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Encyclopedia > The Andrews Sisters
The Andrews Sisters on the cover of the reissue collection The Best of the Andrews Sisters: The Millennium Collection. From left to right: Maxene, Patty, and LaVerne.
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The Andrews Sisters were a close harmony singing group, consisting of sisters LaVerne Sophie Andrews (contralto; July 6, 1911May 8, 1967), Maxene Angelyn Andrews (soprano; January 3, 1916October 21, 1995), and Patricia Marie (a.k.a. Patty) Andrews (lead; born February 16, 1918). All were born in Minnesota to a Greek immigrant father and a Norwegian American mother. Cover of Andrews Sisters collection The Best of the Andrew Sisters: The Millennium Collection, taken from Amazon. ... Close harmony is an arrangement of the notes of chords within a narrow range, typically one octave. ... In music, an alto is a singer with a vocal range somewhere between a tenor and a soprano. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the voice-type. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... The Norwegian-Americans are an ethnic group in the United States. ...

Contents

History

Patty, the youngest and the lead singer of the group, was only seven when the group was formed, and just twelve years old when they won first prize at a talent contest at the local Orpheum Theater in Minneapolis, where LaVerne played piano accompaniment for the silent film showings in exchange for free dancing lessons for her and her sisters. Once the sisters found fame and settled in California, their parents lived with them in a Brentwood estate until their deaths, and several cousins from Minnesota followed them west. The sisters returned to Minneapolis at least once a year to visit family and friends and/or perform. In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... Theatres Orpheum Circuit, Inc. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the neighborhood in Los Angeles. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ...


They started their career as imitators of an earlier successful singing group, The Boswell Sisters. After singing with various dance bands and touring in vaudeville with the likes of comic bandleader Larry Rich (also known as Dick Rich), Ted Mack, and Leon Belasco, they first came to national attention with their recordings and radio broadcasts in 1937, most notably via their major Decca record hit, Bei Mir Bist Du Schön (translation: To me, you are beautiful)[1], an originally Yiddish tune the lyrics of which Sammy Cahn translated to English and the girls harmonized to perfection. It sold a million copies, making them the first female vocal group to achieve a Gold Record award. They followed this success with a string of best-selling records over the next two years and they became a household name by 1940. The Boswell Sisters on the cover of the reissue album collection Thats How Rhythm Was Born The Boswell Sisters were a close harmony singing group that attained national prominence in the USA in the 1930s. ... This article is about the musical variety theatre. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... (Yiddish: , or To Me Youre Beautiful) is a popular Yiddish song originally composed (with the title Bei Mir Bistu Shein) by Jacob Jacobs (lyricist) and Sholom Secunda (composer) for a Yiddish musical, I Would if I Could, (in Yiddish, ) in 1932 that opened and closed after only one season. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... Sammy Cahn (June 18, 1913 – January 15, 1993) was an award-winning American lyricist, songwriter and musician, best known for his romantic lyrics to tin pan alley and Broadway songs, as recorded by Frank Sinatra, Doris Day and many others. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Female (disambiguation). ... Abba Crosby Stills & Nash Danny & The Juniors Dion & the Belmonts Dixie Hummingbirds Earth Wind & Fire Fifth Dimension Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers Gladys Knight & The Pips Hank Ballard & the Midnighters Jay & the Americans Little Anthony & the Imperials Martha & the Vandellas Peter, Paul and Mary Smokey Robinson & The Miracles Sonny Til and... The description Gold Album is applied to recorded music albums that have sold a minimum number of copies (in the US, currently 500,000 sales). ... A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on a list of top-sellers. ...


Record Setting Hits

The Andrews Sisters became the best-selling female vocal group in the history of popular music, setting records that remain unsurpassed to this day:

Some of the trio's best-remembered and most popular hits were: Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Elvis redirects here. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Edward Sullivan, see Edward Sullivan (disambiguation). ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ... Pierino Ronald Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an American crooner. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an American singer, film actor, and comedian. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... For other persons named John Carson, see John Carson (disambiguation). ... Joey Bishop (February 3, 1918 â€“ October 17, 2007) was perhaps best remembered as being a member of the Rat Pack with Frank Sinatra, Peter Lawford, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. ... Art Linkletter caricature by Sam Berman for NBCs 1947 promotion book Art Linkletter (born Gordon Arthur Kelly on July 17, 1912) was the host of two of the longest-running shows in broadcast history: House Party, which ran on CBS radio and television for 25 years, and People Are... Jimmy Dean (b. ...

(Yiddish: , or To Me Youre Beautiful) is a popular Yiddish song originally composed (with the title Bei Mir Bistu Shein) by Jacob Jacobs (lyricist) and Sholom Secunda (composer) for a Yiddish musical, I Would if I Could, (in Yiddish, ) in 1932 that opened and closed after only one season. ... Beer Barrel Polka, also known as Roll Out the Barrel, is a song which became popular world-wide during World War II. The music was originally composed by the Czech musician Jaromír Vejvoda aka Twinkletoes in 1927. ... Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the Bar is a song in the American boogie-woogie tradition of syncopated piano music. ... Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy, a song about a virtuoso trumpet player, was a major hit for the Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Jingle Bells, originally One Horse Open Sleigh, is one of the best known and commonly sung, secular Christmas songs in the world. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Rum and Coca-Cola is the title of a popular calypso song. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Dont Fence Me In is a song written by Cole Porter and Robert Fletcher [1] in 1944. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive is a popular song. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Carmen Miranda, pron. ... Blue Tail Fly, De Blue Tail Fly, or Jimmy Crack Corn is a blackface minstrel song, first performed in the United States in the 1840s, which remains a popular childrens song today. ... Blue Tail Fly, De Blue Tail Fly, or Jimmy Crack Corn is a blackface minstrel song, first performed in the United States in the 1840s, which remains a popular childrens song today. ... Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives (14 June 1909 –14 April 1995) was an Academy Award winning American actor and acclaimed folk music singer and author. ... Winter Wonderland is a pop standard written in 1934 by Felix Bernard (composer) and Richard B. Smith (lyricist). ... Guy Lombardo, photographed by William P. Gottlieb, 1947 Gaetano Alberto Guy Lombardo (June 19, 1902 – November 5, 1977) was a Canadian bandleader and violinist famous in the United States. ... Near You is a popular song. ... Central New York City. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... Rumors Are Flying is a popular song. ... This article is about the musician. ... I Can Dream, Cant I? is a popular song. ... I Wanna Be Loved is a popular song with music by Johnny Green and lyrics by Edward Heyman and Billy Rose, published in 1933. ... Gordon Jenkins Gordon Hill Jenkins (12 May 1910-1 May 1984) was an American arranger who was an influential figure in popular music in the 1940s and 1950s, renowned for his lush string arrangements. ...

