FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski

Theatrical poster
Directed by Joel & Ethan Coen
Produced by Joel & Ethan Coen
Written by Ethan Coen
Joel Coen
Starring Jeff Bridges
John Goodman
Steve Buscemi
Julianne Moore
David Huddleston
Philip Seymour Hoffman
Music by Carter Burwell
Cinematography Roger Deakins
Editing by Tricia Cooke
Roderick Jaynes
Distributed by Gramercy Pictures
Release date(s) March 8, 1998
Running time 118 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $15,000,000
Gross revenue $17,451,873 (USA)
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

The Big Lebowski is a 1998 American comedy film written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. The film follows a few days in the life of Jeffrey "The Dude" Lebowski (Jeff Bridges), a burned-out, unemployed Californian slacker, after he is mistaken for a millionaire with the same name. While The Big Lebowski is not directly based on Raymond Chandler's novel The Big Sleep, the film's overall structure and the use of voiceover narration was influenced by his fiction. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Joel and Ethan Coen, known as The Coen Brothers, are Oscar-winning American filmmakers. ... Jeffrey Leon Bridges (born December 4, 1949) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Goodman (disambiguation). ... Steven Vincent Buscemi (born December 13, 1957) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... Julianne Moore (born December 3, 1960) is a four-time Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Born in Vinton, Virginia, on September 17, 1930, David Huddleston was briefly an officer in the United States Air Force before beginning his formal education in acting at the prestigious American Academy of Dramatic Arts. ... Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Carter Burwell (born November 18, 1955, in New York) is a composer of film soundtracks. ... Roger Deakins (born May 24, 1949 in Torquay, Devon, England) has established himself as a successful cinematographer in America and Britain. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... PolyGram Filmed Entertainment (PFE) was a London-based film studio, founded in 1991 as a European competitor to Hollywood, but eventually sold and merged with Universal Pictures in 1999. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Comedy film is genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humor. ... Joel and Ethan Coen, known as The Coen Brothers, are Oscar-winning American filmmakers. ... Jeffrey Leon Bridges (born December 4, 1949) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Californian can mean: A person from the U.S. state of California, see List of people from California an adjective describing something as from California. ... Slacking in the park The term slacker was commonly used in the United States in World War I and World War II to describe men who were avoiding the military draft. ... For other persons named Raymond Chandler, see Raymond Chandler (disambiguation). ... The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and another filmed in 1978. ...


The Dude is mostly inspired by Jeff Dowd, a member of the Seattle Seven, and a friend of the Coen brothers, Pete Exline, a Vietnam War veteran. Walter (John Goodman), the Dude's best friend, was based on a good friend of Exline's named Lew Abernathy, and on John Milius, a fellow filmmaker. The original score was composed by Carter Burwell, a longtime collaborator of the Coen Brothers. T-Bone Burnett, who also worked with the Coens on O Brother, Where Art Thou? (and later The Ladykillers), is credited as music bibliographer. Jeff Dowd (born 20 November 1949) was the basis for the character the Dude, also known as Jeff Lebowski, from the movie The Big Lebowski. ... The Seattle Liberation Front, or SLF, was a radical anti-Vietnam War organization in Seattle, Washington, in the United States. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Goodman (disambiguation). ... John Milius (born April 11, 1944 in St. ... A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... Carter Burwell (born November 18, 1955, in New York) is a composer of film soundtracks. ... Joel and Ethan Coen, known as The Coen Brothers, are Oscar-winning American filmmakers. ... [[]] The True False Identity, 2006. ... For the film soundtrack, see O Brother, Where Art Thou? (soundtrack). ... The Ladykillers is a 2004 remake of the 1955 Ealing comedy of the same name. ...


The Big Lebowski did not do well at the box office, grossing only USD $17 million domestically, just above its $15 million budget. However, it received generally positive reviews from critics. The film, known for its idiosyncratic characters, surreal dream sequences, unconventional dialogue and eclectic soundtrack, has become a cult classic and has been called "the first cult film of the Internet era".[1] Fans' devotion to the film has even spawned the Lebowski Fest, an annual festival that started in Louisville, Kentucky in 2002, and has since expanded to several other cities. The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... IdiosyncrasyBOOTY!!! comes from Greek ιδιοσυγκρασία a peculiar temperament, habit of body (idios ones own and sun-krasis mixture). It is defined as a structural or behavioral characteristic peculiar to an individual or group. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Louisville redirects here. ...

Contents

Plot

Set in 1991, Jeffrey "The Dude" Lebowski is surprised by two thugs in his home in Venice, California, attempting to collect a debt Lebowski's supposed wife owes to Jackie Treehorn. After the thugs rough up the Dude and urinate on his rug, which, in the words of the Dude and his friends, "really tied the room together", the Dude points out that they're looking for a different person of the same name. At the suggestion of his friend Walter, the Dude decides to seek compensation for his urine-soaked rug from "the other Jeffrey Lebowski, the Millionaire." The next day, the titular "Big" Lebowski, a wheelchair-bound millionaire, gruffly refuses the Dudes request despite Duder's assurance that he "isn't trying to scam anyone." After craftily stealing one of the Big Lebowski's rugs, the Dude meets Bunny Lebowski, the Big Lebowski's nymphomaniacal trophy wife on his way off the property. Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Venice Beach and Boardwalk Venice, California, is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California. ... Hypersexuality describes human sexual behavior at levels high enough to be considered clinically significant. ... A trophy wife is commonly used to describe the second or third wife of (usually) older man; and who is considered a status symbol. ...


Days later, the Big Lebowski contacts the Dude, revealing that Bunny has been kidnapped and asks him to act as a courier for the million-dollar ransom, the Dude being in the unique position of being able to identify the rug-soiling thugs, the suspected kidnappers. Back at his apartment, the Dude naps on his new, stolen rug, only to have his apartment burgled again, the criminals knocking him unconscious. Following a musical dream sequence, the Dude wakes up on his bare wooden floor, his new rug missing. Soon after, when Bunny's kidnappers call to arrange the ransom exchange, Walter Sobchak, the Dude's unstable friend and bowling teammate, tries to convince the Dude to keep the money and give the kidnappers a "ringer" suitcase filled with dirty underwear - a plan the Dude rejects. During their argument, the exchange is bungled, leaving the Dude and Walter with the million, the ringer having been flung out the car window by Walter, who subsequently jumps from the moving car in an attempt to apprehend one of the kidnappers. The kidnappers escape, however; Walter, seemingly unperturbed by this turn of events takes the Dude bowling. Later that night, the Dude's car is stolen, along with the briefcase filled with money. The Dude receives a message from the Big Lebowski's daughter, Maude, who admits to stealing the Dude's rug which he stole from the "Big" Lebowski's home, as it has sentimental value for her. At her art studio, she explains that Bunny is a porn starlet working under producer Jackie Treehorn and confirms the Dude's suspicion that Bunny probably kidnapped herself. She asks the Dude to recover the ransom, as it was illegally withdrawn by her father from a family-run charitable foundation for orphans, offering him a finder's fee in exchange for his services. For other uses, see Courier (disambiguation). ... the sport of cricket|Bowling (cricket)}} For other uses, see Bowling (disambiguation). ... Finders Fee is an American film. ...

