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Encyclopedia > The Age

The front page of The Age
on 12 December 2005
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner Fairfax Media
Editor Andrew Jaspan
Founded 1854
Political allegiance Left-wing
Headquarters Flag of Australia 250 Spencer Street,
Melbourne, Australia
ISSN 0312-6307

Website: www.theage.com.au

The Age is a broadsheet daily newspaper, which has been published in Melbourne, Australia since 1854. The Age was founded by three Melbourne businessmen, the brothers John Cooke and Henry Cooke who had arrived from New Zealand in the 1840s, and Walter Powell. The first edition appeared on 17 October 1854. Image File history File links The-age. ... Image File history File links Age_front_page_12-12-2005. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... It has been suggested that John Fairfax Holdings be merged into this article or section. ... Andrew Jaspan, a British quack, was appointed in October, 2004, as Editor-in-Chief of The Age, a broadsheet daily newspaper published in Melbourne, Australia. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Schematic plan of Hoddles allotments for the village of Melbourne, March,1837 Each block was further subdivided into 20 allotments each 76 perches in area Map of central Melbourne Melbournes CBD. The Hoddle Grid is the layout of the streets in the central business district of Melbourne, Australia. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... Melbournes CBD has grown to straddle the Yarra River in three major precincts. ... Henry Cooke was the pre-eminent leader within Irish Presbyterianism in the 19th century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


The Age currently has an average weekday circulation of 196,250, increasing to 292,250 on Saturdays (in a city of 3.8 million). The Sunday Age has a circulation of 194,750. According to The Age, the paper currently has a Monday to Friday readership average of 658,000, reaching an average of 1,049,000 on Saturdays. The Sunday Age attracts an average of 666,000 readers.


The current editor is Andrew Jaspan. Andrew Jaspan, a British quack, was appointed in October, 2004, as Editor-in-Chief of The Age, a broadsheet daily newspaper published in Melbourne, Australia. ...

Contents

History

The Symes and The Age

The venture was not initially a success, and in June 1856 the Cookes sold the paper to Ebenezer Syme a Scottish-born businessman, and James McEwan, ironmonger and founder of McEwans & Co, for 2,000 pounds at auction. The first edition under the new owners was on 17 June 1856. From its foundation the paper was self-consciously liberal in its politics: "aiming at a wide extension of the rights of free citizenship and a full development of representative institutions," and supporting "the removal of all restrictions upon freedom of commerce, freedom of religion and - to the utmost extent that is compatible with public morality - upon freedom of personal action." Ebenezer Syme (1826 - March 13, 1860) was an Scottish-Australian journalist. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic and Scots1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Ebenezer Syme was elected to the Victorian Legislative Assembly shortly after buying The Age, and his brother David Syme soon came to dominate the paper, editorially and managerially. When Ebenezer died in 1860, David became editor-in-chief, a position he retained until his death in 1908, although a succession of editors did the day-to-day editorial work. In 1891 Syme bought out Ebenezer's heirs and McEwan's and became sole proprietor. He built up The Age into Victoria's leading newspaper. In circulation it soon overtook its rivals The Herald and The Argus, and by 1890 it was selling 100,000 copies a day, making it one of the world's most successful newspapers. The Legislative Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the parliament of Victoria in Australia. ... David Syme (October 2, 1827 - February 14, 1908) was an Scottish-Australian newspaper proprietor of The Age and regarded as the father of protection in Australia who had immense influence in the Government of Victoria. ... Capital Melbourne Government Constitutional monarchy Governor David de Kretser Premier Steve Bracks (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 37  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $222,022 (2nd)  - Product per capita  $44,443/person (5th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  5,110,500 (2nd)  - Density  22. ... The Argus was a newspaper in Melbourne. ...

A copy of the first edition of The Age.
A copy of the first edition of The Age.

Under Syme's control The Age exercised enormous political power in Victoria. It supported liberal politicians such as Graham Berry, George Higinbotham and George Turner, and other leading liberals such as Alfred Deakin and Charles Pearson furthered their careers as Age journalists. Syme was originally a free trader, but converted to protectionism through his belief that Victoria needed to develop its manufacturing industries behind tariff barriers. In the 1890s The Age was a leading supporter of Australian federation and of the White Australia policy. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1635x2220, 2802 KB) The Age first edition copy, Melbourne Museum. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1635x2220, 2802 KB) The Age first edition copy, Melbourne Museum. ... Sir Graham Berry Graham Berry (28 August 1822 - 25 January 1904), Australian colonial politician, was the 11th Premier of Victoria. ... George Higinbotham (April 19, 1827 - 1893), chief-justice of Victoria, Australia, sixth son of T Higinbotham of Dublin, was educated at the Royal School, Dungannon, and at Trinity College, Dublin. ... Sir George Turner (8 August 1851 - 12 August 1916), Australian politician, was Premier of Victoria and a member of the first federal ministry. ... Alfred William Deakin (3 August 1856 – 7 October 1919), Australian politician, was a leader of the movement for Australian federation and later second Prime Minister of Australia. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... A tariff is a tax on foreign goods. ... The Federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia federated on 1 January 1901, to form the Commonwealth of Australia, of which they became component states. ... This badge from 1906 shows the use of the expression White Australia at that time The White Australia policy is a generic term used to describe a collection of historical legislation and policies, intended to restrict non-white immigration to Australia, and to promote European immigration, from 1901 to 1973. ...


