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Encyclopedia > The Acharnians
The Acharnians

Sketch of Aristophanes Image File history File links Aristophanes_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_12788. ...

Written by Aristophanes
Chorus Acharnian charcoal burners
Characters Dicaeopolis
herald
Amphitheus
ambassadors
Pseudartabas
Theorus
daughter of Dicaeopolis
slave of Euripides
Euripides
Lamachus
a Megarian
daughters of the Megarian
informer
a Boeotian
Nicarachus
slave of Lamachus
husbandman
wedding guest
Setting Pnyx at Athens
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
The Acharnians in Greek

The Acharnians (Ancient Greek: Ἀχαρνεῖς / Akharneĩs) is a comedic play by the ancient Greek satirist Aristophanes. Written and performed during the Peloponnesian War, it is famous for its anti-war stance. Produced in 425 BC by Callistratus, it won Aristophanes a first prize at the Lenaea. Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , c. ... Archarnae was the largest deme of ancient Attica; it was located in the northwest part of the Attic plain, around Menidi, and about 10 km due north of Athens. ... A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... feydey 11:57, 4 November 2005 (UTC) Category: Possible copyright violations ... Megara (Greek: Μέγαρα; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is an ancient city in Attica, Greece. ... Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... The speakers platform at the Pnyx, with the Acropolis in the background. ... Nickname: City of Athena or Cradle of Democracy Location of the city of Athens (red dot) within the Prefecture of Athens and Periphery of Attica Coordinates: Country Greece Peripheries Attica Prefecture Athens Founded circa 2000 BC Mayor Nikitas Kaklamanis Area    - City 38. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Greek comedy is the name given to a wide genre of theatrical plays written, and performed, in Ancient Greece. ... Romeo and Juliet by Ford Madox Brown A play, written by a playwright, or dramatist, is a form of literature, almost always consisting of dialog between characters, and intended for performance rather than reading. ... List of satirists below - writers, cartoonists and others known for their involvement in satire - humourous social criticism. ... Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , c. ... Combatants Delian League led by Athens Peloponnesian League led by Sparta Commanders Pericles Cleon Nicias Alcibiades Archidamus II Brasidas Lysander For the earlier war beginning in 460 BC, see First Peloponnesian War The Peloponnesian War (431 BC–404 BC) was an Ancient Greek military conflict fought between Athens and its... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC - 420s BC - 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC Years: 430 BC 429 BC 428 BC 427 BC 426 BC - 425 BC - 424 BC 423 BC... Callistratus of Aphidnae (Greek: Καλλιστράτος Kallistratos) was a friend of Callicrates, a political person and an Athenian orator of the 4th century BCE, a strategos in 378 and was executed in 355. ... The Lenaia was a dramatic but one of the lesser festivals in Athens and Ionia in ancient Greece. ...


The play is set in contemporary Athens and is a hard-hitting satire against the politicians of the time, with some satire against the great tragedian Euripides thrown in for good measure. Athens is at war with Sparta, and has declared a trade embargo with neighboring Megara. Dicaeopolis (Greek for "just city" - sometimes rendered Dikaiopolis), a war veteran himself and representative of an average Athenian, is tired of war. He declares a truce with the enemy, and opens up his home as a sort of free-trade zone. Nickname: City of Athena or Cradle of Democracy Location of the city of Athens (red dot) within the Prefecture of Athens and Periphery of Attica Coordinates: Country Greece Peripheries Attica Prefecture Athens Founded circa 2000 BC Mayor Nikitas Kaklamanis Area    - City 38. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... Nickname: City of Athena or Cradle of Democracy Location of the city of Athens (red dot) within the Prefecture of Athens and Periphery of Attica Coordinates: Country Greece Peripheries Attica Prefecture Athens Founded circa 2000 BC Mayor Nikitas Kaklamanis Area    - City 38. ... Coordinates 37°4′ N 22°26′ E Country Greece Periphery Peloponnese Prefecture Laconia Population 18,184 source (2001) Area 84. ... Megara (Greek: Μέγαρα; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is an ancient city in Attica, Greece. ...


Throughout the play, Aristophanes takes every opportunity to make fun of the Athenian establishment; Euripides; the Prytanes; the Generals. Cleon, the leading politician in Athens at the time, whom Aristophanes had made a personal enemy, is singled out for particular criticism. Cleon was pro-war. This play takes a pro-truce stance, and a number of speeches made to the audience being directly addressed on his shortcomings. Cleon is also lampooned in Aristophanes' play The Knights. A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... The prytaneis (literally presidents) of ancient Athens were members of the boule chosen to perform executive tasks during their term (a prytany), which lasted about one month and then was rotated to other members of the boule. ... Cleon (d. ... Aristophanes play The Knights is an unbridled criticism of Cleon, one of the most powerful men in ancient Athens. ...


