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Encyclopedia > Texas Longhorns
Texas Longhorns
Texas Longhorns athletic logo
University University of Texas at Austin
Conference Big 12
NCAA Division I
Athletics director DeLoss Dodds
Location Austin, TX
Varsity teams 18
Football stadium Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium
Basketball arena Frank Erwin Center
Baseball stadium Disch-Falk Field
Other arenas Gregory Gymnasium
Mascot Bevo
Nickname Longhorns
Fight song Texas Fight
Colors Burnt Orange and White

              Longhorn may refer to: Highland cattle, sometimes called Highland longhorn Longhorn cattle, a traditional long horned brown and white breed of cattle Texas longhorn (cattle), a breed of cattle Windows Server Longhorn, the former working name of an upcoming server operating system from Microsoft Windows Vista, the replacement for the... Image File history File links Texas_Longhorn_logo. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... Categories: College athletics conferences ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... DeLoss Dodds is the current mens athletic director of The University of Texas at Austin Longhorns. ... Skyline from Town Lake Austin is the capital of the state of Texas, within the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium, located in Austin, Texas, is home to the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ... The Frank C. Erwin, Jr. ... Disch Falk Field is the baseball field of the University of Texas at Austin. ... Gregory Gymnasium is the current home of the University of Texas Longhorn Womens Volleyball team, and former home of the Longhorn Basketball and Swimming teams. ... Bevo I (1917). ... Texas Fight is the official fight song of the University of Texas at Austin and was written by Colonel Walter S. Hunnicutt in collaboration with James E. King, then director of the Marlin High School Band. ...

Homepage www.texassports.com

Texas Longhorns athletics programs include the extramural and intramural sports teams of The University of Texas at Austin. These teams are referred to as the Texas Longhorns (or variously as Longhorns, Horns, UT or Texas), taking their name from the Longhorn cattle that were an important part of the development of Texas, and are now the official "large animal" of the State of Texas. The University of Texas at Austin (often referred to as simply The University of Texas, Texas, or the abbreviation UT) is the flagship institution of The University of Texas System. The women's teams are sometimes called the Lady Longhorns, but generally both the men's and women's teams are referred to as the Longhorns. University of Texas redirects here. ... The Texas longhorn is ecologically adapted to the sparse and rugged grazing land of Texas. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities and six are health institutions. ...


The Longhorn nickname appeared in Texas newspapers by 1900.[1]


The University of Texas at Austin offers a wide variety of varsity and intramural sports programs. Due to the breadth of sports offered and the quality of the programs, Texas was selected as "America's Best Sports College" in a 2002 analysis performed by Sports Illustrated. Texas was also listed as the number one Collegiate Licensing Company client from 2005–2007 in regards to the amount of annual trademark royalties received from the sales of its fan merchandise.[2] The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Varsity sports

The UT Tower lit in a special configuration in honor of a National Championship team
The UT Tower lit in a special configuration in honor of a National Championship team

A charter member of the Southwest Conference until its dissolution in 1996, the Texas Longhorns now compete in the Big 12 Conference (South Division), as a member institution of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The school's colors are officially Orange and White, with Burnt Orange — also known as Texas Orange — being the specific shade of orange used.[3][4] The University of Texas Longhorn Band performs the alma mater ("The Eyes of Texas")[5] as well as the university fight song ("Texas Fight") at various sporting events. Image File history File links UT_Tower_83400355_68b7a5eeb9_o. ... Image File history File links UT_Tower_83400355_68b7a5eeb9_o. ... The Southwest Conference (SWC) was a college athletic conference in the United States, now defunct. ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The orange, the fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... This article is about the color. ... The orange, the fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... The Longhorn Band on the field at a football game vs Baylor in 2006 The Showband of the Southwest performs at Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium in 2007 The University of Texas Longhorn Band, also known as the Showband of the Southwest or LHB, is the marching band of... UT Students and Football players singing The Eyes of Texas after a win versus Nebraska For the long-running Texas travel program of the same name, see The Eyes of Texas (TV Series). ... Texas Fight is the official fight song of the University of Texas at Austin and was written by Colonel Walter S. Hunnicutt in collaboration with James E. King, then director of the Marlin High School Band. ...


Over the years, Longhorn sports teams have won 47 total national championships,[6] 39 of which are NCAA national championships.[7] The University of Texas currently fields a varsity team in eight men's sports and 10 women's sports.[8] They are:

Men's sports

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Golf
  • Football
  • Swimming and diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and field
 

Women's sports

  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Golf
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and field
  • Volleyball

Football

The University of Texas has traditionally been considered a college football powerhouse, having earned four National Championships, including one to conclude the 2005-2006 season. From 1936 to 2006, Longhorn football teams have finished their seasons ranked in the top ten of at least one of the two major polls 25 times, or more than one-third of the time, according to the Associated Press. The Longhorn football program experienced its greatest sustained success under the guidance of legendary head coach Darrell Royal, who led Texas to three National Championships (in 1963, 1969, and 1970) during his twenty-year career with the Longhorns (1957-1976). The 1969 Longhorn football team was the last Division I team to win a national championship without an integrated roster. Head coach Mack Brown Ninth year, 93–22 Home stadium Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium Capacity 85,123 - grass Conference Big 12 - South First year 1893 Athletic director DeLoss Dodds Website mackbrown-texasfootball. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium, located in Austin, Texas, is home to the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ... The new scoreboard as seen from the North end zone, approximately 150 yards away at the opposite end of the field Godzillatron is the nickname given to the scoreboard at the University of Texas at Austins Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Darrell K. Royal (born July 6, 1924 in Hollis, Oklahoma), is a College Football Hall of Fame member, and is the most successful football coach, in terms of wins, in University of Texas Longhorn history. ...


Two Texas Longhorn running backs have won college football's most prestigious individual award, the Heisman Trophy: Earl Campbell (1977) and Ricky Williams (1998). Eleven Longhorns have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame[9], while four are enshrined in the NFL Hall of Fame.[10] Other Longhorn players have also received recognition for their performance. Brennan redirects here. ... This article is about the American football player. ... Errick Lynne Williams, Jr. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is actually the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ...


Texas ranks as the third most winning program in college football history, in terms of both total wins and win percentage. As of the end of the 2006 season, the Longhorns' all-time record is 810-312-33 (.716). Only Notre Dame and the University of Michigan have won more games and a greater percentage of games played than Texas,[11] which recorded its 800th victory with the Longhorns' 41-38 win over the USC Trojans in the 2006 BCS National Championship Game at the Rose Bowl. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the program was somewhat less successful, but the Longhorns have since returned to prominence in college football, finishing in the top six of the AP and coaches' polls in 2001, 2002, 2004, and 2005. Head coach Charlie Weis 3rd year, 20–15–0 through 11/11/07 Home stadium Notre Dame Stadium Capacity 80,795 - Grass Conference Independent First year 1887 Athletic director Dr. Kevin White Website UND.com Team records All-time record 822–278–42 (.741) Postseason bowl record 13–15 Awards... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... // USC athletics participates in the NCAA Division I-A Pacific Ten Conference and has won 106 total team national championships, 86 of which are NCAA National Championships. ... The BCS National Championship Game or BCS title game is the final bowl game of the annual Bowl Championship Series and is intended by Series organizers to determine the NCAA Division I-A national football championship. ... The Rose Bowl is an outdoor football stadium in Pasadena, California, a suburb of Los Angeles. ...


The University of Texas team plays home games in Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium which has a seating capacity of 85,123.[12] Renovations began on the stadium November 14, 2005, two days following UT's last home football game of the 2005 season. The improvements scheduled were completed before the 2006-2007 football season, and included additional seating[13] and the nation's first high definition video display in a collegiate facility nicknamed "Godzillatron."[14] With the new bleacher seating section added behind the south endzone, the stadium's stated capacity for the 2006 season was 85,123.[15] This has already been surpassed, with 89,422 viewing the Ohio State game on 9 September 2006.[16] That attendance figure is the largest crowd ever to watch a football game in the state of Texas.[16] Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium, located in Austin, Texas, is home to the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ... Seating capacity refers to the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, either in terms of the space available, or in terms of limitations set by law. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The new scoreboard as seen from the North end zone, approximately 150 yards away at the opposite end of the field Godzillatron is the nickname given to the scoreboard at the University of Texas at Austins Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Longhorns are currently coached by Mack Brown, who came to Texas after being head coach at North Carolina. William Mack Brown (born August 27, 1951) is head coach of the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ...