The Dude (Jeff Bridges) talking to the "Big Lebowski" (David Huddleston) about compensation for the rug
The Dude (Jeff Bridges) talking to the "Big Lebowski" (David Huddleston) about compensation for the rug

The Big Lebowski angrily confronts the Dude over his failure to hand over the money. The Dude claims that he made the pay-off as agreed, but the Big Lebowski responds by handing the Dude an envelope sent to him by the kidnappers which contains a severed toe, presumably Bunny's. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Jeffrey Leon Bridges (born December 4, 1949) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Born in Vinton, Virginia, on September 17, 1930, David Huddleston was briefly an officer in the United States Air Force before beginning his formal education in acting at the prestigious American Academy of Dramatic Arts. ...


The Dude is enjoying a relaxing bath when he receives a message that his car has been found. Mid-message, three German nihilists invade the Dude's apartment, identify themselves as the kidnappers, and interrogate and threaten him for the ransom money. The Dude returns to Maude's studio, where she identifies the German nihilists as Bunny's friends and pornographic co-stars. The Dude picks up his car from the police, and based on evidence he finds in the front seat, he and Walter track down the supposed thief, who turns out to be a stubborn teenager. Upon returning home without any clue about the whereabouts of the ransom money, Jackie Treehorn's thugs return to bring the Dude to Treehorn's beach house in Malibu, where Treehorn inquires about the whereabouts of Bunny. When the Dude confesses he has no such information, Treehorn drugs the Dude's drink and he passes out, leading to a second, more elaborate dream sequence, starting as the opening credits of a movie named "Gutterballs". Upon awakening once again, the Dude finds himself in a police car and then in front of the sheriff of Malibu, who berates him for coming to Malibu and ruining the peace. The Dude arrives home and is greeted by Maude Lebowski, who hopes to conceive a child with him. During post-coital conversation with Maude, the Dude finds out that, despite appearances, her father has no money of his own, as Maude's late mother was the rich one, and she left her money exclusively to the family charity. In a flash, the Dude unravels the whole scheme: When the Big Lebowski heard that Bunny was kidnapped, he used it as a pretense for an embezzlement scheme, in which he withdrew the ransom money from the family charity, kept it for himself, gave an empty briefcase to the Dude (who would be the fall guy on whom he pinned the theft), and was content to let the kidnappers kill Bunny. The Nihilist movement was an 1860s Russian cultural movement which rejected existing authorities and values. ... Malibu may refer to: Malibu, California, a 27-mile beach community in Los Angeles County, California. ... A pair of lions copulating in the Maasai Mara, Kenya. ... A fall guy is a scapegoat, a person who takes the blame for someone elses actions, or someone at the butt of jokes. ...


Meanwhile, it has by now become clear that the kidnapping was itself a ruse. While Bunny took an unannounced trip, the nihilists (her friends) alleged a kidnapping in order to get money from her husband. (It is left unclear whether and to what extent Bunny was an active collaborator in this scheme.) The Dude and Walter arrive at the Big Lebowski residence, finding Bunny back at home, having returned from her trip. They confront the Big Lebowski with their version of the events, which he counters but does not deny. The affair apparently over, the Dude and his bowling teammates are once again confronted by the nihilists, who have set the Dude's car on fire. They are still demanding the million dollars, despite the fact that the Dude does not have the money and Bunny has not even been kidnapped. Walter viciously fights them off, biting and severing an ear out of one of them, but their third teammate, Donny, suffers a fatal heart attack. They take his ashes to a beach, where Walter offers a lengthy eulogy complete with Vietnam War references. He scatters Donny's ashes, but a gust of wind blows much of the ashes onto the Dude's face. Upset, the Dude lashes out at Walter. Walter apologizes and hugs the Dude, before suggesting, "Fuck it, man. Let's go bowling". As the movie nears its end, the Dude sums up his situation and philosophy with the phrase, "The Dude abides". Look up eulogy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Cast and characters

The Dude (Jeff Bridges), Donny (Steve Buscemi), and Walter (John Goodman)
The Dude (Jeff Bridges), Donny (Steve Buscemi), and Walter (John Goodman)
  • John Goodman as Walter Sobchak, a Vietnam War veteran, and the Dude's best friend and bowling teammate. Walter runs his own security firm, Sobchak Security, and places bowling second in reverence only to his religion, Judaism, as evidenced by his strict rule against bowling on Shabbos. He is quite unstable and has a violent temper. He says the Gulf War is all about oil and claims to have dabbled in pacifism. He constantly mentions Vietnam in conversations. He is based on screenwriter John Milius, who is a friend of the Coen Brothers.
  • Steve Buscemi as Theodore Donald "Donny" Kerabatsos, a member of Walter and the Dude's bowling team. Charmingly naïve, Donny is an avid bowler and frequently interrupts Walter's diatribes to inquire about the parts of the story he missed or did not understand, evoking Walter's abusive and frequently repeated response, "Shut the fuck up, Donny!" This line is a reference to Fargo, the Coen Brothers' previous film, in which Buscemi's character was constantly talking.[3]
  • David Huddleston as Jeffrey Lebowski, the "Big" Lebowski referred to in the movie's title, is a wheelchair-bound multi-millionaire who is married to Bunny and is Maude's father by his late wife. He lost the use of his legs in Korea and seems to despise the Dude whom he calls a bum.
  • Julianne Moore as Maude Lebowski, the Big Lebowski's daughter. She is a feminist and an avant-garde artist whose work "has been commended as being strongly vaginal". She is good friends with video artist Knox Harrington (David Thewlis), and is possibly the person who introduced Bunny to Uli Kunkel (Peter Stormare), the nihilist, porn star, new wave musician and would-be kidnapper.
  • Tara Reid as Bunny Lebowski; born Fawn Knutsen, she is the Big Lebowski's "trophy wife". She ran away from her family's farm in Moorhead, Minnesota and soon found herself making pornographic videos (such as 'Logjammin') under the name "Bunny LaJoya". According to Reid, Charlize Theron tried out for the role of Bunny.[4]
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman as Brandt, a sycophant and loyal assistant to the Big Lebowski, who tries to please everyone. Hoffman auditioned for the film and had to do the scene where Brandt shows the Dude around Jeffrey Lebowski's office.[5]
  • Sam Elliott as The Stranger, the film's narrator, who sees this story unfold from an unbiased perspective. His narration is marked by a thick, laid-back Western accent.
  • Peter Stormare, Torsten Voges and Flea play The Nihilists, composed of Uli Kunkel (aka "Karl Hungus"), Franz and Dieter respectively. Three Germans who claim to be nihilists, they, along with Kunkel's ex-girlfriend (Aimee Mann), pretend to be the ones who kidnapped Bunny. The character of Uli originated on the set of Fargo between Ethan Coen and Stormare, who would often speak in a mock German accent.[6]
  • John Turturro as Jesus Quintana, an opponent of the Dude's and Walter's team in the bowling league semifinals match. This eccentric, Latino, trash-talking North Hollywood resident speaks with a thick Hispanic accent, and often refers to himself in the third person, insisting on the English pronunciation of his name (GEE-zus) rather than the Spanish (Hehh-ZOOS). "The Jesus," as he refers to himself, is a pederast and generally creepy pervert who did six months in Chino for exposing himself to an eight-year old. Turturro originally thought that he was going to have a bigger role in the film but when he read the script, he realized that it was much smaller. However, the Coen brothers let him come up with a lot of his own ideas for the character, like shining the bowling ball and the scene where he dances backwards, which he says was inspired by Muhammad Ali.[7]
  • Jon Polito as Da Fino, a private investigator hired by Bunny Lebowski's parents, the Knutsens, to entice their daughter back to their farm in Moorhead, Minnesota. Da Fino, who drives a battered blue Volkswagen Beetle (in reference to the Coen Brothers' first film, Blood Simple), mistakes the Dude for a "brother shamus" (a fellow P.I.), and offends the Dude by referring to Maude as his "special lady" and not the Dude's preferred term, "my fucking lady friend".

