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Encyclopedia > Test cricket
A Test match between South Africa and England in January 2005. The men wearing black trousers on the far right are the umpires. Test cricket is played in traditional white clothes and with red balls.
A Test match between South Africa and England in January 2005. The men wearing black trousers on the far right are the umpires. Test cricket is played in traditional white clothes and with red balls.

Test cricket is the longest form of the sport of cricket. It has long been considered the ultimate test of playing ability between cricketing nations. It remains the highest-regarded form of the game, although the comparatively new One-Day International cricket is now more popular amongst some audiences. The name "Test" is thought to arise from the idea that the matches are a "test of strength" between the sides involved. It seems to have been used first to describe an English team that toured Australia in 1861-62, although those matches are not considered Test matches today. The first ever official test match commenced on the 15th of March 1877, contested by England and Australia at Melbourne Cricket Ground, where the Australians won by 45 runs. England won the second ever match (also at the MCG) by 4 wickets, thus drawing the series 1-1. This was not the first ever international cricket match however, which was played between Canada and the United States, on the 24th and 25th of September 1844. 2nd Womens Test match between Australia and England in Sydney in 1935 Womens test cricket is the long form of womens international cricket. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 1317 KB) South Africa vs England, Jan 2005, Test Day 3 http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 1317 KB) South Africa vs England, Jan 2005, Test Day 3 http://www. ... Germanic trousers of the 4th century found in the Thorsberg moor, Germany Early use of trousers in France: a sans-culotte by Louis-Léopold Boilly. ... An umpire in cricket (from the Old French Nompere meaning not equal, i. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... One-day International (ODI) is a form of cricket, which is played over 50 overs per side between two national cricket teams. ... For more coverage of cricket, see the cricket portal. ... “MCG” redirects here. ...

Contents

Test status

Test matches are a subset of first-class cricket; the step up in required skill between Test and normal first-class cricket, however, is considerable, with many players who had excelled in the first class game proving unable to handle Test cricket. They are played between national representative teams which have "Test status", as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). As of 2007, ten national teams have been given Test status, the most recent being Bangladesh in 2000. First-class cricket matches are those between international teams or the highest standard of domestic teams in which teams have two innings each. ... ICC logo The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the governing body for international Test match and One-day International cricket. ...

  • A list of matches defined as Tests was first drawn up by Australian Clarence Moody in the 1890s.
  • Representative matches played by simultaneous England touring sides of 1891-92 (in Australia and South Africa) and 1929-30 (in the West Indies and New Zealand) are deemed to have Test status.
  • In 1970, a series of five "Test matches" were played in England between England and a Rest of the World XI. Although initially given unofficial Test status (and included as Test matches in some record books, notably Wisden), this was later withdrawn and a principle was established which states that official Test matches can only be between national sides.
  • The series of "Test matches" played in Australia between Australia and a World XI in 1971/72 do not have Test status.
  • The commercial "Supertests" organised by Kerry Packer as part of his World Series Cricket enterprise and played between "WSC Australia", "WSC World XI" and "WSC West Indies" from 1977 to 1979 have never been regarded as having official Test match status.
  • In 2005 the ICC ruled that the six-day Super Series match that took place in October 2005 between Australia and a World XI was an official Test match. This ICC decision was taken despite precedent (e.g. the ICC's earlier ruling on the 1970 England v Rest of the World series) that only matches between nations should be given Test match status. Many cricket writers and statisticians, particularly Bill Frindall, have decided to ignore the ICC's ruling and have excluded the 2005 match from their records.

“West Indian” redirects here. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wisden is the main publisher of information on cricket in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of One-day international cricketers for the ICC World XI. A One-day international, or an ODI, is an international cricket match between two representative teams, each having ODI status, as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). ... Supertests were international cricket matches set up between 1977 and 1979 as a part of World Series Cricket, which was organised and operated by the late Australian publishing magnate Kerry Packer. ... Kerry Francis Bullmore Packer AC (17 December 1937 – 26 December 2005) was an Australian publishing, media and gaming tycoon. ... The WSC logo. ... The ICC Super Series 2005 was a cricket series played in Australia in October 2005 and featuring some of the worlds best cricketers. ... William Howard Frindall ( March 3, 1939, Epsom, Surrey ) is a British cricket scorer and statistician who is familiar to cricket followers from his appearances on the BBCs radio programme Test Match Special. ...

