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Encyclopedia > Textile
Sunday textile market on the sidewalks of Karachi, Pakistan.
Sunday textile market on the sidewalks of Karachi, Pakistan.

A textile is a flexible material comprised of a network of natural or artificial fibers often referred to as thread or yarn. Yarn is produced by spinning raw wool fibers, linen, cotton, or other material on a spinning wheel to produce long strands known as yarn.[1] Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or pressing fibers together (felt). Look up textile in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up fabric in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (947x720, 165 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Karachi Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (947x720, 165 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Karachi Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class o f materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... A spinning wheel is a device for making thread or yarn from fibrous material such as wool or cotton. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... For the record label, see Knitting Factory. ... Detail of a crocheted doily, Sweden Crochet (IPA: krəʊʃeɪ) is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. ... Cavandoli Macrame Macramé or Macrame is a form of textile-making using knotting rather than weaving or knitting. ... A selection of 4 different felt cloths. ...

Contents

Textile terminology

The words fabric and cloth are commonly used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms. Textile refers to any material made of interlacing fibres. Fabric refers to any material made through weaving, knitting, crocheting, or bonding. Cloth refers to a finished piece of fabric that can be used for a purpose such as covering a bed. A tailor attending to a customer in Hong Kong. ... For other uses see Dressmaker (disambiguation) A dressmaker is a person who makes custom clothing for women, such as dresses, blouses, and evening gowns. ...


History

Main article: History of textiles
Late antique textile, Egyptian, now in the Dumbarton Oaks collection.
Late antique textile, Egyptian, now in the Dumbarton Oaks collection.

The production of textiles is an important craft, whose speed and scale of production has been altered almost beyond recognition by industrialization and the introduction of modern manufacturing techniques. However, for the main types of textiles, plain weave, twill or satin weave, there is little difference between the ancient and modern methods. Textiles were invented in the Middle East during the late stone age. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 579 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1170 × 1211 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 579 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1170 × 1211 pixel, file size: 1. ... Dumbarton Oaks is a nineteenth-century mansion located in the Georgetown section of Washington, DC. It houses the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, a leading center for scholarship in Byzantine studies, Pre-Columbian studies and the history of landscape architecture. ... Plain weave is one of the three basic types of textile weaves. ... A twill weave can easily be identified by its diagonal lines. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Incan Indians have been crafting quipus (or khipus) made of fibers either from a protein, such as spun and plied thread like wool or hair from camelids such as alpacas, llamas and camels or from a cellulose like cotton for thousands of years. Khipus are a series of knots along pieces of string. They have been believed to only have acted as a form of accounting, although new evidence conducted by Harvard professor, Gary Urton, indicates there may be more to the khipu than just numbers. Preservation of khipus found in museum and archive collections follow general textile preservation principles and practice. Representation of a quipu Quipu or khipu were recording devices used in the Inca Empire and its predecessor societies in the Andean region. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Professor of Anthropology (1978) Director, Division of Social Sciences (1995 – present) Degrees: BA University of New Mexico 1969; MA, PhD University of Illinois 1971, 1979 Teaching Specialties: South America – the Andes, Amazonia; Native people and cultures of North and South America; topics: social/cultural anthropology, anthropology and history, primitive art... Ainu ceremonial dress on display under glass in the British Museum. ...


Uses

Textiles have an assortment of uses, the most common of which are for clothing and containers such as bags and baskets. In the household, they are used in carpeting, upholstered furnishings, window shades, towels, covering for tables, beds, and other flat surfaces, and in art. In the workplace, they are used in industrial and scientific processes such as filtering. Miscellaneous uses include flags,backpack, tents, nets, cleaning devices, such as handkerchiefs; transportation devices such as balloons, kites, sails, and parachutes; strengthening in composite materials such as fibre glass and industrial geotextiles, and smaller cloths are used in washing by "soaping up" the cloth and washing with it rather than using just soap. Clothing protects the vulnerable nude human body from the extremes of weather, other features of our environment, and for safety reasons. ... Paper bag redirects here. ... Four styles of household basket. ... For other uses, see Carpet (disambiguation). ... For the UK band, see Furniture (band). ... Venetian blind detail, showing how slats are connected Cat tangled in miniblinds A window blind is a covering for a window, usually attached to the interior side of a window. ... A towel is a piece of absorbent fabric or paper used for drying or wiping. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... A backpack A backpack is, in its simplest form, a cloth sack carried on ones back and secured with two straps that go over the shoulders (called shoulder straps) and below the armpits. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up net in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cleanliness is the absence of dirt, including dust, stains and a bad smell. ... Linen handkerchief A handkerchief or hanky is a square of fabric, usually carried in the pocket, for personal hygiene purposes such as wiping ones hands or blowing ones nose, but also used as a decorative accessory in a suit pocket. ... For the movement of people or objects, see transport. ... For other uses, see Balloon (disambiguation). ... Yokaichi Giant Kite Festival held on the fourth Sunday every May in Higashiomi, Shiga, Japan Kite flying is the activity of flying tethered man-made objects in wind. ... A gaff-rigged cutter flying a mainsail, staysail and genoa jib For other uses, see Sail (disambiguation). ... This article is about the device. ... A cloth of woven carbon fiber filaments, a common element in composite materials Composite materials (or composites for short) are engineered materials made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties and which remain separate and distinct on a macroscopic level within the finished structure. ... There is a disputed proposal to merge this article with glass-reinforced plastic. ... Geotextiles are permeable fabrics which, when used in association with soil, have the ability to separate, filter, reinforce, protect, or drain. ...


