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Encyclopedia > Tesco

Coordinates: 51°42′18.89″N 0°1′36.37″W / 51.7052472, -0.0267694 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Tesco
Type Public (LSE: TSCO)
Founded 1919 by Jack Cohen
Headquarters Flag of the United Kingdom Cheshunt, England, UK
Key people Jack Cohen (founder),
Sir Terry Leahy (Chief Executive)
Industry Retail
Products Groceries, Consumer goods, financial services, telecoms
Revenue £46.6 billion (2007)
Operating income £2.47 billion (2007)
Net income £1.90 billion (2007)
Employees 273,028
Subsidiaries Tesco Stores Limited
Tesco Ireland Limited
Tesco Personal Finance (50%)
Website www.tesco.com
1. Results for 52 weeks ended 24 February 2007[1]

Tesco plc is a British-based international grocery and general merchandising retail chain. It is the largest British retailer by both global sales and domestic market share with profits exceeding £2 billion. In 2008, the company overtook German retail giant Metro AG to become the world's fourth largest retailer, the first movement among the top five since 2003.[2] Tesco may refer to: Tesco PLC, the international retailer headquartered in the United Kingdom Tesco Corporation, the international drilling company headquartered in Canada This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Image File history File links Tescologo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Statistics Population: 51,998 (Census 2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL358021 Administration District: Broxbourne Shire county: Hertfordshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hertfordshire Historic county: Hertfordshire Services Police force: Hertfordshire Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: East of England Post... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Sir John Edward Cohen (6 October 1898–24 March 1979), born Jacob Edward Kohen and commonly known as Jack Cohen, was a British businessman who founded the Tesco supermarket chain. ... Sir Terry Leahy (born 28 February 1956) is the CEO of Tesco, the largest British supermarket chain. ... Chief Executive may refer to: Chief Executive of Hong Kong Chief Executive of Macau Chief Executive Officer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Drawing of a self-service store. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For the tax agency in Ireland of the same name, see Revenue Commissioners. ... GBP redirects here. ... Earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), also known as operating income and operating profit, is a term used to describe a companys earnings. ... GBP redirects here. ... Net income is equal to the income that a firm has after subtracting costs and expenses from the total revenue. ... GBP redirects here. ... This article is about work. ... A subsidiary, in business, is an entity that is controlled by another entity. ... Tesco Ireland Limited is a supermarket company in the Republic of Ireland. ... Historic The first self service Tesco, which is in in St Albans Tesco PLC is a United Kingdom based international supermarket chain. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The initials PLC after a UK or Irish company name indicate that it is a public limited company, a type of limited company whose shares may be offered for sale to the public. ... Drawing of a self-service store. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... METRO AG Logo METRO AG is a diversified retail and wholesale/cash and carry group based in Germany. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Originally specialising in food, it has diversified into areas such as clothing, consumer electronics, consumer financial services, retailing and renting DVDs,[3] CDs,music downloads, Internet service, consumer telecoms, consumer health insurance, consumer dental plans and software.
Diversification is a form of growth marketing strategy for a company. ... (See also List of types of clothing) Introduction Humans often wear articles of clothing (also known as dress, garments or attire) on the body (for the alternative, see nudity). ... Consumer electronics is a term used to describe the category of electronic equipment intended for everyday use by people, the consumers. ... Financial services is a term used to refer to the services provided by the finance industry. ... DVD is an optical disc storage media format that is used for playback of movies with high video and sound quality and for storing data. ... CD re-directs here; see Cd for other meanings of CD. Image of a compact disc (pencil included for scale) A compact disc (or CD) is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ... File sharing is the practice of making files available to other users for download over the Internet and smaller networks. ... “ISP” redirects here. ... Telecommunication is the extension of communication over a distance. ... The term health insurance is generally used to describe a form of insurance that pays for medical expenses. ... Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. ... Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ...

Contents

History

Formation

First self service Tesco, St Albans, England
First self service Tesco, St Albans, England

Jack Cohen founded Tesco in 1909 when he began to sell surplus groceries from a stall in the East End of London. The Tesco brand first appeared in 1924. The name came about after Jack Cohen bought a shipment of tea from T.E. Stockwell. He made new labels using the first three letters of the supplier's name (TES), and the first two letters of his surname (CO), forming the word "TESCO".[4] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1747 KB) Description: Tesco in St Peters Street, St Albans. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1747 KB) Description: Tesco in St Peters Street, St Albans. ... Sir John Edward Cohen (6 October 1898–24 March 1979), born Jacob Edward Kohen and commonly known as Jack Cohen, was a British businessman who founded the Tesco supermarket chain. ... For other uses, see Tea (disambiguation). ...