This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Jeffrey Leon Bridges (born December 4, 1949) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Steven Vincent Buscemi (born December 13, 1957) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Goodman (disambiguation). ... Jeffrey Leon Bridges (born December 4, 1949) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Venice Beach and Boardwalk Venice, California, is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... Creedence Clearwater Revival (CCR) was an American roots rock band who gained popularity in the late 1960s and early 70s with a string of successful songs from multiple albums released in 1968, 1969 and 1970. ... This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... Ten-pin bowling. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Goodman (disambiguation). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... This article is about veterans of the Vietnam War. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Pacifist redirects here. ... John Milius (born April 11, 1944 in St. ... Steven Vincent Buscemi (born December 13, 1957) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... Fargo is a 1996 American crime-comedy-drama film written, directed and produced by the Coen Brothers. ... Born in Vinton, Virginia, on September 17, 1930, David Huddleston was briefly an officer in the United States Air Force before beginning his formal education in acting at the prestigious American Academy of Dramatic Arts. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Julianne Moore (born December 3, 1960) is a four-time Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Feminists redirects here. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... David Thewlis (born March 20, 1963 as David Wheeler) is an English film, television and stage actor. ...   (born August 27, 1953) is a Swedish film, stage, voice and television actor as well as a theatrical director and playwright. ... Tara Reid (born November 8, 1975) is an American actress. ... A trophy wife is commonly used to describe the second or third wife of (usually) older man; and who is considered a status symbol. ... Moorhead is a city in Clay County, Minnesota, United States, and the largest city in northwest Minnesota. ... Charlize Theron (born August 7, 1975) is a South African-American actress and former fashion model. ... Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Samuel Pack Elliott (born August 9, 1944) is an American film and television actor. ... The Narrator is the entity within a story that tells the story to the reader. ... Ben Gazzara (born Biagio Anthony Gazzara on August 28, 1930, in New York City) is an American actor in television and motion pictures. ... Porn redirects here. ... A loan shark is a person or body that offers illegal unsecured loans at high interest rates to individuals, often backed by blackmail or threats of violence. ... Location of Malibu in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1991-03-28 [2] Government  - Mayor Jeff Jennings [1] Area  - Total 100. ...   (born August 27, 1953) is a Swedish film, stage, voice and television actor as well as a theatrical director and playwright. ... Michael Peter Balzary (born October 16, 1962 in Melbourne, Australia), better known by his stage name Flea, is the bassist for the alternative rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers. ... This article is about the philosophical position. ... Aimee Mann (born September 8, 1960) is an American rock guitarist, bassist, singer, and noted songwriter. ... John Michael Turturro (born February 28, 1957) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor noted for his performances in To Live and Die in L.A. (1985), The Color of Money (1986), Five Corners (1987), Men of Respect (1991), Quiz Show (1994), Monday Night Mayhem (1999), Secret Window (2004), The... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... North Hollywood is a district in the San Fernando Valley section of Los Angeles, California. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Jon Polito (born December 29, 1950) is an American actor, best known for working with the Coen Brothers. ... A private investigator, private detective, PI, or private eye, is a person who undertakes investigations, usually for a private citizen or some other entity not involved with a government or police organization. ... Moorhead is a city in Clay County, Minnesota, United States, and the largest city in northwest Minnesota. ... This article is about the original Volkswagen Beetle. ... Blood Simple is a neo-noir film, the debut of Joel and Ethan Coen, writers and directors of Fargo, The Man Who Wasnt There, and Raising Arizona, among others. ...

Minor characters

David Thewlis (born March 20, 1963 as David Wheeler) is an English film, television and stage actor. ... Mark Pellegrino (b. ... Jimmie Dale Gilmore(r) and Colin Gilmore at Deep Eddy Pool in Austin, Texas, June 2004. ... Jack Kehler is an actor. ... Dom Irrera, originally from Philadelphia, is a stand-up comedian. ... Mike Gomez (born April 18, 1951 in Dallas, Texas, USA) is an American actor. ... Marshall Manesh (August 16, 1950- ) is a Persian-American actor. ... Leon Russom (born December 6, 1941 in Little Rock, Arkansas) is an American Emmy nominated actor. ... Aimee Mann (born September 8, 1960) is an American rock guitarist, bassist, singer, and noted songwriter. ... Jerry Haleva (Born May 26, 1946) is an American actor best known for his uncanny physical similarities to former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... Warren Keith is a character actor who has been featured in many contemporary films and has an active career on stage in San Francisco in the late 1990s and since 2000. ...

Production

Origins

The Dude is mostly inspired by Jeff Dowd, a man the Coen brothers met while they were trying to find distribution for the feature film Blood Simple.[8] Dowd had been a member of the Seattle Seven, liked to drink White Russians, and was known as "The Dude".[9] The Dude was also partly based on a friend of the Coen brothers, Pete Exline, a Vietnam War veteran who reportedly lived in a dump of an apartment and was proud of a little rug that "tied the room together".[10] He knew Barry Sonnenfeld from New York University and he introduced Exline to the Coen brothers while they were trying to raise money for Blood Simple.[11] Exline became friends with the Coens and, in 1989, told them all kinds of stories from his own life, including ones about his friend Lew Abernathy (one of the inspirations for Walter), a fellow Vietnam vet who later became a private investigator and helped him track down and confront a high school kid who stole his car.[12] Like in the final film, Exline's car was impounded by the Los Angeles Police Department and Abernathy found an 8th grader's homework under the passenger seat.[13] Exline also belonged to an amateur softball league but the Coens changed it to bowling in the movie because "it's a very social sport where you can sit around and drink and smoke while engaging in inane conversation," Ethan said in an interview.[14] The Coens met filmmaker John Milius when they were in Los Angeles making Barton Fink and incorporated his love of guns and the military into the character of Walter.[15] Jeff Dowd (born 20 November 1949) was the basis for the character the Dude, also known as Jeff Lebowski, from the movie The Big Lebowski. ... Blood Simple is a neo-noir film, the debut of Joel and Ethan Coen, writers and directors of Fargo, The Man Who Wasnt There, and Raising Arizona, among others. ... The Seattle Liberation Front, or SLF, was a radical anti-Vietnam War organization in Seattle, Washington, in the United States. ... Barry Sonnenfeld American film maker Barry Sonnenfeld (born New York City, April 1, 1953) worked as cinematographer for the Coen Brothers, then later he directed and produced big budget films such as Men in Black. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... John Milius (born April 11, 1944 in St. ... Barton Fink is a 1991 film by Joel and Ethan Coen. ...