Texas Longhorns under Mack Brown

Mack Brown has been the head football coach for Texas since 1998. From 1998 through the 2006-2007 season, the Longhorns had a 93-22 (81%) win-loss record. In his first six years at Texas, Brown had a winning record but he had not managed to win the Big 12 conference or to lead the Longhorn into a Bowl Championship Series game. He was often lauded for his recruiting while being criticized for failing to win championships. Categories: College athletics conferences ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is a selection system designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner crowned the BCS national champion. ...


That changed with the 2004 Texas Longhorn football team who played in the 2005 Rose Bowl against the Wolverines of the University of Michigan. The game was the first meeting between the two storied teams and the Longhorns' first trip to the Rose Bowl. In a classic game that featured five lead changes and three tie scores during the course of play, the Longhorns defeated the Wolverines 38-37 on a successful 37-yard field goal by place kicker Dusty Mangum as time expired. It was the first time the Rose Bowl had ever been decided on the closing play, and it earned the Longhorns a top 5 finish in the polls. Three ex-Longhorns from the 2005 Rose Bowl team — Cedric Benson, Derrick Johnson, and Bo Scaife — were selected in the 2005 NFL Draft. The 2004 Texas Longhorn football team represented The University of Texas (UT) in the college football season of 2004-2005. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... The University of Michigan features 24 varsity sports teams called the Wolverines, which compete in the NCAAs Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except mens ice hockey which competes in the NCAA D1 Central Collegiate Hockey Association, and womens water polo, which... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Dusty (#14) kicks an extra point during the Arkansas Game. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Cedric Myron Benson (born December 28, 1982 in Midland, Texas) is an American football running back. ... Derrick OHara Johnson (born November 11, 1982 in Waco, Texas) is an American football linebacker drafted fifteenth overall in the 2005 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs. ... Oliver Edward Bo Scaife, III (born January 6, 1981 in Denver, Colorado) is an American football tight end drafted 179th overall in the 2005 NFL Draft by the Tennessee Titans. ... The 2005 National Football League Draft , took place on April 23 and April 24, 2005[1] at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City, New York. ...

The 2005 Texas Longhorns in the "I formation" against Colorado in the 2005 Big 12 Championship Game
The 2005 Texas Longhorns in the "I formation" against Colorado in the 2005 Big 12 Championship Game

Brown followed up the strong 2004 season on the field with an extremely successful 2005 recruiting season by securing the top-ranked recruiting class (the 2005 recruiting season is for players entering the University in Fall 2006). With the exception of Cedric Benson, Derrick Johnson, and Bo Scaife, Texas returned most of their key players from 2004–2005, including red-shirt Junior Quarterback Vince Young. The 2005 Texas Longhorn football team was given a pre-season #2 ranking (behind defending National Champions University of Southern California) by Sports Illustrated magazine, and was also ranked second in the AP and USA Today coaches pre-season polls. They maintained those rankings throughout the entire 2005–2006 season. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x3456, 3196 KB) The University of Texas at Austin college football team in the I formation. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x3456, 3196 KB) The University of Texas at Austin college football team in the I formation. ... Cedric Myron Benson (born December 28, 1982 in Midland, Texas) is an American football running back. ... Derrick OHara Johnson (born November 11, 1982 in Waco, Texas) is an American football linebacker drafted fifteenth overall in the 2005 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs. ... Oliver Edward Bo Scaife, III (born January 6, 1981 in Denver, Colorado) is an American football tight end drafted 179th overall in the 2005 NFL Draft by the Tennessee Titans. ... Vincent Paul Young, Jr. ... The UT Tower lit in a special configuration in honor of the 2005 National Championship football team. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...


Texas and USC ended up winning out their seasons and faced each other in the National Championship, which Texas won, 41-38. At the conclusion of the 2005-2006 season, Sports Illustrated issued a special commemorative edition that featured Vince Young shouting in triumph amidst a storm of multi-colored confetti. Features in the special edition included a story on Vince Young's Glory Days by author Tim Layden, as well as a story disecting How the Rose Bowl was won by Austin Murphy. The issue was on sale nationwide alongside the regular edition of the magazine, which also featured the Rose Bowl on the cover. The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... For other uses, see Confetti (disambiguation). ...


The 2006 Texas Longhorn football team hoped to repeat as national champions. The Texas Longhorns returned several offensive (7) and defensive (7) starters from their National Title team, but quarterback Vince Young elected to go the NFL which left freshman Colt McCoy as the starting quarterback. This article is becoming very long. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Daniel Colt McCoy (born September 5, 1986 in Hobbs, New Mexico[2]) is a quarterback for the Texas Longhorn college football team. ...


The Longhorns opened the season with a win at home against North Texas. Their second game, against Ohio State, was one of the most anticipated college football games of the regular season.[17][18][19] The Longhorns lost that game, but then defeated Rice, Iowa State and Sam Houston State by a combined score of 145-24. Then they defeated number 14th ranked Oklahoma Sooners 28-10 in the Red River Shootout. The Longhorns lost their last two regular season games to Kansas State (45-42)and Texas A&M (12-7). A victory against A&M would have clinched the Big 12 Championship for the Longhorns. As a result of the loss, the Oklahoma Sooners won the division and played in the Big 12 Championship game. The Alamo Bowl, with the 5th pick of Big 12 conference teams selected the Longhorns to play against unranked Iowa who had placed 8th in the Big Ten conference. With Colt McCoy at quarterback, the Longhorns narrowly defeated the Iowa Hawkeyes 26-24. The University of North Texas (UNT) is located in Denton, Texas. ... For information specifically about the 2006 season, see 2006 Ohio State Buckeyes football team. ... Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University (commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art) is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas, USA, near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ... The Iowa State Cyclones, or Clones, are the athletic teams of the Iowa State University. ... Sam Houston State University, (known as SHSU and Sam, for short) founded in 1879, is a public university located in Huntsville, Texas. ... The University of Oklahoma features 17 varsity sports teams. ... Logo for the 2006 meeting between Oklahoma and Texas. ... Kansas State University (sometimes referred to as K-State) is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas. ... Texas A&M University at College Station Texas A&M University, often Texas A&M, A&M or TAMU for short, is one of the flagship universities of Texas, and is the flagship institution of the Texas A&M University System. ...


The 2007 Texas Longhorn football team began play on September 1, 2007. Texas entered the 2007 season ranked third in the all-time list of both total wins and winning percentage. They were ranked in the Top 10 by numerous pre-season polls. For instance, a pre-season ranking by ESPN writer Mark Schlabach had the Longhorns ranked eighth;[20] Rivals.com has them at ninth.[21] College Football News[22] and Real Football 365[23] both had the Longhorns ranked third. The Longhorns come into the season ranked fourth in both the Coaches Poll[24] and AP Poll.[25] The Longhorns failed to make good on that ranking, however, losing to conference foes Kansas State, Oklahoma, and arch-rival Texas A&M. The 2007 Texas Longhorn football team (variously Texas or UT or the Horns) will represent the University of Texas in the college football season of 2007-2008. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Three human polls and one formulaic ranking make up the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) football rankings, in addition to various publications preseason polls. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Mark Schlabach is a columnist for ESPN.com. ... CollegeFootballNews. ... The USA Today Coaches Poll is the current name for a weekly ranking of the top 25 NCAA Division I-A college football and Division I college basketball teams. ... The Associated Press (AP) Poll, along with the USA Today Coaches Poll, ranks the top 25 NCAA Division I college football and basketball teams, weekly. ...