The first Tesco store was opened in 1929 in Burnt Oak, Edgware, Middlesex. Tesco floated on the London Stock Exchange in 1947 as Tesco Stores (Holdings) Limited.[5] The first self service store opened in St Albans in 1947 (still operational in 2007 as a Metro),[6] and the first supermarket in Maldon in 1956.[5] Burnt Oak is a vibrant multi-ethnic suburb in the London Borough of Barnet south of Edgware. ... Chanukah menorah outside Edgware tube station, 2006 Edgware is a suburb of north London situated 9. ... , St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35 km) north of central London. ... See also Malden. ...


During the 1950s and the 1960s Tesco grew organically, but also through acquisitions until it owned more than 800 stores. The company purchased 70 Williamsons stores (1957), 200 Harrow Stores outlets (1959), 212 Irwins stores (1960), 97 Charles Phillips stores (1964) and the Victor Value chain (1968) (sold to Bejam in 1986).[7] Victor Value was a London-based supermarket group operating at the lower end of the grocery trade in the 1960s. ... Bejam was a British frozen food retailer founded by John Apthorp in 1968, based in Stanmore. ...


Management and strategy changes

Founder Jack Cohen was an enthusiastic advocate of trading stamps as an inducement for shoppers to patronise his stores. He signed up with Green Shield Stamps in 1963, and became one of the company's largest clients.[8] Green Shield Stamps were a sales promotion or incentive scheme designed deployed in the UK and Ireland to encourage or reward shopping, by being able to buy free gifts. ...


In 1973 Jack Cohen resigned and was replaced as Chairman by his son-in-law Leslie Porter. Porter and managing director Ian MacLaurin abandoned the "pile it high sell it cheap" philosophy of Cohen which had left the company "stagnating" and with a "bad image".[9] In 1977 Tesco launched "Operation Checkout" with the abandonment of Green Shield stamps, price reductions and centralised buying for all stores. The result was a rise in market share of 4% in two months.[9] Ian Charter MacLaurin, Baron MacLaurin of Knebworth (born March 30, 1937) is a British businessman who has been Chairman of Vodafone and Chairman and Chief Executive of Tesco. ...


1980s

In May 1987 Tesco completed its hostile takeover of the Hillards chain of 40 supermarkets in the North of England for £220 million.[10] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


1990s

In 1994, the company took over the Scottish supermarket chain William Low. Tesco successfully fought off Sainsbury's for control of the Dundee-based firm, which operated 57 stores. This paved the way for Tesco to expand its presence in Scotland, which was weaker than in England. Inverness was recently branded as "Tescotown",[11][12] because well over 50p in every £1 spent on food is believed to be spent in its three Tesco stores.[13] William Low (known informally as Willie Lows, latterly marketed as Wm Low) was a chain of supermarkets based in Dundee, in Scotland. ... This article is about the supermarket business. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ...


In 1995, Tesco became the UK's market leader in the supermarket sector, beating Sainsbury's.[citation needed] This article is about the supermarket business. ...


Tesco introduced a loyalty card, branded 'Clubcard', in 1995 and later an Internet shopping service. As of November 2006 Tesco was the only food retailer to make online shopping profitable.[14] In marketing generally and in retailing more specifically, a loyalty card, rewards card, points card, or club card is a plastic card, visually similar to a credit card or debit card, that identifies the card holder as a member in a commercial incentives programme. ... A Tesco clubcard key-fob Tesco Clubcard is the loyalty card of Tesco, the UKs largest retailer. ...


Terry Leahy assumed the role of chief executive on 21 February 1997, the announcement having been made on 21 November 1995.[15][16] Sir Terry Leahy (born 28 February 1956) is the CEO of Tesco, the largest British supermarket chain. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ...