World War II

During World War II, they entertained the Allied forces extensively in America, Africa and Italy, visiting Army, Navy, Marine and Coast Guard bases, war zones, hospitals, and munitions factories.[2] They also helped actors Bette Davis and John Garfield found California's famous Hollywood Canteen, a welcome retreat for servicemen where the trio often performed, volunteering their personal time to sing for and dance with soldiers, sailors and Marines (they did the same at New York City's Stage Door Canteen during the war). While touring, they often treated three random servicemen to dinner when they were dining out. They recorded a series of Victory Discs (V-Discs) for distribution to Allied fighting forces only, again volunteering their time for studio sessions for the Music Branch, Special Service Division of the Army Service Forces, and they were dubbed the "Sweethearts of the Armed Forces Radio Service" for their many appearances on shows like "Command Performance," "Mail Call," & "G.I. Journal." Perhaps only Bob Hope and his troupe did more to entertain the troops. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... Naval redirects here. ... British Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft Marines (from the English adjective marine, meaning of the sea, from Latin language mare, meaning sea, via French adjective marin(e), of the sea) are, in principle, seaborne land soldiers that are part of a navy. ... A coast guard is a national organization responsible for various services at sea. ... A hospital today is an institution for professional health care provided by physicians and nurses. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... John Garfield John Garfield (born March 4, 1913 in New York City; died May 21, 1952 in New York City) was an American actor. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Hollywood Canteen operated at 1451 Cahuenga Boulevard in Hollywood, California between October 3, 1942 and the end of World War II as a club offering food and entertainment for American servicemen, usually on their way overseas. ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... A sailor is a member of the crew of a ship or boat. ... British Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft Marines (from the English adjective marine, meaning of the sea, from Latin language mare, meaning sea, via French adjective marin(e), of the sea) are, in principle, seaborne land soldiers that are part of a navy. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Stage Door Canteen is a 1943 film. ... In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... American Forces Network, or AFN - the acronym that its most commonly known as, is the brand name used by the United States Armed Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS) for its networks worldwide. ... The abbreviation G.I. or GI is most commonly used to shorten government issue, and has different meanings depending on the part of speech in which it is used. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ...


Setting Records

They recorded 47 songs with crooner Bing Crosby, 23 of which charted on Billboard, thus making the team one of the most successful pairings of acts in a recording studio in show business history. Their million-sellers with Crosby included "Pistol Packin' Mama," "Don't Fence Me In," "South America, Take It Away," and "Jingle Bells," among other yuletide favorites. Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... Show business is a vernacular term for the business of entertainment. ... Dont Fence Me In is a song written by Cole Porter and Robert Fletcher [1] in 1944. ... Jingle Bells, originally One Horse Open Sleigh, is one of the best known and commonly sung, secular Christmas songs in the world. ...


The sisters' popularity was such that after the war they discovered some of their records had actually been smuggled into Germany after the labels had been changed to read "Hitler's Marching Songs." Their recording of Bei Mir Bist Du Schön became a favorite of the Nazis, until it was discovered that the song's composers were of Jewish descent. Still, it did not stop concentration camp inmates from secretly singing it. (Jewish jazzman Benny Goodman, with Martha Tilton singing, had his own hit with the song; it was a highlight of his legendary Carnegie Hall concert of 1938.) Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... (Yiddish: , or To Me Youre Beautiful) is a popular Yiddish song originally composed (with the title Bei Mir Bistu Shein) by Jacob Jacobs (lyricist) and Sholom Secunda (composer) for a Yiddish musical, I Would if I Could, (in Yiddish, ) in 1932 that opened and closed after only one season. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... Benny Goodman, born Benjamin David Goodman[1] , (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was an American jazz musician and virtuoso clarinetist, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, The Professor, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Goodman was born in Chicago, the ninth of twelve children of poor Jewish... Martha Tilton (born November 14, 1915 in Corpus Christi, Texas) is an American popular singer best-known for her 1939 recording of And the Angels Sing with Benny Goodman. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Along with Bing Crosby, separately and jointly, The Andrews Sisters were among the performers who incorporated ethnic music styles into America's Hit Parade, popularizing or enhancing the popularity of songs with melodies originating in Israel, Italy, Spain, France, Ireland, Czechoslovakia, Russia, Sweden, Brazil, Mexico, and Trinidad, many of which their manager chose for them. Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... For other uses, see Trinidad (disambiguation). ...


Movies

Maxene, Patty, and LaVerne appeared in 15 Hollywood films. Their first picture, Argentine Nights, paired them with another enthusiastic trio, the Ritz Brothers. Universal Pictures, always budget-conscious, refused to hire a choreographer, so the Ritzes taught the sisters some eccentric steps. Thus, in Argentine Nights and the sisters' next film, Buck Privates, the Andrews Sisters dance like the Ritz Brothers. The Ritz Brothers were a comedy team who appeared in 1930s films, and as live performers from 1925 to the late 1960s. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... Buck Privates is the 1941 comedy/World War II film that turned Bud Abbott and Lou Costello into bonafide movie stars. ...


Buck Privates, with Abbott and Costello, featured the Andrews Sisters' best-known song, "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy." This Don Raye-Hughie Prince composition was nominated for Best Song at the 1941 Academy Awards ceremony. In 2001, the song was voted #6 on a list of 365 entries for Songs of the Century. Buck Privates is the 1941 comedy/World War II film that turned Bud Abbott and Lou Costello into bonafide movie stars. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy, a song about a virtuoso trumpet player, was a major hit for the Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. ... The Song of the Year is one of the two most prestigious awards in the Grammies, if not in all of the music industry. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Songs of the Century list is part of an education project by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the National Endowment for the Arts, and Scholastic Inc. ...


Universal hired the sisters for two more Abbott & Costello comedies, and then promoted them to full-fledged stardom in B musicals. What's Cookin', Private Buckaroo, and Give Out, Sisters (the latter portraying the sisters as old ladies) were among the team's popular full-length films. Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ...