Textiles used for industrial purposes, and chosen for characteristics other than their appearance, are commonly referred to as technical textiles. Technical textiles include textile structures for automotive applications, medical textiles (e.g. implants), geotextiles (reinforcement of embankments), agrotextiles (textiles for crop protection), protective clothing (e.g. against heat and radiation for fire fighter clothing, against molten metals for welders, stab protection, and bullet proof vests. In all these applications stringent performance requirements must be met. Woven of threads coated with zinc oxide nanowires, laboratory fabric has been shown capable of "self-powering nanosystems" using vibrations created by everyday actions like wind or body movements.[2][3] The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... This article is about firearms projectiles. ... Zinc oxide is a chemical compound with formula ZnO. It is nearly insoluble in water but soluble in acids or alkalis. ... A nanowire is a wire of dimensions of the order of a nanometer (10−9 meters). ...


Fashion and textile designs

Fashion designers commonly rely on textile designs to set their fashion collections apart from others. Marisol Deluna, Nicole Miller, Lilly Pulitzer, the late Gianni Versace and Emilio Pucci can be easily recognized by their signature print driven designs. Marisol Deluna (born 1967, San Antonio, Texas) is an American fashion designer. ... Nicole Miller (born 1952, Lenox, Massachusetts) is an American fashion designer. ... Lilly Pulitzer (b. ... Gianni Versace (December 2, 1946 – July 15, 1997) was an accomplished Italian designer of both clothing and theater costumes. ... Emilio Pucci, Marchese di Barsento (November 20, 1914 – 1992) was an Italian fashion designer. ...


Sources and types

Traditional Romanian fabric
Traditional Romanian fabric

Textiles can be made from many materials. These materials come from four main sources: animal, plant, mineral, and synthetic. In the past, all textiles were made from natural fibres, including plant, animal, and mineral sources. In the 20th century, these were supplemented by artificial fibres made from petroleum. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1299x1197, 503 KB) Traditional tablecloth made in Maramures, Romania. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1299x1197, 503 KB) Traditional tablecloth made in Maramures, Romania. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Petro redirects here. ...


Textiles are made in various strengths and degrees of durability, from the finest gossamer to the sturdiest canvas. The relative thickness of fibres in cloth is measured in deniers. Microfiber refers to fibers made of strands thinner than one denier. The manufacture of textiles is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Look up Canvas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Denier is a unit of measure for the linear mass density of fibers. ... Microfiber (British spelling: Microfibre) is fiber with strands less than one denier. ...


Animal textiles

Animal textiles are commonly made from hair or fur. For the 1968 stage production, see Hair (musical), for the 1979 film, see Hair (film). ... For other uses, see Fur (disambiguation). ...


Wool refers to the hair of the domestic goat or sheep, which is distinguished from other types of animal hair in that the individual strands are coated with scales and tightly crimped, and the wool as a whole is coated with an oil known as lanolin, which is waterproof and dirtproof. Woollen refers to a bulkier yarn produced from carded, non-parallel fibre, while worsted refers to a finer yarn which is spun from longer fibres which have been combed to be parallel. Wool is commonly used for warm clothing. Cashmere, the hair of the Indian cashmere goat, and mohair, the hair of the North African angora goat, are types of wool known for their softness. For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... This article is about the domestic species. ... Species See text. ... Synthetic motor oil For other uses, see Oil (disambiguation). ... Lanolin, also called Adeps Lanae, wool wax, wool fat, or wool grease, a greasy yellow substance from wool-bearing animals, acts as a skin ointment, water-proofing wax, and raw material (such as in shoe polish). ... This article is about wool, the fiber. ... Worsted is the name of a dick the cloth made from this yarn, as well as a yarn weight category. ... Kashmere redirects here. ... from: http://www. ... Not to be confused with Mohair (band). ... The angora goat is a goat from the Angora region in Asia Minor, near present-day Ankara. ...


Other animal textiles which are made from hair or fur are alpaca wool, vicuña wool, llama wool, and camel hair, generally used in the production of coats, jackets, ponchos, blankets, and other warm coverings. Angora refers to the long, thick, soft hair of the angora rabbit. This article is about a breed of domesticated ungulates. ... Binomial name (Molina, 1782) The vicuña (Vicugna vicugna) is one of 2 wild South American camelids, along with the guanaco, which live in the high alpineous areas of the Andes. ... For other uses, see Llama (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Camel (disambiguation). ... Coat can refer to any one of the following: The fur coat of a mammal. ... A jacket is a lightweight, sleeved thigh- or waist-length coat that may be worn by anyone, as jackets are now made for children, adults, the elderly, and even infants. ... Typical Andes poncho in a flea market in Genoa, Italy A poncho is a simple garment designed to keep the body warm, or if made from an impermeable material, to keep dry during rain. ... For other uses, see Blanket (disambiguation). ... Angora was the name of the city of Ankara and the surrounding Ankara Province (vilayet) in Turkey and the Ottoman Empire prior to 1930. ... The Angora rabbit is a variety of domestic rabbit bred for its long, soft hair. ...


