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Encyclopedia > The Beatles (album)
The Beatles
The Beatles cover
Studio album by The Beatles
Released 22 November 1968
Recorded Abbey Road Studios and Trident Studios
30 May 196814 October 1968
Genre Rock
Length 93:22
Label Apple, Parlophone, EMI
Producer George Martin, Chris Thomas
Professional reviews
The Beatles UK chronology
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
(1967)
The Beatles
(1968)
Yellow Submarine
(1969)
The Beatles U.S. chronology
Magical Mystery Tour
(1967)
The Beatles
(1968)
Yellow Submarine
(1969)

The Beatles is the eponymous ninth official album by The Beatles, a double album released in 1968. It is most often referred to as The White Album, as it has no text other than the band's name (and, on the early LP releases, a serial number) on its plain white sleeve, which was designed by pop artist Richard Hamilton. The album was the first album The Beatles undertook following the death of their manager Brian Epstein. Originally planned to be titled A Doll's House, The Beatles is often hailed as one of the major accomplishments in popular music. The White Album can refer to one of the following works: The Beatles (album) (also known as the White Album), The Beatles, 1968 Fleetwood Mac (1975 album) (also sometimes named the White Album), by Fleetwood Mac, 1975 Lightning to the Nations commonly known as The White Album, Diamond Head, 1980... Image File history File links The_White_Album. ... A studio album is a collection of studio-recorded tracks by a recording artist. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Trident Studios is a British recording facility, located at 17 St Annes Court in Londons Soho district. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindström Company. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... Chris Thomas is a respected British record producer who was born on January 13, 1947. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 5_stars. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... For the 1999 release, see Yellow Submarine Songtrack. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Magical Mystery Tour is an album by British rock band The Beatles, first released in late November 1967. ... For the 1999 release, see Yellow Submarine Songtrack. ... An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... A double album is an audio album of sufficient length that two units of the medium in which it is sold (especially records and compact discs) are necessary to contain the entirety of it. ... // January 4 - Guitarist Jimi Hendrix is jailed by Stockholm police, after trashing a hotel room during a drunken fist fight with bassist Noel Redding. ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... Richard Hamilton (born February 24, 1922) is an English painter and collage artist. ... Brian Samuel Epstein (IPA: ) (born in Liverpool, England; 19 September 1934 – 27 August 1967) was the manager of The Beatles. ...


In 1997, The Beatles was named the 10th greatest album of all time in a 'Music of the Millennium' poll conducted by HMV, Channel 4, The Guardian and Classic FM. In 1998, Q magazine readers placed it at number 17, while in 2000 the same magazine placed it at number 7 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever.[1] In 2001, the TV network VH1 named it as the 11th greatest album ever.[2] In 2006, the album was chosen by Time Magazine as one of the 100 best albums of all time.[3] It was ranked number 10 in Rolling Stone's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time in 2003.[4] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the British television station. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Classic FM is the United Kingdoms first national commercial radio station, broadcasting classical music in a popular and accessible style. ... Q is a music and entertainment magazinepublished monthly in the United Kingdom. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... “TIME” redirects here. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2003. ...


According to the Recording Industry Association of America, The Beatles is the Beatles' best-selling album at 19-times platinum and the tenth-best-selling album of all time in the United States. RIAA redirects here. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... This is a list of best-selling albums in the United States according to the Recording Industry Association of America. ...

Contents

Demos and genesis of early material

In May 1968, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison assembled at Kinfauns, Harrison’s home in Esher, and demoed 23 songs, most of which would end up on The Beatles. John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ...


The majority of these songs were conceived during the group's visit to Rishikesh, India in the spring of 1968, where they undertook a transcendental meditation course with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. Each of the Beatles left Rishikesh before the end of the course for various reasons, with Ringo Starr and then Paul McCartney departing first, and Lennon and George Harrison departing together later. John Lennon said that his songs "Yer Blues" and "I'm So Tired" chronicle his discomfort and loneliness in India.[citation needed] River Ganges in Rishikesh Rishikesh (also spelled Hrishikesh) (Hindi: )is a city and a municipal board in Dehradun district in the Indian state of Uttarakhand. ... // Transcendental Meditation or TM is a trademarked meditation technique introduced in 1958 by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi that involves the mental use of specific sounds, called mantras. ... Maharishi Mahesh Yogi (b. ...


According to some reports, Lennon left Rishikesh because he felt personally betrayed by rumors that Maharishi had made sexual advances toward a young woman. Shortly after he decided to leave, Lennon wrote a song called "Maharishi" which included the lyrics, "Maharishi/You little twat"; the song became "Sexy Sadie". According to several authors (Brown and Gaines, 1983; Miles, 1998; Spitz, 2005; Cynthia Lennon, 1978), however, Alexis Mardas (aka "Magic Alex") deliberately engineered these rumours because he was bent on undermining the Maharishi's influence over each Beatle. Regardless of the motivations behind Lennon's departure, the Rishikesh retreat, which was also attended by music figures such as Donovan, Mike Love, and Paul Horn, marked a period of extraordinary musical experimentation and songwriting creativity for the Beatles. Sexy Sadie is the name of a song by The Beatles, written by John Lennon (and Paul McCartney) in India. ... Yanni (John) Alexis Mardas, better known as Magic Alex (born May 5, 1942, Athens, Greece), a self-styled electronics wizard, was the head of The Beatles Apple Electronics. ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... This article is about The Beach Boys band member. ... Paul Horn may refer to: Paul Horn the jazz saxophonist. ...


Recording sessions

The Beatles was recorded between 30 May 1968 and 14 October 1968, largely at Abbey Road Studios, with some sessions at Trident Studios. Although productive, the sessions were reportedly undisciplined and sometimes fractious, and they took place at a time when tensions were growing within the group. Concurrent with the recording of this album, the Beatles were launching their new multimedia business corporation Apple Corps, an enterprise that proved to be a source of significant stress for the band. is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Trident Studios is a British recording facility, located at 17 St Annes Court in Londons Soho district. ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ...


The sessions for The Beatles marked the first appearance in the studio of Lennon's new girlfriend and artistic partner Yoko Ono, who would thereafter be a more or less constant presence in all Beatle sessions. Prior to Ono's appearance on the scene, the individual Beatles had been very insular during recording sessions, with influence from outsiders strictly limited. Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ...


Author Mark Lewisohn reports that The Beatles held their first and only 24-hour recording/producing session near the end of the creation of The Beatles, the final mixing and sequencing for the album, attended by Lennon, McCartney, and producer George Martin.[5] Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ...


Division and discord in the studio

Despite the album's official title, which emphasized group identity, studio efforts on The Beatles captured the work of four increasingly individualized artists who frequently found themselves at odds. The band's work pattern changed dramatically with this project, and by most accounts the extraordinary synergy of The Beatles' previous studio sessions was harder to come by during this period. Sometimes McCartney would record in one studio for prolonged periods of time, while Lennon would record in another, each man using different engineers.[5] At one point in the sessions, George Martin, whose authority over the band in the studio had waned, spontaneously left on vacation, leaving Chris Thomas in charge of producing.[6] During one of these sessions, while recording "Helter Skelter," Harrison reportedly ran around the studio while holding a flaming ashtray above his head.[5] Chris Thomas is a respected British record producer who was born on January 13, 1947. ...