While not as well known as Lysistrata, The Acharnians is widely considered one of Aristophanes' finer efforts. Lysistrata (Attic: Λυσιστράτη, Doric: Λυσιστράτα), Aristophanes anti-war comedy, written in 411 BC, has female characters, led by the eponymous Lysistrata, barricading the public funds building and withholding sex from their husbands to secure peace and end the Peloponnesian War. ...


Plot

The play opens on the Pnyx, where the Athenian Assembly met. Dicaeopolis ("just city") attempts to have the subject of peace with Sparta addressed by the Assembly, but he is ignored. Indignant, Dicaeopolis decides to form a private truce with the enemy for only himself and his family. A chorus of Acharnian charcoal peddlers wants to stone Dicaeopolis to death because of this; as residents of Acharnae, they suffered tremendously in the Peloponnesian War and were famous for their bellicose nature. Dicaeopolis holds them off by holding a bucket of charcoal hostage, threatening to dismember it if they attack. They allow him to make a public address, and he goes to the poet Euripides for tragic props in order to make himself seem more piteous. He eloquently denounces the war and the false pretenses under which it was started, using a modified version of Telephus's speech. General Lamachus shows up, and the two men exchange insults. The chorus is convinced by Dicaeopolis, and is now in favor of peace. They make a moving speech about the justice system in Athens. The speakers platform at the Pnyx, with the Acropolis in the background. ... Coordinates 37°4′ N 22°26′ E Country Greece Periphery Peloponnese Prefecture Laconia Population 18,184 source (2001) Area 84. ... In early tragedy, no parts were played by a single actor; because the actor left the stage often to change roles, the chorus was especially dominant. ... Archarnae was the largest deme of ancient Attica; it was located in the northwest part of the Attic plain, around Menidi, and about 10 km due north of Athens. ... Charcoal is the blackish residue consisting of impure carbon obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. ... Archarnae was the largest deme of ancient Attica; it was located in the northwest part of the Attic plain, around Menidi, and about 10 km due north of Athens. ... Combatants Delian League led by Athens Peloponnesian League led by Sparta Commanders Pericles Cleon Nicias Alcibiades Archidamus II Brasidas Lysander For the earlier war beginning in 460 BC, see First Peloponnesian War The Peloponnesian War (431 BC–404 BC) was an Ancient Greek military conflict fought between Athens and its... A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... A Greek mythological figure, Telephus referred to two different people. ... feydey 11:57, 4 November 2005 (UTC) Category: Possible copyright violations ...


Dicaeopolis opens his market. Comedy ensues. A Megarean puts his two young daughters in a sack, and sells them off as suckling pigs to Dicaeopolis. A Boeotian merchant trades his entire stock of poultry and eels to Dicaeopolis, before Nicarchus appears and arrests the Boeotian merchant for selling wicks that could burn the dockyard. In the end, Dicaeopolis enjoys a huge feast with the goods and women he has accumulated: Lamachus returns from battle bloodied, defeated and shamed. Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... Nicarchus was a Greek writer of the first century AD, best known for his epigrams, of which 42 survive, and his satirical poetry. ...


Translations

  • John Hookham Frere, 1839 - verse
  • Charles James Billson, 1882 - verse: full text
  • Robert Yelverton Tyrrell, 1883 - verse: full text
  • Benjamin B. Rogers, 1924 - verse
  • Arthur S. Way, 1927 - verse
  • Lionel Casson, 1960 - prose and verse
  • Douglass Parker, 1962 - verse
  • Alan H. Sommerstein, 1973 - prose and verse
  • George Theodoridis, 2002 - prose: full text
  • unknown translator - prose: full text
Surviving plays by Aristophanes

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Internet Classics Archive | The Acharnians by Aristophanes (6791 words)
I was hurrying to bring your treaty of truce, but some old dotards from Acharnae got scent of the thing; they are veterans of Marathon, tough as oak or maple, of which they are made for sure-rough and ruthless.
This last is a truce of thirty years, both on sea and land.
When I was young, in the days when I followed Phayllus, running with a sack of coals on my back, this wretch would not have eluded my pursuit, let him be as swift as he will.
The Acharnians (454 words)
The object of the Acharnians is to induce the Athenian people to put an end to the Peloponnesian war, which already threatened the destruction of the State, and a year or two later caused its downfall.
Undeterred by the anger of the Acharnians, who crave vengeance for the destruction of their vineyards, an honest citizen, named Dicaeopolis, enraged at the false pretexts for continuing the war with Sparta, sends an embassy to Lacedaemon and concludes a separate peace for himself and his family.
In spite of all opposition, he builds an enclosure around his house, within which there is peace and free market for the neighboring people, while the rest of the country is harassed by war.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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