Wadmal is a coarse cloth made of wool, produced in Scandinavia, mostly 1000~1500CE.


Silk is an animal textile made from the fibers of the cocoon of the Chinese silkworm. This is spun into a smooth, shiny fabric prized for its sleek texture. For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... Cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha) pupa A pupa (Latin pupa for doll, pl: pupae or pupas) is the life stage of some insects undergoing transformation. ... Binomial name Bombyx mori Linnaeus, 1758 For other senses of this word, see silkworm (disambiguation). ...


Plant textiles

Grass, rush, hemp, and sisal are all used in making rope. In the first two, the entire plant is used for this purpose, while in the last two, only fibres from the plant are utilized. Coir (coconut fiber) is used in making twine, and also in floormats, doormats, brushes, mattresses, floor tiles, and sacking. Subfamilies There are 7 subfamilies: Subfamily Arundinoideae Subfamily Bambusoideae Subfamily Centothecoideae Subfamily Chloridoideae Subfamily Panicoideae Subfamily Pooideae Subfamily Stipoideae The true grasses are monocotyledonous plants (Class Liliopsida) in the Family Poaceae, also known as Gramineae. ... Genera Andesia Distichia Juncus - Rush Luzula - Woodrush Marsippospermum Oxychloë Prionium Rostkovia The Juncaceae, or the Rush Family, is a rather small monocot flowering plant family. ... U.S. Marihuana production permit. ... Binomial name Agave sisalana Perrine Sisal or sisal hemp is an agave Agave sisalana that yields a stiff fiber used in making rope. ... Coir (from Malayalam kayar, cord) is a coarse fibre extracted from the fibrous outer shell of a coconut. ... For other uses, see Coconut (disambiguation). ... A spool of twine. ... This article is about the piece of fabric; see also District of Mat, Albania, and Mat (language) A welcome mat from Lexington, Massachusetts A mat is a generic term for a piece of fabric or flat material, generally placed on a floor or other flat surface, and serving a range... For other uses, see Brush (disambiguation). ... A pillow top queen-size mattress. ... sack-ing ...


Straw and bamboo are both used to make hats. Straw, a dried form of grass, is also used for stuffing, as is kapok. Bales of straw bundles of rice straw Pile of straw bales, sheltered under a tarpaulin Straw is an agricultural byproduct, the dry stalk of a cereal plant, after the nutrient grain or seed has been removed. ... For other uses, see Bamboo (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (L.) Gaertn. ...


Fibres from pulpwood trees, cotton, rice, hemp, and nettle are used in making paper. Pulpwood refers to timber stocks that are cut in order to make wood pulp for paper production. ... Rice paper usually refers to paper made from parts of the rice plant, like rice straw or rice flour. ... Nettles redirects here. ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ...


Cotton, flax, jute, hemp and modal are all used in clothing. Piña (pineapple fiber) and ramie are also fibres used in clothing, generally with a blend of other fabrics such as cotton. For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flax (disambiguation). ... The word Jute is also used in reference to the Germanic people, the Jutes. ... Modal is a bio-based fiber made by spinning reconstituted cellulose from beech trees. ... Piña is a fiber derived from the leaves of a pineapple. ... For other uses, see Pineapple (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaudich. ...


Acetate is used to increase the shininess of certain fabrics such as silks, velvets, and taffetas. Cellulose acetate, first prepared in 1865, is the acetate ester of cellulose. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... Swatch of black cotton velvet decorator fabric used for drapery Velvet is a type of tufted fabric in which the cut threads are very evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it its distinct feel. ... Taffeta (sometimes spelled taffety) is a crisp, smooth woven fabric made from silk or synthetic fibers. ...


Seaweed is used in the production of textiles. A water-soluble fiber known as alginate is produced and is used as a holding fiber; when the cloth is finished, the alginate is dissolved, leaving an open area Ascophyllum nodosum exposed to the sun in Nova Scotia, Canada Dead Mans Fingers (Codium fragile) off Massachusetts coast For the band, see; Seaweed (band) For the rock musician, see; Seaweed (musician) Seaweeds are any of a large number of marine benthic algae. ... Alginic acid (algine, alginate) is a viscous gum that is abundant in the cell walls of brown algae. ...


Mineral textiles

Asbestos and basalt fiber are used for vinyl tiles, sheeting, and adhesives, "transite" panels and siding, acoustical ceilings, stage curtains, and fire blankets. For other uses, see Asbestos (disambiguation). ... Basalt fiber or fibre is a material made from extremely fine fibers of basalt, which is composed of the minerals plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine. ...


Glass Fiber is used in the production of spacesuits, ironing board and mattress covers, ropes and cables, reinforcement fiber for composite materials, insect netting, flame-retardant and protective fabric, soundproof, fireproof, and insulating fibers. There is a disputed proposal to merge this article with glass-reinforced plastic. ... Apollo 15 space suit A spacesuit is a complex system of garments, equipment, and environmental systems designed to keep a person alive and comfortable in the harsh environment of outer space. ... A cloth of woven carbon fiber filaments, a common element in composite materials Composite materials (or composites for short) are engineered materials made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties and which remain separate and distinct on a macroscopic level within the finished structure. ...


