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Encyclopedia > Thanksgiving (United States)
United States Thanksgiving
The First Thanksgiving, painting by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863–1930)
Also called Turkey Day
Observed by  United States
Type National
Significance a celebration of being thankful for what one has and the bounty of the year
Date fourth Thursday in November
2008 date November 27, 2008
Celebrations parades, spending time with family, football games, eating large meals
Related to Christmas and New Year's Day which conclude the American holiday season, and Columbus Day

In the United States, Thanksgiving or Thanksgiving Day is an annual one-day legal holiday to express gratitude for the things one has at the end of the harvest season, usually directed to God.[1][2][3] It is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November (i.e. the Thursday falling between November 22 and November 28). The period from Thanksgiving Day to New Year's Day is often collectively referred to as the "holiday season," and the holiday itself is often nicknamed Turkey Day. Thanksgiving is generally considered a secular holiday, and is not directly based in religious canon or dogma. The holiday's origins trace to harvest festivals that have been celebrated in many cultures since ancient times, and most people celebrate by gathering at home with family or friends for a holiday feast. A tradition also exists to share the fruits of the harvest with those who are less fortunate. For the American holiday, see Thanksgiving (United States). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x688, 752 KB) The first Thanksgiving, painting by Jean Louis Gerome Ferris File links The following pages link to this file: Thanksgiving ... Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863–1930) was an American artist who painted The Eve of Discovery, showing a caravel as it may have appeared in the 1400s. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Marines on parade A parade is an organized procession of people along a street, often in costume, and often accompanied by decorated vehicles called floats or sometimes large lighter-than-air balloons with complex shapes. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Columbus Day is a holiday celebrating the anniversary of Christopher Columbuss arrival in the Americas, which happened on the October 12, 1492 in the Julian calendar, or October 21, 1492 in the modern Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Holidays in Canada. ... For other uses, see Gratitude (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses, see November (disambiguation). ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Holiday season can be a reference to a number of things. ... In Britain, thanks have been given for successful harvests since pagan times. ...

Contents

History

Spaniards

The city of El Paso, Texas claims the first thanksgiving was held in what is now known as the United States, but it was not a harvest celebration. Spaniard Don Juan de Oñate ordered his expedition party to rest and conducted a mass in celebration of thanksgiving on April 30, 1598. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... El Paso redirects here. ... Don Juan de Oñate was a Spanish explorer of North America. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ...


The first recorded Thanksgiving ceremony was on September 8, 1565 in what is now Saint Augustine, Florida. Six hundred Spaniard settlers under the leadership of Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles landed at what would become the city and immediately held a Mass of Thanksgiving for their safe delivery to the New World, followed by a feast and celebration. As the La Florida colony did become part of the United States, this can be classified as the First Thanksgiving.


In 2000, the historian Bill O'Neal of Carthage, Texas, published The First Thanksgiving: It Happened in Texas. Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Carthage is a city located in Panola County, Texas. ...


1619 Thanksgiving, The Virginia Colony

On December 4, 1619, a group of 38 English settlers arrived at Berkeley Hundred which comprised about eight thousand acres (32 km²) on the north bank of the James River near Herring Creek in an area then known as Charles Cittie (sic) about 20 miles upstream from Jamestown, where the first permanent settlement of the Colony of Virginia was established on May 14, 1607. is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ... Berkeley Hundred in the Virginia Colony was comprised of about eight thousand acres on the north bank of the James River near Herring Creek in an area then known as Charles Cittie (sic). ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... Charles City (or citiie as it was then called) was one of four incorporations established in the Virginia Colony in 1619 by the proprietor, the Virginia Company. ... At Jamestown Settlement, replicas of Christopher Newports 3 ships are docked in the harbour. ... A map of the Colony of Virginia. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The group's charter required that the day of arrival be observed yearly as a "day of thanksgiving" to God. On that first day, Captain John Woodleaf held the service of thanksgiving. As quoted from the section of the Charter of Berkeley Hundred specifying the thanksgiving service: "We ordaine that the day of our ships arrival at the place assigned for plantacon in the land of Virginia shall be yearly and perpetually keept holy as a day of thanksgiving to Almighty God."[citation needed] This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


During the Indian Massacre of 1622, caused by an unprovoked assassination of an important Indian leader, nine of the settlers at Berkeley Hundred were killed, as well as about a third of the entire population of the Virginia Colony. The Berkeley Hundred site and other outlying locations were abandoned as the colonists withdrew to Jamestown and other more secure points. Indian massacre of 1622, depicted as a woodcut by Theodore de Bry The Indian massacre of 1622 (also known as the Jamestown massacre) occurred in the Virginia Colony on March 22, 1622. ...