After Syme's death the paper remained in the hands of his three sons, with his eldest son Herbert Syme becoming general manager until his death in 1939. Syme's will prevented the sale of any equity in the paper during his sons' lifetimes, an arrangement designed to protect family control but which had the effect of starving the paper of investment capital for 40 years. Under the management of Sir Geoffrey Syme (1908-42), and his chosen editors Gottlieb Schuler and Harold Campbell, The Age failed to modernise, and gradually lost market share to The Argus and to the tabloid The Sun News-Pictorial, although its classfied advertisement sections kept the paper profitable. By the 1940s the paper's circulation was smaller than it had been in 1900, and its political influence also declined. Although it remained more liberal than the extremely conservative Argus, it lost much of its distinct political identity. Gottlieb Frederick Henry Schuler (1854 – 1926) was an Australian journalist. ... Captain Sir Harold Campbell, KCVO DSO Royal Navy, was Equerry to the King and then to the Queen 1936-1954. ... The Sun News-Pictorial, commonly known as The Sun, was a morning daily tabloid newspaper in Melbourne established in 1922 and closed in 1990. ...


The historian Sybil Nolan writes: "Accounts of The Age in these years generally suggest that the paper was second-rate, outdated in both its outlook and appearance. Walker described a newspaper which had fallen asleep in the embrace of the Liberal Party; "querulous," "doddery" and "turgid" are some of the epithets applied by other journalists. It is inevitably criticised not only for its increasing conservatism, but for its failure to keep pace with innovations in layout and editorial technique so dramatically demonstrated in papers like The Sun News-Pictorial and The Herald."


In 1942 David Syme's last surviving son, Oswald Syme, took over the paper. He modernised the paper's appearance and standards of news coverage (removing classified advertisements from the front page and introducing photographs, long after other papers had done so). In 1948, convinced the paper needed outside capital, he persuaded the courts to overturn his father's will and floated David Syme and Co. as a public company, selling 400,000 pounds worth of shares, enabling a badly needed technical modernisation of the newspaper's production. A takeover attempt by the Fairfax family, publishers of the Sydney Morning Herald, was beaten off. This new lease on life allowed The Age to recover commercially, and in 1957 it received a great boost when The Argus ceased publication. John Fairfax Holdings Limited (ABN 15 008 663 161) is an Australian Public Company operating in the media industry, working predominantly with newspapers. ... ...


The Modern Age

Oswald Syme retired in 1964, and his grandson Ranald Macdonald became chairman of the company. He was the first chairman to hand over full control of the paper to a professional editor from outside the Syme family. This was Graham Perkin, appointed in 1966, who radically changed the paper's format and shifted its editorial line from the rather conservative liberalism of the Symes to a new "left liberalism" characterised by attention to issues such as race, gender and the environment, and opposition to White Australia and the death penalty. The Liberal Premier of Victoria, Henry Bolte, called The Age "that pinko rag," a view conservatives have maintained ever since. Former editor Michael Gawenda in his book American Notebook wrote that the "default position of most journalists at The Age was on the political Left.".[1] This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... List of Premiers of Victoria Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in Victoria. ... Sir Henry Edward Bolte (20 May 1908 - 4 January 1990), Australian politician, was the longest serving Premier of the state of Victoria. ...

Front page of The Age on 11 November 1975
Front page of The Age on 11 November 1975

Perkin's editorship coincided with Gough Whitlam's reforms of the Australian Labor Party, and The Age became a key supporter of the Whitlam government which came to power in 1972. Contrary to subsequent mythology, however, The Age was not an uncritical supporter of Whitlam, and played a leading role in exposing the Loans Affair which led to the demise of the Whitlam government. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (524x700, 114 KB) Summary Front Cover of the Age November 11 1975 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (524x700, 114 KB) Summary Front Cover of the Age November 11 1975 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), Australian politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Loans Affair (also called the Khemlani Affair) is the name given to the political scandal involving the Whitlam Government of Australia in 1975, in which it was accused of attempting to illegally borrow money from Middle Eastern countries by bypassing standard procedure as dictated by the Australian Treasury. ...