On 21 March 1997 Tesco announced the purchase of the retail arm of Associated British Foods which consisted of the Quinnsworth, Stewarts and Crazy Prices chains in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, as well as associated businesses for GB£640 million.[17] The deal was approved by the European Commission on 6 May 1997.[18] This acquisition gave it both a major presence in the Republic of Ireland, and a larger presence in Northern Ireland than Sainsbury's which had begun its move into the province in 1995. is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tesco Ireland was formed from Power Supermarkets Ltd in 1999, more commonly known as the Quinnsworth and Crazy Prices chain of supermarkets in Ireland; the chain is a subsiduary of Tesco PLC. Tesco operates supermarkets under the Tesco and Tesco Ireland brands, as well as one hypermarket under the Tesco... Stewarts Supermarkets Ltd. ... Tesco Ireland was formed from Power Supermarkets Ltd in 1999, more commonly known as the Quinnsworth and Crazy Prices chain of supermarkets in Ireland; the chain is a subsiduary of Tesco PLC. Tesco operates supermarkets under the Tesco and Tesco Ireland brands, as well as one hypermarket under the Tesco... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


In 1996, the typeface of the logo was changed to the current one shown on the top of the page with stripe reflections underneath the typefaces as Tesco used them on their carrier bags. The "typewriter" typeface that the company had been using since the 1970s for its in-store signage was also dropped during this period.


In 1997, Tesco Stores Limited and Esso Petroleum Company Ltd (now part of Exxonmobil Corporation) came together to form a business alliance. The agreement included several petrol filling stations on leases from Esso, where Tesco would operate the store under the Express format. In turn, Esso would operate the forecourts and sell their fuel via the Tesco store. Ten years later, over 600 Tesco/Esso stores can now be found across the United Kingdom. This article is about the trade name. ... For other uses, see Exon (disambiguation). ...


2000s

Trolley shelter

In July 2001 it became involved in internet grocery retailing in the USA when it obtained a 35% stake in GroceryWorks.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2143x937, 513 KB) Summary Tesco shopping trolley shelter Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2143x937, 513 KB) Summary Tesco shopping trolley shelter Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


In 2002 Tesco purchased 13 HIT hypermarkets in Poland; to date there are over 350 Tesco Stores in Poland and this portfolio is still growing with the introduction of Tesco Express stores around all major cities.[citation needed] It also made a major move into the UK convenience store market with its purchase of T & S Stores, owner of 870 convenience stores in the One Stop, Dillons and Day & Nite chains in the UK.[19] One Stop Stores Ltd One Stop offers a wide range of goods including tobacco, confectionery, alcohol, grocery, fresh produce and non food grocery. ...


In October 2003 it launched a UK telecoms division, comprising mobile and home phone services, to complement its existing Internet service provider business. In June 2003 Tesco purchased the C Two-Network in Japan.[20] It also acquired a majority stake in Turkish supermarket chain Kipa.[citation needed] “ISP” redirects here. ... Tesco Kipa is a Turkish chain supermarket. ...


In January 2004 Tesco acquired Adminstore, owner of 45 Cullens, Europa, and Harts convenience stores, in and around London.[21] In August 2004, it also launched a broadband service. In Thailand Tesco Lotus was a joint venture of the Charoen Pokphand Group and Tesco but facing criticism over the growth of hypermarkets. CP Group sold its Tesco Lotus shares in 2003. Broadband in telecommunications is a term that refers to a signaling method that includes or handles a relatively wide range of frequencies, which may be divided into channels or frequency bins. ... Charoen Pokphand is a huge business group based in Thailand. ... Packaged food aisles of Fred Meyer in Portland, Oregon In commerce, a hypermarket or multi-department store is a superstore which combines a supermarket and a department store. ...


In late 2005 Tesco acquired the 21 remaining Safeway/BP stores after Morrisons dissolved the Safeway/BP partnership.[citation needed] A Safeway supermarket in Camberwell, South East London, in 2003 Safeway was a chain of 479 supermarkets and convenience stores in the UK that is now part of Wm Morrison Supermarkets. ... This article is about the energy corporation. ... For other uses, see Morrison. ...


In mid 2006 Tesco purchased an 80% stake in Casino's Leader Price supermarkets in Poland. They will be rebranded into small Tesco stores.[citation needed]


On July 14, 2007, fourteen Tesco stores across the UK were temporarily closed after a 'bomb scare' and a criminal investigation launched after threats were made.[22] A 'suspect device' was found in one store on July 16, 2007 causing the store and surrounding area to be sealed off while the Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit disposed of the package.[23] is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


In 2007, Tesco joined forces with O2 in Ireland to form Tesco Mobile, using the 089 prefix. Tesco owns 50% of the network, with O2 owning the remainder. Tesco has not built its own network in Ireland, but uses the O2 infrastructure already in place, similar to the arrangement in the UK. By doing this, Tesco has saved money and already has 99.6% population network coverage and 95% geographical coverage. O2 or O-2 may be: Oceanic Airlines (Guinea) IATA airline designator Oxygen O2 plc, a telecommunications company. ... O2 or O-2 may be: Oceanic Airlines (Guinea) IATA airline designator Oxygen O2 plc, a telecommunications company. ... O2 or O-2 may be: Oceanic Airlines (Guinea) IATA airline designator Oxygen O2 plc, a telecommunications company. ...