Long after the recording of The Beatles was complete, George Martin mentioned in interviews that his working relationship with The Beatles changed during this period, and that many of the band's efforts seemed unfocused, often yielding prolonged jam sessions that sounded uninspired.[7] On 16 July recording engineer Geoff Emerick, who had worked with the group since Revolver, announced he was no longer willing to work with the group out of disgust with the deteriorating work environment. Engineer Geoff Emerick. ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1966 U.S. LP Back cover Back cover of the original 1966 UK LP. The main photo was edited in separate parts for the booklet of the 1988 Compact Disc release. ...


The sudden departures were not limited to EMI personnel. On 22 August, drummer Ringo Starr abruptly left the studio, explaining later that he felt his role was minimized compared to that of the other members, and that he was tired of waiting through the long and contentious recording sessions. [7] Lennon, McCartney and Harrison pleaded with Starr to return, and after two weeks he did. In Starr's absence, however, McCartney played drums on the tracks that eventually emerged as "Back in the U.S.S.R." and "Dear Prudence." Upon Starr's return, he found his drum kit decorated with red, white and blue flowers, a welcome-back gesture from Harrison.[7] The reconciliation was, however, only temporary, and Starr's exit served as a precursor of future "months and years of misery," in Starr's words. [7] Indeed, after The Beatles was completed, both Harrison and Lennon would stage similar, and similarly unpublicized, departures from the band. [7] McCartney, whose public departure in 1970 would mark the formal end of the band's ensemble, described the sessions for The Beatles as a turning point for the group. Up to this point, he observed, "the world was a problem, but we weren't. You know, that was the best thing about the Beatles, until we started the breakups, like the White Album and stuff. Even the studio got a bit tense then." [7] Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ...


Other musicians

Eric Clapton, at Harrison's invitation, provided lead guitar for Harrison's "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". Harrison soon reciprocated by collaborating on the song "Badge" for Cream's last album Goodbye. George explains in The Beatles Anthology that Clapton's presence temporarily alleviated the studio tension and that all band members were on their best behavior during his time with the band in the studio. Eric Patrick Clapton CBE (born 30 March 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... The 1969 song Badge, by Cream, was penned by Eric Clapton and George Harrison during a collaborative effort between Clapton, Harrison and Ringo Starr. ... Cream were a classic 1960s British rock band, which consisted of guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... Goodbye (also called Goodbye Cream) was the final original album of the rock power trio Cream. ...


Clapton was not the only outside musician to sit in on the sessions. Nicky Hopkins provided piano for "Revolution" and a few others; several horns were also recorded on the album version of "Revolution". "Savoy Truffle" also features the horn section. A bluegrass fiddler was recruited for "Don't Pass Me By," and a team of orchestral players and soothing background singers ended up being important contributors to "Good Night." Nicholas Nicky Hopkins (February 24, 1944 in Ealing, West London – September 6, 1994 in Nashville, Tennessee, USA) was an English musician who featured on scores of the most important British and American popular music recordings of the 1960s and 1970s, playing piano and organ. ... Revolution is a song by The Beatles, written primarily by John Lennon and attributed to Lennon-McCartney. ... Savoy Truffle is a song written by George Harrison and performed by The Beatles on their eponymously-titled album (the White Album). Harrison wrote the song as a tribute to his friend Eric Claptons chocolate addiction, and indeed he derived the title and many of the lyrics from a...


Despite these contributions, and the presence and influence of Ono, no external contributors to The Beatles are listed in the album notes.


Technical advances

The sessions for The Beatles were notable for the band's formal transition from 4-track to 8-track recording. As work on this album began, Abbey Road Studios possessed, but had yet to install, an 8-track machine that had supposedly been sitting in a storage room for months. This was in obedience to EMI's policy of testing and customizing new gear, sometimes for months, before putting it into use in the studios. The Beatles recorded "Hey Jude" and "Dear Prudence" at Trident Studios in central London, which had an 8 track recorder.[5] When they found out about EMI's 8 track recorder they insisted on using it, and engineers Ken Scott and Dave Harries took the machine (without authorization from the studio chiefs) into the Number 2 recording studio for the group to use.[5] Multitrack recording (multitracking or just tracking for short) is a method of sound recording that allows for the separate recording of multiple sound sources to create a cohesive whole. ... Multitrack recording (multitracking or just tracking for short) is a method of sound recording that allows for the separate recording of multiple sound sources to create a cohesive whole. ...


Songs

Although most of the songs on any given Beatles album are usually credited to the songwriting team of "Lennon/McCartney," that description is often misleading, and rarely more so than on The Beatles. With this album, each of the four band members began to showcase the range and depth of his individual songwriting talents, and to display styles that would be carried over to his eventual solo career. Indeed, some songs that the individual Beatles were working on during this period eventually were released on solo albums (John Lennon's "Look At Me" and "Child of Nature," eventually retitled "Jealous Guy"; Paul McCartney's "Junk" and "Teddy Boy"; and George Harrison's "Not Guilty"). John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Jealous Guy is a song written and performed by John Lennon which first appeared on his 1971 album Imagine. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Junk is a song written by Paul McCartney in 1968 while The Beatles were in India. ... Teddy Boy is a song by The Beatles on Anthology 3Which has the chorusTed promised hed be twice as good and he knew he would. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Not Guilty is a song written by George Harrison. ...


Many of the songs on the album display experimentation with unlikely musical genres, borrowing directly from such sources as 1930s dance-hall music (in "Honey Pie"), classical chamber music (in "Piggies"), the avant-garde sensibilities of Yoko Ono and Karlheinz Stockhausen (in "Revolution 9"), and the overproduced sentimentality of lift music (in "Good Night"). Such diversity was quite unprecedented in global pop music in 1968, and the album's sprawling approach provoked (and continues to provoke) both praise and skepticism from observers.[8]' "Revolution 9," in particular, a densely layered eight-minute-and-thirteen-second sound collage, has attracted bewilderment and disapproval from both fans and music critics over the years. Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century (Barret 1988, 45; Harvey 1975b, 705; Hopkins 1972, 33; Klein 1968, 117; Power 1990, 30). ... Elevator music, also known as lift music (in the UK), piped music or muzak, refers to the gentle, bland instrumental arrangements of popular music designed for play in shopping malls, grocery stores, department stores, telephone systems (while the caller is on hold), cruise ships, airports, doctors and dentists offices, and...