History

See main articles:

The game of cricket has a known history spanning from the 16th century to the present day, with international matches played since 1844, although the official history of international Test cricket began in 1877. ... For more coverage of cricket, see the cricket portal. ... For more coverage of cricket, see the cricket portal. ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ...

Test cricket playing nations

There are currently ten Test-playing nations.


Test status is conferred upon a country by the International Cricket Council. Countries that do not have Test status can only officially play a shortened version of cricket, except in events such as the ICC Intercontinental Cup, which was specifically designed to allow non-Test nations to play under conditions similar to Tests. The nations are listed below with the date of each nation's Test debut shown in brackets: ICC logo The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the governing body for international Test match and One-day International cricket. ... The ICC Intercontinental Cup is a cricket tournament organised by the International Cricket Council as part of its cricket development program. ... First-class cricket matches are those between international teams or the highest standard of domestic teams in which teams have two innings each. ...

  1. Flag of EnglandEngland (15 March, 1877) (actually made up of players from England and Wales)
  2. Flag of AustraliaAustralia (15 March, 1877)
  3. Flag of South AfricaSouth Africa (12 March, 1889 - 10 March, 1970) and (18 April, 1992) (South Africa did not compete in international cricket from 1971 to 1991 because, under the Gleneagles Agreement, other countries refused to play against South African teams in protest against their policy of apartheid)
  4. Flag of British West IndiesWest Indies (23 June, 1928) (actually made up of players from a number of nations, including Grenada, Jamaica and St. Lucia)
  5. Flag of New ZealandNew Zealand (10 January, 1930)
  6. Flag of IndiaIndia (25 June, 1932) (Pre-1947 India included those parts of the sub-continent that are now Pakistan and Bangladesh.)
  7. Flag of PakistanPakistan (16 October, 1952) (Pre-1971 Pakistan included that part of the sub-continent that is now Bangladesh.)
  8. Flag of Sri LankaSri Lanka (17 February, 1982)
  9. Flag of ZimbabweZimbabwe (18 October, 1992 - 10 June, 2004) and (6 January, 2005 - 18 January, 2006)
  10. Flag of BangladeshBangladesh (10 November, 2000)

Zimbabwe's Test matches were temporarily suspended from 10 June, 2004, to 6 January, 2005, and from 18 January, 2006 to 2007. In 2003, the ICC announced its intention to confer Test status upon Kenya in the near future, but Kenyan cricket has been through difficulties since then and no date for Kenya's promotion is likely to be set in the near future. Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... The logo of the England Cricket Team which shows the three Lions of England below a five-pointed crown The England cricket team is a cricket team which represents England and Wales, operating under the auspices of the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... The structure of international cricket has evolved only recently from a traditional ad hoc basis. ... The Gleneagles Agreement was unanimously approved by the Commonwealth of Nations at a meeting at Gleneagles, Auchterarder, Scotland. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... Image File history File links West_Indies_Cricket_Board_Flag. ... Learie Constantine, was one of the first great West Indian players. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir) A subcontinent is a large part of a continent. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sri_Lanka. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bangladesh. ...


Conduct of the game

Test cricket is played between two teams of eleven players over a period of up to a maximum of five days - although matches are sometimes completed early when one side wins well within the time allotted (e.g. in three or four days). On each day there are usually three two-hour sessions with a forty minute break for "lunch" and a twenty minute break for "tea"; in England typically 11am-1pm, 1.40pm-3.40pm, 4pm-at least 6pm (play often continues later - up 7.30pm - to make up for overs lost due to the weather, to make up the required minimum number of overs for the day, or if a team is close to being dismissed). The duration of earlier sessions can be altered if there have been weather interruptions or (in certain circumstances) if the state of play so dictates. For example, if rain has stopped play, lunch may be taken early to leave more time in the afternoon for play without rain and/or on a drier pitch. If a team is dismissed close enough to a scheduled break, the break may be brought forward and the other team begin its innings after the break. In the early days of the game, Test matches were played over three or four days and there have also have been 'Timeless Tests', where there was no predetermined length of the match. For more coverage of cricket, see the cricket portal. ... A timeless Test is a match of Test cricket played under no limitation of time, which means the match is played until one side won or the match was tied, with theoretically no possibility for a draw. ...


Before play starts on the first day, a coin is tossed. The team winning the toss chooses whether to bat first or to bowl first. In the following, the team batting first is termed "team A" and its opponents "team B". In cricket, a coin is tossed to determine which team bats first. ...