In 2007 Tesco was placed under investigation by the UK The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) for acting as part of a cartel of five supermarkets (Safeway, Tesco, Asda, Morrisons and Sainsburys) and a number of dairy companies to fix the price of milk, butter and cheese. In December 2007 Asda, Sainsburys and the former Safeway admitted that they acted covertly against the interests of consumers while publicly claiming that they were supporting 5,000 farmers recovering from the foot-and-mouth crisis. They were fined a total of £116M. Tesco, which maintains that it was not a part of the cartel, is still under investigation by the OFT. The Office of Fair Trading or OFT is a UK statutory body established by the Fair Trading Act 1973, which enforces both consumer protection and competition law, acting as the UKs economic regulator. ... For the American pop-punk band, see Cartel (band). ... Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), sometimes called hoof-and-mouth disease, is a highly contagious but non-fatal viral disease of cattle and pigs. ...


Corporate strategy

  • An "inclusive offer". This phrase is used by Tesco to describe its aspiration to appeal to upper, medium and low income customers in the same stores.[citation needed] According to Citigroup retail analyst David McCarthy, "They've pulled off a trick that I'm not aware of any other retailer achieving. That is to appeal to all segments of the market".[24]
    • One plank of this strategy has been Tesco's use of its own-brand products, including the upmarket "Finest" and low-price "Value".
  • Tesco implemented the Clubcard rewards program to gather necessary customer information, which it then used to cater to specific customer needs and potential wants. When shoppers signed up for the card, they automatically submitted their age, gender and address. Tesco was able to segment their shoppers based on these factors. As soon as the shopper used the card when shopping online or in-store, purchased product information was automatically uploaded into Tesco database. Product information was used to cross-sell additional products and services such as grocery delivery services.[25]
  • Beginning in 1997 when Terry Leahy took over as CEO, Tesco began marketing itself using the phrase "The Tesco Way" to describe the company's core purposes, values, principles, and goals[26] This phrase became the standard marketing speak for Tesco as it expanded domestically and internationally under Leahy's leadership, implying a shift by the company to focus on people, both customers and employees[27].

Citi redirects here. ...

Brand image

Tesco operates a "good, better & best" policy for its products, encompassing several product categories such as food, beverage, home, clothing, Tesco Mobile and financial services.

  • Tesco Value - These products minimise Tesco's costs, including simple packaging to keep the retail cost as low as possible. This range has recently expanded into small home electrical items like kettles, toasters, microwaves, vacuum cleaners, food steamers, blenders and floor heaters. The packaging of these products is in a standard design across the whole range and is increasingly being removed from the ranges in many stores.
  • Tesco Brand - Standard products at "mid range, own label store prices".
  • Tesco Finest - These products use "superior" ingredients and in some cases, Tesco claim they are designed/recommended by top chefs. Has also moved into the Non-Food segment of the market, with Finest Health and Beauty, Home and Clothing lines being stocked in Extra stores.
  • Healthy Living/Light Choices - Usually contains lower fat, sugar and salt content than in standard Tesco Brand.
  • Organic - Tesco's own brand range of organic foods, has also moved into the Non-Food market, with organic bedding and clothing planned.
  • Tesco Kids - Brands aimed at children, although this range is being phased out in certain areas and replaced with a dual branding with Disney.
  • Best Of British - British speciality foods.
  • World Foods - Speciality foods from around the world.
  • Tesco Wholefoods - Range of natural, unprocessed products such as, dried fruit, seeds & nuts.
  • Tesco Bakery has pastries and breads baked daily, including cookies, although many of these items tend not to be produced in store, with the stores own bakery preferring to focus its resources on faster selling items[citation needed]
  • Free From - Food that does not contain certain ingredients (e.g. wheat, gluten, dairy & nuts).
  • Tesco Christmas - Seasonal goods that Tesco only stock during the Christmas period.
  • Clothing at Tesco - comprising several exclusive brands including Cherokee, Stone Bay, True and F+F (formerly Florence for women, and Fred for men) - Tesco's own clothing label.
  • Technika/Digilogic - Range of Tesco own brand electrical items (from DVD players to televisions and computers).
  • Tesco Mobile - Tesco's own mobile network has 5 pay as you go tariffs; Value tariff, Standard tariff, Standard Plus tariff, Extra tariff and the Staff Tariff for employees.
  • Cocopia - A range of premium boxed chocolates made in the UK and Ireland exclusively for Tesco. Similar to Hotel Chocolat.