The only western instrument available to the group during their Indian visit was the acoustic guitar, and thus most of the songs on The Beatles were written and first performed on that instrument. Some of these songs remained acoustic on The Beatles (notably "Dear Prudence", "Julia", "Blackbird" and "Mother Nature's Son") and were recorded in the studio either solo, or by only part of the group. Acoustic guitar can refer to the following musical instruments: Nylon and gut stringed guitars: Renaissance guitar Baroque guitar Romantic guitar Classical guitar, the modern version of the original guitar, with nylon strings Flamenco guitar Steel stringed guitars: Steel-string acoustic guitar, also known as western, folk or country guitar Twelve... Music sample Mother Natures Son Problems? See media help. ...


Individual compositions

Lennon's contributions to the album are generally more hard-edged lyrically than his previous output, a trend which carried over to his solo career. Examples include his pleas for death on "Yer Blues", his parodic "Glass Onion," which mocks fans who read too much into Beatles' lyrics (see also Paul is dead), and what may be references to drug addiction in "Happiness Is a Warm Gun" ("I need a fix..."). Lennon's intensely personal "Julia" may be seen as foreshadowing his later song "Mother" from his first solo album, John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band; the political "Revolution 1" begins a pattern of overtly political songs like "Give Peace a Chance" and "John Sinclair"; "Revolution 9" reflects extensive contribution and influence from Yoko Ono, another feature of much of Lennon's solo output. Lennon's songs on The Beatles embrace a wide array of styles, including blues ("Yer Blues"), acoustic ballads ("Julia", "Dear Prudence", and "Cry Baby Cry"), and rock ("Everybody's Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey"). Lennon would later describe his contributions to "The White Album" as among his favorite songs recorded with the Beatles. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Glass onions were large hand blown glass bottles used aboard sailing ships to hold wine or brandy. ... Paul McCartney Dead: The Great Hoax, a magazine reporting on the rumours concerning McCartney. ... Happiness Is a Warm Gun is a song by The Beatles featured on the double-disc album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). ... ) Julia is a song by The Beatles. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Revolution is a song by The Beatles, written primarily by John Lennon and attributed to Lennon-McCartney. ... Give Peace a Chance is a song written by John Lennon and originally credited to Lennon-McCartney (John Lennon and Paul McCartney). ... Music sample Revolution #9 Problems? See media help. ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... This article is about The Beatles song. ... Everybodys Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey is a song written by John Lennon (credited to Lennon/McCartney) and performed by The Beatles on their 1968 album The Beatles, also known as The White Album. ...


McCartney's songs for the album include pop ballads ("I Will"), the proto-heavy metal "Helter Skelter", a Beach Boys homage ("Back in the U.S.S.R."), a Bob Dylan parody ("Rocky Raccoon"), a Little Richard parody "(Why Don't We Do It in the Road?)", a music-hall foxtrot ("Honey Pie"), and a soft acoustic ballad ("Blackbird"), among others. The soothing, stripped-down "I Will" and the ska-tinged "Ob-la-di, Ob-la-da" foreshadow themes of McCartney's solo career. For the Radiohead song see I Will (Radiohead song) I Will is a song by the Beatles that was released on the White Album. ... This article is about the Beatles song. ... The Beach Boys are an American rock and roll band. ... This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Rocky Raccoon is a Beatles song from the double-disc album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... Why Dont We Do It in the Road? is a song by the Beatles released on the White Album. ... Honey Pie is a song by The Beatles, from their 1968 album The Beatles (the White Album). Although credited to Lennon-McCartney, it was composed entirely by Paul McCartney. ... Music sample Blackbird Problems? See media help. ... For the Radiohead song see I Will (Radiohead song) I Will is a song by the Beatles that was released on the White Album. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Harrison's sparse ballad "Long, Long, Long" is stylistically quite similar to much of his solo output. His songs on The Beatles also includes the lyrically sophisticated "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", a chronicle of gastronomic excess and dental trauma in "Savoy Truffle", and a class-driven piece of social commentary in "Piggies". Even Ringo Starr was given leave to include the first song composed entirely by himself to be included on a Beatles' album, the countryish "Don't Pass Me By". Long, Long, Long is a song written and sung by George Harrison, and recorded by the Beatles that is on the C-Side of the White Album. ... While My Guitar Gently Weeps is a rock song by The Beatles from the double album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). ... Savoy Truffle is a song written by George Harrison and performed by The Beatles on their eponymously-titled album (the White Album). Harrison wrote the song as a tribute to his friend Eric Claptons chocolate addiction, and indeed he derived the title and many of the lyrics from a... For the animal, see pig. ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Dont Pass Me By is a song by The Beatles from the double-disc album The Beatles (also known as the White Album). ...


As a reflection of the sharp reduction in Lennon and McCartney's joint songwriting, several fragmental, incomplete songs and song ideas were recorded and released on the album ("Why Don't We Do It in the Road?", "Wild Honey Pie," and an untitled McCartney snippet at the end of "Cry Baby Cry") that on previous albums might have been either abandoned or collaboratively developed before release. This trend continued for the rest of the band's recording career; such song fragments were presented by joining them together as a long suite of songs on side two of Abbey Road. Wild Honey Pie is a short song written by Paul McCartney, but credited to Lennon-McCartney. ... Back cover The back cover of the original 1969 UK LP. Note that Her Majesty is not listed, unlike later reissues and the compact disc version—originally making it a hidden track. ...


Self-reflection and change

Many of the songs are personal and self-referencing; for example, "Dear Prudence" was written about actress Mia Farrow's sister, Prudence, who attended the transcendental meditation course with The Beatles in Rishikesh. Often she stayed in her room, engaged in Transcendental Meditation. "Julia" was the name of Lennon's beloved but frequently absent mother, who died during his youth. "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" expresses concern over being "bought and sold," a theme in later songs about Harrison himself, such as "Handle with Care," recorded with The Traveling Wilburys. "Glass Onion" is a Beatles song about Beatles songs. This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... Mia Farrow (born Maria de Lourdes Villiers-Farrow on February 9, 1945) is an American actress. ... River Ganges in Rishikesh Rishikesh (also spelled Hrishikesh) (Hindi: )is a city and a municipal board in Dehradun district in the Indian state of Uttarakhand. ... The Traveling Wilburys were a short-lived supergroup created by George Harrison and Jeff Lynne. ...


Some of the songs on The Beatles mark important changes in the band's recording style. Previously, no female voices were to be heard on a Beatles album, but Yoko Ono made her first vocal appearance on this record, adding backing vocals in "Birthday" (along with Pattie Harrison and Linda Eastman); Yoko also sang backing vocals and a solo line on "The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill" and was, as noted earlier, a strong influence on Lennon's musique concrète piece, "Revolution 9," an avant-garde sound collage that McCartney initially did not want to include on the album.[7] George Harrison and Pattie Boyd in A Hard Days Night Patricia Anne Pattie Boyd (born 17 March 1944) is an English model and photographer who is best known as the wife of first George Harrison and then Eric Clapton. ... Linda Louise Eastman McCartney (September 24, 1941 – April 17, 1998) was an American photographer, musician, and animal rights activist. ... The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill is a Beatles song from double-disc album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). This song mocks the actions of a young American named Richard A. Cooke III, who was visiting his mother, Nancy Cooke de Herrera, at the ashram of the... Musique concrète (French; literally, concrete music), is a style of avant-garde music that relies on natural environmental sounds and other non-musical noises to create music. ...