Hook em Horns, the UT hand symbol and slogan The UT Tower lit in a special configuration in honor of the 2005 National Championship football team Texas Longhorn Athletics programs include the extramural and intramural sports teams of University of Texas at Austin. ... The 2004 Texas Longhorn football team represented The University of Texas (UT) in the college football season of 2004-2005. ... The UT Tower lit in a special configuration in honor of the 2005 National Championship football team. ... This article is becoming very long. ... The 2007 Texas Longhorn football team (variously Texas or UT or the Horns) will represent the University of Texas in the college football season of 2007-2008. ... The 2007 Longhorns take the field on opening day against Arkansas State. ... Image File history File links Hookem_hand. ...

All-time All-Americans

The Texas Longhorn football program has produced 120 All-American selections (93 players), with 48 of these being Consensus All-American selections (41 players) and 21 of these being Unanimous All-American selections (18 players).[26][27] * Denotes Consensus All-America Selection ‡ Denotes Unanimous All-America Selection Category: ...


All-time national award winners

Players
Heisman Trophy[28]
Best player
1977 Earl Campbell - RB
1998 Ricky Williams - RB
Maxwell Award[29]
Best player
1965 Tommy Nobis - LB/OG
1998 Ricky Williams - RB
2005 Vince Young - QB
Outland Trophy[30]
Best interior lineman
1963 Scott Appleton
1965 Tommy Nobis
1977 Brad Shearer
Walter Camp Award[31]
Best player
1998 Ricky Williams - RB
Dick Butkus Award[32]
Best linebacker
2004 Derrick Johnson
Bronko Nagurski Trophy[33]
Best defensive player
2004 Derrick Johnson - LB
O'Brien Memorial Trophy**[34]
1977 Earl Campbell
Davey O'Brien Award[35]
Best quarterback
2005 Vince Young
Lombardi Award[36]
Best lineman or linebacker
1981 Kenneth Sims - DT
1984 Tony Degrate - DT
Bronko Nagurski Trophy[37]
Best quarterback
2005 Vince Young
Jim Thorpe Award[38]
Best defensive back
2005 Michael Huff - S
2006 Aaron Ross - CB
Manning Award
Best quarterback
2005 Vince Young
Doak Walker Award[39]
Best running back
1997 Ricky Williams
1998 Ricky Williams
2004 Cedric Benson
Associated Press College
Football Player of
the Year Award
Best player
1998 Ricky Williams
** Renamed the Davey O'Brien National Quarterback Award in 1981; now honors the nation's best quarterback.

Brennan redirects here. ... This article is about the American football player. ... Errick Lynne Williams, Jr. ... The Maxwell Award is presented annually to the collegiate American football player adjudged by a panel of sportscasters, sportswriters, and National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and the membership of the Maxwell Football Club to be the best in the United States. ... Thomas Henry Nobis, Jr. ... Errick Lynne Williams, Jr. ... Vincent Paul Young, Jr. ... Football Writers Association logo The Outland Trophy is awarded to the best United States college football interior lineman. ... Scott Appleton was an American college and professional football player. ... Thomas Henry Nobis, Jr. ... Brad Shearer (born August 10, 1955) was an American football player. ... The Walter Camp Award, named in honor of the father of football, is given annually to the College football Player of the Year, as selected by Division 1A coaches and Sports Information directors. ... Errick Lynne Williams, Jr. ... The Dick Butkus Award, instituted in 1985, is given annually to the top linebacker in college football. ... Derrick OHara Johnson (born November 11, 1982 in Waco, Texas) is an American football linebacker drafted fifteenth overall in the 2005 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs. ... The Bronko Nagurski Trophy has been awarded annually since 1993 to the best all-around defensive college football player. ... Derrick OHara Johnson (born November 11, 1982 in Waco, Texas) is an American football linebacker drafted fifteenth overall in the 2005 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs. ... This article is about the American football player. ... OBrien Award logo The Davey OBrien Award, officially the Davey OBrien National Quarterback Award, is presented annually to the collegiate American football player adjudged by the Davey OBrien Foundation to be the best of all National Collegiate Athletic Association quarterbacks. ... Vincent Paul Young, Jr. ... The Rotary Lombardi Award is awarded annual to the best college football lineman or linebacker. ... Kenneth Wayne Sims (born October 31, 1959 in Kosse, Texas), is a former American professional football player who was selected by the New England Patriots as the first overall pick in the 1982 NFL Draft. ... The Bronko Nagurski Trophy has been awarded annually since 1993 to the best all-around defensive college football player. ... Vincent Paul Young, Jr. ... The Jim Thorpe Award, named in memory of multi-sport legend Jim Thorpe, has been awarded to the top defensive back in college football since 1986. ... Michael Wayne Huff II (born March 6, 1983 in Irving, Texas) is currently a defensive back for the Oakland Raiders and played CB/S for the The University of Texas Longhorns. ... Aaron Jermaine Ross (born September 15, 1982 in San Antonio, Texas) is an American football defensive back in the NFL for the New York Giants. ... The Manning Award has been presented annually since 2004 to the collegiate American football quarterback adjudged by the Sugar Bowl Committee to be the best in the United States; the awarded is named in honor of Archie Manning and his sons Cooper, Peyton, and Eli; Peyton and Eli were both... Vincent Paul Young, Jr. ... The Doak Walker Award, first awarded in 1990, honors the nations top college football running back. ... Errick Lynne Williams, Jr. ... Errick Lynne Williams, Jr. ... Cedric Myron Benson (born December 28, 1982 in Midland, Texas) is an American football running back. ... The Associated Press College Football Player of the Year Award has been awarded annually since 1998 to the most outstanding collegiate football player in the country. ... The Associated Press College Football Player of the Year Award has been awarded annually since 1998 to the most outstanding collegiate football player in the country. ... The Associated Press College Football Player of the Year Award has been awarded annually since 1998 to the most outstanding collegiate football player in the country. ... Errick Lynne Williams, Jr. ...

Coaches
Paul "Bear" Bryant Award
Coach of the Year
1961 Darrell Royal
1963 Darrell Royal
2005 Mack Brown

The Paul Bear Bryant Award has been given out annually since 1957 to NCAA college footballs coach of the year. ... Darrell K. Royal (born July 6, 1924 in Hollis, Oklahoma), is a College Football Hall of Fame member, and is the most successful football coach, in terms of wins, in University of Texas Longhorn history. ... Darrell K. Royal (born July 6, 1924 in Hollis, Oklahoma), is a College Football Hall of Fame member, and is the most successful football coach, in terms of wins, in University of Texas Longhorn history. ... William Mack Brown (born August 27, 1951) is head coach of the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ...

All-time University of Texas football team

(As chosen by the Austin American-Statesman on September 9, 2005.) The Austin American-Statesman is the major daily newspaper for Austin, the capital city of Texas. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Offense

Defense Vincent Paul Young, Jr. ... This article is about the American football player. ... Steve Worster (born 1959 in Rowlings, Wyoming) was a highly respected fullback for the University of Texas at Austin football team and was one of the original participants in the wishbone formation. ... Errick Lynne Williams, Jr. ... Hub Bechtol (April 20, 1926 - October 23, 2004) was a college football player for the Texas Tech Red Raiders and the Texas Longhorns. ... Roy Eugene Williams, Jr. ... Bud McFadin was an American college and professional football player. ... Harley Sewell (born April 18, 1931 in St. ... Jerald Grant Sisemore (b. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...