After several years, the site became Berkeley Plantation, and was long the traditional home of the Harrison family, one of the First Families of Virginia. In 1634, it became part of the first eight shires of Virginia, as Charles City County, one of the oldest in the United States, and is located along Virginia State Route 5, which runs parallel to the river's northern borders past sites of many of the James River Plantations between the colonial capital city of Williamsburg (now the site of Colonial Williamsburg) and the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia at Richmond. Berkeley Plantation, one of the first great estates in America, comprises about 100 acres (0. ... First Families of Virginia is a hereditary society composed of individuals who have proved their descent from one of the original Virginia colonists from England who primarily settled at Jamestown and along the James River and other navigable waters in the Virginia Colony during the 17th century. ... Eight Shires of Virginia were formed in 1634 in the Virginia Colony. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... State Route 5 runs between the independent cities of Richmond and Williamsburg in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... James River Plantations were established in the Virginia Colony along the James River between the mouth at Hampton Roads and the head of navigation at the fall line where Richmond is today. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


Berkeley Plantation continues to be the site of an annual Thanksgiving event to this day. President George W. Bush gave his official Thanksgiving address in 2007 at Berkeley saying: George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...

In the four centuries since the founders of Berkeley first knelt on these grounds, our nation has changed in many ways. Our people have prospered, our nation has grown, our Thanksgiving traditions have evolved -- after all, they didn't have football back then. Yet the source of all our blessings remains the same: We give thanks to the Author of Life who granted our forefathers safe passage to this land, who gives every man, woman, and child on the face of the Earth the gift of freedom, and who watches over our nation every day.[3]

1621 Thanksgiving, The Pilgrims at Plymouth Plantation

Squanto, a Native American, taught the Pilgrims how to catch eel and grow corn and served as an interpreter for them (Squanto had learned English as a slave in Europe and travels in England). Without Squanto's help the Pilgrims might not have survived in the New World.[citation needed] The settlers who later came to be called the "Pilgrims" set apart a day to celebrate at Plymouth immediately after their first harvest, in 1621. At the time, this was not regarded as a Thanksgiving observance; harvest festivals were existing parts of English and Wampanoag tradition alike. Several American colonists have personal accounts of the 1621 feast in Plymouth, Massachusetts: This article is about the actual historical figure. ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... 1621 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Wampanoag (Wôpanâak in the Wampanoag language) are a Native American people. ... Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth Settled 1620 Incorporated (town) 1670 Government [1]  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Manager Mark Sylvia Area  - Total 134. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


William Bradford, in Of Plymouth Plantation: William Bradford (March 19, 1590 – May 9, 1657) was a leader of the separatist settlers of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, and was elected thirty times to be the Governor after John Carver died. ... The front page of the Bradford journal Written over a period of years by the leader of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation is the single most complete authority for the story of the Pilgrims and the early years of the Colony they founded. ...

They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their house and dwelling against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty. For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercised in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees). And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides, they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned by true reports.

Edward Winslow, in Mourt's Relation: Edward Winslow, 1651, by an anonymous artist Edward Winslow (1595–1655) was an American Pilgrim leader on the Mayflower. ... Mourts Relation was written primarily by Edward Winslow, although William Bradford appears to have written most of the first section. ...

Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after we had gathered the fruits of our labor. They four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the company almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which we brought to the plantation and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.

The mention of Massasoit's ninety men in the Winslow account is of interest, as the Native People presence,generally ignored in accounts, would have outnumbered the 50 surviving English at that point. The two preceding passages are the only records of the event, but historians presume that both groups were exposed to unfamiliar forms of celebration. What is clear is that Massasoit's people had no interest in aggression, but rather sought to prosper the newcomers. The Pilgrims did not hold a true Thanksgiving until 1623, when it followed a drought, prayers for rain, and a subsequent rain shower. Irregular Thanksgivings continued after favorable events and days of fasting after unfavorable ones. In the Plymouth tradition, a thanksgiving day was a church observance, rather than a feast day. This 1902 photo shows Profile Rock in Assonet, Massachusetts. ...