Demos and bootlegs

A number of songs were recorded in demo form just prior to The Beatles sessions for possible inclusion but were not incorporated as part of the album. These included "Mean Mr. Mustard", "Polythene Pam" (both which would be used for the medley on Abbey Road), "Jubilee" (later retitled "Junk" and released on McCartney's first solo LP), "Child of Nature" (recorded with drastically different lyrics as "Jealous Guy" for Lennon's Imagine), "Circles" (which Harrison would return to fourteen years later on "Gone Troppo") and "Sour Milk Sea" (which Harrison gave to friend and Apple artist Jackie Lomax for his first LP Is This What You Want). Other songs recorded received exposure via bootlegs, notably Harrison's "Not Guilty" (which he would eventually re-record as a solo track and release on his 1979 self-titled album, George Harrison) and Lennon's manic "What's the New Mary Jane". Mean Mr. ... Polythene Pam is the name of a song written by John Lennon (although credited to Lennon-McCartney) and performed by The Beatles on their final album, Abbey Road. ... Back cover The back cover of the original 1969 UK LP. Note that Her Majesty is not listed, unlike later reissues and the compact disc version—originally making it a hidden track. ... Imagine is John Lennons second solo album and is the most popular of his solo works. ... Sour Milk Sea is a song written by George Harrison that surfaced during the sessions for The Beatles (album) (also known as the White Album). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... George Harrison is the eponymous album release by George Harrison in 1979. ... Whats The New Mary Jane is a song written by John Lennon and performed by The Beatles. ...


Album sequencing, editing concerns, and release

The arrangement of the songs on The Beatles follows patterns and establishes symmetries that have been much analyzed over the years. For example, "Wild Honey Pie" is the fifth song from the beginning of the album and "Honey Pie" is the fifth song from the end. Also, three of the four songs containing animal names in their titles ("Blackbird", "Piggies", and "Rocky Raccoon") are grouped together. In a similar fashion, "Honey Pie" and "Savoy Truffle"(both referring to types of desserts) play back to back towards the end of the album. "Savoy Truffle", the fourth song from the end, contains a reference to "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da," the fourth song from the beginning. In addition, the album's four Harrison compositions are distributed evenly, with one appearing on each of the four sides. Each LP's first track is a McCartney composition marking a return to traditional rock n' roll ("Back in the USSR" and "Birthday"). Each LP concludes with a Lennon composition built around themes of childhood and innocence. ("Julia" and "Good Night.") Wild Honey Pie is a short song written by Paul McCartney, but credited to Lennon-McCartney. ... Honey Pie is a song by The Beatles, from their 1968 album The Beatles (the White Album). Although credited to Lennon-McCartney, it was composed entirely by Paul McCartney. ... Savoy Truffle is a song written by George Harrison and performed by The Beatles on their eponymously-titled album (the White Album). Harrison wrote the song as a tribute to his friend Eric Claptons chocolate addiction, and indeed he derived the title and many of the lyrics from a...


The Beatles was the first Beatles' album released by Apple Records, as well as their only original double album. Producer George Martin has said that he was against the idea of a double album at the time and suggested to the group that they reduce the number of songs in order to form a single album featuring their stronger work, but that the band decided against this.[9] A double album is an audio album of sufficient length that two units of the medium in which it is sold (especially records and compact discs) are necessary to contain the entirety of it. ...


Singles

Although "Hey Jude" was not intended to be included on the album, it was recorded during the White Album sessions and was released as a stand-alone single. Its B-side, "Revolution", was an alternate version of the album's "Revolution 1". Lennon had wanted the original version of "Revolution" to be released as a single, but the other three Beatles objected because it was too slow.[7] A new, faster version with distorted guitar was recorded but was nonetheless relegated to the flip side of "Hey Jude". The resulting release -- "Hey Jude" on side A and "Revolution" on side B -- emerged as the first release on the Beatles' new Apple Records label. It went on to become the best selling of all Beatles' singles in the US. For the album of the same name, see Hey Jude (album). ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ...


The album tracks "Ob-La-Di-Ob-La-Da" and "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" were eventually released as single releases in several countries.


Mono version

The Beatles was the last Beatles' album to be released with a unique, alternate mono mix, albeit one issued only in the UK. Twenty-nine of the album's thirty tracks ("Revolution 9" being the only exception) exist in official alternate mono mixes. Label for 1. ...


Beatles' albums after The Beatles (except Yellow Submarine in the UK) occasionally had mono pressings in certain countries, but these editions – of Yellow Submarine, Let It Be, and Abbey Road – were in each case mono fold-downs from the regular stereo mixes. For the 1999 release, see Yellow Submarine Songtrack. ... “Let It Be” redirects here. ...


In the U.S., mono records had already been phased out, so the U.S. release of The Beatles was the first Beatles' LP issued in the U.S. - only in stereo.


Sleeve

The album's sleeve was designed by Richard Hamilton, a notable pop artist who had organised a Marcel Duchamp retrospective at the Tate Gallery the previous year. Hamilton's design was in stark contrast to Peter Blake's vivid cover art for Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, and consisted of a plain white sleeve. The band's name was discreetly embossed slightly below the middle of the album's right side, and the cover also featured a unique stamped serial number, "to create," in Hamilton's words, "the ironic situation of a numbered edition of something like five million copies."[citation needed] Indeed, the artist intended the cover to resemble the "look" of conceptual art, an emerging movement in contemporary art at the time. Later vinyl record releases in the U.S. showed the title in grey printed (rather than embossed) letters. Early copies on compact disc were also numbered. Later CD releases rendered the album's title in black or grey. Richard Hamilton (born February 24, 1922) is an English painter and collage artist. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000), with a complementary website Tate Online (1998). ... Blakes album cover Sir Peter Thomas Blake (born June 25, 1932, in Dartford, Kent) is an English pop artist, best known for his design of the sleeve for The Beatles album Sgt. ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... A serial number is a unique number that is one of a series assigned for identification which varies from its successor or predecessor by a fixed discrete integer value. ... Ironic redirects here. ... Joseph Kosuth, One and Three Chairs (1965) Conceptual art is art in which the concept(s) or idea(s) involved in the work take precedence over traditional aesthetic and material concerns. ... A 12-inch record (left), a 7-inch record (right), and a CD (above) Two 7 singles (left), two colored 7 singles (middle), and two 7 singles with large spindle holes (right). ... CD redirects here. ...


