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Encyclopedia > Texas Christian University

Texas Christian University

Motto Disciplina est Facultas
Knowledge is Power
Tagline Learning to Change the World
Established 1873
Type Private
Endowment ~$1.2 billion (USD)[citation needed] (TCU & Brite Divinity School)
Chancellor Dr. Victor J. Boschini, Jr.
Faculty 477 (full-time)
Students 8,865
Undergraduates 7,267
Postgraduates 1,598
Location Fort Worth, Texas, USA
Campus Urban, 325 acres (1.3 km²)
Mascot Horned Frog
Affiliations Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
Website http://www.tcu.edu

Texas Christian University is a private, coeducational university located in Fort Worth, Texas. TCU is affiliated with, but not governed by, the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Its mascot is the "horned frog" and its school colors are purple and white. The university is currently engaged in a $255 million construction plan consisting of four new residence halls, indoor football practice facility, indoor golf facility, indoor baseball facility, Amon Carter Stadium renovations, a new university union, and full renovation and addition to the School of Education. Work is to be completed the summer of 2008 for the four new residence halls and the new University Union. Official Seal of Texas Christian University This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... A tagline is a variant of a branding slogan typically used in marketing materials and advertising. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Dr. Victor J. Boschini, Jr. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant and Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City  298. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Binomial name Phrynosoma cornutum (Harlan, 1825) The Texas horned lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum) is one of 14 North American species of spikey-bodied reptiles called horned lizards. ... The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), often abbreviated as the Disciples of Christ or Christian Church, is a denomination of Christian Restorationism that grew out of the Restoration Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia (then Virginia) and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant and Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City  298. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), often abbreviated as the Disciples of Christ or Christian Church, is a denomination of Christian Restorationism that grew out of the Restoration Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia (then Virginia) and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky. ... Binomial name Phrynosoma cornutum (Harlan, 1825) The Texas horned lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum) is one of 14 North American species of spikey-bodied reptiles called horned lizards. ... This article is about the color. ... This article is about the color. ... Amon G. Carter Stadium is a 46,083-seat open-air football stadium on the campus of Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas. ...

Contents

Mission, vision, and values

Mission

To educate individuals to think and act as ethical leaders and responsible citizens in the global community.


Vision

To be a prominent private university recognized for our global perspective, our diverse and supportive learning community, our commitment to research and creative discovery, and our emphasis on leadership development.


Core values

TCU values academic achievement, personal freedom and integrity, the dignity and respect of the individual, and a heritage of inclusiveness, tolerance, and service.


History

East Texas brothers Addison and Randolph Clark, together with their father Joseph A. Clark, founded what was then called the AddRan Male & Female College in 1873 after the brothers had returned from service in the American Civil War. AddRan, a contraction of the brothers' names, had been the name of Addison Clark's first child, a boy who died of diphtheria in 1872 at the age of three and is buried in Pioneers Rest Cemetery in Fort Worth. The name is now preserved in TCU's college of humanities and social sciences. Red counties show the core of East Texas; pink and red counties may or may not be included in East Texas, and thus their inclusion varies from source to source. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ...


The Clarks were scholar-preacher/teachers who were products of the Campbellite movement, one of the streams of the Restoration movement in the nineteenth-century American church. The Campbellites were the spiritual ancestors of the modern Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), the independent Christian Churches/Churches of Christ, and the non-instrumental Churches of Christ. Campbellites were also major proponents of education, and the Clarks operated a preparatory school, the Male & Female Seminary of Fort Worth, from 1869 to 1874. But they also envisioned an institution of higher learning for both men and women that would be Christian in character, but nonsectarian in spirit. Campbellites is a pejorative term which has been used to describe adherents of the beliefs of the American Restoration Movement, among whose most prominent 19th century leaders was Alexander Campbell, particularly members of the Churches of Christ (non-instrumental) and the Independent Christian Churches. ... The Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement (or simply, Restoration Movement) is a religious reform movement born in the early 1800s in the United States. ... The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), often abbreviated as the Disciples of Christ or Christian Church, is a denomination of Christian Restorationism that grew out of the Restoration Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia (then Virginia) and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alternate meanings: see Church of Christ (disambiguation). ...


They planned to establish their college in Fort Worth on five city blocks purchased for that purpose in 1869. However, from 1867-1872, the character of Fort Worth changed substantially due to the commercial influence of the Chisholm Trail, the principal route for moving Texas cattle to the Kansas railheads. A huge influx of cattle, men, and money transformed the sleepy frontier village into a booming, brawling cow-town. Randolph Clark described Fort Worth in those days as follows: Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ... Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ... The Chisholm Trail was a route used in the late 19th century in the Western United States for cattle drives, the movement of cattle overland. ...