Metal fiber, metal foil, and metal wire have a variety of uses, including the production of cloth-of-gold and jewelry. Hardware cloth is a coarse weave of steel wire, used in construction. Jewelry (the American spelling; spelled jewellery in Commonwealth English) consists of ornamental devices worn by persons, typically made with gems and precious metals. ...


Synthetic textiles

A variety of contemporary fabrics. From the left: evenweave cotton, velvet, printed cotton, calico, felt, satin, silk, hessian, polycotton.
A variety of contemporary fabrics. From the left: evenweave cotton, velvet, printed cotton, calico, felt, satin, silk, hessian, polycotton.

All synthetic textiles are used primarily in the production of clothing. variety of fabric. ... variety of fabric. ...


Polyester fiber is used in all types of clothing, either alone or blended with fibres such as cotton. SEM picture of a bend in a high surface area polyester fiber with a seven-lobed cross section Polyester (aka Terylene) is a category of polymers which contain the ester functional group in their main chain. ...


Aramid fiber (e.g. Twaron) is used for flame-retardant clothing, cut-protection, and armor. Aramid fiber (1961) is a fire-resistant and strong synthetic fiber. ... Chemical structure of Kevlar. ...


Acrylic is a fibre used to imitate wools, including cashmere, and is often used in replacement of them. Acrylic fibers are synthetic fibers made from a polymer (Polyacrylonitrile) with an average molecular weight of ~100,000. ...


Nylon is a fibre used to imitate silk; it is used in the production of pantyhose. Thicker nylon fibers are used in rope and outdoor clothing. For other uses of this word, see nylon (disambiguation). ... Sheer pantyhose Pantyhose (also called tights) are sheer, close fitting coverings of the body from the waist to the feet, most frequently worn by women. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ...


Spandex (trade name Lycra) is a polyurethane fibre that stretches easily and can be made tight-fitting without impeding movement. It is used to make activewear, bras, and swimsuits. Example of spandex Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity. ... A polyurethane is any polymer consisting of a chain of organic units joined by urethane links. ... Look up bra, bras in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A swimsuit, bathing suit or swimming costume is an item of clothing designed to be worn for swimming. ...


Olefin fiber is a fiber used in activewear, linings, and warm clothing. Olefins are hydrophobic, allowing them to dry quickly. A sintered felt of olefin fibers is sold under the trade name Tyvek. This article needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... A selection of 4 different felt cloths. ... Tyvek house wrap Tyvek suit Tyvek USPS Express Mail Envelope Tyvek is a brand of spunbonded olefin, a synthetic material made of high-density polyethylene fibers; the name is a registered trademark of the DuPont Company. ...


Ingeo is a polylactide fiber blended with other fibres such as cotton and used in clothing. It is more hydrophilic than most other synthetics, allowing it to wick away perspiration. Ingeo™ is a trademark for the first commercially viable man-made fiber made from 100% annually renewable resources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into polylactic acid. ...


Lurex is a metallic fiber used in clothing embellishment. Lurex is the brand name for a type of yarn with a metallic appearance. ...


Production methods

Main article: textile manufacturing
Brilliantly dyed traditional woven textiles of Guatemala, and woman weaving on a backstrap loom.
Brilliantly dyed traditional woven textiles of Guatemala, and woman weaving on a backstrap loom.

Weaving is a textile production method which involves interlacing a set of longer threads (called the warp) with a set of crossing threads (called the weft). This is done on a frame or machine known as a loom, of which there are a number of types. Some weaving is still done by hand, but the vast majority is mechanised. Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 496 pixelsFull resolution (933 × 579 pixel, file size: 170 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 496 pixelsFull resolution (933 × 579 pixel, file size: 170 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... WaRp. ... WEFT Champaign 90. ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ...


Knitting and crocheting involve interlacing loops of yarn, which are formed either on a knitting needle or on a crochet hook, together in a line. The two processes are different in that knitting has several active loops at one time, on the knitting needle waiting to interlock with another loop, while crocheting never has more than one active loop on the needle. For the record label, see Knitting Factory. ... Detail of a crocheted doily, Sweden Crochet (IPA: krəʊʃeɪ) is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Bamboo knitting needles A little dexterity is helpful in working with knitting needles A knitting needle or knitting pin is a long stick or rod used as a tool in the manufacture of hand knitted fabric. ... The hook A crochet hook is a type of needle with a hook at one end used to draw thread through knotted loops. ...


Braiding or plaiting involves twisting threads together into cloth. Knotting involves tying threads together and is used in making macrame. A braid Step by step creation of a basic braid using three strings To braid is to interweave or twine three or more separate strands of one or more materials in a diagonally overlapping pattern. ... A plait is a knot usually tied from multiple lines and exhibiting a repeating pattern, often a braid and often referring to hair. ... Categories: Needlework | Stub ...