Coach: Darrell Royal, 1957-76
Honorary captain: Louis Jordan, 1911-14. First Texas player to make the Walter Camp All-American team. He was later killed in France in World War II. William James Atessis was born July 16, 1949, in Houston, Texas and is a former American football player who played on two NCAA national championship teams at The University of Texas. ... Scott Appleton was an American college and professional football player. ... Kenneth Wayne Sims (born October 31, 1959 in Kosse, Texas), is a former American professional football player who was selected by the New England Patriots as the first overall pick in the 1982 NFL Draft. ... Derrick OHara Johnson (born November 11, 1982 in Waco, Texas) is an American football linebacker drafted fifteenth overall in the 2005 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs. ... Thomas Henry Nobis, Jr. ... Nathan Vasher (born November 17, 1981 in Wichita Falls, Texas), full name Nathanial DeWayne Vasher, is an American football cornerback who plays for the Chicago Bears. ... Raymond DeWayne Clayborn(Born in 1955) is a former American Football defensive back who played for the New England Patriots(1977-1989) and Cleveland Browns(1990, 1991) in the NFL. Before his NFL career, he played for the University of Texas Clayborn had a superb career with the Patriots, making... Jerry Gray (born 1962) is a former American Football cornerback who played for the Los Angeles Rams (1985-1991), Houston Oilers (1992), and Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1993). ... There are two famous people of that name: Johnnie Johnson (musician) Johnnie Johnson (pilot) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Russell Erxleben is a former American football player and currency investor. ... Darrell K. Royal (born July 6, 1924 in Hollis, Oklahoma), is a College Football Hall of Fame member, and is the most successful football coach, in terms of wins, in University of Texas Longhorn history. ... Walter Chauncey Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was a sports writer and football coach known as the Father of American Football. Along with John Heisman, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Glenn Scobey Warner, and George Halas, Camp was one of the most significant people in the history of American football. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Basketball

The Frank Erwin Center during a UT basketball game
The Frank Erwin Center during a UT basketball game

The Texas men's basketball team has achieved national prominence under head coach Rick Barnes in recent years. Barnes has guided Texas to a school-record nine consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances and a school-best eight consecutive 20-win seasons as of March 11, 2007. NCAA Tournament Final Four 1943, 1947, 2003 Conference Tournament Champions Southwest Conference: 1994, 1995 Conference Regular Season Champions Southwest Conference: 1915, 1916, 1917, 1919, 1924, 1933, 1939, 1943, 1947, 1951, 1954, 1960, 1963, 1965, 1972, 1974, 1978, 1979, 1986, 1992, 1994, 1995 Big 12 Conference: 1999, 2006 The Texas Longhorns... NCAA Tournament Champions 1986 NCAA Tournament Final Four 1986, 1987, 2003 Conference Tournament Champions Southwest Conference: 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1994 Big 12 Conference: 2003 Conference Regular Season Champions Southwest Conference: 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1996 Big 12 Conference: 2003, 2004... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Frank C. Erwin, Jr. ... This article is about the sport. ... Rick Barnes (born July 17, 1954 in Hickory, North Carolina) is the current head coach of the University of Texas Longhorns mens basketball team. ... // Final four redirects here. ...


Hired as the twenty-third men's basketball coach in University of Texas history on April 12, 1998, Rick Barnes left Clemson University to take over a Longhorn program coming off of a losing season and "in disarray."[40] Former head coach Tom Penders had resigned after a scandal involving his unlawful release of player Luke Axtell's grades to the media. Longhorn players Axtell, Chris Mihm, Gabe Muoneke, and Bernard Smith had met with Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds "to say that they had lost faith in Penders and his program."[41][42] Rick Barnes (born July 17, 1954 in Hickory, North Carolina) is the current head coach of the University of Texas Longhorns mens basketball team. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. ... Tom Penders is currently the head coach at the University of Houston. ... Christopher (Chris) Steven Mihm (born July 16, 1979 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA. He stands 7 feet tall (213 cm) and weighs 265 pounds (120 kg). ... DeLoss Dodds is the current mens athletic director of The University of Texas at Austin Longhorns. ...


Despite playing with just seven scholarship players for the majority of the 1998-1999 season — and opening the season with a 3-8 record — Barnes engineered one of the greatest midseason turnarounds in school history. The Longhorns won 16 of their final 21 games, posting a 13-3 record in conference play and winning the school's first regular season Big 12 Conference championship by a two-game margin, and finishing the year at 19-13, with a No. 7 seed in the NCAA Tournament. The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... The 1999 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ...


In 2002, the Longhorns advanced to the NCAA Sweet Sixteen for the first time since the 1996-97 season, and for only the third time since the expansion of the tournament to 64 participants in 1985. The 2003 Longhorn basketball team matched the school record for most basketball victories in a season with their 26-7 mark and advanced to the NCAA Tournament Final Four round for the first time in 56 years, and for the third time in school history. Along the way, Texas earned its highest ranking in both the Associated Press and the ESPN/USA Today polls in school history (No. 2 in both polls on Dec. 2, 2002) and received its first No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament. Sophomore point guard T.J. Ford became the first UT male player to earn the Naismith and Wooden Awards as college basketball's Player of the Year in 2003. The 2002 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... // Final four redirects here. ... The 2003 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Terrance Jerod T.J. Ford (born March 24, 1983, in Houston, Texas) is an American professional basketball player in the NBA, currently playing for the Toronto Raptors. ... The Naismith College Player of the Year award, named for basketball inventor James Naismith, is given annually by the Atlanta Tipoff Club to college basketballs top male and female player. ... The John R. Wooden Award is an award given annually to the most outstanding mens and womens college basketball players. ...


Despite the early departure of Ford to the NBA as the eighth overall pick (Milwaukee Bucks), Texas compiled a 25-8 overall record in 2004 and advanced to the Sweet Sixteen round for a school-record third consecutive year. The four senior starters on the 2004 team graduated as the winningest class in school history (98 wins) to that point. In 2006, the Longhorns recorded the program's first 30-win season (30-7), claimed a share of the Big 12 Conference regular season championship, received a No. 2 seed in the NCAA Tournament, and advanced to the Elite Eight (Texas fell to LSU in overtime), marking the fourth time in five years that Texas had advanced to at least the NCAA Sweet Sixteen. The 2006 class, which finished with 101 wins in four years, bested the 2004 class' mark of 98 wins to become the winningest class in the history of Longhorn basketball. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 2004 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... The 2006 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... Disambiguation: March Madness comes from the phrase Mad as a March Hare. In England, the phrase March Madness may refer to wasteful spending at the end of a budget year. ... City Baton Rouge, Louisiana Team Colors Purple and gold Head Coach John Brady Home Stadium Pete Maravich Assembly Center League/Conference affiliations NCAA Division I Southeastern Conference Western Division Team History All-Time Record 1329-995 National Championships (1) 1935^ Final Four Appearances (4) 1953, 1981, 1986, 2006 Conference Championships... Disambiguation: March Madness comes from the phrase Mad as a March Hare. In England, the phrase March Madness may refer to wasteful spending at the end of a budget year. ...


The 2005-06 season also marked the 100th anniversary of basketball at UT. Special logos were placed on the uniforms to commemorate this anniversary.


In 2007, the men's basketball team was ranked sixth by the Harris Poll for favorite men's college basketball teams, moving up one spot from the previous year. [1]


The women's basketball team has long been a national power, especially during the late 1980s (winning a National Title in 1986) and through the 1990s. Both teams play home games in the Frank Erwin Special Events Center. The Frank C. Erwin, Jr. ...


Baseball

The Texas Longhorns are the winningest team in college baseball history, both in terms of total wins and in terms of win percentage. Texas holds the records for most appearances in the College World Series (32) and most individual CWS games won. The Longhorns have won six NCAA baseball national championships (1949, 1950, 1975, 1983, 2002, and 2005) — second only to Southern California's total of 12 — and have appeared in the CWS Championship Game or Championship Series on five other occasions (1953, 1984, 1985, 1989, and 2004). City Austin, Texas Team Mascot Bevo Team Colors Burnt Orange and White Head Coach Augie Garrido Home Stadium Disch-Falk Field Conference Affiliations Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1895-1904) Southwestern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1905-1909) Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1910-1913) Southwest Conference (1914-1996) Big 12 Conference — South Division... City Austin, Texas Team Mascot Bevo Team Colors Burnt Orange and White Head Coach Augie Garrido Home Stadium Disch-Falk Field Conference Affiliations Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1895-1904) Southwestern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1905-1909) Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1910-1913) Southwest Conference (1914-1996) Big 12 Conference — South Division... College baseball is baseball as played on the intercollegiate level at institutions of higher education, predominantly in the United States. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ...


