sales[28] on an approximate $28 million budget.[29] Blues Brothers 2000 is a 1998 musical/comedy film and sequel to the highly successful 1980 film The Blues Brothers. ... // February 14 - Sharon Stone marries Phil Bronstein. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) is an Academy Award-nominated Canadian comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ... John Stephen Goodman (born June 20, 1952) is a Golden Globe-winning and Emmy-nominated American actor. ... Joe Morton (born October 18, 1947, New York, New York, USA) is an African-American stage, television, and movie actor. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American soul, R&B, and gospel singer, songwriter, and pianist born in Memphis, Tennessee, but raised in Detroit, Michigan, USA. She has been called for many years The Queen Of Soul, but many also call her Lady Soul, as well as... James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006),[3] commonly referred to as The Godfather of Soul and The Hardest Working Man in Show Business, was an American entertainer recognized as one of the most influential figures in 20th century popular music. ... Samuel David Moore (born 12 October 1935, Miami, Florida) is an American rhythm and blues singer best known for his work in the soul duo Sam & Dave. ... Wilson Pickett (March 18, 1941 – January 19, 2006) was an American R&B/Rock and Roll and soul singer. ... Paul Shaffer Paul Allen Wood Shaffer (born November 28, 1949 in Fort William (now Thunder Bay), Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian-American musician, actor, voice actor, author, comedian and composer currently seen as the bandleader on the Late Show with David Letterman. ... Riley B. King, better known as B. B. King (born September 16, 1925 in Itta Bena, Mississippi), is an American blues guitarist and singer-songwriter, widely considered one of the best and most respected blues musicians of all time. ... Eric Clapton CBE (born 30 March 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English guitarist, singer and composer, who is one of the most successful musicians of the 20th century,[1] garnering an unprecedented three inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ... The Louisiana Gator Boys is a fictional blues band created for the movie Blues Brothers 2000, featuring a plethora of highly talented performers. ...


See also

The Blues Brothers. ... See You Next Wednesday is a fictional film that is the trademark of film director John Landis. ... Country of origin United States Region, town Source of milk Cow Pasteurised Yes Texture thick, viscous liquid Aging time n/a Certification Cheez Whiz is a thick processed cheese sauce or spread introduced by Kraft Foods in 1952. ...

References

  1. ^ Rotten Tomatoes. Info & Tidbits on The Blues Brothers. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  2. ^ The Illinois Nazis were modeled on the real-life National Socialist Party of America
  3. ^ Fortune City-Blues Brothers. Biography of the Blues Brothers-From their album, A Briefcase Full of Blues. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  4. ^ a b Stories Behind the Making of The Blues Brothers, documentary feature on 1998 DVD and 25th Anniversary DVD (2005).
  5. ^ 411Mania. Band: The Blues Brothers Movie: The Blues Brothers. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  6. ^ Blues Brothers Central. The Blues Brothers : About The Movie. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  7. ^ a b Chicago Sun-Times. Movie still remembered after 25 years. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  8. ^ The Center for Land Use Interpretation. The CLUI Land Use Database-Dixie Square Mall. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  9. ^ Blues Brothers Filming Locations. Locations in the Blues Brothers. Retrieved on December 23, 2006.
  10. ^ DVD Laser. The Blues Brothers. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  11. ^ Comedy Central. Empty Calories Movie Trivia - Blues Brothers. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  12. ^ Onscreen Illinois. Chicago-The Blues Brothers. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  13. ^ a b c d Chicago Sun-Times. Incredible stunt driving: "That was all real". Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  14. ^ Curtis Salgado. Biography. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  15. ^ Chicago Sun-Times. Blues Brothers 25th Anniversary. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  16. ^ a b Box Office Mojo. The Blues Brothers. Retrieved on May 14, 2007.
  17. ^ Rotten Tomatoes. The Blues Brothers (1980). Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  18. ^ The Envelope. Every show, every winner, every nominee-Blues Brothers. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  19. ^ Comedy Zone. Film & Movie Comedy Classics. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  20. ^ Manroom Magazine. Bravo's 100 Funniest Movies List is Laughable. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  21. ^ Roger Ebert-Chicago Sun-Times. The Blues Brothers. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  22. ^ Janet Maslin-New York Times. Blues Brothers - Belushi and Aykroyd. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  23. ^ Guralnick, Peter. 1986. Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom. Little Brown. ISBN 0-316-33273-9 (Page 352).
  24. ^ The Age. A mission from God nears its end. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  25. ^ The Return of the Blues Brothers. The Melbourne Blues Brothers go global!. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  26. ^ Film Stew. Blues Brothers Makes History. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  27. ^ Home Theater. John Landis, Uncensored. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  28. ^ Box Office Mojo. Blues Brothers 2000. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.
  29. ^ Internet Movie Database. Business Data for Blues Brothers 2000. Retrieved on December 16, 2006.

December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... National Socialist Party of America leader Frank Collin (seated) announces the groups intention to march through Skokie, Illinois The National Socialist Party of America was an extremist Chicago based neo-Nazi organization founded in 1970 by Frank Collin shortly after he left the National Socialist White Peoples Party. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (358th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Peter Guralnick is a music critic and historian of American popular music. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

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