After Perkins's early death in 1975 The Age returned to a more moderate liberal position. It supported Malcolm Fraser's Liberal government in its early years, but after 1980 became increasingly critical and was a leading supporter of Bob Hawke's reforming government after 1983. But from the 1970s the political influence of The Age, as with other broadsheet newspapers, derived less from what it said in its editorial columns (which relatively few people read) than from the opinions expressed by journalists, cartoonists, feature writers and guest columnists. The Age has always kept a stable of leading editorial cartoonists, notably Les Tanner, Bruce Petty, Ron Tandberg and Michael Leunig. Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the former Prime Minister of Australia; for the Western Australian public servant, see Malcolm Fraser (surveyor). ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) is a former Australian trade union leader turned politician who became the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Les Tanner (1927 - 2001) was an Australian Cartoonist. ... Bruce Petty (Melbourne, 1929 - ) is one of Australia’s best known political satirists and cartoonists. ... Born in 1943, Ron Tandberg is an Australian illustrator and political cartoonist who has contributed to The Age newspaper since 1972. ... Michael Leunig (born 2 June 1945), often referred to as Leunig, is a noted Australian cartoonist. ...


In 1966 Macdonald took the fateful step of allowing the Fairfaxes to acquire a stake in the paper, although an agreement was signed guaranteeing the editorial independence of The Age. In 1972 Fairfax bought a majority of David Syme shares, and in 1983 bought out all the remaining shares. David Syme and Co. became a subsidiary of John Fairfax and Co. Macdonald was denounced as a traitor by the remaining members of the Syme family (who nevertheless accepted Fairfax's generous offer for their shares), but he argued that The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald were natural partners and that the greater resources of the Fairfax group would enable The Age to remain competitive. By the 1980s a new competitor had appeared in Rupert Murdoch's national daily The Australian. In 1999 David Syme and Co. became The Age Company Ltd as part of John Fairfax Holdings Ltd., finally ending the Syme connection. Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... The Australian (informally referred to as The Oz) is a national daily broadsheet newspaper published by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ...


The Age was published from offices in Collins St until 1969, when it moved to its current headquarters at 250 Spencer St (hence the nickname "The Spencer Street Soviet" favoured by some critics). Recently The Age has opened a new printing centre at Tullamarine. The Melbourne suburb of Tullamarine, Victoria, Australia, is a collection of recent housing estates and light industry. ...


Currently there are two editions of The Age printed nightly. The NAA edition, for interstate and country Victorian readers and the MEA edition, for metropolitan areas. These two editions are printed in three separate editions, the earliest for country and interstate readers, the second edition for metropolitan and the final late edition THA, also for metropolitan areas carrying late or breaking stories not covered in the first two editions.


Friday's edition of the newspaper now includes a racing liftout which includes extended form and analysis for Saturday's major race meetings.


On April 26, 2007, it was announced by The Age that it will change the size of the paper by taking approx. 4cm off the width of the pages to make it easier to read.[2] is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Ownership

Since the 1980s The Age, despite the loss of its corporate independence, has remained a successful and influential newspaper. Under editors such as Creighton Burns and Michael Gawenda, it has attracted a range of high quality contributors. The research efforts of the "Age Insight" team have broken a number of major stories. Its arts and lifestyle content - increasingly important in all newspapers as the leading role in news coverage is lost to television and the internet - is generally regarded as comprehensive. Its sports journalism is also extensive, although it does not try to compete with The Herald Sun in volume of sports coverage. Its classified advertising section remains the foundation of its business model. Michael Gawenda, an Australian journalist, was editor of The Age from 1997 to 2004. ... The Herald Sun is a newspaper in Melbourne, Australia, that is published by The Herald and Weekly Times Ltd, a subsidiary of Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ...


Nevertheless The Age is under challenge, as are all major daily newspapers, from new trends in media. Its dependence on classified advertising for a large part of its revenue makes vulnerable to the growth of online classified alternatives such as Seek, realestate.com.au and eBay, plus various offerings from Telstra subsidiary Sensis such as The Trading Post. The Sydney media magnate Kerry Packer, now deceased, long considered to be interested in acquiring Fairfax, was reportedly no longer interested because of this and had extensively invested in online competitors of The Age. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about online auction centre. ... Telstra Corporation (ASX: TLS, NZX: TLS, NYSE: TLS) (formed from Telecom Australia) is an Australian telecommunications company under private ownership, holding a dominant position in landline telephone services, large share of mobile phone services, domestic consumer (including dial-up access and Broadband internet broadband cable modem, satellite and ADSL services... Kerry Francis Bullmore Packer AC (17 December 1937 – 26 December 2005) was an Australian publishing, media and gaming tycoon. ...