The Andrews Sisters have a specialty number in the all-star revue Hollywood Canteen. They can be seen singing "You Don't Have to Know the Language" with Bing Crosby in Paramount's Road to Rio with Bob Hope, that year's highest-grossing movie. Their singing voices are heard in two full-length Walt Disney features ("Make Mine Music" which featured Johnny Fedora & Alice Blue Bonnet, and "Melody Time", which introduced Little Toot, both of which are available on DVD today). The Hollywood Canteen operated at 1451 Cahuenga Boulevard in Hollywood, California between October 3, 1942 and the end of World War II as a club offering food and entertainment for American servicemen, usually on their way overseas. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Road to Rio is a 1948 comedy film, directed by Norman Z. McLeod and starring Bob Hope and Bing Crosby. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Make Mine Music is an animated feature produced by Walt Disney and released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures on April 20, 1946. ... Melody Time (first released on May 27, 1948) is an animated feature produced by Walt Disney and released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Little Toot is a childrens story written by Hardie Gramatky ISBN 0-399-22419-X. It tells the story of Little Toot, an anthropomorphic tugboat child, who disgraces his father Big Toot with his childish antics. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Stage and radio shows

The Andrews Sisters were the most sought-after entertainment property in theater shows worldwide during the 1940s and early 1950s, always topping previous house averages. Blonde Patty, brunette Maxene and redhead LaVerne headlined at the London Palladium in 1948 and 1951 to sold-out crowds. They hosted their own radio shows for ABC & CBS from 1944-1951, singing specially-written commercial jingles for such products as Wrigley's chewing gum, Dole pineapples, Nash motor cars, Kelvinator home appliances, Campbell's soups, and Franco-American food products. The London Palladium in 2004 The London Palladium is a 2,286 seat West End theatre located off Oxford Street in the City of Westminster. ... This article is about the American broadcast network. ... CBSs first color logo, which debuted in the fall of 1965. ... The Wm. ... Chewing gum Chewing gum is a type of confectionery, traditionally, made of chicle, a natural latex product, although for reasons of economy and quality many modern chewing gums use rubber instead of chicle. ... Dole can refer to: Look up dole in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nash may refer to: // Nash, Buckinghamshire, England Nash, Herefordshire, England Nash, Bromley, London Borough Nash, Newport, Wales Nash, Telford and Wrekin, former village in Shropshire, England Nash, South Shropshire, England Nash Lee, Buckinghamshire, England Nash Mills, Hertfordshire, England Nash, Oklahoma, a town Nash, Texas, a city Nash, North Dakota, a... Kelvinator Appliance ad from 1951 Kelvinator is an appliance company since 1994 owned by Electrolux of Sweden. ... Campbell Soup Company (NYSE: CPB) (also known as Campbells) is undeniably the most well-known producer of canned soups and related products in the United States (and possibly the world). ... Franco-American is a former brand name of the Campbell Soup Company. ...


Musical innovators

When the sisters burst upon the music scene in the late-1930s, they shook a very solid musical foundation: producing a slick harmonic blend by singing at the top of their lungs while trying - successfully - to emulate the blare of three harmonizing trumpets, with a full big band racing behind them. Some bandleaders of the day, such as Artie Shaw and his musicians, resented them for taking the focus away from the band and emphasizing the vocals instead. They were also in as high demand as the big bandleaders themselves, many of whom did not want to share the spotlight and play back-up to a girl trio. A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... Artie Shaw (May 23, 1910, New York, New York – December 30, 2004, Thousand Oaks, California) is considered to be one of the best jazz musicians of his time. ...


Nevertheless, they found instant appeal with teenagers and young adults who were engrossed in the swing and jazz idioms, especially when they performed with nearly all of the major big bands, including those led by Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Buddy Rich, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Gene Krupa, Joe Venuti, Freddie Slack, Eddie Heywood, Bob Crosby (Bing's brother), Desi Arnaz, Guy Lombardo, Les Brown, Bunny Berigan, Xavier Cugat, Paul Whiteman, Ted Lewis, Nelson Riddle and mood-master Gordon Jenkins, whose orchestra and chorus accompanied them on such successful soft and melancholy renditions as "I Can Dream, Can't I?" (which shot to number one on Billboard and remained in the Top 10 for 25 weeks), "I Wanna Be Loved," "There Will Never Be Another You," and the inspirational "The Three Bells" (the first recorded English version of the French composition), as well as several solo recordings with Patty, including a cover version of Nat "King" Cole's "Too Young," "It Never Entered My Mind," "If You Go," and "That's How A Love Song Is Born." For other uses, see swing. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... A big band is a type of musical ensemble associated with playing jazz music and which became popular during the Swing Era from the early 1930s until the late 1940s, although there are many big-bands around nowadays. ... This article is about the jazz musician. ... Benny Goodman, born Benjamin David Goodman[1] , (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was an American jazz musician and virtuoso clarinetist, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, The Professor, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Goodman was born in Chicago, the ninth of twelve children of poor Jewish... Bernard Buddy Rich (September 30, 1917 Brooklyn, New York – April 2, 1987) was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. ... Tommy Dorsey, in a publicity shot for The Big Apple Tommy Dorsey (November 19, 1905 – November 26, 1956) was an American jazz trombonist and bandleader in the Big Band era. ... James Jimmy Dorsey (February 29, 1904 - June 12, 1957) was a prominent jazz clarinetist, saxophonist and big band leader. ... Gene Krupa (January 15, 1909 – October 16, 1973) was a famous and influential American jazz and big band drummer, known for his highly energetic and flamboyant style. ... Giuseppe (Joe) Venuti (September 16, 1903 – August 14, 1978) was a U.S. jazz musician and violinist. ... Frederick Charles Slack (August 7, 1910 – August 10, 1965) was an American swing and boogie-woogie pianist and bandleader. ... Eddie Heywood (birthname:Edward Heywood, Jr. ... Bob Crosby (August 23, 1913 - March 9, 1993) was an American bandleader and singer. ... Desi Arnaz (born Desiderio Alberto Arnaz y de Acha III) (March 2, 1917 – December 2, 1986) was a Cuban musician, actor, comedian and television producer. ... Guy Lombardo, photographed by William P. Gottlieb, 1947 Gaetano Alberto Guy Lombardo (June 19, 1902 – November 5, 1977) was a Canadian bandleader and violinist famous in the United States. ... Les Brown may refer to: Les Brown (bandleader) (1912–2001), U.S. Big Band leader Les Brown Jr. ... Bunny Berigan (November 2, 1908 – June 2, 1942) was an early, great jazz trumpeter. ... Xavier Cugat and his Orchestra 1952 Film featurette - Universal Studios Francesc dAsís Xavier Cugat Mingall de Bru i Deulofeu (1 January 1900 – 27 October 1990) was a Catalan-Cuban bandleader whom many consider to have had more to do with the infusion of Latin music into United States... 1928 Columbia Records label with caricature of Paul Whiteman Paul Whiteman (March 28, 1890 – December 29, 1967) was a popular american orchestral leader. ... There have been several people of note called Ted Lewis. ... Nelson Smock Riddle, Jr. ... Gordon Jenkins Gordon Hill Jenkins (12 May 1910-1 May 1984) was an American arranger who was an influential figure in popular music in the 1940s and 1950s, renowned for his lush string arrangements. ... I Can Dream, Cant I? is a popular song written by Sammy Fain and the lyrics by Irving Kahal. ... Number One or number one is used in a variety of meanings: // 1 (number) Number One (song), a single by rapper Nelly Number Ones, an album by Michael Jackson Number One (Pist. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... I Wanna Be Loved is a popular song with music by Johnny Green and lyrics by Edward Heyman and Billy Rose, published in 1933. ... There Will Never Be Another You is a popular song. ... The Three Bells is a song made popular by The Browns in 1959. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Nat King Cole in The Blue Gardenia (1953) Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a hugely popular American singer and jazz musician. ... Too Young is a popular song. ... It Never Entered My Mind is a 1940 popular song composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics by Lorenz Hart for the musical Higher and Higher (1940), where it was introduced by Shirley Ross. ... Track Listing “As Time Goes By” Herman Hupfield 2:48 “If You Go” Geoffrey Parsons, Michel Emer 2:39 “Oh Love Hast Thou Forsaken Me” William Bowers 2:33 “Say It Isnt So” Irving Berlin 2:53 “I Wish I Didnt Love You So” Frank Loesser 2:45...