"The longhorns roamed over the hills and valleys by the thousands. ...Ft. Worth was a supply station; here the 'grub-wagon' was replenished for the long drive to the Red River and through the Indian Territory to Kansas. Here the buyers from the North met the cattlemen from the range. Prospectors and adventurers, the genuine cowboys in charge of the herds and the noisy imitation, the tough vagabond and the professional gambler... seemed ever present. Money circulated freely. There was no law against carrying deadly weapons. Business was transacted in the open, and each man carried his burglar insurance. ...The quiet prairie town was deluged with a flood of humanity. Boys, young men, and family men were caught up in this whirlpool of licentiousness and greed. It came to be a saying that one trip over the trail with a herd to Kansas would ruin the ordinary boy, and that the boy who was strong enough to stand two trips was forever safe, but he would show the scars." (Randolph Clark, Reminiscences Biographical and Historical, 1919.)


The area around the property purchased by the Clarks for their college soon became the town's vice district, an unrelieved stretch of saloons, dance halls, gambling parlors, and bordellos catering to the bawdy appetites of cowboys and gamblers. It soon acquired a nickname that stuck: "Hell's Half Acre."


The Clarks feared their students would be "dazzled by this glitter of vice and caught like insects around a street lamp." They began to look for an alternative site to establish their college, and they found it at Thorp Spring, a frontier stagecoach stop 40 miles (60 km) to the southwest, near the fringe of Comanche and Kiowa territory. It was perhaps a marker of their Campbellite sensibilities that the Clarks feared the Indians less than they feared the corrupting influence of "the Acre." This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The Kiowa are a nation of Native Americans who lived mostly in the plains of west Texas, Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico at the time of the arrival of Europeans. ...


AddRan College (TCU) was one of the first coeducational institutions of higher education west of the Mississippi River, a progressive step at a time when only 15% of the national college enrollment was female and almost exclusive enrolled at women's colleges. AddRan's inaugural enrollment was 13 students, though this number rose to 123 by the end of the first term. Shortly thereafter, annual enrollment ranged from 200 to 400. The college formed a partnership with what would become the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in 1889 and was renamed AddRan Christian University. The church does not own or operate TCU; the partnership is based on a common heritage and shared values. Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), often abbreviated as the Disciples of Christ or Christian Church, is a denomination of Christian Restorationism that grew out of the Restoration Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia (then Virginia) and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky. ...


The need for a larger population and transportation base prompted the university to relocate to Waco from 1895 to 1910. A featured speaker at the Waco welcoming ceremony was the president of crosstown rival, Baylor University. The institution was renamed Texas Christian University in 1902, though almost immediately it was dubbed with the unofficial moniker by which it is popularly known today: TCU. For the Branch Davidian siege in Waco, Texas, see Waco Siege. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ...


In 1910, a fire of unknown origin destroyed the university's main administration building. A group of enterprising Fort Worth businessmen offered the university $200,000 in rebuilding money and a 50 acre campus as an inducement to relocate to their city. This move brought TCU back to the historic source of its institutional roots. It also completed TCU's nearly 40-year transition from a frontier college to an urban university. Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ...


Colleges and Schools

  • AddRan College of Humanities & Social Sciences
  • Brite Divinity School
  • M.J. Neeley School of Business, including the Neeley Entrepreneurship Center
  • College of Communication
  • School of Education
  • College of Fine Arts
  • Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences
  • Schieffer School of Journalism
  • College of Science & Engineering

Brite Divinity School is affiliated with and located at Texas Christian University. ...

Greek life

Fraternities

Sororities Beta Upsilon Chi, Brothers Under Christ, ΒΥΧ (pronounced Bucks) is the largest Christian social fraternity in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 236 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... ΛΧΑ (Lambda Chi Alpha), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters (called Zetas) at more than 300 universities. ... Lambda Theta Phi, Latin Fraternity, Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phi Mu Alpha (ΦΜΑ) Sinfonia is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ...

Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, formed in January 15, 1908 at Howard University, became Americas first Greek-letter organization established by Black college women, and remains a predominately African-American sorority. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eta Iota Sigma, or ΗΙΣ, is a Christian sorority currently located on the campuses of Southern Methodist University and Texas Christian University, The sorority is represented by the Greek letters ΗΙΣ (Eta Iota Sigma). ... Gamma Phi Beta (ΓΦΒ) is an international sorority that was founded on November 11, 1874 at Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Sigma Lambda Alpha Sorority, Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zeta Tau Alpha (ΖΤΑ) is a womens fraternity, founded October 15, 1898 at what used to be State Female Normal School but is now known as Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ...