Politics

In 2004 Gawenda was succeeded as editor by British journalist Andrew Jaspan. Jaspan aroused controversy by initially not appearing to know that The Age was published in Melbourne, sacking Gerard Henderson, a prominent conservative columnist, from the paper and by making remarks critical of Douglas Wood, an Australian who was held hostage and tortured in Iraq. Jaspan accused Wood on ABC radio of being boorish and coarse for speaking harshly about those who kidnapped and tortured him.[3] Andrew Jaspan, a British quack, was appointed in October, 2004, as Editor-in-Chief of The Age, a broadsheet daily newspaper published in Melbourne, Australia. ... Gerard Henderson is a well known conservative Australian newspaper columnist for the Sydney Morning Herald, and is executive director of the Sydney Institute, a conservative think-tank. ... Initial image of Douglas Wood after capture by Iraqi militants. ...


Many commentators, former editors and senior management have suggested that The Age is ideologically left wing. A former Age columnistGerard Henderson, for example, describes it as "the Guardian on the Yarra" [1]. Gerard Henderson is a well known conservative Australian newspaper columnist for the Sydney Morning Herald, and is executive director of the Sydney Institute, a conservative think-tank. ... Several newspapers go by the name of Guardian: The Guardian, a British newspaper founded in 1821 as the Manchester Guardian, which took its current title in 1959. ... The City of Yarra is a Local Government Area in Victoria, Australia. ...


Following the appointment of Andrew Jaspan as editor, The Age has taken a prominent campaigning role role in relation to some issues, for example by launching a campaign Free David Hicks (a prisoner at Guantanamo Bay) in February 2007, and in relation to global warming Andrew Jaspan, a British quack, was appointed in October, 2004, as Editor-in-Chief of The Age, a broadsheet daily newspaper published in Melbourne, Australia. ... Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002 Guantánamo Bay detainment camp serves as a joint military prison and interrogation center under the leadership of Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO), has occupied a portion of the United States Navys base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba since 2002. ...


According to the Guardian newspaper, former Fairfax chief executive Fred Hilmer wrote in his memoirs that "He confessed that he struggled to cope with a left-leaning editorial culture at papers such as the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and was surprised that journalists saw themselves as advocates rather than simply reporters."[4] Hilmer said "Fairfax's default position was to turn left and be agenda-driven... Journalists often conducted campaigns where they persisted in covering stories long after readers had lost interest."[5]


Editors of The Age

David Blair (4 June 1820 – February 19, 1899) was an Irish Australian politician, journalist and encyclopedist. ... Ebenezer Syme (1826 - March 13, 1860) was an Scottish-Australian journalist. ...

Under David Syme

James Harrison (1816 - September 3, 1893) was a Scottish-Australian pioneer in the field of mechanical refrigeration. ... Arthur Lloyd Windsor (c. ... Gottlieb Frederick Henry Schuler (1854 – 1926) was an Australian journalist. ...

Under Geoffrey Syme

Gottlieb Frederick Henry Schuler (1854 – 1926) was an Australian journalist. ...

Under Oswald Syme

  • Harold Campbell 1942–59
  • Keith Sinclair 1959–66

Recent editors

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Les Carlyon was born in northern Victoria, Australia in 1942. ... Alan Kohler has been a financial journalist since 1971. ... Michael Gawenda, an Australian journalist, was editor of The Age from 1997 to 2004. ... Andrew Jaspan, a British quack, was appointed in October, 2004, as Editor-in-Chief of The Age, a broadsheet daily newspaper published in Melbourne, Australia. ...

References

  1. ^ Caroline Overingnewton (July 21, 2007). Leunig off line: ex-editor. The Australian. Retrieved on 2007-07-22.
  2. ^ Jesse Hogan (April 26, 2007). Fairfax flags narrower papers, job losses. The Age. Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  3. ^ Andrew Bolt (June 26, 2005). How the Left gets loonier. The Herald-Sun. Retrieved on 2007=07-22.
  4. ^ Roy Greenslade (January 24, 2007). Fairfax boss shocked at papers' left-wing culture. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-07-22.
  5. ^ Paddy Manning (January 24, 2007). Fairfax boss was troubled by left-leaning editorial culture. The Australian. Retrieved on 2007-07-22.

is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

This is a list of Australian newspapers - see also * Australian Newspapers Online. ... Journalism in Australia varies from American and international standards in areas as diverse as legal freedoms to editorial practices. ...

External links

  • The Age website
  • History of The Age since 1854
  • Half a century of obscurity (Sybil Nolan on the history of The Age)
  • "The Age: A part of Victoria for over 147 years"
  • The Age's new print centre
  • "Gerard Henderson: How I was sacked by The Age" (critique originally published by Crikey)

The word crikey is also a phrase made famous internationally by Steve Irwin. ...

Further reading

  • C. E. Sayers, David Syme, Cheshire 1965
  • Don Hauser, The Printers of the Streets and Lanes Of Melbourne (1837 - 1975) Nondescript Press, Melbourne 2006

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