Many styles

While the sisters specialized in swing, boogie-woogie, and novelty hits with their trademark lightning-quick vocal syncopations, they also produced major hits in jazz, ballads, folk, country-western, seasonal, and religious titles, being the first Decca artists to record an album of gospel standards in 1950. Their versatility allowed them to pair with many different artists in the recording studios, producing Top 10 hits with the likes of Bing Crosby (the only recording artist of the 1940s to sell more records than The Andrews Sisters), Danny Kaye, Dick Haymes, Carmen Miranda, Al Jolson, Ray McKinley, Burl Ives, Ernest Tubb, Red Foley, Dan Dailey, Alfred Apaka, and Les Paul. In personal appearances, on radio and on television, they sang with everyone from Rudy Vallee, Judy Garland and Nat "King" Cole to Jimmie Rodgers, Andy Williams, and Diana Ross & The Supremes. For other uses, see swing. ... Boogie woogie has two different meanings: a piano based music style, boogie woogie (music) a dance that imitates the rocknroll of the 50s, boogie woogie (dance) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... A ballad is a story in song, usually a narrative song or poem. ... Folk can refer to a number of different things: It can be short for folk music, or, for folksong, or, for folklore; it may be a word for a specific people, tribe, or nation, especially one of the Germanic peoples; it might even be a calque on the related German... Country music, once known as Country and Western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... This article is about divisions of a year. ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... Dick Haymes (born September 13, 1918 in Buenos Aires) was one of the most popular American male vocalists of the 1940s. ... Carmen Miranda, pron. ... Al Jolson (May 26, 1886–October 23, 1950) was a highly acclaimed American singer, comedian and actor of Jewish heritage whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... Ray McKinley (June 18, 1910–May 7, 1995) was an American jazz drummer, singer, and bandleader. ... Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives (14 June 1909 –14 April 1995) was an Academy Award winning American actor and acclaimed folk music singer and author. ... Ernest Dale Tubb (February 9, 1914 – September 6, 1984), nicknamed the Texas Troubadour, was an American singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of country music. ... Clyde Julian Red Foley ( June 17, 1910 - September 19, 1968) was a country music singer. ... Daniel James Dailey Jr. ... Alfred Apaka (1919 - 1960) was a famous singer of Hawaiian music in the 1940s and 1950s. ... This article is about the musician. ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Nat King Cole in The Blue Gardenia (1953) Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a hugely popular American singer and jazz musician. ... Jimmie Rodgers was the name of two singers: Jimmie Rodgers (country singer) Jimmie Rodgers (pop singer) Jimmie Rodgers (SPC Deputy Director General) Note that there was also a Jimmy Rogers (note the spelling), a blues singer born in 1924. ... For other persons named Andrew Williams, see Andrew Williams (disambiguation). ... For the author-illustrator, see Diana Ross (author). ... For other uses, see Supremes (disambiguation). ...


Career interruption

The Andrews Sisters broke up in 1953, the main catalyst being Patty's decision to go solo, with her husband acting as her agent. When Maxene & LaVerne learned of Patty's decision from newspaper gossip columns rather than their own sister, it caused a rather bitter two-year separation, especially when Patty decided to worsen matters by suing LaVerne for a larger share of their parents' estate. Maxene and LaVerne tried to continue the act as a duo and met with good press during a 10-day tour of Australia, but a reported suicide attempt by Maxene in December, 1954 put a halt to any further tours (Maxene spent a short time hospitalized after swallowing 18 sleeping pills, which LaVerne told reporters was an accident). Gossip column A gossip column is an article in a newspaper or magazine written by a gossip columnist. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


When all was forgiven and the trio reunited in 1956, they signed a new recording contract with Capitol Records (for which Patty had become a featured soloist) and they released a dozen singles through 1959, some rock-and-roll flavored and not very well received, and three hi-fi albums, including a vibrant LP of songs from the dancing 1920s with Billy May's orchestra. In 1962, they signed with Dot Records and recorded a series of stereo albums over five years, both re-recordings of earlier hits, as well as new material, including "I Left My Heart In San Francisco," "Still," "The End Of The World," "Puff the Magic Dragon," "Sailor," "Satin Doll," the Theme from Come September, and the Theme from A Man and a Woman. They toured extensively during the 1960s, favoring top nightclubs in Las Vegas, Nevada, California and London, England. Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... This article is about the 1940s–1960s style of music. ... High Fidelity is also the title of a book by Nick Hornby and a film directed by Stephen Frears, based upon Hornbys book. ... An LP Long playing (LP), either 10 or 12-inch diameter, 33 rpm (actually 33. ... William E. May, better known as Billy May (10 November 1916 – 22 January 2004) was an American composer, arranger and musician. ... Dot Records was an American record label which was active between 1950 and 1977. ... This article is about the spacecraft and the mission. ... Tony Bennetts heart in San Franciscos Union Square I Left My Heart in San Francisco is a popular song, written in 1954. ... The term still is a contraction of the verb to distill. A still is an apparatus used to distill miscible or immiscible (eg. ... Puff, the Magic Dragon is a song written and popularized by Peter, Paul and Mary in the 1960s. ... This article is about maritime crew. ... Satin Doll is a famous jazz standard written by Johnny Mercer, Duke Ellington, and Billy Strayhorn. ... Come September is a 1961 comedy-romance genre film, directed by Robert Mulligan. ... For the song by U2, see A Man and a Woman (song). ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ...


