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Encyclopedia > The Black Ships

The Black Ships (in Japanese, 黒船: kurofune) was the name given to four ships, Mississippi, Plymouth, Saratoga, and Susquehanna, under the command of United States Commodore Matthew Perry that arrived in 1853 at Uraga Harbor (part of present-day Yokosuka) in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The word "black" refers to the black smoke from coal-fired power plants and the black color of these American ships. The Japanese language is a spoken and written language used mainly in Japan. ... Black is a color with several subtle differences in meaning. ... A boat is a watercraft, usually smaller than most ships. ... A ship is a large, usually decked watercraft. ... USS Mississippi, a sidewheel steamer, was the first ship of the United States Navy bear that name. ... USS Plymouth, a sloop-of-war, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for a town in Massachusetts on Plymouth Bay, 18 miles southeast of Brockton, Massachusetts; founded by the Pilgrims in 1620. ... USS Saratoga, a sloop-of-war, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for the Battle of Saratoga of the American Revolutionary War. ... USS Susquehanna, a sidewheel steamer, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for a river which rises in Lake Otsego in central New York and flows across Pennsylvania and the northeast corner of Maryland to empty into the Chesapeake Bay. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Matthew Calbraith Perry (April 10, 1794 - March 4, 1858) was the Commodore of the U.S. Navy who forced the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854, under the threat of military force. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Categories: Cities in Kanagawa Prefecture | Japan geography stubs ... Kanagawa Prefecture (神奈川県; Kanagawa-ken) is a geographic and political area located in the Kanto region on Honshu island, Japan. ... Official language Japanese Capital Tokyo Largest City Tokyo Emperor Akihito Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 60th 377,835 km² 0. ... Black is a color with several subtle differences in meaning. ... Smoke is a suspension in air of small particles resulting from incomplete combustion of a fuel. ... Coal Coal is a fossil fuel extracted from the ground either by underground mining, open-pit mining or strip mining. ... For alternative meanings, see color (disambiguation). ...


Commodore Perry's superior military force enabled him to negotiate a treaty allowing American trade with Japan, ending a 200-year period of Japanese isolation. Wiktionary has a definition of: Trade Trade centers on the exchange of goods and/or services. ...


The following year, at the Convention of Kanagawa, Perry returned with seven ships and forced the shogun to sign the "Treaty of Peace and Amity", establishing formal diplomatic relations between Japan and the United States. Within five years, Japan had signed similar treaties with other western countries. The Harris Treaty was signed with the United States on July 29, 1858. On March 31, 1854, the Convention of Kanagawa (Japanese:神奈川条約,or 日米和親条約) was used by Commodore Matthew Perry of the U.S. Navy to force the opening of the Japanese ports of Shimoda and Hakodate to American trade and ended Japans 200 year policy of seclusion. ... This page is about the Japanese ruler and military rank. ... For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ... The Treaty of Peace and Commerce between the United States and Japan was signed July 29, 1858. ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ...


The surprise and confusion these ships inspired are described in this famous kyoka (a humorous poem similar to the 5-line waka): This article discusses humour in terms of comedy and laughter. ... See Waka (disambiguation) for other usages. ...

たいへいの Taihei no
ねむりをさます Nemuri wo samasu
じょうきせん Jokisen
たったしはいで Tatta shihai de
よるもねむれず Yoru mo nemurezu

This poem is a complex set of puns (in Japanese, kakekotoba or "pivot words"). Jokisen (上喜撰) is the name of a costly brand of green tea containing large amounts of caffeine, and shihai means "four cups", so a literal translation of the poem is: A pun (also known as paronomasia) is a deliberate confusion of similar-sounding words or phrases for comic or serious effect. ... Green tea (绿茶) is tea that has undergone minimal oxidation during processing. ... Caffeine molecular structure Caffeine, also known as coffeine, theine, mateine, guaranine, and methyltheobromine, is an alkaloid found naturally in such foods as coffee beans, tea, kola nuts, Yerba maté, guarana, and (in small amounts) cacao beans. ...

Awoken from sleep
of a peaceful quiet world
by Jokisen tea
with only four cups of it
no more sleep possible at night

However, jokisen (蒸気船) can also be translated as "steam-powered ships", and shihai can also be used to refer to four vessels. The poem has a deeper meaning, which is: In physical chemistry and in engineering, steam refers to vaporized water. ... A feeling can refer to: sensation related to one of several senses (tactition, thermoception, nociception, equilibrioception, proprioception), See also: touch, qualia emotion intuition In the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, feeling means you tend to put a higher priority on personal factors than impersonal factors. ... A boat is a watercraft, usually smaller than most ships. ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ...

The steamships
break the peaceful slumber
of the Pacific
a mere four boats are enough
to make us lose sleep at night.

See also

History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei Pre-History/The Origin of History Jomon Period Main... Manifest Destiny, meaning obvious (or undeniable) fate was a belief originally held by Democratic Republicans, specifically Warhawks during the presidency of James Madison, that stated the United States had a divinely-inspired mission to expand itself and its system of government to the western frontier. ...

External links

  • Effort of Commodore Perry (http://www.japan-society.org/commodoreperry.html)
  • Black Ships and Samurai (http://www.blackshipsandsamurai.com)

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Black Ships - definition of The Black Ships in Encyclopedia (325 words)
The Black Ships (in Japanese, 黒船;: kurofune) was the name given to four ships, Mississippi, Plymouth, Saratoga, and Susquehanna, under the command of United States Commodore Matthew Perry that arrived in 1853 at Uraga Harbor (part of present-day Yokosuka) in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.
The word "fl" refers to the fl smoke from coal-fired power plants and the fl color of these American ships.
However, jokisen (蒸気船) can also be translated as "steam-powered ships", and shihai can also be used to refer to four vessels.
Encyclopedia: The Black Ships (1022 words)
USS Plymouth, a sloop-of-war, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for a town in Massachusetts on Plymouth Bay, 18 miles southeast of Brockton, Massachusetts; founded by the Pilgrims in 1620.
USS Susquehanna, a sidewheel steamer, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for a river which rises in Lake Otsego in central New York and flows across Pennsylvania and the northeast corner of Maryland to empty into the Chesapeake Bay.
The surprise and confusion these ships inspired are described in this famous kyoka (a humorous poem similar to the 5-line waka): This article discusses humour in terms of comedy and laughter.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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