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Encyclopedia > Tewkesbury
Tewkesbury

Tewkesbury shown within Gloucestershire
Population 10,016 (2001 Census)
OS grid reference SO895325
 - London 94 miles (151 km) ESE
District Tewkesbury
Shire county Gloucestershire
Region South West
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town TEWKESBURY
Postcode district GL20
Dial code 01684
Police Gloucestershire
Fire Gloucestershire
Ambulance Great Western
UK Parliament Tewkesbury
European Parliament South West England
List of places: UKEnglandGloucestershire

Coordinates: 51°59′11″N 2°09′42″W / 51.98634, -2.16159 Image File history File links Size of this preview: 504 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 714 pixel, file size: 398 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... A modern compass card. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Tewkesbury is a local government district and borough in Gloucestershire, south-west England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the United Kingdom anthem is God Save the Queen. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The GL postcode area, also known as the Gloucester postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Badminton, Berkeley, Blakeney, Cheltenham, Chipping Campden, Cinderford, Cirencester, Coleford, Drybrook, Dursley, Dymock, Fairford, Gloucester, Lechlade, Longhope, Lydbrook, Lydney, Mitcheldean, Moreton-in-Marsh, Newent, Newnham, Ruardean, Stonehouse, Stroud, Tetbury, Tewkesbury, Westbury-on... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Gloucestershire Constabulary is the police force covering the non-metropolitan county of Gloucestershire in England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The Gloucestershire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Great Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust provides services in Bath and North East Somerset, Bristol, Gloucestershire, North Somerset, South Gloucestershire, Swindon and Wiltshire in the South West England region. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Tewkesbury is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... The constituency (first used 2004) within England; Gibraltar is in the inset. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Tewkesbury (pronounced [ˈtjuːksˌbɹi]) is a town in Gloucestershire, England. It stands at the confluence of the River Severn and the River Avon, and also minor tributaries the Swilgate and Carrant Brook. It gives its name to the Borough of Tewkesbury, of which the town is the largest settlement. This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the United Kingdom anthem is God Save the Queen. ... “Severn” redirects here. ... The River Avon or Avon is a river in or adjoining the counties of Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire in the midlands of England. ... Tewkesbury is a local government district and borough in Gloucestershire, south-west England. ...


The name Tewkesbury comes from the name of a Saxon who founded a hermitage there in the seventh century, Theoc, and in the Saxon tongue was called Theocsbury. This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

History

Tewkesbury is named after the Saxon hermit, Theoc, who is thought to have founded an hermitage here in the seventh century. Evidence of a church predating the abbey suggests that a considerable settlement rose up on the site previous to the Norman Conquest. Evidence of monastic buildings from the years immediately following the conquest can still be seen surrounding the abbey, which was begun in 1090 and consecrated on 23 October 1121. Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Concordat of Worms condemns Pierre Abélards writings on the Holy Trinity. ...


Tewkesbury was the site of the Battle of Tewkesbury on 4 May 1471. At the “Bloody Meadow,” south of the town, Edward IV's Yorkist forces defeated the House of Lancaster in an historic battle of the Wars of the Roses with a bloody aftermath. Tewkesbury was incorporated during the reign of Elizabeth I. Combatants House of York House of Lancaster Commanders Edward IV of England Edmund Beaufort Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire, which took place on May 4, 1471, completed one phase of the Wars of the Roses. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1471, not the BT caller ID service accessible by dialling 1-4-7-1. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... The House of York was a dynasty of English kings. ... The House of Lancaster is a dynasty of English kings. ... Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...