The album's inside packaging included a poster, the lyrics to the songs, and a set of photographs taken by John Kelley during the autumn of 1968 that have themselves become iconic. This is the only sleeve of a Beatles' studio album not to show the members of the band on the front. In 1988, however, Capitol/EMI released a 2-cassette version of the album that featured the bandmembers' faces on the sleeve in the same arrangement as that of With The Beatles. John Adelbert Kelley (the Elder) (September 6, 1907 – October 6, 2004) was an American athlete. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Re-issues

Two re-issues in 1978 (one by Capitol Records, the other by Parlophone) saw the album pressed on white vinyl, completing the look of the "white" album. In 1985, EMI Electrola released a DMM (direct metal mastered) white vinyl pressing of the album in Germany, which was imported to the United States in large numbers. Another popular white vinyl pressing was manufactured in France. The 1978 Parlophone white vinyl export pressing and the German DMM pressing are widely considered the best-sounding versions of the album.[citation needed] This is due to the use of the famed Neumann lathe on the 1978 export pressing and the use of the DMM process on the 1985 pressing. Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindström Company. ...


In 1998, a 30th Anniversary reissue of the album was released on a 2-disc compact disc version, which was imported from the United Kingdom. The packaging of this release is virtually identical to its vinyl counterpart. It has the same pure white gatefold cover, complete with the title "The BEATLES" in a slightly raised, embossed graphic at a slight angle. There is also the now-classic sequentially numbered signification on the front of this cover, thus making this one a real limited edition. The interior to this cover features the song titles on the left-hand side, and the four black-and-white photos of the group members on the right. This version of the cover even accurately mimics the original British vinyl pressing from 1968, with the openings for the discs at the top rather than the sides. There are miniatures of the 4 full-colour glossy portrait photos included, as well as an exact replica of the poster with the photo collage on one side, and the album's complete song lyrics on the opposite side. The CDs are housed in black sleeves, which were also used for the original British album. Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Critical assessments and the album's legacy

The Beatles were at the peak of their global influence and visibility in late 1968. The release of their self-titled album was a major event both for the mainstream press and for the youth-oriented counterculture movement with which they had by this time become strongly associated.

  • Tony Palmer, in the London Observer, wrote shortly after the album's release: "If there is still any doubt that Lennon and McCartney are the greatest songwriters since Schubert, then . . . [the album The Beatles] . . . should surely see the last vestiges of cultural snobbery and bourgeois prejudice swept away in a deluge of joyful music making. . . ."[10]

Many of the reviews that have followed in the decades since -- and The Beatles surely ranks among the most-reviewed releases in rock history -- have been similarly enthusiastic. A consistent note of skepticism about the album's seemingly undisciplined structure has, however, emerged as a common critical theme. The Observer is a United Kingdom newspaper published on Sundays. ... For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ...

  • The New Rolling Stone Album Guide praises the album but maintains that it has "loads of self-indulgent filler," identifying "Revolution #9" in particular as "justly maligned," and suggests that listeners in the CD era, who can program digital players to skip over unwanted tracks, may have an advantage over the album's original audience. [11]

Some critics have gone so far as to list the album's inclusion of supposedly extraneous material as a part of its appeal. The music.com review contends that: Music. ...

  • "Each song on the sprawling double album The Beatles is an entity to itself, as the band touches on anything and everything they can. This makes for a frustratingly scattershot record or a singularly gripping musical experience, depending on your view, but what makes the White Album interesting is its mess." [12]

One important current trend in critical assessments of the album is to draw parallels between the band's disintegrating ensemble and the chaotic events of the tumultuous year in which The Beatles was created, 1968. Along these lines, Slant Magazine observed that: Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Since its inception in 2001, Slant Magazine has grown exponentially in content, exposure, and readership. ...

  • "(The album) reveals the popping seams of a band that had the pressure of an entire fissuring generational/political gap on its back. Maybe it's because it shows the Beatles at the point where even their music couldn't hide the underlying tensions between John, Paul, George, and Ringo, or maybe because it was (coincidentally?) released at the tail end of a year anyone could agree was the embittered honeymoon's end for the Love Generation, the year when, to borrow from a famous Yeats poem, the center decidedly could not hold ... for whatever reason, The Beatles is still one of the few albums by the Fab Four that resists reflexive canonization, which, along with society's continued fragmentation, keeps the album fresh and surprising." [13]

Cultural responses

Ian McDonald, in his book "Revolution in the Head," argues that The Beatles was the album in which the band's cryptic messages to its fan base became not merely vague but intentionally and perhaps dangerously open-ended, citing oblique passages in songs like "Glass Onion" (e.g., "the walrus was Paul") and "Piggies" ("what they need's a damn good whacking"). These pronouncements, and many others on the album, came to attract extraordinary popular interest at a time when more of the world's youth were using drugs recreationally and looking for spiritual, political, and strategic advice from The Beatles. Steve Turner, too, in his book "A Hard Day's Write," maintains that, with this album, "The Beatles had perhaps laid themselves open to misinterpretation by mixing up the languages of poetry and nonsense." [14] Bob Dylan's songs had been similarly mined for hidden meanings, but the massive countercultural analysis (or perhaps overanalysis) of The Beatles surpassed anything that had gone before. [15] This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the recording artist. ...


The search for hidden meanings within the songs reached its low point when cult leader Charles Manson used the record, and generous helpings of hallucinogens, to persuade members of his "family" that the album was in fact an apocalyptic message predicting a prolonged race war and justifying the murder of wealthy people. (See Helter Skelter (Manson scenario).) The album's strange association with a high-profile mass murder was one of many factors that helped to deepen the accelerating divide between those who were profoundly skeptical of the "youth culture" movement that had unfolded in the middle and late 1960s in England, the United States, and elsewhere, and those who admired the openness and spontaneity of that movement. Charles Milles Manson (b. ... // The murders perpetrated by Charles Manson and members of his Family were inspired in part by Mansons prediction of Helter Skelter, an apocalyptic war he believed would arise from tension over racial relations between blacks and whites. ...


Even Lennon's seemingly direct engagement with the tumultuous political issues of 1968 in "Revolution 1" carried a nuanced obliqueness, and ended up sending messages the author may not have intended. In the album's version of the song, Lennon advises those who "talk about destruction" to "count me out." As McDonald notes, however, Lennon then follows the sung word "out" with the spoken word "in." At the time of the album's release -- which followed, chronologically, the up-tempo single version of the song, "Revolution," in which Lennon definitely wanted to be counted "out" -- that single word "in" was taken by many on the radical left as Lennon's acknowledgment, after considered thought, that violence in the pursuit of political aims was indeed justified in some cases. At a time of increasing unrest in the streets and campuses of Paris and Berkeley, the album's (seemingly more equivocal) lyrics seemed to many to mark a reversal of Lennon's position on the question, which was hotly debated during this period.[15]