Gradually, an annual Thanksgiving after the harvest developed in the mid-17th century. This did not occur on any set day or necessarily on the same day in different colonies in America.


The Massachusetts Bay Colony (consisting mainly of Puritan Christians) celebrated Thanksgiving for the first time in 1630, and frequently thereafter until about 1680, when it became an annual festival in that colony; and Connecticut as early as 1639 and annually after 1647, except in 1675. The Dutch in New Netherland appointed a day for giving thanks in 1644 and occasionally thereafter. A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... States which were part of New Netherlands Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ...


Charlestown, Massachusetts held the first recorded Thanksgiving observance June 29, 1671 by proclamation of the town's governing council. Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ...


During the 18th century individual colonies commonly observed days of thanksgiving throughout each year. We might not recognize a traditional Thanksgiving Day from that period, as it was not a day marked by plentiful food and drink as is today's custom, but rather a day set aside for prayer and fasting.
Later in the 1700's individual colonies would periodically designate a day of thanksgiving in honor of a military victory, an adoption of a state constitution or an exceptionally bountiful crop. Such a Thanksgiving Day celebration was held in December of 1777 by the colonies nationwide, commemorating the surrender of British General Burgoyne at Saratoga. Fasting is primarily the act of willingly abstaining from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. ...


The Revolutionary War to nationhood

During the American Revolutionary War the Continental Congress appointed one or more thanksgiving days each year, each time recommending to the executives of the various states the observance of these days in their states. The First National Proclamation of Thanksgiving was given by the Continental Congress in 1777: This article is about military actions only. ...

FOR AS MUCH as it is the indispensable Duty of all Men to adore the superintending Providence of Almighty God; to acknowledge with Gratitude their Obligation to him for Benefits received, and to implore such farther Blessings as they stand in Need of: And it having pleased him in his abundant Mercy, not only to continue to us the innumerable Bounties of his common Providence; but also to smile upon us in the Prosecution of a just and necessary War, for the Defense and Establishment of our unalienable Rights and Liberties; particularly in that he hath been pleased, in so great a Measure, to prosper the Means used for the Support of our Troops, and to crown our Arms with most signal success:

It is therefore recommended to the legislative or executive Powers of these UNITED STATES to set apart THURSDAY, the eighteenth Day of December next, for SOLEMN THANKSGIVING and PRAISE: That at one Time and with one Voice, the good People may express the grateful Feelings of their Hearts, and consecrate themselves to the Service of their Divine Benefactor; and that, together with their sincere Acknowledgments and Offerings, they may join the penitent Confession of their manifold Sins, whereby they had forfeited every Favor; and their humble and earnest Supplication that it may please GOD through the Merits of JESUS CHRIST, mercifully to forgive and blot them out of Remembrance; That it may please him graciously to afford his Blessing on the Governments of these States respectively, and prosper the public Council of the whole: To inspire our Commanders, both by Land and Sea, and all under them, with that Wisdom and Fortitude which may render them fit Instruments, under the Providence of Almighty GOD, to secure for these United States, the greatest of all human Blessings, INDEPENDENCE and PEACE: That it may please him, to prosper the Trade and Manufactures of the People, and the Labor of the Husbandman, that our Land may yield its Increase: To take Schools and Seminaries of Education, so necessary for cultivating the Principles of true Liberty, Virtue and Piety, under his nurturing Hand; and to prosper the Means of Religion, for the promotion and enlargement of that Kingdom, which consisteth "in Righteousness, Peace and Joy in the Holy Ghost.


And it is further recommended, That servile Labor, and such Recreation, as, though at other Times innocent, may be unbecoming the Purpose of this Appointment, be omitted on so solemn an Occasion.

George Washington, leader of the revolutionary forces in the American Revolutionary War, proclaimed a Thanksgiving in December 1777 as a victory celebration honoring the defeat of the British at Saratoga.
George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Combatants British 9th/Hill, 20th/Lynd, 21st/ Hamilton, 62nd/Ansthruter, Simon Fraser Brunswick Major Generals V. Riedesel, 1st Brigade (Brunswickers) Brig. ...


Thanksgiving Proclamations in the First Thirty Years of Nationhood

As President, on October 3, 1789, George Washington made the following proclamation and created the first Thanksgiving Day designated by the national government of the United States of America: is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor, and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me "to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.

Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be. That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks, for his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation, for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his providence, which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war, for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed, for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted, for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.


And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions, to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually, to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed, to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shown kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord. To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease of science among them and Us, and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.


Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.[1]

George Washington again proclaimed a Thanksgiving in 1795. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


President John Adams declared Thanksgivings in 1798 and 1799. No Thanksgiving proclamations were issued by Thomas Jefferson but James Madison renewed the tradition in 1814, in response to resolutions of Congress, at the close of the War of 1812. Madison also declared the holiday twice in 1815; however, none of these were celebrated in autumn. For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ...


A thanksgiving day was annually appointed by the governor of New York from 1817. In some of the Southern states there was opposition to the observance of such a day on the ground that it was a relic of Puritanic bigotry, but by 1858 proclamations appointing a day of thanksgiving were issued by the governors of 25 states and two territories. This article is about the state. ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...


Lincoln and the Civil War

In the middle of the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln, prompted by a series of editorials written by Sarah Josepha Hale,[2] proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day, to be celebrated on the final Thursday in November 1863: Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Sarah Josepha Hale (October 24, 1788 - April 30, 1879) was an American writer. ...

The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequalled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle, or the ship; the axe had enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consciousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years, with large increase of freedom.

No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy.


It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and voice by the whole American people. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquility and Union.


In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.


Done at the city of Washington, this third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the independence of the United States the eighty-eighth." is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up AD, ad-, and ad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Proclamation of President Abraham Lincoln, 3 October 1863.[2] is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been observed annually in the United States.


1939 to present

Abraham Lincoln's successors as president followed his example of annually declaring the final Thursday in November to be Thanksgiving. But in 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared that Thanksgiving would be the second-to-last Thursday of November rather than the last. With the country still in the midst of The Great Depression, Roosevelt thought this would give merchants a longer period to sell goods before Christmas. Increasing profits and spending during this period, Roosevelt hoped, would aid bringing the country out of the Depression. At the time, it was considered inappropriate to advertise goods for Christmas until after Thanksgiving. However, since a presidential declaration of Thanksgiving Day was not legally binding, 23 states went along with Roosevelt's recommendation, and 22 did not. Other states, like Texas, could not decide and took both weeks as government holidays. Roosevelt persisted in 1940 to celebrate his "Franksgiving," as it was termed. The U.S. Congress in 1941 split the difference and passed a bill requiring that Thanksgiving be observed annually on the fourth Thursday of November, which was sometimes the last Thursday and sometimes (less frequently) the next to last. On November 26 of that year President Roosevelt signed this bill, for the first time making the date of Thanksgiving a matter of federal law. FDR redirects here. ... The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the creator of Franksgiving Franksgiving is a term referring to the early celebration of the American Thanksgiving holiday from 1939—1941. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

President Truman receiving a Thanksgiving turkey from members of the Poultry and Egg National Board and other representatives of the turkey industry, outside the White House.
President George W. Bush pardons “Flyer” the turkey during the 2006 ceremony in the White House Rose Garden[4].

Since 1947, or possibly earlier, the National Turkey Federation has presented the President of the United States with one live turkey and two dressed turkeys, in a ceremony known as the National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation. The live turkey is pardoned and lives out the rest of its days on a peaceful farm. While it is commonly held that this tradition began with Harry Truman in 1947, the Truman Library has been unable to find any evidence for this. Still others claim that the tradition dates back to Abraham Lincoln pardoning his son's pet turkey.[5] Both stories have been quoted in more recent presidential speeches. Image File history File links Truman2_thanksgiving. ... Image File history File links Truman2_thanksgiving. ... Image File history File linksMetadata GWBush_Thanksgiving_2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata GWBush_Thanksgiving_2006. ... The National Turkey Federation (NTF) is the national advocate for all segments of the turkey industry, providing services and conducting activities which increase demand for its members products by protecting and enhancing their ability to profitably provide wholesome, high-quality, nutritious products. ... President Truman is presented with a turkey National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation is a ceremony that takes place at the White House every year. ... For the Breton religious festivals, see Pardon (ceremony). ... For the victim of Mt. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


In more recent years, two turkeys have been pardoned, in case the original turkey becomes unavailable for presidential pardoning. Since 2003 the public has been invited to vote for the two turkeys' names. They were named Stars and Stripes in 2003 and 2004's turkeys were called Biscuit and Gravy. In 2005 the public decided on Marshmallow and Yam, in 2006 on Flyer and Fryer, and in 2007 on May and Flower.[6] [7] Since 2005, the two turkeys have been flown first class on United Airlines from Washington, D.C. to the Los Angeles area where they become the Grand Marshals of Disneyland's annual Thanksgiving Day parade down Main Street. The two turkeys then live out the rest of their relatively short lives in Disneyland's Frontierland ranch.[8] United Airlines is a major airline of the United States. ... Disneyland is a theme park that is located at 1313 South Harbor Boulevard in Anaheim, California, USA. It opened on July 17, 1955. ...