Former Longhorns who have gone on to success in Major League Baseball include Roger Clemens, Calvin Schiraldi, Burt Hooton, Keith Moreland, Spike Owen, Greg Swindell, and Huston Street. Major Leagues redirects here. ... William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962, in Dayton, Ohio), is a starting pitcher for the New York Yankees, and is one of the preeminent pitchers in Major League history. ... Calvin Drew Schiraldi (born June 16, 1962 in Houston, Texas) was a Major League Baseball player who pitched for the Boston Red Sox, is best known for being the losing pitcher of Game 6 and Game 7 of the 1986 World Series. ... Burt Carlton Hooton (born February 7, 1950 in Greenville, Texas) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher who played for the Chicago Cubs (1971_75), Los Angeles Dodgers (1975-84) and Texas Rangers (1985). ... Bobby Keith Moreland (born May 2, 1954 in Dallas, Texas) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, and San Diego Padres. ... Spike Dee Owen (born April 19, 1961 in Cleburne, Texas) is a former shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for the Seattle Mariners (1983-86), Boston Red Sox (1986-88), Montreal Expos (1989-92), New York Yankees (1993) and California Angels (1994-95). ... Forest Gregory Swindell (born January 2, 1965 Fort Worth, Texas - ) was a pitcher with a 17-year career from 1986 to 2002. ... Huston Lowell Street (born August 2, 1983, in Austin, Texas) is a relief pitcher for the Oakland Athletics, currently best known for winning the 2005 American League Rookie of the Year. ...


Since 1997, the Longhorns have been led by head coach Augie Garrido, the winningest coach in NCAA baseball history. The team plays its home games at Disch-Falk Field. Augie Garrido (born February 6, 1939) is a coach in NCAA Division I college baseball. ... College baseball is baseball as played on the intercollegiate level at institutions of higher education, predominantly in the United States. ... Disch Falk Field is the baseball field of the University of Texas at Austin. ...


Men's golf

The University of Texas has a strong golf tradition, winning National Titles in 1971 and 1972 and finishing runner-up four other times. Individual National Champions were Ed White (1935), Ben Crenshaw (1971, 1972, and 1973), Tom Kite (1972), and Justin Leonard (1994). Several former Longhorn players have gone on to success on the PGA Tour including: Tom Kite, Ben Crenshaw, Phil Blackmar, Mark Brooks, Bob Estes, and Justin Leonard. Legendary golf instructor Harvey Penick was a long-time coach at Texas. The team is currently coached by John Fields and Steve Keasler. [2] The NCAA Division I Mens Golf Championships, played in late May or early June, is the top annual competition in U.S. mens collegiate golf. ... Ben Crenshaw (born January 11, 1952 in Austin, Texas) is an American golfer. ... // Tom Kite (born December 9, 1949 in Austin, Texas) is an American golfer. ... Justin Leonard (1972- ) is an American professional golfer. ... Phil Blackmar (born September 22, 1957) is an American professional golfer. ... Mark Brooks (March 25, 1961 Fort Worth, Texas) is an American golfer. ... Bob Estes (born February 2, 1966) is an American professional golfer. ... Harvey Morrison Penick (October 23, 1904–April 2, 1995) was a well-known golf pro and instructor. ...


Track and field / cross country

The men's program is coached by Bubba Thornton, who will also be the men's U.S. Olympic coach in 2008; as a team, the Longhorn men placed thirteenth in the 2007 NCAA championships. Other notable coaches of the Texas men's program have included Stan Huntsman (Texas coach, 1986-95), who was also the coach of the 1988 U.S. Olympic team, and Clyde Littlefield (Texas coach, 1920-60), the 1925 co-founder of the annual Texas Relays. Flag of the United States The United States competed at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul. ... Clyde Littlefield(October 6, 1892 to May 20, 1981) was the head football coach at Texas from 1927 to 1933. ... The Clyde Littlefield Texas Relays are an annual track and field competition held at Mike A. Myers Stadium in Austin, Texas. ...


The Texas Longhorn women placed sixth in the 2007 NCAA championships. The women's program is coached by Beverly Kearney, who has guided the Lady Longhorns to six NCAA Championships: Indoor Championships in 1998, 1999, and 2006, and Outdoor Championships in 1998, 1999, and 2005. Other notable coaches have included Terry Crawford, whose teams won Indoor Championships in 1986, 1988, and 1990, and Outdoor Championships in 1982 and 1986. Crawford's athletes also won the 1986 Women's Cross Country Championship. Texas Longhorns athletics programs include the extramural and intramural sports teams of The University of Texas at Austin. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... NCAA Team Champions for Womens Indoor Track and Field Division One 1983 Nebraska 1984 Nebraska 1985 Florida St 1986 Texas 1987 LSU 1988 Texas 1989 LSU 1990 Texas 1991 LSU 1992 Florida 1993 LSU 1994 LSU 1995 LSU 1996 LSU 1997 LSU 1998 Texas 1999 Texas 2000 UCLA 2001... NCAA Team champions for Womens Outdoor Track and Field Division One 1982 UCLA 1983 UCLA 1984 Florida St 1985 Oregon 1986 Texas 1987 LSU 1988 LSU 1989 LSU 1990 LSU 1991 LSU 1992 LSU 1993 LSU 1994 LSU 1995 LSU 1996 LSU 1997 LSU 1998 Texas 1999 Texas 2000... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... NCAA Team Champions for Womens Indoor Track and Field Division One 1983 Nebraska 1984 Nebraska 1985 Florida St 1986 Texas 1987 LSU 1988 Texas 1989 LSU 1990 Texas 1991 LSU 1992 Florida 1993 LSU 1994 LSU 1995 LSU 1996 LSU 1997 LSU 1998 Texas 1999 Texas 2000 UCLA 2001... NCAA Team champions for Womens Outdoor Track and Field Division One 1982 UCLA 1983 UCLA 1984 Florida St 1985 Oregon 1986 Texas 1987 LSU 1988 LSU 1989 LSU 1990 LSU 1991 LSU 1992 LSU 1993 LSU 1994 LSU 1995 LSU 1996 LSU 1997 LSU 1998 Texas 1999 Texas 2000... NCAA team Champions for Womens Cross Country Division One 1981 Virginia 1982 Virginia 1983 Oregon 1984 Wisconsin 1985 Wisconsin 1986 Texas 1987 Oregon 1988 Kentucky 1989 Villanova 1990 Villanova 1991 Villanova 1992 Villanova 1993 Villanova 1994 Villanova 1995 Providence 1996 Stanford 1997 Brigham Young 1998 Villanova 1999 Brigham Young...


The Longhorn track and field programs have produced numerous Olympians for various nations. Female Olympic medalists have included Sanya Richards and Moushami Robinson (USA, gold, 4x400 meter relay, 2004), Sandie Richards (Jamaica, silver, 4x400m relay, 2000 and 2004), Merlene Frazer (Jamaica, silver, 4x100m relay, 2000), Nanceen Perry (USA, bronze, 4x100m relay, 2000), Carlette Guidry (USA, gold, 4x100m relay, 1992 and 1996), Juliet Cuthbert (Jamaica, silver, 100m and 200m, 1992 and bronze, 4x100m relay, 1996), and Nikole Mitchell (Jamaica, bronze, 4x100m relay, 1996). Male medalists include Winthrop Graham (Jamaica, silver, 400m hurdles, 1992 and 4x400m relay, 1988), Patrick Sang (Kenya, silver, 3000m steeplechase, 1992), Du’aine Ladejo (Great Britain, bronze, 4x400m relay, 1992), Johnny "Lam" Jones (USA, gold, 4x100m relay, 1976), Eddie Southern (USA, silver, 400m hurdles, 1956), and Dean Smith (athlete) (USA, gold, 4x100m relay, 1952). Sanya Richards (born February 26, 1985 in Kingston, Jamaica) is a track and field athlete who competes internationally for the United States. ... Sandie Richards (born November 6, 1968 in Clarendon Park, Jamaica) is a track and field athlete, competing internationally for the Jamaica. ... Merlene Frazer (born 27 December 1973 in Trelawny) is a Jamaican sprinter who specialized in the 200 metres. ... Nanceen Perry (born April 19, 1977) is a former sprinter from the United States who won an Olympic bronze medal in 4 x 100 metres relay in Sydney 2000. ... Carlette D. Guidry-White (born September 4, 1968 in Houston, Texas, United States) is a former sprinter who won an Olympic gold medal in 4 x 100 metres relay in Barcelona 1992. ... Juliet Cuthbert (born 6 April 1964) is a Jamaican athlete who competed mainly in the sprints (100 and 200 metres). ... Nicole Mitchell (also spelled Nikole, born 5 June 1974) is a retired Jamaican sprinter who specialized in the 100 metres. ... Winthrop Graham (born November 17, 1965 in Saint Elizabeth) is a retired Jamaican athlete who mainly competedin in the 400 metres hurdles. ... Patrick Sang (born April 11, 1964) is a former Kenyan runner. ... Eddie Southern (born 4 January 1938) was an American athlete who competed mainly in the 400 meter hurdles. ... Finis Dean Smith (born January 15, 1932) is a former American athlete and stuntman, winner of gold medal in 4x100 m relay at the 1952 Summer Olympics. ...


