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Encyclopedia > Test tube
Look up test tube in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Test tube

Two small test tubes in a test tube rack.
Other Names Culture tube
Uses Chemical reactions
Related Vacutainer
Boiling tube
Centrifuge tube

A test tube, also known as a culture tube, is a piece of laboratory glassware composed of a finger-like length of glass tubing, open at the top, with a rounded U-shaped bottom. Often, the top features a flared lip. This is to aid pouring of a liquid from the test tube to a beaker. A distinction between test tube and culture tube is often made, calling a tube with a lip a test tube and one without a lip a culture tube. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... A man looking at the contents of a test tube. ... For other uses, see Chemical reaction (disambiguation). ... A range of Vacutainer tubes containing blood. ... A large, thick-walled laboratory tube used for strongly heating substances with a Bunsen burner or other heat source. ... A laboratory centrifuge is a piece of laboratory equipment, driven by a motor, which spins liquid samples at high speed. ... Brown glass jars with some clear lab glassware in the background Laboratory glassware refers to a variety of equipment, traditionally made of glass, used for scientific experiments and other work in science, especially in chemistry and biology laboratories. ... This article is about the material. ... Illustration of a Beaker A beaker is a type of laboratory glassware which consists of a cylindrical cup with a notch on the top to allow for the pouring of liquids. ...

Contents

Construction and uses

Eight cavity test tube mold courtesy of Lake Charles Manufacturing.

Test tubes are available in a multitude of lengths and widths to serve a varying number of needs. They are typically used by chemists to retain multiple discrete samples of materials, usually liquids, during chemical procedures and experiments, and are designed to allow easy heating of these samples. Often, test tubes are constructed of expansion-resistant glasses such as Pyrex, and can usually be held in a flame such as that produced by a bunsen burner. A boiling tube is, however, preferred when heating samples for any length of time. It is used to hold chemicals. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... // For the programming language, see Pyrex (programming language). ... Look up Bunsen burner in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A large, thick-walled laboratory tube used for strongly heating substances with a Bunsen burner or other heat source. ...


Test tubes made from plastics are formed using injection molding. Injection molding is a process in which plastic is heated and then injected, under pressure, into a test tube mold commonly made from metal.[1]


Variations

References

  1. ^ M. Jeremy Ashcraft, General Manager, Lake Charles Manufacturing (2007). Test Tube Molding Process: A discussion on the molding of plastic test tubes. Lake Charles Manufacturing. 

External links

  • ARKive: image of 16×150 multi-color polypropylene test tubes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Test tube - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (228 words)
A test tube, also known as a culture tube, is a piece of laboratory glassware composed of a finger-like length of glass tubing, open at the top, with a rounded U-shaped bottom.
Test tubes are available in a multitude of lengths and widths to serve a varying number of needs.
Often, test tubes are constructed of expansion-resistant glasses such as Pyrex, and can usually be held in a flame such as that produced by a bunsen burner.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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