Since 1970, a group of leftist Native Americans and others have held a National Day of Mourning protest on Thanksgiving at Plymouth Rock in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Left wing redirects here. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The National Day of Mourning is an annual protest held on the fourth Thursday of November (known to many as Thanksgiving) in the United States of America since 1970. ... Plymouth Rock, described by some as the most disappointing landmark in America because of its small size and poor visitor access. ... Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth Settled 1620 Incorporated (town) 1670 Government [1]  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Manager Mark Sylvia Area  - Total 134. ...


Traditional celebrations

Foods of the season

U.S. tradition compares the holiday with a meal held in 1621 by the Wampanoag and the Pilgrims who settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts. This element continues in modern times with the Thanksgiving dinner, often featuring turkey, playing a large role in the celebration of Thanksgiving. Some of the details of the American Thanksgiving story are myths that developed in the 1890s and early 1900s as part of the effort to forge a common national identity in the aftermath of the Civil War and in the melting pot of new immigrants. The Wampanoag (Wôpanâak in the Wampanoag language) are a Native American people. ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... Seal of Plymouth Colony Map of Plymouth Colony showing town locations Capital Plymouth Language(s) English Religion Puritan, Separatist Government Monarchy Legislature General Court History  - Established 1620  - First Thanksgiving 1621  - Pequot War 1637  - King Philips War 1675–1676  - Part of the Dominion of New England 1686–1688  - Disestablished 1691... The centerpiece of contemporary Thanksgiving in the United States is a large meal, centered around a large roasted turkey. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Alternate meaning: crucible (science) The melting pot is a metaphor for the way in which heterogenous societies develop, in which the ingredients in the pot (iron, tin; people of different backgrounds and religions, etc. ...

Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner

In the United States, certain kinds of food are traditionally served at Thanksgiving meals. First and foremost, turkey is usually the featured item on any Thanksgiving feast table (so much so that Thanksgiving is sometimes referred to as "Turkey Day"). Stuffing, mashed potatoes with gravy, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce, maize, other fall vegetables, and pumpkin pie are commonly associated with Thanksgiving dinner. All of these primary dishes are actually native to the Americas or were introduced as a new food source to the Europeans when they arrived. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 900 KB) hello . ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 900 KB) hello . ...


To feed the needy at Thanksgiving time, most communities have annual food drives that collect non-perishable packaged and canned foods, and corporations sponsor charitable distributions of staple foods and Thanksgiving dinners.


Giving thanks

Thanksgiving was originally a religious observance for all the members of the community to give thanks to God for a common purpose. Historic reasons for community thanksgivings include the 1541 thanksgiving mass after the expedition of Coronado safely crossing part of Texas and finding game[9][10], and the 1777 thanksgiving after the victory in the revolutionary battle of Saratoga[11]. In his 1789 Proclamation, President Washington gave many noble reasons for a national Thanksgiving, including “for the civil and religious liberty,” for “useful knowledge,” and for God’s “kind care” and "his providence."[12] The only presidents to inject a specifically Christian focus to their proclamation have been Grover Cleveland in 1896,[13] and William McKinley in 1900.[14] Several other presidents have cited the Judeo-Christian tradition. Gerald Ford's 1975 declaration made no clear reference to any divinity.[15] Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ...


The tradition of giving thanks to God is continued today in various forms. Religious and spiritual organizations offer services and events on Thanksgiving themes the week-end before, the day of, or the week-end after Thanksgiving. Bishop Ryan observed about Thanksgiving Day, "It is the only day we have that consistently finds Catholics at Mass in extraordinary numbers...even though it is not a holy day of obligation.[16]."


In celebrations at home, it is a holiday tradition in many families to begin the Thanksgiving dinner by saying grace[3]. Found in diverse religious traditions, grace is a prayer before or after a meal to express appreciation to God, to ask for God’s blessing, or in some philosophies, to express an altruistic wish or dedication. The custom is portrayed in the photograph “Family Holding Hands and Praying Before a Thanksgiving Meal.” The grace may be led by the hostess or host, as has been traditional, or, in contemporary fashion, each person may contribute words of blessing or thanks[17]. According to a 1998 Gallup poll, an estimated 64 percent of Americans say grace[18].