According to Julianne Moore, the character of Maude was based on artist Carolee Schneemann "who worked naked from a swing" and Yoko Ono.[16] The character of Jesus Quintana was inspired, in part, by a performance the Coens had seen John Turturro give in 1988 at the Public Theater in a play called Ma Puta Vita in which he played a pederast-type character, "so we thought, let's make Turturro a pederast. It'll be something he can really run with," Joel said in an interview.[14] Carolee Schneemann (b. ... For the song by Die Ärzte, see Yoko Ono (song). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


The film's overall structure was influenced by the detective fiction of Raymond Chandler. Ethan said, "We wanted something that would generate a certain narrative feeling – like a modern Raymond Chandler story, and that's why it had to be set in Los Angeles ... We wanted to have a narrative flow, a story that moves like a Chandler book through different parts of town and different social classes".[17] The use of the Stranger's voiceover also came from Chandler as Joel remarked, "He is a little bit of an audience substitute. In the movie adaptation of Chandler it's the main character that speaks off-screen, but we didn't want to reproduce that though it obviously has echoes. It's as if someone was commenting on the plot from an all-seeing point of view. And at the same time rediscovering the old earthiness of a Mark Twain".[18] For other persons named Raymond Chandler, see Raymond Chandler (disambiguation). ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ...


The significance of the bowling culture was, according to Joel, "important in reflecting that period at the end of the Fifties and the beginning of the Sixties. That suited the retro side of the movie, slightly anachronistic, which sent us back to a not-so-far-away era, but one that was well and truly gone nevertheless".[19] The 1950s decade refers to the years of 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ...


Screenplay

The Big Lebowski was written around the same time as Barton Fink. When the Coen brothers wanted to make it, John Goodman was taping episodes for the Roseanne television program and Jeff Bridges was making the Walter Hill film, Wild Bill. The Coens decided to make Fargo in the meantime.[15] According to Ethan, "the movie was conceived as pivoting around that relationship between the Dude and Walter," which sprang from the scenes between Barton Fink and Charlie Meadows in Barton Fink.[18] They also came up with the idea of setting the film in contemporary L.A. because the people who inspired the story lived in the area.[20] When Pete Exline told them about the homework in a baggie incident, the Coens thought that that was very Raymond Chandler-esque and decided to integrate elements of the author's fiction into their script. Joel Coen cites Robert Altman's contemporary take on Chandler with The Long Goodbye as a primary influence on their film in the sense that The Big Lebowski "is just kind of informed by Chandler around the edges".[21] When they started writing the script, the Coens wrote only 40 pages and then let it sit for a while before finishing it. This is the normal writing process for them, because they often "encounter a problem at a certain stage, we pass to another project, then we come back to the first script. That way we've already accumulated pieces for several future movies".[22] In order to liven up a scene that they thought as too heavy on exposition, they added an "effete art-world hanger-on", known as Knox Harrington, late in the screenwriting process.[23] In the original script, the Dude's car was the one Dowd used to have – a Chrysler LeBaron but it was not big enough to fit John Goodman so the Coens changed it to a Ford Torino.[24] Jackie Harris redirects here. ... Walter Hill (born January 10, 1942 in California) is a prominent American film director, who is known in particular for his revival of the Western. ... Fargo is a 1996 American crime-comedy-drama film written, directed and produced by the Coen Brothers. ... For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... The Long Goodbye is a 1973 film adaptation of Raymond Chandlers novel The Long Goodbye. ... Chrysler introduced the LeBaron model in 1977 as its lowest priced model, and the name was used on various Chryslers until 1995. ... The Ford Torino was an intermediate sized car produced by the Ford Motor Company for the North American market between 1968 and 1976. ...


Pre-production

Polygram and Working Title Films, who had funded Fargo, backed The Big Lebowski with a budget of $15 million. In casting the film, Joel remarked, "we tend to write both for people we know and have worked with, and some parts without knowing who's going to play the role. In The Big Lebowski we did write for John [Goodman] and Steve [Buscemi], but we didn't know who was getting the Jeff Bridges role".[25] In preparation for his role, Bridges met Dowd but actually "drew on myself a lot from back in the Sixties and Seventies. I lived in a little place like that and did drugs, although I think I was a little more creative than the Dude".[10] The actor went into his own closet with the film's wardrobe person and picked out clothes that he had that the Dude might wear.[2] He wore his character's clothes home because most of them were his own.[26] The actor also adopted the same physicality as Dowd, including the slouching and his ample belly.[24] Originally, Goodman wanted a different kind of beard for Walter but the Coen brothers insisted on the "Gladiator" or what they called the "Chin Strap" and he thought it would go well with his flat-top haircut.[27] PolyGram was the name from 1972 of the major label recording company started by Philips as a holding company for its music interests in 1945. ... Current company logo, introduced in 1999. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


For the look of the film, the Coens wanted to avoid the usual retro 1960s clichés like lava lamps, Day-Glo posters, and Grateful Dead music[28] and for it to be "consistent with the whole bowling thing, we wanted to keep the movie pretty bright and poppy," Joel said in an interview.[29] For example, the star motif featured predominantly throughout the movie started with the film's production designer Richard Heinrichs' design for the bowling alley. According to Joel, he "came up with the idea of just laying free-form neon stars on top of it and doing a similar free-form star thing on the interior". This carried over to the film's dream sequences. "Both dream sequences involve star patterns and are about lines radiating to a point. In the first dream sequence, the Dude gets knocked out and you see stars and they all coalesce into the overhead nightscape of L.A. The second dream sequence is an astral environment with a backdrop of stars," remembers Heinrichs.[29] For Jackie Treehorn's Malibu beach house, he was inspired by late 1950s and early 1960s bachelor pad-style furniture. The Coen brothers told Heinrichs that they wanted Treehorn's beach party to be Inca-themed with a "very Hollywood-looking party in which young, oiled-down, fairly aggressive men walk around with appetizers and drinks. So there's a very sacrificial quality to it".[30] This article is about the band. ... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ...


Cinematographer Roger Deakins discussed the look of the film with the Coens during pre-production. They told him that they wanted some parts of the film to have a real and contemporary feeling and other parts, like the dream sequences, to have a very stylized look.[31] Bill and Jacqui Landrum did all of the choreography for the film. For his dance sequence, Jack Kehler went through three three-hour rehearsals.[2] The Coen brothers offered him three to four choices of classical music for him to pick from and he settled on "Pictures at an Exhibition". At each rehearsal, he went through each phase of the song.[32] Roger Deakins (born May 24, 1949 in Torquay, Devon, England) has established himself as a successful cinematographer in America and Britain. ...