Endowment

As of the 2006 fiscal year, TCU's combined endowment stood at $1.485 USD billion. (48th largest in the United States).[citation needed] The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... This list of US and colleges and universities by endowment contains the 56 universities in the United States that have an endowment of at least 1 billion US dollars (at fiscal year-end 2005). ...


Athletics

Main article: TCU Horned Frogs

TCU competes in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports as a member of the Mountain West Conference in Division I (I-A in football). TCU was a long-time member of the former Southwest Conference (which also included Texas, Texas A&M, Texas Tech, Baylor, Southern Methodist University, Houston, Arkansas, and Rice) until that conference was disbanded after the 1995 season with the formation of the Big 12 Conference. TCU then moved to the Western Athletic Conference, shifted to Conference USA in 2001, and moved again in 2005 to the Mountain West Conference. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Texas Christian University features 18 varsity sports teams. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... “Mountain West” redirects here. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The Southwest Conference (SWC) was a college athletic conference in the United States, now defunct. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... Texas A&M University, often called A&M or TAMU, is a coeducational public research university located in College Station, Texas. ... Texas Tech University is a public, coeducational, doctoral/research university located in Lubbock, Texas (USA). ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... Dallas Hall at Dedman College at SMU The Laura Lee Blanton Hall during a rare snow storm Southern Methodist University (commonly SMU) is a private, coeducational university in University Park, Texas (an enclave of Dallas). ... The University of Houston, formerly University of Houston–University Park, is a comprehensive doctoral degree-granting university[2] located in Houston, Texas. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University (commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art) is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas, USA, near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... The Western Athletic Conference (commonly referred to as the WAC, pronounced whack) was formed on July 27, 1962, making it the sixth oldest of the 11 college athletic conferences currently participating in the NCAAs Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS; formerly Division I-A). ... Conference USA, officially abbreviated C-USA, is a college athletic conference whose member institutions are located within the Southern United States. ... “Mountain West” redirects here. ...


Football

  • TCU won the national championship in 1935[1] and 1938[2]
  • They won the Mountain West Conference championship in their inaugural season, 2005.
  • In 2006, TCU finished ranked 2nd in the MWC football standings and defeated Northern Illinois University 37-7 in the Poinsettia Bowl in San Diego on December 19,2006.

Head Coach Gary Patterson 8th Year, 54-20-0 Home Stadium Amon Carter Stadium Capacity 44,008 - Grass Conference Mountain West First Year 1896 Athletic Director Dr. Daniel Morrison Website GoFrogs. ... The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... “Mountain West” redirects here. ... ESPN Game Day photo of The Texas Longhorn mascot Bevo seen with the Bowl Championship Series trophy during the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. ...