Historically, Tewkesbury is a market town, serving the local rural area. It underwent some expansion in the period following World War II, and today has a small but significant high technology industry. Tewkesbury has also been a centre for flour milling for many centuries, and the older Abbey Mill still stands though it has now been converted for residential use. Until recently flour was still milled at a more modern mill a short way upriver on the site of the town quay; parts of the mill dated to 1865 when it was built for Healings and it was once thought to be the largest and most modern flour mill in the world. The Mill has, in the course of it's history, had three forms of transport in and out Road, Rail and Barge. Whilst the railway line was brought up along with the rest of the Tewkesbury to Upton upon Severn, the two barges Chaceley and Tirley remained in Service right up to 1998 transporting Grain from Avonmouth and Sharpness to the plant, a practice that originated in the 1930's. However, the mill closed in November 2006, ending at least 800 years of milling in Tewkesbury and 140 years of milling on that particular site. It is expected that the mill buildings will be converted to housing, small businesses and leisure facilities. The two barges were also sold and left Tewkesbury for the last time in March 2007. The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... High tech refers to high technology, technology that is at the cutting-edge and the most advanced currently available. ... For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... Upton-upon-Severn is a small town in Worcestershire, England, on the River Severn. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Categories: Stub | Bristol | Ports and harbours of the UK ... This article refers to the English port of Sharpness. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


The town also hosts a large Armed forces vehicle supply and maintenance depot at nearby Ashchurch. The town suffered from some decline in the early-1990s, with a few local shops and businesses closing, but now appears to be on the up again. US 1979 and 2002 Reissue Cover Also known as paint spatter cover For the military meaning, see Armed forces. ... Ashchurch is a village and civil parish in the Tewkesbury district of Gloucestershire, England. ...


2007 floods

Tewkesbury flooded in July 2007
Tewkesbury flooded in July 2007
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom floods

In July 2007 the town came to both national and international prominence, appearing on the front page of numerous national newspapers, when it suffered from some of the worst flooding in recorded British history. Both rivers which meet at Tewkesbury - the Severn and Avon - were overwhelmed by the volume of rain that fell in the surrounding areas (up to 5 inches) on one day Friday 20th July. All four access roads to the town, the Gloucester road (old A38 ) from the South, the A38 to the North West, the B4080 North East to Bredon and the A438 east were flooded and rendered impassable. The only major remaining access was via what was once a railway line, the embankment allowing for access via foot or cycle, although many braved a route through a residential estate, where the flood levels were low enough to wade through. Despite the lack of access several businesses remained open, most notably the Old Plough Pub on Barton Street, where the clientele lined much of the street; lightheartedly many residents noted the irony that the Town's Annual Water Festival, that was planned for that weekend, had been cancelled. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Two kayakers make their way through a street in Yorkshire. ... Two kayakers make their way through a street in Yorkshire. ... Bredon is a village in Worcestershire in England, on the banks of the River Avon. ...


For the first time in its 100-year history the Mythe Water Treatment Works flooded, resulting in the loss of tap water for 140,000 Homes over a period of two weeks.


Geography

Suburbs

Mitton, Newtown, Northway, Priors Park, Walton Cardiff, Wheatpieces, Ashchurch


Nearby places

Bredon is a village in Worcestershire in England, on the banks of the River Avon. ... For the parliamentary constituency, see Cheltenham (UK Parliament constituency). ... Gloucester (pronounced ) is a city and district in the English county of Gloucestershire, close to the Welsh border. ... Malvern is a town and civil parish in Worcestershire, England . ... Upton-upon-Severn is a small town in Worcestershire, England, on the River Severn. ... The Cotswolds is the name given to a range of hills in central England, sometimes called the Heart of England, a hilly area reaching over 300 m or 1000 feet. ... The Forest of Dean is a geographical, historical and cultural region in the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... Malvern Hills in June, looking north. ...

Demography

At the 2001 UK census the town itself had a population of 10,016. If the neighbouring parishes of Walton Cardiff (1,291 including the large new Wheatpieces housing development), and Ashchurch (6,064 including the even larger but older Northway residential area) were added, the figure rose to 17,371, perhaps a more accurate reflection of Tewkesbury's total population. With the continuing growth of Wheatpieces the figure is now close to 19,000. The Tewkesbury urban area is divided in two by the north-south running M5 motorway, opened in February 1971. However, the town is generally considered as the built-up area to the immediate east and west of the M5 at junction 9, with the town centre, abbey and old town situated to the west. Census 2001 is the name by which the national census conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001 is known. ... The M5 near J28, Devon This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ...