Principal photography

Actual filming took place over an eleven-week period with location shooting in and around L.A., including all of the bowling sequences at the Hollywood Star Lanes (for three weeks in Santa Monica)[33] and the Dude's Busby Berkeley-esque dream sequences in a converted airplane hangar.[17] According to Joel, the only time they ever directed Bridges "was when he would come over at the beginning of each scene and ask, 'Do you think the Dude burned one on the way over?' I'd reply 'Yes' usually, so Jeff would go over in the corner and start rubbing his eyes to get them bloodshot".[34] Julianne Moore was sent the script while working on The Lost World: Jurassic Park. She worked only two weeks on the film, early and late during the production that went from January to April 1997[35] while Sam Elliott was only on set for two days and did many takes of his final speech.[36] For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ... Kaleidoscopic Choreography from Footlight Parade, 1933 Busby Berkeley (November 29, 1895 – March 14, 1976), born William Berkeley Enos in Los Angeles, California, was a highly influential Hollywood movie director and musical choreographer. ... The Lost World: Jurassic Park is a 1997 movie which is a sequel to the blockbuster Jurassic Park. ...


Deakins described the look of the fantasy scenes as being very crisp, monochromatic, and highly lit in order to afford greater depth of focus. However, with the Dude's apartment, Deakins said, "it's kind of seedy and the light's pretty nasty" with a grittier look. The visual bridge between these two different looks was how he photographed the night scenes. Instead of adopting the usual blue moonlight or blue street lamp look, he used a very orange sodium-light effect.[37] The Coen brothers shot a lot of the film with wide-angle lens because, according to Joel, it made it easier to hold focus for a greater depth and it made camera movements more dynamic.[38]


To achieve the point-of-view of a rolling bowling ball the Coen brothers mounted a camera, "on something like a barbecue spit," according to Ethan, and then dolly it along the lane. The challenge for them was figuring out the relative speeds of the forward motion and the rotating motion. CGI was used to create the vantage point of the thumb hole in the bowling ball.[35]


Soundtrack

The Big Lebowski: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
The Big Lebowski: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack cover
Soundtrack by Various artists
Released February 24, 1998
Genre Rock, classical, jazz, country, folk, pop
Length 51:43
Label Mercury
Producer T-Bone Burnett, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Professional reviews
Coen Brothers film soundtracks chronology
Fargo
(1996)
The Big Lebowski
(1998)
O Brother, Where Art Thou?
(2000)

The original score was composed by Carter Burwell, a veteran of all the Coen Brothers' films. The Coens asked T-Bone Burnett to pick songs for the soundtrack of the film. They knew that they wanted different genres of music from different times but, as Joel remembers, "T-Bone even came up with some far-out Henry Mancini and Yma Sumac".[39] Burnett was going to be credited on the film as "Music Supervisor" but asked his credit to be "Music Archivist" because he "hated the notion of being a supervisor; I wouldn't want anyone to think of me as management".[39] Image File history File linksMetadata Biglebowskisoundtrackalbum. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... The term Various Artists is used in the record industry when numerous singers and musicians collaborate on a song or collection of songs. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the genre. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Folk song redirects here. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Mercury Records is a record label currently headquartered in the UK, and is a subsidiary of Universal Music Group. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... [[]] The True False Identity, 2006. ... Joel and Ethan Coen, commonly called The Coen Brothers in the film business, are United States directors best known for their quirky comedies like Fargo and Raising Arizona; the brothers write their own scripts and alternate top billing for the screenplay. ... Joel and Ethan Coen, commonly called The Coen Brothers in the film business, are United States directors best known for their quirky comedies like Fargo and Raising Arizona; the brothers write their own scripts and alternate top billing for the screenplay. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 3. ... Joel and Ethan Coen, known as The Coen Brothers, are Oscar-winning American filmmakers. ... Fargo is a 1996 American crime-comedy-drama film written, directed and produced by the Coen Brothers. ... O Brother, Where Art Thou? is the soundtrack of music from the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou? an American film starring George Clooney. ... A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... Carter Burwell (born November 18, 1955, in New York) is a composer of film soundtracks. ... Joel and Ethan Coen, known as The Coen Brothers, are Oscar-winning American filmmakers. ... [[]] The True False Identity, 2006. ...


For Joel, "the original music, as with other elements of the movie, had to echo the retro sounds of the Sixties and early Seventies".[16] Music defines each character. For example, "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" by Bob Nolan was chosen for the Stranger at the time the Coens wrote the screenplay, as was "Lujon" by Henri Mancini for Jackie Treehorn. "The German nihilists are accompanied by techno-pop and Jeff Bridges by Creedence. So there's a musical signature for each of them," remarked Ethan in an interview.[16]


Soundtrack album track listing

  1. "The Man in Me" – written and performed by Bob Dylan
  2. "Her Eyes Are A Blue Million Miles" – written and performed by Captain Beefheart
  3. "My Mood Swings" – written by Elvis Costello and Cait O'Riordan; performed by Costello
  4. "Ataypura" – written by Moises Vivanco; performed by Yma Sumac
  5. "Traffic Boom" – written and performed by Piero Piccioni
  6. "I Got It Bad & That Ain't Good" – written by Duke Ellington and Paul Francis Webster; performed by Nina Simone
  7. "Stamping Ground" – written by Louis T. Hardin; performed by Moondog with orchestra
  8. "Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)" – written by Mickey Newbury; performed by Kenny Rogers & The First Edition
  9. "Walking Song" – written and performed by Meredith Monk
  10. "Glück das mir verblieb" from Die tote Stadt – written and conducted by Erich Wolfgang Korngold; performed by Ilona Steingruber, Anton Dermota and the Austrian State Radio Orchestra
  11. "Lujon" – written and performed by Henry Mancini.
  12. "Hotel California" – written by Don Henley, Glenn Frey and Don Felder; performed by The Gipsy Kings
  13. "Technopop (Wie Glauben)" – written and performed by Carter Burwell
  14. "Dead Flowers" – written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards; performed by Townes van Zandt