Influences, parodies and tributes

The album's cover, though stark and minimalistic, has been highly influential. Goth Rock band The Damned released The Black Album in 1980, and is considered the first album to draw influence from the cover, as well as the first band to use the term "Black Album". The 1984 Rob Reiner 'rockumentary' Spinal Tap also pays homage with their own 'Black Album', which is juxtaposed to the original by A&R staff Bobbi Fleckman, who notes in a debate about appropriate packaging material: 'What about the White album? There's was nothing on that cover'. The band are generally less enthusiastic, referring to it variously as 'a black mirror', 'none more black' and 'death'. In the 1990s, both Prince and Metallica released self-titled albums with their names printed against mostly plain black covers, and are both informally referred to as "The Black Album". In 2003, rapper Jay-Z released an album officially called The Black Album. Two compilations of Beatles material, released in 1973 as 1962–1966 and 1967–1970, are often referred to as "The Red Album" and "The Blue Album" respectively, in reference to their colour scheme. Both of Weezer's self-titled albums borrow from this idea as well and fans refer to them respectively as "The Blue Album" (1994) and "The Green Album" (2001). 311's self-titled release from 1995 is often referred to as "The Blue Album", and The Dells' 1973 self-titled album is often known as "The Brown Album", as is The Band's 1969 self-titled album. This article is about the music group. ... The Black Album was the fourth album by The Damned, and the first to feature Paul Gray on bass guitar. ... For other uses, see Spinal Tap (disambiguation). ... For another person sometimes known as The Artist, see Michael Haynes III. Prince Rogers Nelson (born June 7, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American funk musician. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Jay-Z (aka the Jigga, HOV and Hova, born Shawn Carter on December 4, 1970 in Brooklyn, New York) is an African American rapper/hip hop artist and record label executive; one of the most popular and successful rappers of the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... Singles from The Black Album Released: November 11, 2003 Released: January 13, 2004 Released: April 13, 2004 The Black Album is a 2003 hip hop music album by rapper Jay-Z. It was supposedly his last studio album until Jay-Z announced a return to solo recording in 2006. ... 1962–1966 (widely known as The Red Album) is a compilation of The Beatles greatest hits from 1962 to 1966. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For the albums, see Weezer (1994 album) and Weezer (2001 album). ... Alternate cover Cover of 2004 double-CD deluxe edition Weezer, often referred to as The Blue Album, is the debut album by the alternative rock band Weezer. ... Weezer, commonly referred to as The Green Album, is a 2001 album by the band Weezer. ... 311 (pronounced three eleven) is a band, from Omaha, Nebraska. ... The Blue Album is the name commonly used for the eponymously titled album by 311. ... The Dells are one of the longest standing R&B groups; formed in 1952 in Chicago, Illinois, and still going as of 2005. ... For other uses, see Band. ... The Band is the eponymous second album by The Band, released on September 22, 1969 (see 1969 in music). ...


Bob and Tom's first comedy album, The White Album, released Christmas 1986, borrows its name from the Beatles' album, though the cover does not - rather, it features cartoon caricature portraits of the show's titular stars Bob Kevoian and Tom Griswold. This is the first of two Bob and Tom compilations to be named after or parody Beatles' albums (the other being their second release, Shabbey Road.) Both albums are out-of-print. The Bob & Tom Show is a radioshow established by Bob Kevoian and Tom Griswold at radio station WFBQ in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1983. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...


In 1979, the writer Joan Didion published a collection of essays in a volume entitled The White Album. Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American writer, known as a journalist, essayist, and novelist. ...


In 1982, Canadian comedians Bob and Doug McKenzie released their "Great White North" album, which Bob introduced as the "Great White Album." Great White North album cover with Bob (left) and Doug McKenzie (right) Bob and Doug McKenzie were a pair of fictional Canadian brothers who hosted The Great White North, a sketch which was introduced on SCTV for the shows third season when it moved to the CBC in 1980. ...


Washington based band Sunny Day Real Estate released an album with an entirely pink cover, which became to be known as The Pink Album. Sunny Day Real Estate or SDRE was an alternative rock band formed in Seattle, Washington. ... Sunny Day Real Estate is the second studio album by emo band Sunny Day Real Estate. ...


They Might Be Giants' 1986 self-titled debut album is referred to as The Pink Album for the colour of the record's centre label (and later the colour of the CD label), as well as to avoid confusion with the band's name and their later song "They Might Be Giants." This article is about the musical group. ... They Might Be Giants is the eponymous first album from They Might Be Giants, also known as the Pink Album. It was released in 1986. ...


In 1987, Saturday Night Live comedian Dennis Miller released his first comedy album, entitled The Off-White Album, recorded live at George Washington University, featuring a likewise coloured album cover. This article is about the American television series. ... Dennis Miller (born November 3, 1953) is an American Emmy Award-winning comedian, political commentator, television personality, and talk radio host. ...


Electronica duo Orbital's first two albums are both titled Orbital and known colloquially as the "Green Album" (1991) and the "Brown Album" (1993), whilst their 2004 release has the formal title Blue Album. Orbital was an English techno duo from 1989 until 2004, consisting of brothers Paul and Phil Hartnoll. ... Orbital was the first album from Orbital, released in 1991. ... Orbital is the second album from the British electronica duo, Orbital. ... The Blue Album (released 21 June 2004) was the final album from the British electronica duo Orbital. ...


In 1995, the Australian comedy duo Martin/Molloy released a double CD officially called The Brown Album, and in 1997 the band Primus released a CD with the same title. Martin/Molloy was a hugely popular Australian radio program starring Tony Martin and Mick Molloy, both formerly of The D-Generation and The Late Show. ... The Brown Album is the first compliation double-album of material taken from the Australian radio program Martin/Molloy. ... For other uses, see Primus. ... For other uses, see The Brown Album. ...


In 1998, an album of new songs from The Simpsons, titled The Yellow Album, was released. The album's cover was a parody of the cover of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, which had already been done as a couch gag for an episode in the series. Simpsons redirects here. ... The Yellow Album is the 1998 Simpsons album released as a follow up to the 1990 album The Simpsons Sing the Blues. ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... The couch gag is a running visual joke in the opening credits of the animated television series The Simpsons. ...


In 2000, comedian Lewis Black released an album titled The White Album, with similar cover art, down to the capitalisation scheme of "Lewis BLACK". Lewis Niles Black (born August 30, 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning American stand-up comedian, author, playwright, and actor. ...


In 2004, Brian Burton (also known as Danger Mouse) released The Grey Album, an unauthorised mashup remix album that was later distributed on the Internet, using samples from The White Album against the a cappella version of Jay-Z's Black Album. EMI and Apple sent Brian Burton cease and desist letters, which prevented official distribution of The Grey Album. Brian Joseph Burton, better known by his stage name Danger Mouse, is an American artist and producer. ... The Grey Album is an album by Danger Mouse released in 2004 (see 2004 in music). ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ... This article is about the vocal technique. ... Cease-and-desist is a legal term meaning essentially stop: It is used in demands for a person or organization to stop doing something (to cease and desist from doing it). ...


Also in 2004, Australian alternative band TISM released a 2 DVD/1 CD pack called The White Albun. An intentional misspelling of The White Album, its packaging was a white box with 'TISM' embossed on the front. At the end of the song "Cerebral Knievel" there is a short parody of "Revolution 9". TISM (an acronym of This Is Serious Mum) is a seven piece anonymous alternative rock band from Melbourne, Australia. ... The White Albun is an album by Australian alternative rock band TISM. It is a deliberate misspelling of the famous Beatles album (the White Album). ...