Vacation and travel

On Thanksgiving Day, families and friends usually gather for a large meal or dinner, the result being that the Thanksgiving holiday weekend is one of the busiest travel periods of the year. In the United States, Thanksgiving is a four-day or five-day weekend vacation in school and college calendars. Most business and government workers (78% in 2007) are also given both Thanksgiving and the day after as paid holidays[19]. Thanksgiving Eve, on the Wednesday night before, has been one of the busiest nights of the year for bars and clubs, both in terms of sales and volume of patrons, as many students have returned to their hometowns from college. For other uses, see Transport (disambiguation). ...


Parades

See also: List of Christmas parades

In New York City, the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade (often erroneously referred to as the "Macy's Day Parade") is held annually every Thanksgiving Day from the Upper West Side of Manhattan to Macy's flagship store in Herald Square. The parade features parade floats with specific themes, scenes from Broadway plays, large balloons of cartoon characters and TV personalities, and high school marching bands. The float that traditionally ends the Macy's Parade is the Santa Claus float. This float is a sign that the Christmas season has begun. Thanksgiving parades also occur in many cities such as the 6abc Boscov's Thanksgiving Day Parade in Philadelphia (which claims the oldest parade), the McDonald's Thanksgiving Parade in Chicago (carried by WGN-TV and Superstation WGN), the America's Hometown Thanksgiving Parade in Plymouth (covered by WHDH-TV), the H-E-B Holiday Parade in Houston (televised by KHOU-TV), the the America's Thanksgiving Parade in Detroit (where it is the only major parade of the year, televised on WDIV-TV), and the Fountain Hills Thanksgiving Parade, among various other cities. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania holds the Macy's-sponsored Celebrate the Season Parade on the Saturday after Thanksgiving, co-sponsored and televised by WPXI. Within the New York metropolitan area, the city of Stamford, Connecticut holds an alternative parade called the UBS Parade Spectacular (with different character balloons from the Macy's parade) the Sunday before Thanksgiving that has attracted over 250,000 people in recent years. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Macys Day Parade redirects here. ... A year is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the R. H. Macy & Co. ... Categories: Stub | Manhattan ... A float is a decorated platform, either built on a vehicle or towed behind one, which is a component of many festive parades, such as the Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade and the Tournament of Roses Parade. ... Current Logo of the 6abc Boscovs Thanksgiving Day Parade. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Superstation WGN is a Chicago-based American superstation, owned by Tribune Broadcasting Company. ... Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth Settled 1620 Incorporated (town) 1670 Government [1]  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Manager Mark Sylvia Area  - Total 134. ... WHDH redirects here. ... H.E. Butt Grocery Company (abbreviated H-E-B) is a privately held San Antonio, Texas-based supermarket chain with over 300 stores throughout Texas and northern Mexico. ... Houston redirects here. ... KHOU-TV is the local CBS affiliate in Houston, Texas, owned by Belo Corporation (which purchased the station, along with the rest of Corinthian Broadcasting, from Dun & Bradstreet in 1984). ... Detroit redirects here. ... WDIV Local 4 is the NBC television station based in Detroit, Michigan. ... The world famous fountain of Fountain Hills, Arizona, spews water to a height of 562 feet, once per hour. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... WPXI Channel 11 is the NBC television affiliate based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The UBS Tower in Chicago (photo by Krzysztof Makara) UBS AG (NYSE: UBS; SWX: UBSN; TYO: 8657) is a diversified global financial services company, with its main headquarters in Basel & Zürich, Switzerland. ...


Despite taking place in September, Honolulu, Hawaii's annual Aloha Floral Parade was taped and featured on CBS annually as part of its "All American Thanksgiving Day Parade" until 2001, and is sometimes associated with Thanksgiving. Also as part of CBS's coverage, Nashville, Tennessee, for a period of about five years, held its own Thanksgiving parade called the "Aqua Parade," sponsored by the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center. For the city and county of Honolulu, see City & County of Honolulu. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Nashville redirects here. ... Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center, formerly known as Opryland Hotel, is a large hotel and convention center located in Nashville, Tennessee and owned by Gaylord Hotels, a division of Gaylord Entertainment Company. ...