The Man In Me is a song from Bob Dylans 1970 album New Morning. It is featured in the soundtrack to the 1998 Coen Brothers film The Big Lebowski. It plays during one of the films famous hallucination sequences. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Clear Spot is the seventh album by Captain Beefheart & the Magic Band, originally released in 1972. ... Don Van Vliet (born Don Glen Vliet on January 15, 1941, in Glendale, California, U.S.) is an American musician and visual artist, best known by the pseudonym Captain Beefheart. ... Elvis Costello (born Declan Patrick McManus August 25, 1954) is an English musician, singer, and songwriter. ... Caitlín Cáit ORiordan (born 4 January 1965) was the bass player for Irish punk/folk band, The Pogues from 1983-1986. ... Yma Sumac on the cover of her collection The Ultimate Yma Sumac Collection Yma Sumac (born September 10, 1922?), also spelled Ymma Sumak, is a noted vocalist of Peruvian origin. ... Piero Piccioni (Turin, December 6, 1921 - Rome, July 23, 2004), was an Italian pianist, organist, conductor, composer, and author of more than 100 film soundtracks. ... This article is about the American Jazz composer and performer. ... Paul Francis Webster (December 20, 1907-March 18, 1984) was an American lyricist. ... Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known by her stage name Nina Simone (IPA: ninɐ sʌmɞnɑ) (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), was a fifteen-time Grammy Award-nominated American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger and civil rights activist. ... Moondog the nom de plume of Louis T. Hardin (May 26, 1916 – September 8, 1999), was an American composer, musician and poet, who also invented musical instruments - all this despite being blind, and, for three decades, homeless. ... Moondog the nom de plume of Louis T. Hardin (May 26, 1916 – September 8, 1999), was an American composer, musician and poet, who also invented musical instruments - all this despite being blind, and, for three decades, homeless. ... Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In) is a song written by Mickey Newbury. ... Mickey Newbury (May 19, 1940 - September 29, 2002) was an American songwriter and singer. ... Kenneth Ray[2] Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... For the bibliographical term, see First edition. ... Meredith Monk (born November 20, 1942, in Lima, Peru[1]) is an American composer, performer, director, vocalist, film-maker, and choreographer. ... Glück das mir verblieb is an aria from the opera Die Tote Stadt by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. ... Die tote Stadt (German for The Dead City) is an opera in Three Acts by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. ... Korngold conducting the Warner Brothers studio orchestra (Rhino Records) Erich Wolfgang Korngold (May 29, 1897 – November 29, 1957) was a 20th century romantic composer. ... Kammersänger Anton Dermota (June 4, 1910-June 22, 1989) was a Yugoslav tenor. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... Hotel California is the title song from the Eagles album of the same name and was released as a single in early 1977. ... Donald Hugh Don Henley (born July 22, 1947 in Gilmer, Texas) is an American rock musician who is the drummer and one of the lead singers and songwriters of the band Eagles. ... Glenn Lewis Frey (born November 6, 1948 in Detroit, Michigan[1]) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, and actor, best known as one of the founding members of rock band Eagles. ... Donald William[1] Felder (born September 21, 1947 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American rock musician who was a member of the Eagles from 1974-1980 and from 1994-2001. ... The Gipsy Kings are a group from Arles and Montpellier in France. ... Carter Burwell (born November 18, 1955, in New York) is a composer of film soundtracks. ... Dead Flowers is a song written by Jagger and Richards of the rock and roll band Rolling Stones off of their 1971 album Sticky Fingers. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer, producer and founding member of The Rolling Stones. ... Townes Van Zandt (March 7, 1944 – January 1, 1997) was a country-folk music singer-songwriter, performer, and poet. ...

Other music in the film

The song Tumbling Tumbleweeds was composed by Bob Nolan, one of the founding (albeit reluctant) members of the Sons of the Pioneers. ... Bob Nolan (April 13, 1908 - June 16, 1980) was a Canadian-born singer, songwriter, and actor. ... The Sons of the Pioneers was a cowboy singing group founded in 1933 by Leonard Slye (better known by his later screen name Roy Rogers), with Tim Spencer and Bob Nolan. ... The Requiem Mass in D minor (K. 626) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was composed in 1791. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... The Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (Slovak: Slovenská philharmónia) is the premier symphony orchestra in Slovakia. ... Run Through the Jungle is a song recorded by the American band Creedence Clearwater Revival and written by the bands lead singer, guitarist and songwriter, John Fogerty. ... This article is about the musician. ... Creedence Clearwater Revival (CCR) was an American roots rock band who gained popularity in the late 1960s and early 70s with a string of successful songs from multiple albums released in 1968, 1969 and 1970. ... Lookin Out My Back Door is a song recorded by the American band Creedence Clearwater Revival and written by the bands lead singer, guitarist and songwriter, John Fogerty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Steve The Colonel Cropper (born October 21, 1941) is an American guitarist, songwriter, producer, and soul musician. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Booker T. & the M.G.s is a soul band, most prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. ... The Monks are a rock and roll band, primarily active in Germany in the mid to late sixties. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Mussorgsky in 1874 This article refers to the original suite by Modest Mussorgsky. ... Maurice Ravel. ... Juan García Esquivel (January 20, 1918 – January 3, 2002) often known as simply Esquivel!, was a Mexican band leader, pianist, and film composer. ... Standing on the Corner is a popular song. ... Image:FrankLoesser1. ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti; June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an American singer, film actor, television personality, and comedian. ... Tammy is a popular song. ... Jay Livingston (March 28, 1915 - October 17, 2001) was a partner in the composing and songwriter duo with Ray Evans, best known for the songs they composed for films. ... Raymond Bernard Evans (February 4, 1915 - February 15, 2007) was an American songwriter. ... For other persons named Debbie Reynolds, see Deborah Reynolds (disambiguation). ... For the Pearl Jam song, see Whale Song (song). ... Tito Puente, Sr. ... For the Costa Rican soccer player, see Carlos Santana (footballer); for the Mexican academic, see Carlos Santana Morales. ... Jack Tempchin is an American musician and songwriter, best known for writing The Eagles hit Peaceful Easy Feeling and co-writing their hit Already Gone. ... The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ... Branded was a Western series which aired on NBC from 1965 through 1966. ... Dominic Frontiere (born June 17, 1931) is an American composer and arranger. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Doc Pomus (January 27, 1925 - March 14, 1991) was an American blues singer and songwriter, active throughout the 20th century. ... Mort Shuman (November 12, 1936 _ November 2, 1991) was an American singer and songwriter. ... Look up Johnson, johnson in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Shawn Colvin. ...

Reception

The Big Lebowski received its world premiere at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival on January 18, 1998 at the 1,300 capacity Eccles Theater. Reportedly, there were a few walkouts and Peter Howell, in his review for the Toronto Star, wrote, "It's hard to believe that this is the work of a team that won an Oscar last year for the original screenplay of Fargo. There's a large amount of profanity in the movie, which seems a weak attempt to paper over dialogue gaps".[40] The film was also screened at the 1998 Berlin Film Festival[41] before opening in North America on March 6, 1998 in 1,207 theaters. It grossed USD $5.5 million on its opening weekend, grossing $17 million domestically, just above its $15 million budget.[42] The Sundance Film Festival is a film festival in the state of Utah in the United States. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... The Berlin International Film Festival, also called the Berlinale, is one of the most important film festivals in Europe and the world. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


Reviews have been mostly positive. The Big Lebowski currently has a rating of 77% on Rotten Tomatoes (58% for their "Cream of the Crop" designation). Todd McCarthy in Variety magazine wrote, "One of the film's indisputable triumphs is its soundtrack, which mixes Carter Burwell's original score with classic pop tunes and some fabulous covers".[43] USA Today gave the film three out of four stars and felt that the Dude was "too passive a hero to sustain interest", but that there was "enough startling brilliance here to suggest that, just like the Dude, those smarty-pants Coens will abide".[44] In his review for the Washington Post Desson Howe praised the Coens and "their inspired, absurdist taste for weird, peculiar Americana – but a sort of neo-Americana that is entirely invented – the Coens have defined and mastered their own bizarre subgenre. No one does it like them and, it almost goes without saying, no one does it better".[45] Janet Maslin praised Bridges' performance in her review for The New York Times: "Mr. Bridges finds a role so right for him that he seems never to have been anywhere else. Watch this performance to see shambling executed with nonchalant grace and a seemingly out-to-lunch character played with fine comic flair".[46] Andrew Sarris, in his review for the New York Observer, wrote, "The result is a lot of laughs and a feeling of awe toward the craftsmanship involved. I doubt that there'll be anything else like it the rest of this year".[47] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... ... Janet Maslin (b. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Andrew Sarris is a film critic and a leading proponent of the Auteur theory of criticism. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ...