  • Team A bats until either ten batsmen are dismissed (team A is "all out"), or its captain chooses to stop batting (called a "declaration"). This batting period is called an "innings". There is no limit to the length of an innings provided there remain at least two batsmen who have not been dismissed (when ten are dismissed, the eleventh cannot continue by himself) and the five days have not elapsed.
  • After team A's first innings the teams swap roles, with team B batting its first innings, and team A bowling and fielding.
  • If team B is dismissed with a score 200 runs or more behind team A, team A chooses whether to "invite" team B to bat again for its second innings (called "enforcing the follow-on"), or to bat itself to gain a bigger lead. (If the whole first day of play is abandoned without a single ball being bowled, whether because of rain or otherwise, the follow-on requirement is reduced to 150 runs.)

If the follow-on is forced: Warwickshire batsman Mike Powell A batsman in the sport of cricket is, depending on context: Any player in the act of batting. ... In the sport of cricket a declaration occurs when a captain declares his teams innings closed and a forfeiture is when a captain chooses to forfeit an innings. ... An innings, or inning, is a fixed-length segment of a game in any of a variety of sports – most notably baseball and cricket – during which one team attempts to score while the other team attempts to prevent the first from scoring. ... Follow-on is a term (noun and verb) used in the sport of cricket. ...

  • Team B bats its second innings.
  • If team B's total score from both innings is less than team A's first innings score, team A wins the match.
  • If this is not the case, team A must bat its second innings to attempt to score more than team B's total. If it succeeds in the remaining time, team A wins. If it is dismissed before this occurs, team B wins. (This is very unusual - teams that enforce the follow-on very rarely lose. This has happened only three times in the entire history of Test cricket and each time the losing team has been Australia; the most recent one being the India-Australia series in India in 2001.)
  • If time runs out before any of the above occurs, the match is called a draw.

If, after each team's first innings, the follow-on is not forced or cannot be forced: To tie or draw is to finish a competition with identical or inconclusive results. ...

  • Team A bats its second innings. If time runs out before the innings is completed, the match is a draw.
  • If team A's total score for its two innings is less than team B's score from its first innings, team B is the winner. Otherwise, team B must bat a second innings.
  • If team B's total score over two innings is more than team A's, team B wins the match.
  • If team B is dismissed before reaching team A's total, team A wins the match.
  • If neither occurs before the scheduled end of the match, it is a draw.

Finally, if the team batting in the fourth innings is dismissed with the combined totals equal, the game is a tie (as distinct from a draw, as described above). With the comparatively high scores in cricket, only two ties have occurred over the entire history of over 1,700 Test matches. Both matches are regarded as amongst the most exciting ever played. To tie or draw is to finish a competition with identical or inconclusive results. ... In Test cricket, a Tie occurs when the aggregate scores of both teams are equal at the conclusion of play and the side batting last has completed its innings - all 10 batsmen will be out. ...


The decision for the winner of the toss to bat or bowl first is based on an assessment of the relative strengths and weaknesses of each team and the conditions of the wicket. Most of the time pitches tend to become hard to bat on as the game nears its conclusion, and players bat more poorly after the fatigue of four solid days of cricket, so teams usually prefer to bat first. However, sometimes the conditions at the very beginning of the match particularly suit fast bowling, so if either team has particularly strong set of pace bowlers, the team winning the toss may choose to bowl first (either to take advantage of their own attack or to disallow the opposition the use of a "green" wicket whose erratic bounce will help seam bowling). In cricket, a coin is tossed to determine which team bats first. ... Cricket pitch (not to scale) A wicket consists of three stumps that are placed into the ground, and topped with two bails. ... Fast bowling, sometimes known as pace bowling, is one of the two main approaches to bowling in the sport of cricket. ... Muttiah Muralitharan bowling A bowler in the sport of cricket is usually a player whose speciality is bowling, analogous to a pitcher in baseball. ... In cricket, a coin is tossed to determine which team bats first. ... Cricket pitch (not to scale) A wicket consists of three stumps that are placed into the ground, and topped with two bails. ... Seam bowling is a phrase used for a cricket bowling technique whereby the ball is deliberately bowled onto its seam, to cause a random deviation. ...


After 80 overs, the captain of the bowling side has the option to take a new ball. A new ball, which is harder than an old ball, generally favours fast bowlers who can make it bounce at a greater range of (unpredictable) heights and speeds. Spin bowlers or those using reverse swing prefer an old ball. The captain may delay the decision to take the new ball if he wishes to continue with his spinners (because the pitch favours spin), though in general the new ball is looked forward to as an opportunity to introduce new life into the bowling with more chance of taking wickets. Cricket ball A cricket ball is a hard, solid ball used to play cricket. ... Swing bowling is a technique used for bowling in the sport of cricket. ...