In 2006, Brian Molko of Placebo sings "You were Mother Nature's son]] in the song "Song to Say Goodbye", which is a reference to the song "Mother Nature's Son" from the White Album. Brian Molko (born December 10, 1972, in Belgium) is a songwriter, lead vocalist and guitarist of the band Placebo. ... Placebo are an alternative rock band currently consisting of Brian Molko and Stefan Olsdal. ... Song to Say Goodbye is the second single from Placebos sixth studio album Meds. ...


Additionally, in 2007 The Hives released The Black and White Album This article is about the Swedish band. ... Singles from The Black and White Album Released: August 14, 2007 The Black and White Album is the title of the fourth full-length album by Swedish garage rock revivalists The Hives. ...


Later covers and coverage

is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about the holiday. ... The logo from the Live Phish Halloween shows. ... Live Phish Vol. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Chris Thomas is a respected British record producer who was born on January 13, 1947. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... Roxy Music are an English art rock group founded in the early 1970s by art school graduate Bryan Ferry (vocals and keyboards). ... Brian Eno (pronounced IPA: ) born on 15 May 1948 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) is an English electronic musician, music theorist and record producer. ... Bardo Pond are an American psychedelic rock band formed in 1991. ... Deerhoof is a San Francisco musical group, currently consisting of Satomi Matsuzaki (usually vocals and bass), John Dieterich (usually guitar) and Greg Saunier (usually drums). ... Bedouin Soundclash frontman Jay Malinowski in Ottawa, 2007. ...

Track listing

All songs credited to Lennon/McCartney, except where noted. The songwriting partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney, usually referred to as Lennon/McCartney (sometimes McCartney/Lennon), is one of the best-known and most successful musical collaborations of all time. ...


Side one

  1. "Back in the U.S.S.R." – 2:43
  2. "Dear Prudence" – 3:56
  3. "Glass Onion" – 2:17
  4. "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da" – 3:08
  5. "Wild Honey Pie" – 0:52
  6. "The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill" – 3:13
  7. "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" (George Harrison) – 4:45
  8. "Happiness Is a Warm Gun" – 2:43

This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... Glass onions were large hand blown glass bottles used aboard sailing ships to hold wine or brandy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wild Honey Pie is a short song written by Paul McCartney, but credited to Lennon-McCartney. ... The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill is a Beatles song from double-disc album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). This song mocks the actions of a young American named Richard A. Cooke III, who was visiting his mother, Nancy Cooke de Herrera, at the ashram of the... While My Guitar Gently Weeps is a rock song by The Beatles from the double album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Happiness Is a Warm Gun is a song by The Beatles featured on the double-disc album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). ...

Side two

  1. "Martha My Dear" – 2:28
  2. "I'm So Tired" – 2:03
  3. "Blackbird" – 2:18
  4. "Piggies" (Harrison) – 2:04
  5. "Rocky Raccoon" – 3:32
  6. "Don't Pass Me By" (Ringo Starr) – 3:50
  7. "Why Don't We Do It in the Road?" – 1:40
  8. "I Will" – 1:45
  9. "Julia" – 2:54

Martha My Dear is a Beatles song which first appeared on the double-disc album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). ... Im So Tired is a Beatles song from the double-disc album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). ... Music sample Blackbird Problems? See media help. ... For the animal, see pig. ... Rocky Raccoon is a Beatles song from the double-disc album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). ... Dont Pass Me By is a song by The Beatles from the double-disc album The Beatles (also known as the White Album). ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Why Dont We Do It in the Road? is a song by the Beatles released on the White Album. ... For the Radiohead song see I Will (Radiohead song) I Will is a song by the Beatles that was released on the White Album. ... ) Julia is a song by The Beatles. ...

Side three

  1. "Birthday" – 2:42
  2. "Yer Blues" – 4:00
  3. "Mother Nature's Son" – 2:47
  4. "Everybody's Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey" – 2:24
  5. "Sexy Sadie" – 3:15
  6. "Helter Skelter" – 4:29
  7. "Long, Long, Long" (Harrison) – 3:03

Birthday is a fun and frivolous song that is sometimes played to celebrate the anniversary of a persons birth written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney (though largely the work of McCartney) and performed by The Beatles on their self-titled The White Album. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Music sample Mother Natures Son Problems? See media help. ... Everybodys Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey is a song written by John Lennon (credited to Lennon/McCartney) and performed by The Beatles on their 1968 album The Beatles, also known as The White Album. ... Sexy Sadie is the name of a song by The Beatles, written by John Lennon (and Paul McCartney) in India. ... This article is about the Beatles song. ... Long, Long, Long is a song written and sung by George Harrison, and recorded by the Beatles that is on the C-Side of the White Album. ...

Side four

  1. "Revolution 1" – 4:15
  2. "Honey Pie" – 2:40
  3. "Savoy Truffle" (Harrison) – 2:54
  4. "Cry Baby Cry" – 3:02
  5. "Revolution 9" – 8:13
  6. "Good Night" – 3:11

Revolution is a song by The Beatles, written primarily by John Lennon and attributed to Lennon-McCartney. ... Honey Pie is a song by The Beatles, from their 1968 album The Beatles (the White Album). Although credited to Lennon-McCartney, it was composed entirely by Paul McCartney. ... Savoy Truffle is a song written by George Harrison and performed by The Beatles on their eponymously-titled album (the White Album). Harrison wrote the song as a tribute to his friend Eric Claptons chocolate addiction, and indeed he derived the title and many of the lyrics from a... This article is about The Beatles song. ... Music sample Revolution #9 Problems? See media help. ... Good Night is the final song by The Beatles on their self-titled album (aka The White Album). ...

Other tracks of the period

The following were rejected before the original release and final mixing:[5]

  1. "What's the New Mary Jane"
  2. "Not Guilty"
  3. "Etcetera"

"Hey Jude" was always intended to be a stand-alone single and was never intended for the album.[16] Whats The New Mary Jane is a song written by John Lennon and performed by The Beatles. ... Not Guilty is a song written by George Harrison. ... For the album of the same name, see Hey Jude (album). ...