The act came to an abrupt end in 1967 when eldest sister LaVerne died of cancer after a year-long bout with the illness, during which she was replaced by singer Joyce DeYoung. LaVerne had founded the original group, and often acted as the peacemaker amongst the three during the sisters' lives, more often siding with her parents, to whom the girls were extremely devoted, than with either of her sisters. Once she was gone, Maxene saw no need to continue as a duo (she taught acting, drama, and speech at a Lake Tahoe college and worked with troubled teens), and Patty was once again eager to be a soloist. Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... This article is about the lake in California/Nevada. ... In music, a solo is a piece or a section of a piece played or sung by a single performer (solo is an Italian word literally meaning alone). ...


Comeback

Both surviving sisters had something of a comeback when Bette Midler recorded a rock-and-roll version of their song "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" in 1972. Their most notable comeback, however, was in the Sherman Brothers' nostalgic World War II musical: "Over Here!" which premiered on Broadway at the Shubert Theater in 1974 to rave reviews. This was a follow-up to Patty's success in "Victory Canteen" a 1971 California revue. The musical starred Maxene and Patty (with Janie Sell filling in for LaVerne and winning a Tony Award for her performance) and was written with both sisters in mind for the leads. It launched the careers of many now notable theater, film and television icons (John Travolta, Marilu Henner, Treat Williams, Ann Reinking, et al). It was the last major hurrah for the sisters and was cut short due to a frivolous lawsuit initiated by Patty's husband against the show's producers, squashing an extensively scheduled road tour for the company, including the sisters. Bette Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress and comedienne, also known to her fans as The Divine Miss M. She is named after the actress Bette Davis although Davis pronounced her first name in two syllables, and Midler uses one. ... This article is about the 1940s–1960s style of music. ... Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy, a song about a virtuoso trumpet player, was a major hit for the Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. ... Robert B. Sherman & Richard M. Sherman at the London Palladium in 2002 during the premiere of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Stage Musical. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Over Here! is a musical with a score by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman and book by Will Holt. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Shubert Theatre, Boston The Shubert Organization was founded by the Shubert brothers, Sam Shubert, Lee Shubert, and Jacob J. Shubert of Syracuse, New York in the late 19th century in upstate New York, entering into New York City productions in 1900. ... Victory Canteen is a musical comedy play with script by Milt Larsen and Bobby Lauher and song score by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... Janie Sell is a theater, movie and TV actress born in Detroit on October1, 1941, who won Broadways 1974 Tony Award as Best Supporting or Featured Actress (Musical) for Over Here!, which also starred the then-surviving Andrews Sisters, Maxene and Patty. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer, best known for his leading roles in films such as Saturday Night Fever, Grease and Pulp Fiction. ... Marilu Henner (born April 6, 1952) is an American actress and producer. ... Treat Williams (born December 1, 1951) is an American film, stage and television actor. ... Ann Reinking (born November 10, 1949 in Seattle, Washington) is an American actress and dancer, most famous for her association with choreographer Bob Fosse. ...


Patty immediately distanced herself from Maxene, who claimed until her death that she was not aware of Patty's motives regarding the separation. She appealed to Patty for a reunion, personally if not professionally, both in public and in private, but to no avail. Maxene suffered a serious heart attack while performing in Illinois in 1982 and underwent quadruple bypass surgery, from which she successfully recovered. Patty visited her sister while she was hospitalized. Now sometimes appearing as "Patti" (but still signing autographs as "Patty") she re-emerged in the late 1970s as a regular panelist on The Gong Show. Maxene had a very successful comeback as a cabaret soloist in 1979 and toured worldwide for the next 15 years, recording a solo album in 1985 entitled "Maxene: An Andrews Sister" for Bainbridge Records. Patty debuted her own solo act in 1981, but did not receive the critical acclaim her sister had for her performances, even though it was Patty who was considered to be the "star" of the group for years. The critics' major complaint was that Patty's show concentrated too much on Andrews Sisters material, which did not allow Patty's own talents as a very expressive and bluesy vocalist to shine through. Heart attack redirects here. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Coronary artery bypass surgery Image showing a tube leading into the heart as well as the chest spreaders used to keep the chest cavity open. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The two sisters did reunite, albeit briefly, on October 1, 1987 when they received a star on Hollywood's famous Walk of Fame, even singing a few bars of "Beer Barrel Polka" for the Entertainment Tonight cameras. Ironically, an earthquake shook the area that very morning and the ceremony was nearly canceled, which caused Patty to joke, "Some people said that earthquake this morning was LaVerne because she couldn't be here, but it was really Maxene and I on the telephone." Both sisters laughed and shared a hug. Other than this encounter, they remained estranged for a total of 20 years. is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... A Walk of Fame is a public installation which honours celebrities by embedding star-shaped tiles bearing the names of famous people in a sidewalk. ... Beer Barrel Polka, also known as Roll Out the Barrel, is a song which became popular world-wide during World War II. The music was originally composed by the Czech musician Jaromír Vejvoda aka Twinkletoes in 1927. ... Entertainment Tonight is a daily television entertainment news show that is syndicated by CBS Paramount Domestic Television throughout the United States, Canada, on the Nine Network in Australia and on UBC Inside in Thailand. ...


Shortly after her off-Broadway debut in New York City in a show called Swingtime Canteen, Maxene suffered another heart attack and died at Cape Cod Hospital on October 21, 1995. Not long before she died, Maxene told music historian William Ruhlmann, "I have nothing to regret. We got on the carousel and we each got the ring and I was satisfied with that. There's nothing I would do to change things if I could...Yes, I would. I wish I had the ability and the power to bridge the gap between my relationship with my sister, Patty." It was also reported that Maxene was estranged from her two adopted children, Aleda Ann & Peter, at the time of her death. Upon hearing the news of her sister's death, Patty became very distraught. As her husband Wally went to her, he fell on a flight of stairs and broke both wrists. Patty did not attend her sisters' memorial services in New York, nor in California. Said Bob Hope of Maxene's passing, "She was more than part of The Andrews Sisters, much more than a singer. She was a warm and wonderful lady who shared her talent and wisdom with others." Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Cape Cod Hospital is a not-for-profit regional medical center located in Hyannis, Massachusetts. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ...