There appear to be limits on how far the town can expand in the future, due to the close proximity of large areas of land that are prone to flooding, as evidenced by the severe floods that struck the region in July 2007. However, the present Borough of Tewkesbury, created on 1 April 1974, also contains a large portion of rural north Gloucestershire, extending as far as the edges of Gloucester itself and also Cheltenham, and has a present population approaching 80,000. Tewkesbury is a local government district and borough in Gloucestershire, south-west England. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... For the parliamentary constituency, see Cheltenham (UK Parliament constituency). ...


Landmarks

The Tewkesbury War Memorial, locally known as the Cross.
The Tewkesbury War Memorial, locally known as the Cross.

The town features many notable Tudor buildings, but its major claim to fame is Tewkesbury Abbey, a fine Norman Abbey, originally part of a monastery, which was saved from dissolution by King Henry VIII after being bought by the townspeople for £453 to use as their parish church. Most of the monastery buildings, as well as the vineyards, were destroyed during this time. The Abbey Mill however still remains, resting upon the Mill Avon, a channel built by the monks so that they could have a working mill closer to the Abbey. The weir exists to this day, and the channel represents one of the biggest projects in Tewkesbury's history, though the present sluice gate dates only from the last decade, replacing two installed in the 1930s. The Abbey Mill is also sometimes known as "Abel Fletcher's Mill", but this is simply the name given to it in Dinah Craik's novel "John Halifax, Gentleman", whose setting Norton Bury is based on Tewkesbury (see the Tewkesbury in Literature section below); Abel Fletcher never actually existed. Image File history File links Tewkesbury_War_Memorial. ... Image File history File links Tewkesbury_War_Memorial. ... The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh: ) was a series of five monarchs who ruled England and Ireland from 1485 until 1603. ... The Abbey of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, one of the finest Norman buildings in England, is the second largest parish church in England, having become so at the Dissolution of the Monasteries. ... The nave of Durham Cathedral demonstrates the characteristic round arched style, though use of shallow pointed arches above the nave is a forerunner of the Gothic style. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... Monastery of St. ... dissolution see Dissolution. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... A parish church is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish, the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. ...


The Abbey is also thought to be the site of the place where the hermit "Jiraiya", once lived. The great Romanesque arch on the west front is particularly striking, and the stained glass window at this end has recently been restored. The monastery was founded by the Despensers as a family mausoleum, and the Despenser and Neville tombs are stunning examples of small-scale late medieval stonework. The tower is believed to be the largest Norman tower still in existence (though that at Norwich Cathedral is another strong contender). The tower once had a wooden spire which may have taken the total height of the building to as much as 260 feet (79 m), but this was unfortunately blown off in a heavy storm on Easter Monday 1559; the present pinnacles and battlements were added in 1600 to give the tower a more "finished" look. The height to the top of the pinnacles is 148 feet (45 m). The Abbey is thought to be the third largest church in Britain that is not a cathedral (after Westminster Abbey and Beverley Minster). From end to end it measures 312 feet (95 m), though prior to the destruction of the original Lady Chapel (also at the time of the dissolution), the Abbey's total length was 375 feet (114 m). The Abbey is a parish church, still used for daily services, and is believed to be the second largest parish church in England, again, after Beverley Minster. South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... Hugh le Despenser (or Hugh Despenser) was the name of five English lords during the 13th and 14th centuries, in a direct line of descent. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Norwich Cathedral: Spire and south transcept. ... Easter Wednesday is the day after Easter Tuesday and is celebrated as a holiday in some largely Christian cultures. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... The West front of Beverley Minster. ... Dissolution or dissolvetiyny can have the following meanings: Dissolve (song), a song on Gusters album Parachute to crumble into a liquid. ... The West front of Beverley Minster. ...