Lace is made by interlocking threads together independently, using a backing and any of the methods described above, to create a fine fabric with open holes in the work. Lace can be made by either hand or machine. For other uses, see Lace (disambiguation). ...


Carpets, rugs, velvet, velour, and velveteen, are made by interlacing a secondary yarn through woven cloth, creating a tufted layer known as a nap or pile. For other uses, see Carpet (disambiguation). ... Look up Rug in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Swatch of black cotton velvet decorator fabric used for drapery Velvet is a type of tufted fabric in which the cut threads are very evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it its distinct feel. ... Velour is a textile, a knitted counterpart of velvet. ... Velveteen is a cotton cloth made in imitation of velvet. ...


Felting involves pressing a mat of fibers together, and working them together until they become tangled. A liquid, such as soapy water, is usually added to lubricate the fibers, and to open up the microscopic scales on strands of wool. A selection of 4 different felt cloths. ...


Treatments

Woven tartan of Clan Campbell, Scotland.
Woven tartan of Clan Campbell, Scotland.

Textiles are often dyed, with fabrics available in almost every colour. Coloured designs in textiles can be created by weaving together fibres of different colours (tartan or Uzbek Ikat), adding coloured stitches to finished fabric (embroidery), creating patterns by resist dyeing methods, tying off areas of cloth and dyeing the rest (tie-dye), or drawing wax designs on cloth and dyeing in between them (batik), or using various printing processes on finished fabric. Woodblock printing, still used in India and elsewhere today, is the oldest of these dating back to at least 220CE in China. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Clan Campbell is historically one of the largest and most powerful Highland Scottish clans. ... This article is about the country. ... Dyeing is the process of changing the colour of a yarn or cloth by treatment with a dye. ... For the artificial athletic track surface, see tartan track. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... Embroidery in silk thread on linen, 19th century Embroidery is the art or handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with designs stitched in strands of thread or yarn using a needle. ... Resist dyeing, resist-dyeing and variants is a term for a number of traditional methods of dyeing textiles with patterns. ... Categories: Stub ... This article is about the textile dyeing technique. ... Yuan Dynasty woodblock edition of a Chinese play For the use of the technique in art, see Woodcut on the technique, and Old master print for the history in Europe and woodblock printing in Japan. ...


Textiles are also sometimes bleached. In this process, the original colour of the textile is removed by chemicals or exposure to sunlight, turning the textile pale or white. This article is about the chemical whitener. ...


Textiles are sometimes finished by starching, which makes the fabric stiff and less prone to wrinkles, or by waterproofing, which makes the fabric slick and impervious to water or other liquids. Since the 1990s, finishing agents have been used to strengthen fabrics and make them wrinkle free. [1]
Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ... Waterproof fabrics are usually natural or synthetic fabrics that are laminated to or coated in some sort of permanently waterproofing material, such as rubber, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyurethane (PU), silicone elastomer, and wax. ...


Self-cleaning textiles

Scientists from Organic Chemistry at the Faculty of Science of Monash University had created a very interesting invention - a nanoparticle coating that removes most types of stains from fabric. To become "self-cleaning", fabric must be prepared with a nanoparticle coating composed from anatase titanium dioxide - substance that is known to destroy stains, dirt and harmful microorganisms when exposed to sunlight. However, it is hard to apply a ceramic inorganic material to organic fibers, such as wool, silk or hemp.[4]


See also

Ainu ceremonial dress on display under glass in the British Museum. ... Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... The manufacture of textiles is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Timeline of clothing and textiles technology. ... Textile printing is a general name for all woven fabrics and the art of ornamenting such fabrics by printing on designs or patterns in color is very ancient, probably originating in the East. ... Inca Quipu. ...

References

  1. ^ An Introduction to Textile Terms (pdf). Retrieved on August 6, 2006.
  2. ^ Keim, Brandon. "Piezoelectric Nanowires Turn Fabric Into Power Source", Wired News, CondéNet, February 13, 2008. Retrieved on 2008-02-13. 
  3. ^ Yong Qin, Xudong Wang & Zhong Lin Wang (October 10, 2007). "Letter/abstract: Microfibre–nanowire hybrid structure for energy scavenging". Nature 451: 809-813. Nature Publishing Group. doi:10.1038/nature06601. Retrieved on 2008-02-13. cited in Editor's summary: Nanomaterial: power dresser. Nature. Nature Publishing Group (February 14, 2008). Retrieved on 2008-02-13.
  4. ^ Self-cleaning fabrics
  • Good, Irene. 2006. "Textiles as a Medium of Exchange in Third Millennium B.C.E. Western Asia." In: Contact and Exchange in the Ancient World. Edited by Victor H. Mair. University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu. Pages 191-214. ISBN 978-0824828844
  • Fisher, Nora (Curator Emirta, Textiles & Costumes), Museum of International Folk Art. "Rio Grande Textiles." Introduction by Teresa Archuleta-Sagel. 196 pages with 125 black and white as well as color plates, Museum of New Mexico Press, Paperbound.
  • David H. Abrahams, "Textile chemistry", McGraw Hill Encyclopedia of Science -- available in AccessScience@McGraw-Hill, DOI 10.1036/1097-8542.687500, last modified: February 21, 2007.] (Subscription access)

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The Museum of International Folk Art is a state-run institution in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. It is one of eight museums operated by the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. ...