Legacy

Instrumental to the sisters' success over the years were their parents, Olga (d. 1948) and Peter (d. 1949); their orchestra leader and musical arranger Vic Schoen (d. 2000); music publishing giant Lou Levy (who passed away only days after Maxene), their manager from 1937 to 1951 as well as Maxene's husband from 1941-1949, ; and both Jack & David Kapp, who founded Decca Records. OLGA is an acronym for On-line Guitar Archive [1], the oldest internet library of guitar and bass tablature, or tabs. Born from a collection of guitarist internet-forum archives, it has been a useful resource for musicians for over a decade. ... Look up Peter, peter in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lou Levy may refer to: Lou Levy (publisher) – New York music publisher and partner of Sammy Cahn. ... Look up Jack, jack in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Patty Andrews married agent Marty Melcher in 1947, and left him in 1949 when he pursued a romantic relationship with Doris Day (at the time of his death, Melcher left Day in millions of dollars of debt after mismanaging her money for years, unbeknownst to Doris). Patty then married Walter Weschler in 1951, the trio's pianist. LaVerne married Lou Rogers (who died days after Lou Levy in 1995) in 1948, a trumpet player in Vic Schoen's band, and remained with him until her death. Doris Mary Ann von Kappelhoff (born April 3, 1924)[1] is an American singer, actress, and animal welfare advocate known as Doris Day. ... Lou Levy may refer to: Lou Levy (publisher) – New York music publisher and partner of Sammy Cahn. ...


Throughout their long career, the sisters had sold over well over 75 million records (that being the last official count released by MCA Records in the mid-1970s). The group was inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 1998. The Music Corporation of America was a United States based corporation in the music business. ... The Vocal Group Hall of Fame was organized to honor what they term the Greatest Vocal Groups in the World. The Hall of Fame is headquartered in Sharon, Pennsylvania, United States. ...


LaVerne and Maxene Andrews are interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California with their parents, and room remains in the crypt for Patty if she chooses that as her final resting place. Gates of Forest Lawn Forest Lawn Memorial Park is a cemetery in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California. ... Nickname: Location of Glendale within Los Angeles County and the State of California. ...


The Andrews Sisters' recording of "Don't Sit under the Apple Tree" was sampled in Soul Coughing's song "Down to This" off their album Ruby Vroom. Until the advent of the Ronettes and the Supremes, the sisters were the most imitated of all female singing groups, and influenced many artists, including Mel Tormé, Les Paul & Mary Ford, The Four Freshmen, The McGuire Sisters, The Lennon Sisters, The Pointer Sisters, The Manhattan Transfer, Barry Manilow, and Bette Midler; even Elvis Presley was a fan. Soul Coughing (1992–2000) was a New York-based alternative rock band comprised of Mike Doughty (vocals, lyrics, guitar), Mark De Gli Antoni (samples, keyboards), Sebastian Steinberg (string bass) and Yuval Gabay (drums). ... Ruby Vroom was Soul Coughings 1994 (see 1994 in music) debut album. ... The Ronettes first album The Ronettes were a girl group of the 1960s from New York City, best known for their work with producer Phil Spector. ... For other uses, see Supremes (disambiguation). ... Melvin Howard Tormé (September 13, 1925 – June 5, 1999), nicknamed The Velvet Fog, is best known as one of the great male jazz singers. ... This duo was comprised of Les Paul and Mary Ford This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Four Freshmen were an American vocal group popular from the 1950s through the early 1960s. ... The McGuire Sisters The McGuire Sisters were a singing trio in American popular music. ... The Lennon Sisters were a singing group consisting of four siblings: Dianne (born December 1, 1939), Peggy (born April 8, 1941), Kathy (born August 2, 1943), and Janet (born June 15, 1946). ... The Pointer Sisters was an American vocal group and recording act that achieved great success during the 1970s and 1980s. ... The Manhattan Transfer is an American vocal group that was established in New York City in 1972. ... Barry Manilow (born June 17, 1946) is an American singer and songwriter best known for such recordings as I Write the Songs, Mandy, Weekend in New England and Copacabana. ... Bette Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress and comedienne, also known to her fans as The Divine Miss M. She is named after the actress Bette Davis although Davis pronounced her first name in two syllables, and Midler uses one. ... Elvis redirects here. ...


Most of the Andrews Sisters' music has been restored and released in compact disc form, yet over 300 of their original Decca recordings, a good portion of which was hit material, has yet to be released by MCA/Decca in over 50 years. Many of these Decca recordings have been used in such television shows and Hollywood movies as Homefront, ER, The Brink's Job, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, Swing Shift, Raggedy Man, Summer Of '42, Slaughterhouse Five, Maria's Lovers, Harlem Nights, In Dreams, Murder In The First, L.A. Confidential, Just Shoot Me, Mama's Family, War & Remembrance, Jacob The Liar, Lolita, The Polar Express, The Chronicles Of Narnia, Memoirs of a Geisha, and more. Comical references to the trio in television sitcoms can be found as early as I Love Lucy and as recent as Everybody Loves Raymond. Recently their version of Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen was included in the game BioShock, a first-person shooter that takes place in 1960. CD redirects here. ... The Music Corporation of America was a United States based corporation in the music business. ... Homefront may be: a computer game mod, see Homefront (game) a TV show series, see Homefront (TV show) the civilian populace in a war, see home front This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... ER is an Emmy-winning American serial medical drama created by novelist Michael Crichton and set primarily in the emergency room of fictional County General Hospital in Cook County, Chicago, Illinois. ... The Brinks Job Starring Peter Falk Peter Boyle Allen Goorwitz Warren Oates Gena Rowlands Paul Sorvino Directed by William Friedkin 1978 Dino De Laurentiis Corp. ... National Lampoons Christmas Vacation (1989, Warner Bros. ... Swing shift, also known as second shift, is an employment schedule during the evening, for example 4 p. ... Raggedy Man is a 1981 film starring Sam Shepard and Sissy Spacek. ... Slaughterhouse-Five; or, The Childrens Crusade: A Duty-Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Harlem Nights is a comedy-drama / Mobster film starring Eddie Murphy and Richard Pryor. ... Roy Orbison - In Dreams In Dreams is a Roy Orbison 33 1/3 record album from Monument Records recorded at their studio in Hendersonville, Tennessee and released in 1963. ... This article is about the film. ... Just Shoot Me was an American television sitcom airing on NBC from 1997 to 2003. ... Mamas Family is an American television sitcom that premiered on NBC on January 22, 1983. ... Lolita is a 1997 film directed by Adrian Lyne and was the second screen adaptation of the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... The Polar Express is a 1985 childrens book (ISBN 0-86264-143-8) written and illustrated by Chris Van Allsburg, a former professor at the Rhode Island School of Design. ... Narnia redirects here. ... This article is about the book. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... I Love Lucy is a television situation comedy, starring Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball, also featuring Vivian Vance and William Frawley. ... Everybody Loves Raymond is an American sitcom originally broadcast on CBS from 1996 to 2005. ... Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen is a popular song, the title meaning to me you are beautiful. ... BioShock is a first-person shooter[10] video game by 2K Boston/2K Australia (previously Irrational Games),[11] designed by Ken Levine. ...