However, Jonathan Rosenbaum wrote in the Chicago Reader, "To be sure, The Big Lebowski is packed with show-offy filmmaking and as a result is pretty entertaining. But insofar as it represents a moral position–and the Coens' relative styling of their figures invariably does–it's an elitist one, elevating salt-of-the-earth types like Bridges and Goodman ... over everyone else in the movie".[48] Dave Kehr, in his review for the Daily News, criticized the film's premise as a "tired idea, and it produces an episodic, unstrung film".[49] The Guardian criticized the film as "a bunch of ideas shoveled into a bag and allowed to spill out at random. The film is infuriating, and will win no prizes. But it does have some terrific jokes".[50] Jonathan Rosenbaum is a prominent American film critic. ... The Chicago Reader is an alternative newsweekly in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It was founded in 1971[2] by a group of friends who attended Carleton College. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ...


Legacy

The Big Lebowski has become a cult classic over the years and has been called "the first cult film of the Internet era".[1] Steve Palopoli wrote about the film's emerging cult status in July 2002.[51] He first realized that the film had a cult following when he attended a midnight screening in 2000 at the New Beverly Cinema in L.A. Palopoli witnessed people quoting dialogue from the film to each other.[52] Soon after the article appeared, the programmer for local midnight film series in Santa Cruz decided to screen The Big Lebowski and on the first weekend they had to turn away several hundred people. The theater held the film over for six weeks which had never happened before.[53] A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... This article does not discuss cultist groups, personality cults, or cult in its original sense of religious practice. See cult (disambiguation) for more meanings of the term cult. A cult following is a group of fans devoted to a specific area of pop culture. ... For other uses, see Santa Cruz. ...


An annual festival, the Lebowski Fest, began in Louisville, Kentucky in 2002 with 150 fans showing up, and has since expanded to several other cities.[54] The Festival's main event each year is a night of unlimited bowling with various contests including costume, trivia, hardest- and farthest-traveled contests. Held over a weekend, events typically include a pre-fest party with bands the night before the bowling event as well as a day long outdoor party with bands, vendor booths, games. Various celebrities from the film have even attended some of the events, including Jeff Bridges attending the Los Angeles event.[54] The British equivalent, inspired by Lebowski Fest, is known as The Dude Abides and is held in London.[55] This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Louisville redirects here. ... Jeffrey Leon Bridges (born December 4, 1949) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ...

Two-disc 10th Anniversary Edition DVD cover artwork
Two-disc 10th Anniversary Edition DVD cover artwork

DVD

Universal Studios released a "Collector's Edition" DVD on October 18, 2005 with extra features that included and "Introduction by Mortimer Young", "Jeff Bridges' Photography", "Making of The Big Lebowski", and "Production Notes". In addition, a limited edition "Achiever’s Edition Gift Set" also included The Big Lebowski Bowling Shammy Towel, four Collectible Coasters that included photographs and quotable lines from the movie, and eight Exclusive Photo Cards from Jeff Bridges’ personal collection.[56] A "10th Anniversary Edition" will be released on September 9, 2008 and will feature all of the extras from the "Collector's Edition" and "The Dude's Life: Strikes and Gutters ... Up's and Downs ... The Dude Abides", Theatrical Trailer (from the first DVD release), "The Lebowski Fest: An Achiever's Story", "Flying Carpets and Bowling Pin Dreams: The Dream Sequences of the Dude", "Interactive Map", "Jeff Bridges Photo Book",and a "Photo Gallery". There will be both a standard release and a Limited Edition which features "Bowling Ball Packaging" and is individually numbered.[57] This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Russell, Will. "Hey Dude: The Lebowski Festival", The Independent, August 15, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. 
  2. ^ a b c Green, Bill; Ben Peskoe, Will Russell, Scott Shuffitt. "I'm A Lebowski, You're A Lebowski", Bloomsbury, 2007, pp. 27. 
  3. ^ Coen, Joel (Writer, Director) and Ethan Coen (Writer, Producer). (2005-10-18). 'The Big Lebowski (Collector's Edition) [DVD]. Universal Studios. Retrieved on 2007-12-17. Event occurs at (Special Feature Interview).
  4. ^ Green 2007, p. 72.
  5. ^ Green 2007, p. 49.
  6. ^ Green 2007, p. 57.
  7. ^ Green 2007, p. 44.
  8. ^ Green 2007, p. 90.
  9. ^ Green 2007, p. 91-92.
  10. ^ a b Bergan, Ronald. "The Coen Brothers", Thunder's Mouth Press, 2000, pp. 188. 
  11. ^ Green 2007, p. 97-98.
  12. ^ Green 2007, p. 99.
  13. ^ Green 2007, p. 100.
  14. ^ a b Bergan 2000, p. 195.
  15. ^ a b Bergan 2000, p. 189.
  16. ^ a b c Ciment, Michel; Hubert Niogret. "The Logic of Soft Drugs", 'Postif', May 1998, pp. 156. 
  17. ^ a b Levine, Josh. "The Coen Brothers: The Story of Two American Filmmakers", ECW Press, 2000, pp. 140. 
  18. ^ a b Ciment 2000, p. 169.
  19. ^ Ciment 2000, p. 170.
  20. ^ Robertson, William Preston; Tricia Cooke. "The Big Lebowski: The Making of a Coen Brothers Film", W.W. Norton, 1998, pp. 41. 
  21. ^ Robertson 1998, p. 43.
  22. ^ Ciment 2000, p. 171.
  23. ^ McCarthy, Phillip. "Coen Off", Sydney Morning Herald, March 27, 1998. 
  24. ^ a b Green 2007, p. 93.
  25. ^ Woods, Paul A. "Joel & Ethan Coen: Blood Siblings", Plexus, 2000. 
  26. ^ Carr, Jay. "The Big Easy", Boston Globe, March 1, 1998. 
  27. ^ Green 2007, p. 32.
  28. ^ Robertson 1998, p. 95.
  29. ^ a b Bergan 2000, p. 191.
  30. ^ Robertson 1998, p. 91.
  31. ^ Robertson 1998, p. 77.
  32. ^ Green 2007, p. 64.
  33. ^ Wloszcyna, Susan. "Another Quirky Coen Toss Turning Their Sly Style to Lebowski", USA Today, March 5, 1998. 
  34. ^ Bergan 2000, p. 195.
  35. ^ a b Arnold, Gary. "Siblings' Style Has No Rivals", Washington Times, March 6, 1998. 
  36. ^ Green 2007, p. 46.
  37. ^ Robertson 1998, p. 79.
  38. ^ Robertson 1998, p. 82.
  39. ^ a b Altman, Billy. "A Music Maker Happy to Be Just a Conduit", The New York Times, February 24, 2002. Retrieved on 2008-04-30. 
  40. ^ Howell, Peter. "Coens' latest doesn't hold together The Big Lebowski is more sprawling than large", Toronto Star, January 19, 1998. 
  41. ^ "Berlinale 1998: Pix in official selection", Variety, February 9, 1998February 15, 1998. 
  42. ^ "The Big Lebowski", Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2008-01-04. 
  43. ^ McCarthy, Todd. "The Big Lebowski", Variety, January 20, 1998. Retrieved on 2008-01-04. 
  44. ^ Wloszczyna, Susan. "The Big Lebowski: Coen humor to spare", USA Today, March 6, 1998. 
  45. ^ Howe, Desson. "The Big Lebowski: Rollin' a Strike", Washington Post, March 6, 1998. 
  46. ^ Maslin, Janet. "A Bowling Ball's-Eye View of Reality", The New York Times, March 6, 1998. Retrieved on 2008-01-04. 
  47. ^ Sarris, Andrew. "A Cubist Coen Comedy", New York Observer, March 8, 1998. Retrieved on 2008-01-04. 
  48. ^ Rosenbaum, Jonathan. "L.A. Residential", Chicago Reader, March 6, 1998. Retrieved on 2008-01-04. 
  49. ^ Kehr, Dave. "Coen Brothers' Latest is a Big Letdownski", Daily News, March 6, 1998. 
  50. ^ "Meanwhile, The Big Lebowski should have stayed in the bowling alley ...", The Guardian, April 24, 1998. 
  51. ^ Palopoli, Steve. "The Last Cult Picture Show", Metro Santa Cruz, July 25-31, 2002. Retrieved on 2008-04-10. 
  52. ^ Green 2007, p. 129.
  53. ^ Green 2007, p. 130.
  54. ^ a b Hoggard, Liz. "Get with the Dude's vibe", The Guardian, July 22, 2007. Retrieved on 2008-01-04. 
  55. ^ Hodgkinson, Will. "Dude, let's go bowling", The Guardian, May 11, 2005. Retrieved on 2008-01-04. 
  56. ^ Foster, Dave. "The Big Lebowski CE in October", DVD Times, August 27, 2005. Retrieved on 2008-06-04. 
  57. ^ Foster, Dave. "The Big Lebowski 10th AE (R1) in September", DVD Times, April 6, 2008. Retrieved on 2008-06-04. 