Tewkesbury also lays claim to Gloucestershire's oldest public house, the Black Bear, dating from 1308. Other notable buildings are the Royal Hop Pole Hotel in Church Street (which has recently closed and is being converted into a part of the Wetherspoons Pub chain), mentioned in Charles Dickens' The Pickwick Papers, the Bell Hotel, a large half-timbered structure opposite the Abbey gateway, and the House of the Nodding Gables in the High Street. The historic Abbey Cottages, over 500 years old, were rescued from dereliction in the 1970s; one houses a museum, the others are residential homes. At the Tudor House Hotel in the High Street however, although it is indeed chiefly a Tudor building, the frontage comprises artificial half timbering attached to a brick-built facade. This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The Moon Under Water in Hounslow J. D. Wetherspoon plc (LSE: JDW) (commonly referred to as Wetherspoons or spoons) is a British pub chain founded by Tim Martin. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. ...


Just to the west of the town is Thomas Telford's impressive Mythe Bridge over the River Severn, a cast iron structure with a 170 foot span, opened in 1826. Tewkesbury's other notable bridge is the stone-built King John's Bridge over the Avon, commissioned by King John in the late 12th century as part of improvements to the main road from Gloucester to Worcester. Original stonework can still be seen on its north side; the bridge was considerably widened in the early 1960s to meet modern traffic requirements. Thomas Telford (August 9, 1757 - September 2, 1834) was born in Westerkirk, Scotland. ... Mythe Bridge carries the A483 road across the River Severn at Tewkesbury. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the King of England. ... Gloucester (pronounced ) is a city and district in the English county of Gloucestershire, close to the Welsh border. ... Worcester (pronounced ) is a city in the West Midlands of England, and is the county town of Worcestershire. ...


Transport

  • Tewkesbury is served by the M5 motorway, the A38 trunk road, and also the A46 and A438.
  • The National Cycle Network is to soon complete its work in this area and connect Tewkesbury to the National Scheme, as well as improving localised Cycle Routes.

A38 passing under M50 in Worcestershire The A38 is a major trunk road in England. ... A63(T) trunk road A trunk road, trunk highway, or strategic road is a major road—usually connecting one or more cities, ports, airports, etc. ... The A46 is a trunk road in England. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street Station in 1865. ... Upton-upon-Severn is a town in Worcestershire, England, on the River Severn. ... Malvern is a town and civil parish in Worcestershire, England . ... Ashchurch for Tewkesbury railway station is a railway station serving the village of Ashchurch near Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire. ... The Cross Country Route (MR) is the name given to a major British rail route, running from South West England via Bristol, Birmingham, Derby and Sheffield to North East England and Scotland. ... The first section of the NCN to be built was the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, opened in 1984. ...

Culture

  • The Roses Theatre combines an arthouse cinema and a live performance venue. The Roses Theatre is where comedian Eric Morecambe collapsed after a charity performance in May 1984. He died hours later in Cheltenham General Hospital. Eric is remembered at the theatre with the naming of a Conference room: The Eric Morcambe Room.
  • Tewkesbury School plays host to Tewkesbury Music Centre, an organisation which promotes young musicians.
  • Tewkesbury is home to many historic public houses.
  • Robert Falcon Scott, famous for his expedition to the South Pole, left one of the sleds used on the expedition to the former Tewkesbury Grammar School; it currently resides in the present Tewkesbury School's new Humanities Building.
  • Tewkesbury mustard, a creamy blend of mustard and horseradish, made the town famous in the 17th century and is again being manufactured.
  • The ska punk band [spunge] are from Tewkesbury.
  • Tewkesbury Town Band (a Brass Band) actively plays locally and nationally as well as touring abroad and taking part in competitions. [1]
  • Every Wednesday and Saturday, one of the large town centre car parks is the location of the busy Tewkesbury Market. A Farmers Market is also held every month, usually hosted by Tewkesbury Abbey.
  • Cascades swimming pool is open all year round and has designated slots for professional swimming, lessons and family fun time with a water slide and bubble seats.