Christina Aguilera used the The Andrews Sisters' "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" to inspire her song "Candyman" (released as a single in 2007) from her hit album Back to Basics. The song was co-written by Linda Perry. The London based trio the Puppini Sisters uses their style harmonies on several Andrews Sisters and other hits of the 1940's and 1950's as well as later rock and disco hits. The trio has said their name is a tribute to The Andrews Sisters. This article is about the singer. ... Candyman is a pop song written by Christina Aguilera and Linda Perry for Aguileras third studio album Back to Basics (2006). ... Singles from Back to Basics Released: June 3, 2006 Released: October 18, 2006 Released: February 5, 2007 Released: July 28, 2007 Released: November 23, 2007 Back to Basics is the third full-length English studio album from American pop singer-songwriter Christina Aguilera. ... Linda Perry, born April 15, 1965 in Springfield, Massachusetts, to parents of Portuguese descent,[1] is an American rock musician, songwriter, and record producer. ... The Puppini Sisters are a musical trio specializing in 1940s style vocal close harmony music. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... This article is about the music genre. ...


At age 89, Patty Andrews remains a recluse in Northridge, California, together with Wally, her husband of over 55 years. In interviews, when granted, she rarely speaks personally of her sisters. When asked about their legendary feuding, she jokes about it and quickly moves onto the next topic. Perhaps they were less virulent than they were rumored to be, considering that the sisters were hardly separated in 36 years of performing as a trio (they even vacationed together). Northridge is a community in the City of Los Angeles. ...


Hit records

Highest Chart Positions on Billboard; with Vic Schoen & his orchestra, unless otherwise noted:

(Yiddish: , or To Me Youre Beautiful) is a popular Yiddish song originally composed (with the title Bei Mir Bistu Shein) by Jacob Jacobs (lyricist) and Sholom Secunda (composer) for a Yiddish musical, I Would if I Could, (in Yiddish, ) in 1932 that opened and closed after only one season. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beer Barrel Polka, also known as Roll Out the Barrel, is a song which became popular world-wide during World War II. The music was originally composed by the Czech musician Jaromír Vejvoda aka Twinkletoes in 1927. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy, a song about a virtuoso trumpet player, was a major hit for the Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jingle Bells, originally One Horse Open Sleigh, is one of the best known and commonly sung, secular Christmas songs in the world. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Santa Claus Is Coming to Town (sometimes with Coming changed to Comin) is a Christmas song. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Is You Is Or Is You Aint My Baby is a 1944 Louis Jordan song, released on a single with G.I. Jive which reached #1 on both the Billboard pop and R&B charts. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dont Fence Me In is a song written by Cole Porter and Robert Fletcher [1] in 1944. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rum and Coca-Cola is the title of a popular calypso song. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive is a popular song. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Along the Navajo Trail is a country/pop song, written by Dick Charles (pseudonym for Richard Charles Krieg), Larry Markes, and Edgar De Lange in 1945. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rumors Are Flying is a popular song. ... This article is about the musician. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Near You is a popular song. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Civilization is a popular song. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Underneath the Arches was the venue at which the aba daba company performed during the nineties. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... I Can Dream, Cant I? is a popular song. ... Gordon Jenkins Gordon Hill Jenkins (12 May 1910-1 May 1984) was an American arranger who was an influential figure in popular music in the 1940s and 1950s, renowned for his lush string arrangements. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... I Wanna Be Loved is a popular song with music by Johnny Green and lyrics by Edward Heyman and Billy Rose, published in 1933. ... Gordon Jenkins Gordon Hill Jenkins (12 May 1910-1 May 1984) was an American arranger who was an influential figure in popular music in the 1940s and 1950s, renowned for his lush string arrangements. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Other songs

Highest Chart Positions on Billboard; with Vic Schoen & his orchestra, unless otherwise noted:

Nice Work If You Can Get It is a 1983 (see 1983 in music) studio album by the American jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald, accompanied by the pianist Andre Previn, and the double bassist Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen. ... Shortenin Bread is a traditional song. ... James Jimmy Dorsey (February 29, 1904 - June 12, 1957) was a prominent jazz clarinetist, saxophonist and big band leader. ... James Jimmy Dorsey (February 29, 1904 - June 12, 1957) was a prominent jazz clarinetist, saxophonist and big band leader. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Giuseppe (Joe) Venuti (September 16, 1903 – August 14, 1978) was a U.S. jazz musician and violinist. ... The Woodpecker Song was a hit recorded by Glenn Miller and Kate Smith in 1940. ... Title card from the 1941 cartoon Scrub Me Mama with a Boogie Beat. ... Look up Aurora, aurora in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Basic Information Sonny Boy is a 1928 Al Jolson film. ... JEALOUS is the first single by the J-Rock group Dir en grey released in 1998 on an independent label. ... Here Comes the Navy is a 1934 romantic comedy starring James Cagney, Pat OBrien and Gloria Stuart. ... Tico-Tico no Fubá is the title of a renounded Brazilian choro music piece much celebrated by Carmen Miranda in the 1940s which was composed by Zequinha de Abreu. ... The Three Caballeros is a 1944 animated feature film, produced by Walt Disney and distributed by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Guy Lombardo, photographed by William P. Gottlieb, 1947 Gaetano Alberto Guy Lombardo (June 19, 1902 – November 5, 1977) was a Canadian bandleader and violinist famous in the United States. ... The New York Public Library (NYPL), one of three public library systems serving New York City, is one of the leading libraries in the United States. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... I Dont Know Why (I Just Do) is a popular song. ... Eddie Heywood (birthname:Edward Heywood, Jr. ... Winter Wonderland is a pop standard written in 1934 by Felix Bernard (composer) and Richard B. Smith (lyricist). ... Guy Lombardo, photographed by William P. Gottlieb, 1947 Gaetano Alberto Guy Lombardo (June 19, 1902 – November 5, 1977) was a Canadian bandleader and violinist famous in the United States. ... Guy Lombardo, photographed by William P. Gottlieb, 1947 Gaetano Alberto Guy Lombardo (June 19, 1902 – November 5, 1977) was a Canadian bandleader and violinist famous in the United States. ... Tallahassee is the capital of Florida, a state of the United States of America. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Perhaps one of the most famous, and recognizable, show-tunes ever is Theres No Business Like Show Business. This Irving Berlin marvel was written for Annie Get Your Gun and has two reprises within the show. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Dick Haymes (born September 13, 1918 in Buenos Aires) was one of the most popular American male vocalists of the 1940s. ... Carmen Cavalarro was an American pianist from New York. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Teresa, Theresa, and Therese (French: ) are feminine given names. ... Dick Haymes (born September 13, 1918 in Buenos Aires) was one of the most popular American male vocalists of the 1940s. ... In the strictest definition, a heartbreaker is one who causes a broken heart, or feeling of severe loss in another person. ... The Harmonica Gentlemen was a TRIO consisting of George Fields (chromatic harmonica), Leo Friedman (chord harmonica), and Don Ripps (bass harmonica). ... The Harmonica Gentlemen was a TRIO consisting of George Fields (chromatic harmonica), Leo Friedman (chord harmonica), and Don Ripps (bass harmonica). ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... The Harmonica Gentlemen was a TRIO consisting of George Fields (chromatic harmonica), Leo Friedman (chord harmonica), and Don Ripps (bass harmonica). ... Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives (14 June 1909 –14 April 1995) was an Academy Award winning American actor and acclaimed folk music singer and author. ... You Call Everybody Darlin is a popular song. ... Carmen Miranda, pron. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Ernest Dale Tubb (February 9, 1914 – September 6, 1984), nicknamed the Texas Troubadour, was an American singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of country music. ... Gordon Jenkins Gordon Hill Jenkins (12 May 1910-1 May 1984) was an American arranger who was an influential figure in popular music in the 1940s and 1950s, renowned for his lush string arrangements. ... Bob Crosby (August 23, 1913 - March 9, 1993) was an American bandleader and singer. ... She Wore a Yellow Ribbon is a western film. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Charley, My Boy is a song written by Gus Kahn and Ted Fiorito in 1924. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Guy Lombardo, photographed by William P. Gottlieb, 1947 Gaetano Alberto Guy Lombardo (June 19, 1902 – November 5, 1977) was a Canadian bandleader and violinist famous in the United States. ... Have I Told You Lately that I Love You? can refer to: Have I Told You Lately that I Love You?, a country music song, with many pop cover versions, written in 1945 by Scott Wiseman Have I Told You Lately that I Love You?, a 1989 song by Van... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Quicksilver is a common name for the chemical element mercury, literally meaning living silver based on its appearance and its unusual liquidity at room temperature. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Carmen Miranda, pron. ... Gordon Jenkins Gordon Hill Jenkins (12 May 1910-1 May 1984) was an American arranger who was an influential figure in popular music in the 1940s and 1950s, renowned for his lush string arrangements. ... A Bushel and a Peck is a popular song. ... Sparrow in the Treetop is a popular song. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Too Young is a popular song. ... Victor Young (August 8, 1900 - November 10, 1956) was an Jewish-American composer, violinist and conducter. ...

Filmography

  • Argentine Nights (Universal Pictures, 1940)
  • Buck Privates (Universal Pictures, 1941)
  • In the Navy (Universal Pictures, 1941)
  • Hold That Ghost (Universal Pictures, 1941)
  • What's Cookin'? (Universal Pictures, 1942)
  • Private Buckaroo (Universal Pictures, 1942)
  • Give Out, Sisters (Universal Pictures, 1942)
  • How's About It (Universal Pictures, 1943)
  • Always a Bridesmaid (Universal Pictures, 1943)
  • Swingtime Johnny (Universal Pictures, 1943)
  • Moonlight and Cactus (Universal Pictures, 1944)
  • Follow the Boys (Universal Pictures, 1944)
  • Hollywood Canteen (Warner Brothers, 1944)
  • Her Lucky Night (Universal Pictures, 1945)
  • Make Mine Music (Walt Disney Studios, 1946)
  • Road to Rio (Paramount Pictures, 1947)
  • Melody Time (Walt Disney Studios, 1948)

Buck Privates is the 1941 comedy/World War II film that turned Bud Abbott and Lou Costello into bonafide movie stars. ... In The Navy is a 1941 film starring the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. ... Hold That Ghost is a 1941 film starring the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. ... Moonlight and Cactus is a 1932 comedy film directed by Fatty Arbuckle. ... Follow the Boys, also known as Three Cheers for the Boys, is a 1944 musical film made by Universal Pictures as an all-star cast morale booster to entertain the troops abroad and the civilians at home. ... The Hollywood Canteen operated at 1451 Cahuenga Boulevard in Hollywood, California between October 3, 1942 and the end of World War II as a club offering food and entertainment for American servicemen, usually on their way overseas. ... Make Mine Music is an animated feature produced by Walt Disney and released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures on April 20, 1946. ... Road to Rio is a 1948 comedy film, directed by Norman Z. McLeod and starring Bob Hope and Bing Crosby. ... Melody Time (first released on May 27, 1948) is an animated feature produced by Walt Disney and released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures. ...

Broadway

  • Over Here! (1974; Shubert Theater, New York City, 9 months)

Over Here! is a musical with a score by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman and book by Will Holt. ...

See also

List of best-selling music artists The worlds best-selling music artists cannot be listed officially, as there is no organization that has recorded global music sales in the manner that the RIAA does in the United States. ...


References

  1. ^ SHOLOM SECUNDA The Story of Bei Mir Bist du Schön
  2. ^ Andrews, Maxene and Bill Gilbert. Over Here, Over There: The Andrews Sisters and the USO Stars in World War II. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp, 1993.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Andrews Sisters - definition of Andrews Sisters in Encyclopedia (320 words)
The Andrews Sisters were a group of singing sisters: LaVerne Andrews (contralto; 1911-May 8, 1967), Maxene Andrews (high harmony; 1916-1995) and Patty Andrews (lead; born 1918).
They started their career as imitators of an earlier successful singing group, the Boswell Sisters.
After a long silence, the two surviving sisters had something of a comeback when Bette Midler recorded a cover of their song "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy." Maxine and Patti appeared both together and separately throughout the 1970s, with Maxine releasing a solo album in 1986.
Solid! -- The Andrews Sisters (427 words)
The most successful female group in the history of popular music, the Andrews Sisters will always be associated with World War II.
Born and raised in Minnesota, the sisters began their professional career in 1933, touring with the Larry Rich vaudeville troupe.
Their unique vocal arrangements and tight harmonies quickly made the sisters one of the most popular musical acts in the country, with a string of hits and regular appearances on radio.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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