The rationale for a team declaring their innings closed prior to being bowled out may be confusing for cricketing neophytes, but it is often a sound tactic. Remember that to win a game, the losing side must be given the opportunity to complete two innings. If they do not do so the game ends in a draw, no matter how many runs they may be behind (an example of this is Sri Lanka's 952 run innings against India. Despite this being the highest total runs in a test match innings, the game was drawn). Therefore, a team with a large lead will declare to give themselves more time to bowl at the opposition and take all their wickets.


Competitions

Test cricket's competition structure has evolved somewhat idiosyncratically due to the long match duration, the fact that a proportion of test matches end in draws, cricket's status as one of the earliest professional spectator sports, and the wide geographical distribution of the teams. These factors mean that a 'world cup' similar to the event in one-day cricket or the football world cup is not feasible for Test cricket. A spectator sport is a sport that is characterized by the presence of spectators, or watchers, at its matches. ... The Cricket World Cup is the premier international championship of mens One-Day International (ODI) cricket. ... The FIFA World Cup Trophy, which has been awarded to the world champions since 1974. ...


Test cricket is almost always played as a series of matches between two countries, with all matches in the series taking place in the same country (the host). The number of matches in a series varies from one to six. Often there is a perpetual trophy traded between a pair of teams when series between them are won or lost. The Ashes series between England and Australia is the most famous of these. There have been two exceptions to the bilateral nature of Test cricket: the 1912 Triangular Tournament, a three-way competition between England, Australia and South Africa (hosted by England), and the Asian Test Championship, an event held in 1998/99 and 2001/02. The Ashes is a Test cricket series, played between England and Australia - it is international crickets most celebrated rivalry and dates back to 1882. ... The 1912 Triangular Tournament was the first competition where all of Test cricketing nations of Australia, England and South Africa, played together. ... The Asian Test Championship is a Test cricket tournament between the test playing nations of Asia: India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. ...


Until recently, Test series between international teams were organised between the two national cricket organisations with umpires provided by the home team. However, with the entry of more countries into Test cricket competition, and a wish by the ICC to maintain public interest in Tests (which was flagging in many countries with the introduction of one-day cricket), a new system was added to Test match competition. A rotation system that sees all ten Test teams playing each other over a six-year cycle, and an official ranking system (with a trophy held by the highest-ranked team) were introduced. It was hoped by the ICC that the new ranking system would help maintain interest in Test cricket in nations where one-day cricket is more popular. The simplicity of the ranking system has proven successful, although the rotation system is currently being challenged by India (who wish to play more frequently against the more financially attractive opposition such as England and Australia). An umpire in cricket (from the Old French Nompere meaning not equal, i. ... ICC logo The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the governing body for international Test match and One-day International cricket. ... A night match at Old Trafford. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


In the new system, umpires are provided by the ICC. An "elite panel" of eleven umpires has been established, and the panel is supplemented by an additional "International Panel" that includes three umpires named by each Test-playing country. The elite umpires officiate almost all Test matches; the International Panel is only employed when the cricketing calendar is filled with activity, or for one-day internationals (ODIs).


See also

Cricket Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... In the sport of cricket, a coin is tossed to determine which team bats first. ... The ICC Test Championship is a notional competition run by the International Cricket Council in the sport of cricket for the 10 nations that play Test cricket. ... For matches of Test cricket, see one of these articles: History of Test cricket (to 1883) History of Test cricket (1884 to 1889) History of Test cricket (1890 to 1900) History of Test cricket (1901 to 1914) Test matches (1918-1939) Category: ... The first Test cricket match was played at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) situated in Yarra Park, Melbourne, Australia, in 1877. ... This is a list of Test cricket records; that is, record team and individual performances in Test cricket. ... This is a list by country of every cricketer who has played at least one Test match. ...

References

  • Origin of the name "Test"
  • USA v Canada - The oldest international sporting fixture


Forms of cricket
International: Test cricket | One-Day International | Twenty20 | Hong Kong International Cricket Sixes | Women's cricket
Other: First-class cricket | Limited overs cricket | Club cricket
Variations: Indoor cricket | French cricket | Backyard cricket | Kwik cricket | Catchy Shubby Cricket | Blind cricket | Kilikiti | Short form cricket | Gilli-danda

 
 

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