For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bloomsbury may refer to: Bloomsbury, London, an area in the centre of the city the Bloomsbury group, an English literary group active around from around 1905 to the start of World War II. the Bloomsbury Gang, a political grouping centred on the local landowner, John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... W. W. Norton & Company is an American book publishing company. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chicago Reader is an alternative newsweekly in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It was founded in 1971[2] by a group of friends who attended Carleton College. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Bergan, Ronald, The Coen Brothers, (2000, Thunder's Mouth Press), ISBN.
  • Green, Bill, Ben Peskoe, Scott Shuffitt, Will Russell; I'm a Lebowski, You're a Lebowski: Life, The Big Lebowski, and What Have You, (Bloomsbury USA - August 21, 2007), ISBN 978-1596912465
  • Levine, Josh, The Coen Brothers: The Story of Two American Filmmakers, (2000, ECW Press), ISBN.
  • Robertson, William Preston, Tricia Cooke, John Todd Anderson and Rafael Sanudo, The Big Lebowski: The Making of a Coen Brothers Film, (1998, W.W. Norton & Company), ISBN 0-393-31750-1.
  • An Interview with the Coen Brothers, Joel and Ethan about The Big Lebowski

is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Further reading

  • Coen, Ethan and Joel Coen, The Big Lebowski;(May 1998, Faber and Faber Ltd.), ISBN 0-571-19335-8.
  • Tyree, J.M., Ben Walters The Big Lebowski (BFI Film Classics), (2007, British Film Institute), ISBN 978-1844571734.
  • The Big Lebowski in Feminist Film Theory

Joel and Ethan Coen, commonly called The Coen Brothers in the film business, are United States directors best known for their quirky comedies like Fargo and Raising Arizona; the brothers write their own scripts and alternate top billing for the screenplay. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... For the fruit also known as hulu, see calabash. ... Joel and Ethan Coen, known as The Coen Brothers, are Oscar-winning American filmmakers. ... Blood Simple is a neo-noir film, the debut of Joel and Ethan Coen, writers and directors of Fargo, The Man Who Wasnt There, and Raising Arizona, among others. ... Raising Arizona is a 1987 Coen Brothers comedy film starring Nicolas Cage, Holly Hunter, William Forsythe, John Goodman, Frances McDormand, and Randall Tex Cobb. ... For the Stargate Atlantis episode, see Millers Crossing (Stargate Atlantis). ... Barton Fink is a 1991 film by Joel and Ethan Coen. ... The Hudsucker Proxy (1994) is a screwball comedy film directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, telling a fictitious story about the rise and fall of a naive executive and the invention of the hula hoop. ... Fargo is a 1996 American crime-comedy-drama film written, directed and produced by the Coen Brothers. ... For the film soundtrack, see O Brother, Where Art Thou? (soundtrack). ... For other uses, see The Man Who Wasnt There (disambiguation). ... Intolerable Cruelty is a 2003 dark comedy/romance directed by Joel and Ethan Coen and starring George Clooney, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Cedric the Entertainer, and Billy Bob Thornton. ... The Ladykillers is a 2004 remake of the 1955 Ealing comedy of the same name. ... Paris, je taime is a 2006 film starring an ensemble cast of American, British and French movie actors. ... No Country for Old Men is a 2007 crime thriller film adapted for the screen and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, starring Tommy Lee Jones, Josh Brolin, and Javier Bardem. ... Burn After Reading is an upcoming film, set for release in 2008, starring George Clooney and made by Joel and Ethan Coen. ... A Serious Man is an upcoming film, set for release in 2009. ... The Yiddish Policemens Union is a 2007 novel by American author Michael Chabon. ... Director Sam Raimis first studio film following the success of The Evil Dead. ... Bad Santa is a 2003 film directed by Terry Zwigoff, produced by Joel and Ethan Coen, and starring Billy Bob Thornton as the title character and Tony Cox as his partner-in-crime. ... Romance & Cigarettes is a 2006 musical romantic-comedy film written and directed by John Turturro. ... Category: ... Gambit is a 1966 film starring Michael Caine and Shirley MacLaine as two criminals involved in an elaborate plot to steal a priceless antiquity from millionaire Mr Shabandar, played by Herbert Lom. ... The Coen Brothers, a sibling duo of filmmakers, are known for their frequent collaborations with various actors and film crew members. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Big Lebowski (2488 words)
The walls and ceiling of Big Lebowski are something else altogether, and it wasn't until almost the last scene of the film that what the Coens were getting at hit me. But, hit me it did, like a bowling ball in the solar plexus, and everything that came before suddenly made perfect sense.
Lebowski, her father, is the old white man who wants to steal his children's heritage out from under them.
This story isn't about the Big Lebowski." It's about the Little Lebowski, who, someday, is going to grow up to be trapped in his or her own generation, too.
'The Big Lebowski' (574 words)
The alleys of "The Big Lebowski" aren't shadowed or menacing, they're gleaming with varnish and alive with the satisfying crack of ball with pins.
Jeff "The Dude" Lebowski (Jeff Bridges), a laid-back pothead whose life is basically one long flashback, spends most of his time at the lanes with his obstreperous best friend, Walter (John Goodman), and the third member of their bowling team, Donny (Steve Buscemi).
Lebowski's trophy wife owes their boss a wad of dough, but the toughs attempt to extract the money from the Dude.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m