Shopping

The American winter holiday season (generally the Christmas shopping season in the U.S.) traditionally begins the day after Thanksgiving, known as "Black Friday", although most stores actually start to stock for and promote the December holidays immediately after Halloween, and sometimes even before. Opponents of consumerism in some places protest this behavior by declaring the day after Thanksgiving Buy Nothing Day. Black Friday is the day after Thanksgiving and is the beginning of the traditional Christmas shopping season in the United States. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Black Friday is the day after Thanksgiving and is the beginning of the traditional Christmas shopping season in the United States. ... This article is about the holiday. ... Consumerist redirects here. ... Buy Nothing Day demonstration, San Francisco, November 2000 Buy Nothing Day is an informal day of rism]] observed by l acti While critics of the day charge that Buy Nothing Day simply causes participants to buy the next day[1], Adbusters states that it isnt just about changing your...


Football

Main article: American football on Thanksgiving
See also: Thanksgiving Classic

American football is often a major part of Thanksgiving celebrations in the United States. Professional games are traditionally played on Thanksgiving Day; until recently, these were the only games played during the week apart from Sunday or Monday night. The National Football League has played games on Thanksgiving every year since its creation; the tradition is referred to as the Thanksgiving Classic. The Detroit Lions have hosted a game every Thanksgiving Day since 1934, with the exception of 1939–1944 (due to World War II). The Dallas Cowboys have hosted every Thanksgiving Day since 1966, with the exception of 1975 and 1977 when the then-St. Louis Cardinals hosted. The American Football League also had a Thanksgiving Classic since its founding in 1960, with its 8 founding teams rotating one game each year (two games after the AFL-NFL merger). Additionally, many college and high school football games are played over Thanksgiving weekend, often between regional or historic rivals. Among these are Ole Miss Rebels vs. Mississippi State Bulldogs (a.k.a. the "Egg Bowl"), LSU Tigers vs. Arkansas Razorbacks, Georgia Bulldogs vs. Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, Colorado Buffaloes vs. Nebraska Cornhuskers, Texas Longhorns vs. Texas A&M Aggies, and (usually) the Bayou Classic, all of which are carried by national television networks. NFL Thanksgiving 2006 logo. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... NFL redirects here. ... NFL Thanksgiving 2006 logo. ... City Detroit, Michigan Team colors Honolulu Blue, Silver, and Black Head Coach Rod Marinelli Owner William Clay Ford, Sr. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, The Pokes Team colors White, Silver, Silver-Green, Royal Blue, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Western Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1969) Capitol Division... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red, The Buzzsaw Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner Bill Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952... The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ... The AFL-NFL Merger of 1970 involved the merger of the two major professional American football leagues in the United States during the time: the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL). ... University of Mississippi sports teams, originally known as the Mississippi Flood, were re-named the Rebels in 1935 and compete in the competitive twelve-member Southeastern Conference (West Division) of the NCAAs Division I. The schools colors are cardinal red (PMS 199) and navy blue (PMS 280), purposely... The Mississippi State Bulldogs are the athletic teams of Mississippi State University. ... The Egg Bowl is a nickname given to the annual college football game between Mississippi State University and the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss). The official name of the game is The Battle for the Golden Egg. ... LSU (Louisiana State University) is a member of the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) and the Southeastern Conference. ... The Arkansas Razorbacks, also known as the Hogs, are the names of college sports teams at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... The Georgia Bulldogs are the athletic teams of The University of Georgia. ... The Yellow Jackets is the name used for all of the intercollegiate athletic teams that play for the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Mike Bohn at the 2005 Spring Practice game. ... The Nebraska Cornhuskers (often abbreviated to Huskers) is the name given to several sports teams of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. ... For other uses, see Longhorn. ... Texas A&M Aggies is the name given to the sports teams of Texas A&M University. ... The State Farm Bayou Classic is the annual college football game between the Grambling State University Tigers and the Southern University Jaguars, first held in 1974 at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


See also

The former church where the story begins; the restaurant itself is roughly six miles north in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. ... Harvest festivals around the world: Chuseok: Korea Dongmaeng: Korea Erntedank: Germany Gawai Dayak: Malaysia Harvest festival: United Kingdom Kaamatan (May 30-31), Sabah in Malaysia Makar Sankranti: India Maras Taun: Belitung in Indonesia Mid-Autumn Festival: China Nabanna: Bengal region which comprises West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh Onam: celebrated by... For the American holiday, see Thanksgiving (United States). ... A Turkey Trot is an American Thanksgiving tradition. ...