Volleyball

Texas has finished among the top 25 in the nation 19 out of the last 23 years, with a national championship in 1981, as well as runner-up finishes in 1988 and 1995. It also sent Demetria Sance to the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia. The team is currently coached by Jerritt Elliott and plays home games in Gregory Gymnasium. The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... This is about the city of Sydney in Australia. ... Gregory Gymnasium is the current home of the University of Texas Longhorn Womens Volleyball team, and former home of the Longhorn Basketball and Swimming teams. ...


Swimming and diving

In addition, Texas has won nine National Titles in men's swimming and diving (1981, 1988-1991, 1996, 2000-2002) and nine in Women's Swimming and Diving (1981-82, 1984-88, 1990-91). Texas women's cross country won a National Title in 1986. Women's tennis claimed the title in 1993 and 1995. Women's track and field achieved national indoor titles in 1986, 1988, 1990, 1998-99, and outdoor titles in 1982, 1986, 1998-99, 2005. Volleyball achieved titles in 1981 and 1988.

Gold Silver Bronze
2004 9 4 6
2000 9 9 2
1996 7 2 3
1992 5 3 3
1988 5 4 1
1984 5 1 0
1980 0 1 0
1976 2 0 0
1968 1 0 0
1960 1 0 0
1956 1 1 0
1952 2 0 0
1984 1 0 0
Total 48 24 15

Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... A silver medal is a medal awarded to the second place finisher of contests (typically athletics competitions) such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. ... A bronze medal is a medal awarded to the third place finisher of contests (typically athletics competitions) such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were held in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were held in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were held in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ...

Longhorns at the Olympics

Several Longhorn athletes have had success at the Olympics over the years. The table at right shows Longhorn medals won in the Summer Olympics. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ...


Championship history

National championships[43] (47)

Baseball (6)
  • 1949, 1950, 1975, 1983, 2002, 2005

Football (4)
  • 1963, 1969, 1970, 2005

Men's Golf (2)
  • 1971, 1972

Men's Swimming And Diving (9)
  • 1981, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002

Women's Basketball (1)
  • 1986

Women's Cross Country (1)
  • 1986
Women's Swimming And Diving (9)
  • 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991

Women's Tennis (2)
  • 1993, 1995

Women's Indoor Track & Field (6)
  • 1986, 1988, 1990, 1998, 1999, 2006

Women's Outdoor Track & Field (5)
  • 1982, 1986, 1998, 1999, 2005

Volleyball (2)
  • 1981, 1988

Conference championships[44]

Baseball (74 regular season titles; 13 tournament titles)
  • Regular season: 1899, 1905, 1907, 1908, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1932, 1935, 1936, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1943*, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951*, 1952, 1953*, 1954, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963*, 1965, 1966*, 1967*, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972*, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986*, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1996, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2007
  • Tournament: 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1994, 2002, 2003

Basketball (24 regular season titles; 2 tournament titles)
  • Regular season: 1915, 1916, 1917, 1919, 1924, 1933, 1939, 1943*, 1947, 1951*, 1954*, 1960, 1963, 1965*, 1972*, 1974, 1978*, 1979*, 1986*, 1992*, 1994, 1995*, 1999, 2006*
  • Tournament: 1994, 1995

Men's Cross Country (38)
  • 1920, 1923, 1924, 1931, 1932, 1933*, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1954, 1955, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1969, 1972, 1973, 1978*, 1979*, 1986*, 1991, 1992*, 1993, 1994, 1995*

Fencing (5)
  • 1942, 1943, 1947, 1948, 1949 (discontinued in 1957)

Football (27)
  • 1920, 1928, 1930, 1942, 1943, 1945, 1950, 1952, 1953*, 1959*, 1961*, 1962, 1963, 1968*, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975*, 1977, 1983, 1990, 1994*, 1995, 1996, 2005

Men's Golf (42)
  • 1927, 1928, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1964, 1965, 1968, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974*, 1975*, 1981, 1983, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 2002, 2003, 2004

Men's Swimming & Diving (49)
  • 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944*, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1955, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007

Men's Tennis (23)
  • 1915, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1961, 1963, 1967, 1977, 1990, 1993, 1994*, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2006

Men's Indoor Track & Field (9)
  • 1974, 1975, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1999, 1999, 2006, 2007*

Men's Outdoor Track & Field (49)
  • 1915, 1916, 1920, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1950, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1979, 1986, 1987, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2006

Women's Basketball (12 regular season titles; 10 tournament titles)
  • Regular season: 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1996, 2003, 2004
  • Tournament: 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1994, 2003

Women's Cross Country (4)
  • 1985, 1986, 1987, 1989

Women's Golf (12)
  • 1984, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2004

Soccer (1 regular season title; 1 tournament title)
  • Regular season: 2001
  • Tournament: 2006

Softball (4 regular season titles; 4 tournament titles)
  • Regular season: 1999, 2002, 2003, 2006
  • Tournament: 1999, 2002, 2003, 2005

Women's Swimming and Diving (22)
  • 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006

Women's Tennis (17)
  • 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2005

Women's Indoor Track & Field (17)
  • 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2006

Women's Outdoor Track & Field (17)
  • 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2006

Volleyball (14)
  • 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1997

* Denotes shared conference title


Note: The University of Texas began NCAA and Southwest Conference competition in women's sports for the 1982-83 season. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Southwest Conference (SWC) was a college athletic conference in the United States, now defunct. ...


Rivalries

The university's biggest in-state rival is Texas A&M University,[45][46] although UT considers the Oklahoma Sooners to also be important rivals in football, especially in recent years due to the prominence of both programs.[47] Other teams have also been considered to be rivals of the Longhorns in various sports.[48][49][50][51] Texas A&M University redirects here. ... The University of Oklahoma features 17 varsity sports teams. ...


Texas A&M

The Texas/Texas A&M rivalry has given rise to several stereotypes on both sides: Aggies are generally portrayed as ignorant and dumb farmers, while Longhorns are portrayed as highbrow and arrogant city-slickers.[52] The annual football game with Texas A&M takes place the day after Thanksgiving each year. In an attempt to generate more attention for the rivalry in sports other than football, in 2004 the two schools started the Lone Star Showdown,[53] a trial two-year program. Essentially, each time the two schools meet in a sport, the winner of the matchup gets a point. At the end of the year, the school with the most points wins the series and receives a trophy. For other uses, see Thanksgiving (disambiguation). ... Lonestar Showdown logo The State Farm Lone Star Showdown is the official moniker (trademarked in 1996)[1] for all varsity mens and womens athletics competitions between The University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M University. ...