The following songs were in an early form and may or may not have been considered for the album:[17]

  1. "Junk" (known at the time as "Jubilee", released on McCartney's first solo album McCartney)
  2. "Circles" (later released on Harrison's solo album Gone Troppo)
  3. "Sour Milk Sea" (later recorded by Jackie Lomax)
  4. "Something" (later featured on Abbey Road)
  5. "Mean Mr. Mustard" (later featured on Abbey Road)
  6. "Polythene Pam" (later featured on Abbey Road)
  7. "Child of Nature" (inspired by the same Maharishi lecture as Paul McCartney's "Mother Nature's Son", its lyrics were too similar to Paul's composition for it to be considered for the album - a reworked version of this song later appeared as a hit single from John Lennon's solo album "Imagine" in the form of "Jealous Guy")

Junk is a song written by Paul McCartney in 1968 while The Beatles were in India. ... McCartney is the first solo album by Paul McCartney and was released in 1970. ... Gone Troppo is an album by George Harrison recorded and released in 1982. ... Sour Milk Sea is a song written by George Harrison that surfaced during the sessions for The Beatles (album) (also known as the White Album). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... For other uses, see Something (disambiguation). ... Back cover The back cover of the original 1969 UK LP. Note that Her Majesty is not listed, unlike later reissues and the compact disc version—originally making it a hidden track. ... Mean Mr. ... Polythene Pam is the name of a song written by John Lennon (although credited to Lennon-McCartney) and performed by The Beatles on their final album, Abbey Road. ... Music sample Mother Natures Son Problems? See media help. ... Imagine is John Lennons second solo album and is the most popular of his solo works. ... Jealous Guy is a song written and performed by John Lennon which first appeared on his 1971 album Imagine. ...

Personnel

John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Acoustic guitar can refer to the following musical instruments: Nylon and gut stringed guitars: Renaissance guitar Baroque guitar Romantic guitar Classical guitar, the modern version of the original guitar, with nylon strings Flamenco guitar Steel stringed guitars: Steel-string acoustic guitar, also known as western, folk or country guitar Twelve... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... The Hammond organ is an electric organ which was invented by Laurens Hammond in 1934 and manufactured by the Hammond Organ Company until the 1970s. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... A Harmonium is a free-standing musical keyboard instrument similar to a Reed Organ or Pipe Organ. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ... Rhythm guitar is a guitar that is primarily used to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment for a singer or for other instruments in an ensemble. ... The Hammond organ is an electric organ which was invented by Laurens Hammond in 1934 and manufactured by the Hammond Organ Company until the 1970s. ... Acoustic guitar can refer to the following musical instruments: Nylon and gut stringed guitars: Renaissance guitar Baroque guitar Romantic guitar Classical guitar, the modern version of the original guitar, with nylon strings Flamenco guitar Steel stringed guitars: Steel-string acoustic guitar, also known as western, folk or country guitar Twelve... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Wild Honey Pie is a short song written by Paul McCartney, but credited to Lennon-McCartney. ... This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... “Buben” redirects here. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... Eric Patrick Clapton CBE (born 30 March 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... While My Guitar Gently Weeps is a rock song by The Beatles from the double album The Beatles (also known as The White Album). ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Maureen Cox Starkey (August 4, 1946 – December 30, 1994) was the first wife of The Beatles drummer, Ringo Starr. ... Pattie Boyd with George Harrison George and Pattie in A Hard Days Night Patricia Anne Pattie Boyd (born 17 March 1945 in Hampstead, London, England), model and photographer, is best known as the wife of two famous rock musicians and the possible inspiration for several memorable rock love songs. ... Malcolm Mal Evans (27 May 1935 – 5 January 1976) is best known as the road manager, assistant, and a friend of the Beatles. ... Chris Thomas may refer to: Chris Thomas (basketball), a former mens basketball player for Notre Dame Chris Thomas (boxer), a cruiserweight boxer Chris Thomas (comedian), a comedian and former host of syndicated music show Rap City Chris Thomas (record producer), a record producer of rock and New Wave albums... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ...

Release history

Country Date Label Format Catalog
United Kingdom November 22, 1968 Apple Records mono double LP PMC 7067-8
stereo double LP PCS 7067-8
United States November 25, 1968 Apple, Capitol Records double LP SWBO 101
Worldwide reissue July 20, 1987 Apple, Parlophone, EMI double CD CDP 7 46443-4 2
Japan March 11, 1998 Toshiba-EMI double CD TOCP 51119-20
Japan January 21, 2004 Toshiba-EMI remastered LP TOJP 60139-40

is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... Label for 1. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Label for 2. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindström Company. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... CD redirects here. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Toshiba-EMI - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

See also

Paul McCartney Dead: The Great Hoax, a magazine reporting on the rumours concerning McCartney. ... Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century (Barret 1988, 45; Harvey 1975b, 705; Hopkins 1972, 33; Klein 1968, 117; Power 1990, 30). ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Maharishi Mahesh Yogi (b. ... Music sample Revolution #9 Problems? See media help. ... Charles Milles Manson (b. ... The Grey Album is an album by Danger Mouse released in 2004 (see 2004 in music). ...

Notes

  1. ^ The 100 Greatest British Albums Ever. Q. Retrieved on 2007-11-20.
  2. ^ 2001 VH1 Cable Music Channel All Time Album Top 100. VH1. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  3. ^ The All-Time 100 Albums. Time. Retrieved on 2007-11-20.
  4. ^ The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Lewisohn, Mark (1988). The Beatles Recording Sessions. New York: Harmony Books. ISBN 0-517-57066-1. 
  6. ^ The White Album @ Playhouse. BBC.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h The Beatles Anthology (1995)
  8. ^ "Each song on the sprawling double album The Beatles is an entity to itself, as the band touches on anything and everything they can. This makes for a frustratingly scattershot record or a singularly gripping musical experience, depending on your view, but what makes the White Album interesting is its mess." http://www.music.com/release/the_beatles/1/
  9. ^ The Beatles Anthology DVD features an interview with Martin confirming this discussion.
  10. ^ Norman, Phillip (1981). Shout!. Fireside Press. 
  11. ^ Brackett, Nathan (2004). The New Rolling Stone Album Guide. Simon and Schuster. 
  12. ^ White ALbum Review. Retrieved on 2007-10-08.
  13. ^ Slant Magazine review.
  14. ^ Turner, Steve (1996). A Hard Day's Write. London: Little Brown. 
  15. ^ a b MacDonald, Ian (2005). Revolution in the Head: The Beatles' Records and the Sixties. 
  16. ^ Lewisohn, Mark (1988). The Beatles Recording Sessions, 145. 
  17. ^ Lewisohn, Mark (1996). The Complete Beatles Chronicle. Chancellor Press. ISBN 0-7607-0327-2. 

Q is a music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom, with a circulation of 140,282 and a readership of 731,000. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Internet Beatles Album - Beatles Reference Library (2061 words)
Beatles on Ed Sullivan - A rundown of the entire Ed Sullivan show on February 7, 1964, on which the Beatles appeared, and some relevant comments, by Saki, and a posting of all the songs the Beatles played on all four Ed Sullivan appearances.
Beatles Bibliography - A very comprehensive list of most of the books about the Beatles that are currently in print in the US and the UK, updated April 1996.
Sessions - A newspaper article from the Chicago Sun-Times regarding the Sessions album, the album of Beatles alternate LP cuts and outtakes that was due to be released but never came to be, and an article by Alan Kozzin describing why Sessions was never released.
Internet Beatles Album - Beatles Portfolios (328 words)
Kite Ballad of John and Yoko Beatles Bigger Than Jesus Paul Is Dead...
A year ago the Beatles were known only to patrons of Liverpool pubs.
Now the Beatles are getting a royal welcome in America.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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