References

  1. ^ a b 1789 Thanksgiving Proclamation by George Washington. George Washington Papers at Library of Congress. Library of Congress. Retrieved on 2008-01-26.
  2. ^ a b c Proclamation of Thanksgiving (October 3, 1863). INS Showcase. Retrieved on 2007-11-22.
  3. ^ a b President Bush Offers Thanksgiving Greetings. The White House. Retrieved on 2007-11-22.
  4. ^ President Bush Pardons "Flyer and Fryer" in National Thanksgiving Turkey Ceremony
  5. ^ Cynthia Edwards (2003-12-05). Did Truman pardon a Turkey?. Truman Trivia. Harry S. Truman Presidential Museum & Library. Retrieved on 2006-09-20.
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ [2]
  8. ^ Pardon me – do you know the way to first class?. OC Register. Retrieved on 2006-11-26.
  9. ^ http://timelines.ws/1525_1549.HTML] the 1610 Jamestown thanksgiving after the arrival of supply ships
  10. ^ Thanksgiving Timeline, 1541 - 2001
  11. ^ Thanksgiving Timeline, 1541 - 2001
  12. ^ Presidential Thanksgiving Proclamations 1789
  13. ^ Presidential Thanksgiving Proclamations 1890
  14. ^ Presidential Thanksgiving Proclamations 1900
  15. ^ Presidential Thanksgiving Proclamations 1970
  16. ^ Thanksgiving is a Holy Day?
  17. ^ Giving Thanks and Saying Grace
  18. ^ AMAZING GRACE / No matter what's on the plate, giving thanks is universal
  19. ^ BNA - Thanksgiving Holiday Leave Reaches New High;Turkey Stages a Comeback as Employer Holiday Gift

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Entrance to the Museum and Library, April 2007 (Robert E. Nylund) Kofi Annan speaking at the Museum and Library. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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There is more than one person sharing this name. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... In the United States, a Federal holiday is a holiday recognized by the United States Government. ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... Inauguration Day 2005 of President George W. Bush on the west steps of the U.S. Capitol. ... Presidents Day (or Presidents Day), is the common name for the federal holiday officially designated as Linclon Birthday, and both variants are among the official names of a number of coinciding state holidays. ... Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ... 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Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth Settled 1620 Incorporated (town) 1670 Government [1]  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Manager Mark Sylvia Area  - Total 134. ... The National Thanksgiving Proclamation was the first formal proclamation of Thanksgiving in America. ... President Truman is presented with a turkey National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation is a ceremony that takes place at the White House every year. ... For the American holiday, see Thanksgiving (United States). ... Martin Frobisher by Cornelis Ketel. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Statue symbolizing Samuel de Champlain in Ottawa. ... The City of Halifax (1841-1996) was the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, and the largest city in Atlantic Canada. ... The centerpiece of contemporary Thanksgiving in the United States is a large meal, centered around a large roasted turkey. ... Macys Day Parade redirects here. ... Current Logo of the 6abc Boscovs Thanksgiving Day Parade. ... The song, written by Lydia Maria Child in 1844, celebrates her childhood memories of visiting her Grandfathers House at the Christmas holiday. ... We Gather Together is a Christian hymn of Netherlands origin written in 1597 by Adrianus Valerius (pka François Valéry) as Wilt Heden Nu Treden to celebrate the Dutch victory over Spanish forces in the Battle of Turnhout. ... The former church where the story begins; the restaurant itself is roughly six miles north in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. ... For other uses, see Society (disambiguation). ... Black Friday is the day after Thanksgiving and is the beginning of the traditional Christmas shopping season in the United States. ... The term Cyber Monday refers to the Monday immediately following Black Friday, the ceremonial kick-off of the holiday online shopping season in the United States between Thanksgiving Day and Christmas. ... Harvest festivals around the world: Chuseok: Korea Dongmaeng: Korea Erntedank: Germany Gawai Dayak: Malaysia Harvest festival: United Kingdom Kaamatan (May 30-31), Sabah in Malaysia Makar Sankranti: India Maras Taun: Belitung in Indonesia Mid-Autumn Festival: China Nabanna: Bengal region which comprises West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh Onam: celebrated by... NFL Thanksgiving 2006 logo. ... A Turkey Trot is an American Thanksgiving tradition. ...

 
 

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