Notable alumni

Anthony Alabi (born February 16, 1981 in San Antonio, Texas) is an American football player who currently plays tackle for the Miami Dolphins. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua, Coral, White and Navy Head Coach Cam Cameron Owner H. Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T.D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... Charles (Ki) Collins Aldrich (June 1, 1916 - March 12, 1983) was an American football player. ... Look up Center in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Arizona Cardinals are a National Football League team based in Tempe, Arizona. ... Samuel Adrian Baugh (born March 17, 1914) is a retired American football player born in Temple, Texas, the second son of James and Lucy Baugh. ... Official Logo The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award (often known simply as the Heisman Trophy or The Heisman), named after former college football player and coach John Heisman, is awarded annually to the most outstanding collegiate football player in the U.S. The award is considered the highest individual player honor... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Lyle Vernon Blackwood (born May 24, 1951 in San Antonio, Texas) was a safety who played 14 seasons in the National Football League. ... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua, Coral, White and Navy Head Coach Cam Cameron Owner H. Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T.D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... The Super Bowl is the championship game of the National Football League, the pinnacle of American football. ... Larry Brown, Jr. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys Team colors Royal Blue (PMS 661), Silver-Green (PMS 8280), Silver (PMS 8240), and Navy Blue (PMS 282) Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Northern Conference (1960... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Al Davis League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970... Date January 28, 1996 Stadium Sun Devil Stadium City Tempe, Arizona MVP Larry Brown, Cornerback Favorite Cowboys by 13 1/2 National anthem Vanessa Williams Coin toss Joe Montana representing previous Super Bowl MVPs Referee Red Cashion Halftime show Diana Ross Attendance 76,347 TV in the United States Network... Betty Lynn Buckley (born July 3, 1947) is an American theater, film, and television actress. ... James Cash, Jr. ... Ge may refer to: Gê, a group of indigenous Brazilian tribes and their Ge languages Ge (Cyrillic) (Г, г), a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet Ge with upturn (Ґ, Ò‘), a letter of the Ukrainian alphabet Nikolai Ge, a Russian painter GÄ“, an ancient Chinese dagger-axe Ge (genus), a genus of butterflies Also... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Secretary Gordon R. England Gordon Richard England is an American businessman who (as of 2004) serves as the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The United States Deputy Secretary of Defense is the second-highest ranking official in the United States Department of Defense. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 1-800-Flowers is a major flower retailer and distribution company in the United States. ... Kenneth Earl Davis (born April 16, 1962 in Temple, Texas) is a former professional American football running back who played for the Green Bay Packers (1986-1988) and the Buffalo Bills (1989-1994) in the NFL. Before his NFL career, Davis played for Texas Christian University from 1982-1985. ... Official Logo The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award (often known simply as the Heisman Trophy or The Heisman), named after former college football player and coach John Heisman, is awarded annually to the most outstanding collegiate football player in the U.S. The award is considered the highest individual player honor... The term All-American has two uses: It can be used as a reference to an athlete selected as a member of an All_America team, as in Eddie George was named an All-American football player by both wire services in 1995. ... City Orchard Park, New York Team colors Navy blue, light blue, Red, light Red, White, Royal, and Nickel Head Coach Dick Jauron Owner Ralph Wilson General manager Marv Levy Mascot Billy Buffalo League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... Jamie Dixon Jamie Dixon (b. ... The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Larry Foyt is a NASCAR driver and an IRL driver. ... Glenda Green, M.A., D.D. is an American artist , academic and author. ... Ronald J.J. Henry III (born 2 April 1975) is an American PGA Tour golfer. ... The Ryder Cup is a golf trophy contested biennially in an event called the Ryder Cup Matches by teams from Europe and the United States. ... Kristin Holt Kristin Holt (born August 17, 1981 in Plano, TX) is an entertainment news correspondent and the current host of G4s Cheat!, a television show dedicated to video game cheats and strategies, and also is a substitute host for G4s tentpole shows, Attack of the Show! and... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys Team colors Royal Blue (PMS 661), Silver-Green (PMS 8280), Silver (PMS 8240), and Navy Blue (PMS 282) Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Northern Conference (1960... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... The Phoenix Mercury is a Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys Team colors Royal Blue (PMS 661), Silver-Green (PMS 8280), Silver (PMS 8240), and Navy Blue (PMS 282) Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Northern Conference (1960... Michael Jerome Irvin (born March 5, 1966 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida) is a former American football player for the Dallas Cowboys, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on August 4th, 2007. ... Dan Jenkins (born December 2, 1929 in Fort Worth, Texas) is an American author and sportswriter, most notably for Sports Illustrated. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... James Kerwin (born October 13, 1973 in St. ... Bob Lilly (born July 26, 1939) is a former American football player and photographer. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys Team colors Royal Blue (PMS 661), Silver-Green (PMS 8280), Silver (PMS 8240), and Navy Blue (PMS 282) Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Northern Conference (1960... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Guy Morriss (born May 13, 1951) is the current head coach of the football team at Baylor University where he replaced Kevin Steele. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... Jeffrey Lynn Newman (born September 11, 1948 Fort Worth, Texas - ) was a utility player with a 9 year career from 1976 to 1984 and a manager in 1986. ... Robert David OBrien (June 22, 1917 – November 18, 1978) was a professional American football player who played quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles, and was also an agent for the FBI. OBrien played college football at Texas Christian University, and in 1938 led TCU to an undefeated season. ... Official Logo The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award (often known simply as the Heisman Trophy or The Heisman), named after former college football player and coach John Heisman, is awarded annually to the most outstanding collegiate football player in the U.S. The award is considered the highest individual player honor... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Casey J. Printers (born May 16, 1981)[1] is a professional American football and former Canadian football player from Texas. ... Michael Mike Roy Renfro (born June 19, 1955 in Fort Worth, Texas), is a former American professional football player who was selected by the Houston Oilers in the fourth round of the 1978 NFL Draft. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Khadevis Robinson (born 19 July 1976) is an American middle distance runner who specializes in the 800 metres. ... Winthrop Paul Win Rockefeller (September 17, 1948 – July 16, 2006) was Lieutenant Governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas from 1996 until his death. ... The official duties of Arkansas lieutenant governor as described by the Arkansas Constitution are to preside over the Senate with a tie-breaking vote, to serve as governor when the governor is out of state, and to serve as governor if the governor is impeached, removed from office, dies or... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Robert Ray Rod Roddy (September 28, 1937 – October 27, 2003) was an American radio and television announcer[1], best known as the announcer for the popular game show The Price is Right from 1986 until his death. ... The Price Is Rights US 35th season logo. ... Bob Schieffer Bob Lloyd Schieffer (born February 25, 1937 in Austin, Texas) is an American journalist who has been with CBS News since 1969, serving 23 years as anchor on the Saturday edition of CBS Evening News from 1973-1996; chief Washington correspondent since 1982, moderator of the Sunday public... CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ... Aaron R. Schobel (born September 1, 1977 in Columbus, Texas) is an American football player who currently plays defensive end for the Buffalo Bills. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Orchard Park, New York Team colors Navy blue, light blue, Red, light Red, White, Royal, and Nickel Head Coach Dick Jauron Owner Ralph Wilson General manager Marv Levy Mascot Billy Buffalo League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... Robert Edward Schobel (born March 24, 1981 in Columbus, Texas) is an American football defensive end for the Tennessee Titans of the NFL. He attended Texas Christian University. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Team colors Speed Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue [1] League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South... Cincinnati Bengals tight end Matt Schobel. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Travis Schuldt (18 September 1974) is an American actor. ... Passions is a multi-Daytime Emmy Award-winning American television soap opera created by veteran writer James E. Reilly. ... Scrubs is an Emmy- and Peabody Award-winning American situation comedy/dramedy that premiered on October 2, 2001 on NBC. It was created by Bill Lawrence, who also co-created Spin City. ... Kurt Vincent Thomas (born October 4, 1972 in Dallas, Texas) is an American professional basketball player with the NBAs Seattle Supersonics. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Phoenix Suns are a professional basketball team, based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... LaDainian Tomlinson (born June 23, 1979) is an American football player who currently plays running back for the San Diego Chargers of the National Football League. ... Official Logo The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award (often known simply as the Heisman Trophy or The Heisman), named after former college football player and coach John Heisman, is awarded annually to the most outstanding collegiate football player in the U.S. The award is considered the highest individual player honor... In professional American football, the Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). ... “Chargers” redirects here. ... This is a list of individual NFL Records. ... Kris Tschetter (born December 30, 1964 in Detroit, Michigan)is an American golfer, currently playing on the LPGA Tour. ... The LPGA is the Ladies Professional Golf Association. ... Paul Tyson (1886-1950) was a very successful high school football coach at Waco High School. ... Waco High School is a located on N. 42 Street in Waco, Texas. ... John Howard Vaught (May 6, 1909 – February 3, 2006) was an American college football coach at the University of Mississippi from 1947 to 1970 and again in 1973. ... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ... Roger Williams is the Secretary of State for the US State of Texas. ... Jeff Zimmerman (born August 9, 1972 in Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada) was a pitcher for the Texas Rangers. ... All-star (also, Allstar or All Star) is a term with meanings in both the worlds of sports and entertainment. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames None in common use Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ...