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  • Design a Textile. Textiles. Victoria and Albert Museum. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Cornell redirects here. ... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The textile arts include feltmaking, quilting, patchwork, sewing, knitting, crochet, needlework and embroidery. ... Quilt block in applique and reverse applique Applique or appliqué (from French, applied) is an ancient needlework technique in which pieces of fabric, embroidery, or other materials are sewn onto a foundation fabric to create designs. ... Detail of a crocheted doily, Sweden Crochet (IPA: krəʊʃeɪ) is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. ... Dyeing is the process of changing the colour of a yarn or cloth by treatment with a dye. ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class o f materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... For the record label, see Knitting Factory. ... For other uses, see Lace (disambiguation). ... Nålebinding (Danish: literally binding with a needle or needle-binding, also naalbinding or naalebinding) is a fabric creation technique predating both knitting and crochet. ... Needlework is another term for the handicraft of decorative sewing and textile arts. ... Example of patchwork Patchwork or pieced work is a form of needlework that involves sewing together pieces of fabric into a larger design. ... Passementerie of applied gold cord and embroidery worn by Henry VIII of England (detail of a portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger, c. ... Plying, in textile manufacture, is the activity of twisting, intermingling, or otherwise intimately combining two or more fibers or yarns into a combined yarn or fiber. ... Quilter and Quilters redirect here. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... Sewn redirects here. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... Textile printing is a general name for all woven fabrics and the art of ornamenting such fabrics by printing on designs or patterns in color is very ancient, probably originating in the East. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Ladies making silk, early 12th century painting by Emperor Huizong of Song (a remake of an 8th century original by artist Zhang Xuan), illustrates silk fabric manufacture in China. ... The history of silk begins, according to Chinese tradition, in the 27th century BC. The Chinese were able to continue making it exclusively for three millennia without ever divulging the secret process whereby it was made. ... Quilting fabric is as old as ancient Egypt if not older and wholecloth quilts were very common trade goods in wealthy circles in Europe and Asia going back as far as the 15th century. ... With the establishment of overseas colonies, the British Empire at the end of the 17th century/beginning of the 18th century had a vast source of raw materials and a vast market for goods. ... Timeline of clothing and textiles technology. ... In knitting, crochet and other textile arts, blocking is a family of techniques for setting the stable dimensions of a finished textile piece by pinning it to the desired size and annealing it with heat and moisture, e. ... Fiber art is a subclassification of fine art defined by the usually exclusive use of fabrics, yarn, other natural fibers, and now synthetic fibers to focus on the properties of the material as well as the hands-on work intensive process as part of the significance of the piece. ... Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Ainu ceremonial dress on display under glass in the British Museum. ... The manufacture of textiles is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... The Textile industry (also known in the United Kingdom and Australia as the Rag Trade) is a term used for industries primarily concerned with the design or manufacture of clothing as well as the distribution and use of textiles . ... Wearable Art, also known as Artwear, describes the making of individually designed pieces of usually hand-made clothing as artistic expressions. ... Barkcloth is a soft, thick, slightly textured fabric so named because it has a rough surface like that of tree bark. ... Batiste is the softest of the lightweight opaque fabrics. ... Bombazine, or bombasine, is a fabric originally made of silk or silk and wool, and now also made of cotton and wool or of wool alone. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Burlap is a dense woven fabric, usually made of jute and allied vegetable fibers. ... Buckram is available in many colors. ... Calico is a textile made from unbleached, and often not fully processed, cotton. ... Cambric is a lightweight cotton cloth used as fabric for lace and needlework. ... Look up Canvas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Chambray is a commune of the Eure département in France. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ... Cheesecloth is a loosewoven cotton cloth, such as is used in pressing cheese curds. ... Chiffon, from the French word for Cloth, is a lightweight, balanced plain-woven sheer fabric woven of alternate S- and Z-twist crepe (high-twist) yarns. ... Chino cloth is a kind of twill fabric, usually made primarily from cotton. ... Cloth of gold is a fabric woven with a gold-wrapped or spun weft - referred to as a spirally spun gold strip. In most cases, the core yarn is silk wrapped with a band/ or strip of high content gold filé. In rarer instances, fine linen and wool have been... Cotton duck (from Dutch doek,linen canvas), also simply duck, sometimes duck cloth or duck canvas is a heavy cotton fabric. ... Coutil (or Coutille) is woven twill cloth created specifically for making corsets. ... Crape (an anglicized version of the Fr. ... This article is about the material denim. ... Dimity is a lightweight, sheer cotton fabric having at least two warp threads thrown into relief to form fine cords. ... Dowlas is the name given to a plain cloth, similar to sheeting, but usually coarser. ... Drill is a strong, durable cotton fabric with a strong bias (diagonal) in the weave. ... A foulard is a lightweight fabric, either twill or plain-woven, made of silk or a mix of silk and cotton. ... A young man wearing a tartan flannel shirt. ... Gabardine Gabardine is a tough, tightly woven fabric used to make suits, overcoats, trousers and other garments. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gingham is a fabric made from dyed cotton yarn. ... Haircloth is a stiff, unsupple fabric typically made from horsehair and/or from the wooly hair of a camel. ... For other uses, see Harris Tweed (disambiguation). ... Hodden is a coarse kind of cloth made of undyed wool, formerly much worn by the peasantry of Scotland. ... Irish linen is the brand name given to linen produced in Ireland. ... Jamdani is a kind of fine cloth made in Bangladesh. ... A man weaves kente cloth using a traditional loom in Bonwire village, Ashanti region, Ghana. ... Lamé is a type of fabric woven or knit with metallic yarns. ... Lawn cloth, Lawn is a plain weave cloth, produced from cotton. ... Linsey-Woolsey is a fabric that has been in use since colonial times. ... water resisting material for clothing made from sheep wool; usually green and used in bavarian traditional clothing. ... Madras is a lightweight cotton fabric with patterned texture, used primarily for summer clothing -- pants, shorts, dresses and jackets. ... Moleskin is made from moles. ... Muslin is a type of finely-woven cotton fabric, introduced to Europe from the Middle East in the 17th century. ... A sheer fabric of silk, rayon, or nylon made in a variety of tight smooth weaves or open lacy patterns. ... Oilskin jacket (left) and high trousers (right). ... Organdy or organdie is the sheerest cotton cloth made. ... Organza fabric Organza is a thin, plain weave, sheer fabric traditionally made from silk, the continuous filament of silkworms. ... Oxford refers to a type of weave employed to make the fabric in oxford shirts. ... Percale refers to a closely woven fabric often used for bed linens. ... Poplin, also called tabinet, is a heavy, durable fabric consisting of a silk warp with a weft of worsted yarn. ... Rep, Repp, or Reps is a cloth made of silk, wool, or cotton. ... Ripstop nylon is the primary material used in Hot air balloons Rip-stop Nylon is a light-weight, water-repellent nylon fabric with inter-woven ripstop reinforcement threads in a crosshatch pattern, so the material resists ripping or tearing. ... Russell cord is a corded fabric which is woven using equal quantities of cotton and wool. ... Sateen is a cotton fabric with a satin-like finish, often found in bed sheets. ... Satin used in bedding Structure of silk satin Look up Satin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Scarlet was a type of fine and expensive woolen cloth common in mediaeval England. ... Grey and white seersucker material. ... Serge is a type of twill fabric that has diagonal lines or ridges on both sides, made with a two-up, two-down weave. ... Stuff was a type of coarse woven cloth manufactured in various places, formerly including Kidderminster. ... Taffeta (sometimes spelled taffety) is a crisp, smooth woven fabric made from silk or synthetic fibers. ... Tweed is a rough, unfinished woolen fabric, of a soft, open, flexible texture resembling cheviot or homespun, but more closely woven. ... A twill weave can easily be identified by its diagonal lines. ... Via Gellia is a steep sided wooded dry valley and road in Derbyshire. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (725 × 725 pixel, file size: 1 MB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Brocade can stands for: thick heavy fabric into which raised patterns have been woven. ... Camlet, also commonly known as camelot or camblet, is a woven fabric that might have originally been made of camel or goats hair, now chiefly of goats hair and silk, or of wool and cotton. ... Italian silk damask, 1300s. ... Songket is fabric which belongs to the brocade family of textiles. ... Baize is a coarse woollen or cotton cloth, often coloured red or green. ... Chenille may refer to either a type of cored yarn or fabric made from it. ... Corduroy is a fabric composed of twisted fibers that when woven lie parallel (similar to twill) to one another to form the cloths distinct pattern, a cord. ... Fustian is a term for a variety of heavy woven cotton fabrics, chiefly prepared for menswear. ... Plush (from French peluche) is a textile fabric having a cut nap or pile the same as fustian or velvet. ... Polar fleece, more often called just fleece, is a soft napped insulating synthetic wool fabric made from PET or other synthetic fibers. ... Terry cloth. ... Velours du Kasaï Velours du Kasaï (Kasaï velvet) is a kind of textile fabric made in Kasai, a province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zaïre). ... Swatch of black cotton velvet decorator fabric used for drapery Velvet is a type of tufted fabric in which the cut threads are very evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it its distinct feel. ... Velveteen is a cotton cloth made in imitation of velvet. ... Zibeline is a thick, soft fabric with a long nap. ... A selection of 4 different felt cloths. ... Nonwoven textiles are those which are neither woven nor knit, for example felt. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A modern industrial knitting machine in action The knitting machine, sometimes called knitting frame, knitting loom, or hand knitting machine, is used to produce knit fabrics on a fixed bed of hooked needles. ... Velour is a textile, a knitted counterpart of velvet. ... Net or netting is any textile in which the warp and weft yarns are looped or knotted at their intersections, resulting in a fabric with large open spaces between the yarns. ... Bobbinet is a specific type of tulle netting which has been made in the UK since the invention of the bobbinet machine in 1806 by John Heathcoat. ... Carbon fiber composite is a strong, light and very expensive material. ... This article is about the article of clothing. ... For other uses, see Lace (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mesh (disambiguation). ... Needlerun Net refers to a family of laces created by using a needle to embroider on a net ground. ... A sheer fabric of silk, rayon, or nylon made in a variety of tight smooth weaves or open lacy patterns. ... Tulle is a netting, which is often starched, made of various fibers, including