The Roses Theatre is a art-house cinema and live performance venue located in the centre of Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England. ... John Eric Bartholomew OBE (May 14, 1926 – May 28, 1984), better known by his stage name, Eric Morecambe was an English comedian who together with Ernie Wise, formed the double act Morecambe and Wise. ... Tewkesbury School is a comprehensive school in the English town of Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire. ... History is often used as a generic term for information about the past, such as in geologic history of the Earth. When used as the name of a field of study, history refers to the study and interpretation of the record of human societies. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... For other persons named Robert Scott, see Robert Scott (disambiguation). ... Tewkesbury Mustard is a blend of Mustard flour and grated Horseradish root. ... Mustard on bread. ... Binomial name Armoracia rusticana P.G. Gaertn. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... [spunge] is a ska punk band from Tewkesbury, England. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ...

Festivals and Fairs

  • In February Tewkesbury holds a Winter Beer Festival, organised by the Tewkesbury branch of CAMRA.
  • In early May a "Festival of Food & Drink" has been held in the grounds of the abbey church to promote food and drink from regional producers. Started only recently in 2005, it is intended that the festival become an annual event.
  • In July the town hosts Tewkesbury Medieval Festival, "Europe's largest battle re-enactment and fair". Thousands of re-enactors travel to the town from around the world to re-enact the Battle of Tewkesbury near to the original battle site. The festival includes a "living history" recreation of a medieval encampment, games, food and a large fair where re-enactment clothing, furniture and weaponry can be purchased.
  • In July the "Water Festival" takes place with events on the river and the banks including an evening procession of brightly lit boats normally ending with an impressive firework display. The festival started in 1996 but its future is now in question due to funding issues and the 2006 event was much reduced in scale. Ironically, the event was cancelled in 2007 as it coincided with the Summer 2007 Floods.
  • In October the town holds the annual Mop Fair. Originally a "hiring" fair where people came to seek employment the event is now just a large fun-fair taking over much of the centre of town.

The GBBF beer festival A Beer Festival is an organised event during which a variety of beers will be available for tasting and buying. ... CAMRA (the CAMpaign For Real Ale) is an independent, voluntary, consumer organisation in the United Kingdom, with the main aim of promoting real ale and the traditional British pub. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants House of York House of Lancaster Commanders Edward IV of England Edmund Beaufort Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire, which took place on May 4, 1471, completed one phase of the Wars of the Roses. ... Mop Fairs (also The Mop singular and Mops plural) are a feature of many English towns and are traditionally held on or around Michaelmas Day. ...

Cultural references

  • Victorian authoress Dinah Craik (1826-1887) visited Tewkesbury in 1852, and later set her most famous work "John Halifax, Gentleman" (pub. 1857) in the town, calling it Norton Bury in the book. There is a "Craik House" in Church Street, near the Abbey, but Mrs. Craik never lived there and had no other connection with Tewkesbury. There is a memorial to her in the Abbey's south transept.
  • Author John Moore (1907-1967) was born and lived in Tewkesbury. He set his novel "Portrait of Elmbury" (pub. 1945) as a "fictionalised biography" of Tewkesbury, the town being the "Elmbury" of the book. Another of his books, "Brensham Village" (pub. 1946) used nearby Bredon as its basis.
  • A E Housman's "A Shropshire Lad" also mentions Tewkesbury, as well as nearby Bredon Hill, even though neither place is in Shropshire.
  • The plot in the Dungeon series revolves around Clive Folliot, son of fictional Baron Tewkesbury, and his quest to find his older brother Neville.

Dinah Maria Craik (née Dinah Maria Mulock, also often credited as Miss Mulock) (20 April 1826 - 12 October 1887) was an English novelist and poet. ... John Moore was a British author and pioneer conservationist. ... Bredon is a village in Worcestershire in England, on the banks of the River Avon. ... Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 _ April 30, 1936) was an English poet and classical scholar, now best known for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. ... A Shropshire Lad is a cycle of sixty-three poems by the English poet Alfred Edward Housman. ... Bredon Hill is a hill in the English county of Worcestershire, south-west of Evesham. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Notable people

Henry Disston (May 24, 1819 - March 16, 1878) was an English-American industrialist who founded the Disston Saw Mill and developed the surrounding neighborhood of Tacony in Philadelphia. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Green was the nom de plume of Henry Vincent Yorke (October 29, 1905-December 13, 1973) . He was born near Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, of an educated family with successful business interests in Birmingham. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Anna Ford (born 2 October 1943 in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire) is a retired British television presenter, best known as a newsreader. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Eric Bartholomew OBE (May 14, 1926 – May 28, 1984), better known by his stage name, Eric Morecambe was an English comedian who together with Ernie Wise, formed the double act Morecambe and Wise. ... The Roses Theatre is a art-house cinema and live performance venue located in the centre of Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England. ...