Aspects of the rivalry include:

  • Each school mentions the other in their fight song (Texas with "and it's goodbye to A&M" in Texas Fight,[54] and the Aggies singing about Texas for essentially the entire second verse of the Aggie War Hymn[55])
  • The football series between the two universities is the third longest running rivalry in all of college football.[56] Since 1900, the last regular season football game is usually reserved for their matchup.[57]
  • Each school has elaborate pre-game preparations for the annual football clash, including the Aggie Bonfire[58] and the Hex Rally[59]
  • Texas has a unique lighting scheme for the UT Tower after wins over Texas A&M.[60]
  • In the past, mischief has preceded the annual game, such as "kidnapping" each other's mascots.[61][62]

Texas Fight is the official fight song of the University of Texas at Austin and was written by Colonel Walter S. Hunnicutt in collaboration with James E. King, then director of the Marlin High School Band. ... ... The 1993 Aggie Bonfire; the relative size of the wedding cake-style structure can be seen in comparison to the people standing at its base. ... Hex Rally (sometimes Texas Hex) is a pep rally at The University of Texas at Austin that occurs in the week prior to the annual football game between the Texas Longhorns and their main rivals, the Texas A&M Aggies. ... The Main Building Tower in the foreground. ...

University of Oklahoma

Texas has a long-standing, bitter rivalry with the University of Oklahoma. The football game between the University of Texas and Oklahoma is commonly known as the "Red River Shootout" and is held annually in Dallas, Texas at the Cotton Bowl. This name has come to refer to the two schools' contests in other major team sports as well. Since 2005, the football game has received sponsorship dollars in return for being referred to as the "SBC Red River Rivalry"[63] (changed to AT&T Red River Rivalry in 2006 when SBC changed its corporate name to AT&T), a move which has been criticized both for its commercialism[64] and its political correctness.[65] University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Logo for the 2006 meeting between Oklahoma and Texas. ... Dallas redirects here. ... For the Cotton Bowl game, see Cotton Bowl (game). ... Commercialism, in its original meaning, is the practices, methods, aims, and spirit of commerce or business. ... Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ...


In recent years, this rivalry has taken on added significance, since both football programs have been highly ranked and compete in the same division of the Big 12 conference. In 2005, the Dallas Morning News did an opinion poll of the 119 Division 1A football coaches as to the nations top rivalry game in college football. The OU/Texas game was ranked third.[66] The Dallas Morning News is the major daily newspaper serving the Dallas, Texas area. ... A sports rivalry is intense competition between athletic teams or athletes. ...


Others

Many other schools consider UT among their biggest rivals. This list includes several other colleges in Texas, but especially Baylor[67] (located just up Interstate 35 from UT), Texas Tech,[68] and Houston.[69] Texas is also the biggest rival of the University of Arkansas[70] which may be attributed to their long tenure as the two eponymous state schools of the former Southwest Conference, or to the 1969 game between the two, which decided the national championship in favor of the Longhorns.[71][72] Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 35 Interstate 35 (abbreviated I-35) is a north–south interstate highway in the central United States. ... Texas Tech University redirects here. ... For other system schools, see University of Houston System. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... The Southwest Conference (SWC) was a college athletic conference in the United States, now defunct. ...


Facilities

Major sporting facilities and their main use include:

In addition, The University of Texas has numerous practice, training, and intramural facilities. Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium, located in Austin, Texas, is home to the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ... The Frank C. Erwin, Jr. ... Disch Falk Field is the baseball field of the University of Texas at Austin. ... Mike A. Myers Stadium is the home of The University of Texas Longhorn track and field and soccer teams and also home to the USATF Elite Running Circuit Austin Track Club. ... The Red and Charline McCombs Field is the current home of the University of Texas Longhorn Womens Softball team. ... Gregory Gymnasium is the current home of the University of Texas Longhorn Womens Volleyball team, and former home of the Longhorn Basketball and Swimming teams. ... The Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center is an aquatic facility at the University of Texas at Austin. ...


Traditions

Hook 'em Horns, the UT hand symbol and slogan, as featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated.
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The University of Texas is a tradition-rich school, and many of those traditions are associated with athletics events, especially football. Some UT traditions include: Image File history File links Sports Illustrated cover showing the Hook em Horns sign, and problaiming the University of Texas at Austin to be number one. ... Image File history File links Sports Illustrated cover showing the Hook em Horns sign, and problaiming the University of Texas at Austin to be number one. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mano cornuto. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... For gestures in computing, see mouse gesture. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3456, 3019 KB) Summary A football fan holds up a home-made flag cheering the 2005_Texas_Longhorn_football_team on to victory in the Big 12 Conference championship game, earning them a spot to play for the National Championship. ... Image File history File links This image, including all photography and graphics used in it, was taken and created by myself, Shem Daimwood. ...

  • Bevo - the school mascot, a live Texas longhorn steer present for football games and other special events
  • Big Bertha - At one time, this was the world's largest drum
  • "The Eyes of Texas" - the school song, traditionally led by the Orange Jackets on the football field
  • Hook 'em Horns - the school hand signal, was introduced at a pep rally in 1955.[73] Sports Illustrated featured the Hook 'em Horns symbol in front of a Texas pennant on the cover of their 10 September 1973 issue (pictured).[74]
  • "Texas Fight" - the school fight song
  • Texas - Fight! cheer - one side of the stadium yells "Texas!" and then the other side yells "Fight" - this is usually repeated several times
  • Script Texas - half-time routine by the Longhorn Band
  • Smokey the Cannon - fired in celebration on game day at the moment of kickoff and after UT scores
  • The University of Texas Longhorn Band, nicknamed The Showband of the Southwest
  • The World's Largest Texas Flag is unfurled before football games and at pep rallies.
  • Lighting the UT Tower (also known as the Main Building) in different colors for various types of sporting victories
  • Read the rest - Students from primarily Texas A&M University usually taunt Texas students by threatening to "saw off" the horns of Bevo, citing the Bible verse Psalms 75:10, "I shall cut off the horns of the wicked." As it turns out, that's not the entire verse, and as a response, Texas students tell Aggies to "read the rest." The rest of the verse is "but the horns of the righteous shall be lifted up." This appears on shirts, usually with "Hook 'Em" written underneath. Their other primary rivals, the Oklahoma Sooners, generally prefer to show their disdain by inverting the "Hook 'Em" hand sign or Longhorn logo.

Bevo I (1917). ... The Texas Longhorn is a breed of cattle known for its characteristic horns, which can extend to six feet in width and have a slight upward turn at their tips, as well as for their distinctive burnt orange coloring. ... Big Bertha is the worlds largest drum. ... UT Students and Football players singing The Eyes of Texas after a win versus Nebraska For the long-running Texas travel program of the same name, see The Eyes of Texas (TV Series). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mano cornuto. ... For gestures in computing, see mouse gesture. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Texas Fight is the official fight song of the University of Texas at Austin and was written by Colonel Walter S. Hunnicutt in collaboration with James E. King, then director of the Marlin High School Band. ... The Texas Cowboys firing Smokey at the 2003 Texas Football Spring Jamboree. ... The Longhorn Band on the field at a football game vs Baylor in 2006 The Showband of the Southwest performs at Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium in 2007 The University of Texas Longhorn Band, also known as the Showband of the Southwest or LHB, is the marching band of... The Worlds Largest Texas Flag refers to any of the Texas flags used by the Alpha Rho chapter of Alpha Phi Omega at The University of Texas at Austin in displays at football pre-game shows, at pep rallies, or for other purposes. ... The Main Building Tower in the foreground. ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ... Aggie may mean: Aggie (software), a news aggregator Aggie (marble), a type of marble made from or resembling agate Aggie, a slang term for a person that works in agriculture Aggie, a student or sports team at certain US universities, typically those with agricultural curricula, and usually qualified with the... The University of Oklahoma features 17 varsity sports teams. ...