silk, nylon, and rayon, that is most commonly used for veils, gowns (particularly wedding gowns) and ballet tutus. ... Gore-tex is a proprietary teflonized textile material owned by W.L. Gore & Associates. ... SmartWool is a company founded by ski instructors Peter and Patty Duke in New England in 1994 and acquired by the Timberland Company in 2005. ... Silnylon, a contraction of Silicone impregnated nylon, is a synthetic fabric used mainly in lightweight outdoor gear. ... Example of spandex Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity. ... SympaTex or Sympa-Tex or Sympatex is a textile trademark. ... An argyle sock The argyle (occasionally argyll) pattern is one containing diamonds in a diagonal checkerboard arrangement. ... A sample cross-stitch of a Welsh dresser Cross-stitch is a popular form of counted-thread embroidery in which X-shaped stitches are used to form a picture. ... Houndstooth is a duotone textile pattern, characterized by broken checks or abstract four-pointed shapes. ... Paisley wallpaper Paisley or Paisley pattern is a droplet-shaped vegetal motif of Persian origin, similar to half of the Yin yang symbol, or the leaf of the Indian bodhi tree or the mango tree. ... Several plaid patterns on modern day uniforms Plaid is a Scots language word meaning blanket, usually referring to patterned woollen cloth; it is unclear if the Gaelic word Plaide came first. ... For the artificial athletic track surface, see tartan track. ... Toile is a type of decorating pattern, consisting of a white or off-white background on which a repeated pattern depicting a fairly complex scene, generally of a pastoral theme such as (for example) a couple having a picnic by a lake. ... Acrylic fibers are synthetic fibers made from a polymer (Polyacrylonitrile) with an average molecular weight of ~100,000. ... This article is about a breed of domesticated ungulates. ... Angora wool or Angora fiber refers to the downy coat produced by the Angora rabbit. ... For other uses, see Asbestos (disambiguation). ... Carbon fiber composite is a strong, light and very expensive material. ... Kashmere redirects here. ... Catgut is the name applied to cord of great toughness and tenacity prepared from the intestines of sheep/goat, or occasionally from those of the hog, horse, mule, pig, and donkey. ... Binomial name Rupicapra rupicapra (Linnaeus, 1758) The chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) is a large, goat-like animal that lives in the European Alps and Carpathians. ... Coir (from Malayalam kayar, cord) is a coarse fibre extracted from the fibrous outer shell of a coconut. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... U.S. Marihuana production permit. ... The word Jute is also used in reference to the Germanic people, the Jutes. ... Kevlars molecular structure; BOLD: monomer unit; DASHED: hydrogen bonds. ... Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... Not to be confused with Mohair (band). ... For other uses of this word, see nylon (disambiguation). ... Microfibre is a term for fibres with strands thinner than one denier. ... A synonym for the more widely accepted term, alkene. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... SEM picture of a bend in a high surface area polyester fiber with a seven-lobed cross section Polyester (aka Terylene) is a category of polymers which contain the ester functional group in their main chain. ... Piña is a fiber derived from the leaves of a pineapple. ... Binomial name Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaudich. ... Rayon is a manufactured regenerated cellulosic fiber. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... A tendon or sinew is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue, attached on one end to a muscle and on the other to a bone. ... Binomial name Agave sisalana Perrine Sisal or sisal hemp is an agave Agave sisalana that yields a stiff fiber used in making rope. ... Example of spandex Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity. ... Spider silk is a fibre secreted by spiders. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... This article is about the textile dyeing technique. ... Bògòlanfini (sometimes bogolan) is a traditional Malian fabric dyed with fermented mud, particularly associated with the Bambara. ... Fulling is a step in clothmaking which involves the cleansing of cloth (particularly wool) to get rid of oils, dirt, and other impurities. ... Mercerization is a treatment for cotton fabric and thread mostly employed to give cotton a lustrous appearance. ... Textile printing is a general name for all woven fabrics and the art of ornamenting such fabrics by printing on designs or patterns in color is very ancient, probably originating in the East. ... Watered silk is a type of silk fabric which has been passed through a set of rollers as a fabric finishing process, to give the surface a moire pattern which looks like a water surface. ... Woodblock printing on textiles is the process of printing patterns on textiles, usually of linen, cotton or silk, by means of incised wooden blocks. ... Dyeing is the process of changing the colour of a yarn or cloth by treatment with a dye. ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class o f materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... Textiles were invented in the Middle East during the late stone age. ... The history of silk begins, according to Chinese tradition, in the 27th century BC. The Chinese were able to continue making it exclusively for three millennia without ever divulging the secret process whereby it was made. ... For the record label, see Knitting Factory. ... The manufacture of textiles is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Ainu ceremonial dress on display under glass in the British Museum. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ...

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Textile Reference (0 words)
A Textile document can then be converted to HTML for viewing on the web.
Textile is also available as RedCloth for Ruby or PyTextile for Python.
In each example, the Textile example is followed by the raw HTML it is translated into, followed by how the HTML appears in the browser.
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