Sports and recreation

  • Tewkesbury has one of the 471 King George's Fields as its recreation ground.
  • It has its own football team, Tewkesbury Town F.C., which plays in the Cheltenham League
  • Cheltenham College Boathouse is situated at Lower Lode

There are 471 King George V Playing Fields[2] in the United Kingdom, all part of an enormous memorial to King George V, each of which is an individual registered charity[3]. This is the page for Gloucestershire Main article: King Georges Fields See also: List of King George... Cheltenham College is a famous English coeducational independent school in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. ...

Twin Town

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Miesbach is a town in Bavaria, Germany, and is the capital of the Miesbach district. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ...

References

External links


Towns on the River Severn, UK edit

Heading downstream: Llanidloes | Newtown | Welshpool | Shrewsbury | Bridgnorth
Bewdley | Stourport | Worcester | Tewkesbury | Gloucester | Berkeley | Bristol A street in Ynysybwl, Wales, relatively stereotypical of a small town A town is usually an urban area which is not considered to rank as a city. ... “Severn” redirects here. ... {{|Population= 2314 |Place= Llanidloes |Council= Powys |Traditional= Montgomeryshire |Ceremonial= Powys |Constituency= Montgomeryshire |PostalTown= LLANIDLOES |PostCode= SY18 |DiallingCode= +44-1686 (4) |GridReference= SN954844 |OldMapsYear= 1891 |OldMapsEasting= 295500 |OldMapsNorthing= 284500 |OldMapsCounty= 10montg511 |Police= Dyfed-Powys Police }} Llanidloes is a town in Powys, traditional county of Montgomeryshire, mid Wales. ... Newtown town centre Newtown (Welsh: ) is a town with a population of 10,541 (1993) lying on the River Severn in Mid Wales. ... Welshpool Town Hall Welshpool (Welsh: ) is a town in Powys, Wales, only 4 miles (6 km) from the border with England. ... , Shrewsbury (pronounced either or [1]) is the county town of Shropshire, West Midlands, England. ... , Bridgnorth is a town in Shropshire, England, along the Severn Valley. ... Bewdley ( pronunciation) is a small town in Worcestershire, England, along the Severn Valley a few miles to the west of Kidderminster. ... , Stourport Basin Stourport-on-Severn, often shortened to Stourport, is a town in Worcestershire, England, a few miles to the south of Kidderminster. ... Worcester (pronounced ) is a city in the West Midlands of England, and is the county town of Worcestershire. ... Gloucester (pronounced ) is a city and district in the English county of Gloucestershire, close to the Welsh border. ... Berkeley (pronounced ) is a town between the south bank of the River Severn and the M5 motorway in Gloucestershire, England, at grid reference ST685992. ... This article is about the English city. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tewkesbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1784 words)
Tewkesbury was incorporated during the reign of Elizabeth I.
Tewkesbury's other notable bridge is the stone-built King John's Bridge over the Avon, commissioned by King John in the late 12th century as part of improvements to the main road from Gloucester to Worcester.
Tewkesbury Mustard, a creamy blend of mustard and horseradish, made the town famous in the 17th century and is again being manufactured.
Tewkesbury - LoveToKnow 1911 (879 words)
Tewkesbury returned two members from 1609 to 1867, when it lost one member, and in 1885 the representation was merged in that of the county.
Tewkesbury was once celebrated for the manufacture of mustard, which ceased to be important at the end of the 18th century.
Tewkesbury was strategically important in the Wars of the Roses, and was the site of a battle in 1471, and in the Civil War was four times besieged.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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