Merchandise

For the two fiscal years 2005–2007, Texas was listed as the number one Collegiate Licensing Company client in regards to the amount of annual trademark royalties received from the sales of its fan merchandise.[2] Schools that are not members of Collegiate Licensing Company however are not ranked in the listing.[75] Money from merchandising sales goes to the university, as opposed to being earmarked specifically for athletics programs.[2] There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


References

  1. ^ Barry Popik's archives Longhorn (University of Texas nickname) Accessed September 9, 2006.
  2. ^ a b c Maher, John. "Texas repeats as national champion in merchandising", The Austin American-Statesman, 2007-08-16. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. 
  3. ^ Board of Regents Meeting Minutes, p.43-44 - July 31, 1970 The University of Texas System. Accessed February 27, 2006.
  4. ^ The University of Texas Style Guidelines - signed by UT president Larry Faulkner. Accessed February 27, 2006.
  5. ^ Berry, Margaret C. The University of Texas at Austin from the Handbook of Texas Online. Accessed December 1, 2005.
  6. ^ Texas Longhorns Championships History: National Champions TexasSports.com. March 20, 2007
  7. ^ Schools with the Most National Championships NCAA.org. Fall 2006
  8. ^ http://www.texassports.com/
  9. ^ http://www.collegefootball.org/halloffamers.php
  10. ^ http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/colleges.html
  11. ^ Division I-A All-Time Wins. College Football Database.
  12. ^ "Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium", MackBrownTexasFootball. Retrieved on 2006-09-22. 
  13. ^ Young, Meghan Regents approve stadium upgrades November 10, 2005 The Daily Texan.
  14. ^ Longhorns choose Daktronics for HD video display
  15. ^ Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium. Retrieved on 2006-09-07.
  16. ^ a b "Ohio State vs Texas", MackBrownTexasFootball. New attendance record for the state of Texas
  17. ^ September's intriguing matchups (HTML) (English). ESPN (2006-07-26).
  18. ^ Johnston, Joey. "Home field will lift Texas over Ohio St. Buckeyes vs. Longhorns on Saturday very well could be Game of the Year", MSNBC, 7 September 2006. Retrieved on 2006-09-07. 
  19. ^ "Texas now No. 2, preps for No. 1 Ohio St. - Saturday will be first 1-2 showdown in regular season since 1996", MSNBC, 6 September 2006. Retrieved on 2006-09-08. 
  20. ^ Schlabach, Mark. "Booty could return Trojans to No. 1 ranking", ESPN, 2007-01-11. Retrieved on 2007-01-23. (English) 
  21. ^ McClellan, Mark. "Rivals.com 2007 Preseason Top 25", ESPN, 2007-01-09. Retrieved on 2007-01-18. (English) 
  22. ^ CFN 2007 Pre-Preseason Rankings - Top 25. College Football News (January 14, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-01-23.
  23. ^ 2007 Preseason Rankings, National Title Contenders - No. 1 to No. 25 (HTML) (English). Scout.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-16.
  24. ^ "Longhorns ranked fourth in coaches poll", Austin American-Statesman, 3 August 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-03. 
  25. ^ Russo, Ralph. "USC Is No. 1 in AP Top 25 College Poll", Associated Press, 19 August 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-19. 
  26. ^ Texas Football All-Americans. MackBrown-TexasFootball.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  27. ^ "The Annual Review", ESPN College Football Encyclopedia, ESPN Books, 2005. 
  28. ^ Slovick Trophy Winners. heisman.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  29. ^ The Maxwell Award: Collegiate Player of the Year - Past Recipients. Maxwell Football Club. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  30. ^ ALL-TIME OUTLAND TROPHY WINNERS. Football Writers Association of America. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  31. ^ Alder, James. Walter Camp Award Winners. About.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  32. ^ Alder, James. Butkus Award Winners. About.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  33. ^ Past Winners of the Bronko Nagurski Trophy. The Touchdown Club. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  34. ^ The Davey O'Brien Awards. Davey O’Brien Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  35. ^ Previous Davey O'Brien National Quarterback Award Winners. Davey O’Brien Foundation. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  36. ^ Alder, James. Lombardi Award. About.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  37. ^ Past Winners of the Bronko Nagurski Trophy. The Bronko Nagurski Charlotte Touchdown Club. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  38. ^ The Jim Thorpe Award - Past Winners. The Jim Thorpe Association. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  39. ^ Doak Walker Award Recipients. doakwalkeraward.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  40. ^ "Rick Barnes Leaves Clemson for Texas", Associated Press
  41. ^ "Rick Barnes Leaves Clemson for Texas", Associated Press
  42. ^ "George Washington; Penders Hired," New York Times
  43. ^ Texas Longhorns Championships History: National Champions. TexasSports.com.
  44. ^ Texas Longhorns Championships History: Conference Championships. TexasSports.com.
  45. ^ What is Texas' biggest sports rivalry?. SportsIllustrated.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  46. ^ Associated Press. "Longhorns focus on rivalry with Aggies", AOL Sports, 2005. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  47. ^ "A Red River rivalry - UT's attention has shifted from Texas A&M to Oklahoma", The Daily Texan, 2004-10-04. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  48. ^ Longhorns bounce back against rival, Sam Houston. ESPN.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  49. ^ "Texas calls on Omaha architectural firm to build stadium worthy of program", TexasSports.com, 2006-06-18. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  50. ^ Brown, Jacob. "Texas, Rice, ensue rivalry at the Dish", The Daily Texan, 2005-03-09. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  51. ^ "'No Place Else But Texas'", ESPN, 26 December 2001. Retrieved on 2006-12-11. 
  52. ^ Stratton, W.K. (2002, 2003). Backyard Brawl : Inside the Blood Feud Between Texas and Texas A&M. New York, New York: Three Rivers Press. 
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  54. ^ History of School and Fight Songs. The University of Texas Longhorn Band website. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  55. ^ The Aggie War Hymn. Official Website of Texas A&M Athletics. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  56. ^ Wieberg, Steve. "Texas following usual rivalry game routine", USA Today, 2005-11-24. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  57. ^ All Time Results. MackBrownTexasFootball.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  58. ^ The Bonfire Burns. StudentBonfire.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  59. ^ Hex Rally. MackBrownTexasFootball.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  60. ^ University approves new policy for lighting UT Tower On Campus. Accessed 1 December 2005.
  61. ^ Nikar, Jim. Bevo. MackBrownTexasFootball.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  62. ^ Retired Mascot Reveille VI Euthanized Oct. 18. Official website of Texas A&M University. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  63. ^ SBC Companies Extend Sponsorship with Universities of Oklahoma and Texas for the SBC Red River Rivalry. ATT.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  64. ^ "From the Daily:Adhering to tradition - SBC Sponsor Threatened Game's Integrity", The Michigan Daily, 2006-07-10. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  65. ^ "Defense's goal is 13 points or less", Houston Chronicle, 2005-08-11. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  66. ^ Davis, Brian. "UT-OU : Best Rivalry?", Dallas Morning News, 2005-10-07. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  67. ^ "Texas sinks rival Baylor in CWS", TheSportsNetwork.com, 2005-06-18. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  68. ^ Clark, Kyle. "Women's tennis finds positives in loss to rival Longhorns", The Daily Toreador, 2003-03-25. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  69. ^ The Cougars and the Lonhorns : History and Hatred. Midspring. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  70. ^ Hale, Clint. "Offense using bye week to prepare for Arkansas", The Daily Texan, 2003-09-03. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  71. ^ Associated Press. "Texas 1969 Champions a Left a Lasting Legacy", CollegeSportsTV.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-11. 
  72. ^ Frei, Terry (2002). Horns, Hogs, and Nixon Coming: Texas vs. Arkansas in Dixie's Last Stand. USA: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-7432-2447-7. 
  73. ^ Proud Traditions: Hook 'em Horns Mack Brown Texas Football.
  74. ^ (1973-09-10) "No. 1 - Hook 'em Horns! Sports Illustrated". Sports Illustrated. 
  75. ^ The Collegiate Licensing Company Rankings. Retrieved on 2007-08-17.

The Austin American-Statesman is the major daily newspaper for Austin, the capital city of Texas. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Larry Faulkner presenting at the May 10, 2004 Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board meeting. ... The Handbook of Texas (ISBN 0-87611-151-7) is a comprehensive encyclopedia of Texas geography, history, and historical persons published jointly by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) and the General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Autumn colours at Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire, England. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  • Texas Longhorn Athletics

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