University statistics

  • Annual Cost (Estimate): $40,550 (includes housing, books and fees)
  • Student Organizations: Over 200
  • Residence Halls: 16 (with four more in construction and several in planning)

References

  1. ^ Complete List of Williamson National Champions from CFB Database
  2. ^ NCAA Division I-A national football championship

The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship...

See also

  • Image magazine school magazine

Image magazine, the student magazine of Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas, was started as an alternative to the schools yearbook in 1972. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
HELMDisciples.org > Colleges and Universities > Texas Christian University (296 words)
Students come to TCU from all across America as well as from over 70 countries and are free to choose from 82 academic majors in the humanities and social sciences, business, communication, education, fine arts, health and human sciences, and science and engineering.
TCU students thrive in an academic environment marked by classes small in size (the student-faculty ratio is 14:1) that offer direct access to regular faculty members, 93 percent of whom hold the Ph.D. or other appropriate terminal degree.
Texas Christian University is related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
Texas Christian University: Information from Answers.com (2395 words)
The Campbellites were the spiritual ancestors of the modern Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), the independent Christian Churches/Churches of Christ, and the non-instrumental Churches of Christ.
The institution was renamed Texas Christian University in 1902, though almost immediately it was dubbed with the unofficial moniker by which it is popularly known today: TCU.
TCU was a long-time member of the former Southwest Conference (which also included Texas, Texas AandM, Texas Tech, Baylor, Southern Methodist University, Houston, Arkansas, and Rice) until that conference was disbanded after the 1995 season with the formation of the Big 12 Conference.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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