In order to protect its brand image, and given its expansion plans in Thailand, Tesco has recently been employing a policy of launching defamation proceedings. In November 2007, Tesco sued a Thai academic and a former minister for civil libel and criminal defamation. Tesco is claiming that the two pay £1.6m and £16.4m plus two years' imprisonment respectively. They have been alleged to have misstated that Tesco's Thai market amounts to 37% of its global revenues, amongst criticism of Tesco's propensity to put small retailers out of business.[28] Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Digilogic is a name used by supermarket chain Tesco for its own electronic products. ... Hotel Chocolat is a British owned luxury chocolate manufacturer founded by Angus Thirlwell and Peter Harris in 1993. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... for other uses please see Crime (disambiguation) A crime is an act that violates a political or moral law. ...


Corporate tax structure

In May 2007 it was revealed that Tesco had moved the head office of its online operations to the tax haven of Switzerland. This allows it to sell CDs, DVDs and electronic games through its web site without charging VAT.[29] The operation had previously been run out of the tax haven of Jersey, but had been closed by authorities who feared damage to the islands's reputation.[29]


In February 2008 a six month investigation by The Guardian revealed that Tesco has developed a complex taxation structure involving offshore bank accounts in the tax haven of the Cayman Islands.[30] Tesco is in the process of selling its UK stores, worth an estimated £6 billion, to Cayman Island based companies set up by Tesco. These companies then lease the stores back to Tesco. This arrangement enables Tesco to avoid an estimated £1 billion tax on profits from the property sales, and also to avoid paying any tax on continuing operation of the stores, as the rate of corporation tax in the Cayman Islands is zero. Tesco have defended this arrangement, saying it has a duty to organise its affairs in a tax-efficient manner, and pointing out that the corporation already pays a lot of tax, including VAT on behalf of its customers, and PAYE and National insurance contributions on behalf of its employees. For other uses, see Guardian. ... An offshore bank account is a bank located outside the country of residence of the depositor, typically in a low tax jurisdiction (or tax haven) that provides financial and legal advantages. ... A tax haven is a place where certain taxes are levied at a low rate or not at all. ... vat can be a type of barrel used for storage. ... PAYE (or pay-as-you-earn) is a payroll deduction system for collecting income tax in the United Kingdom. ... UK Income Tax and National Insurance (2005–2006) UK Income Tax and National Insurance as a % of Salary (2005–2006) National Insurance is a system of taxes, and related social security benefits, that has operated in the United Kingdom since its introduction in 1911, and wider extension by the government...


Following these revelations, several MPs called for an inquiry into Tesco's tax avoidance schemes.[31]


Tesco issued a libel writ against the Guardian five weeks later. Tesco denied that it had avoided paying £1 billion corporation tax, but refused to answer further questions, or to clarify the purpose of the complex artificial tax structure they had created. Further investigations by the Guardian discovered that the tax structures were aimed at avoiding Stamp Duty Land Tax, and not corporation tax as originally thought. SDLT is leveled at 4%, and corporate tax at around 30%, so the figure of £1 billion tax avoided by Tesco has been revised to an estimated £90-£100 million.[32] According to the Guardian "Tesco has been involved in a game of cat and mouse with HM Revenue & Customs since 2003. On three occasions when the government has closed a loophole to prevent avoidance, Tesco has taken advantage of ingenious schemes to get around it. Tesco still has 36 stores wrapped up in UK limited partnerships - with Cayman Islands registered partners - which were established in 2006 before the latest loophole was closed."[32] Stamp duty is a form of tax that is levied on documents. ... Jim Callaghan, the Chancellor of the Exchequer who introduced corporation tax in 1965. ...


Corporate social responsibility

Tesco has made a commitment to Corporate social responsibility, in the form of contributions of 1.87% in 2006 of its pre-tax profits to charities/local community organisations.[33] This compares favourably with Marks & Spencer's 1.51% but not well with Sainsbury's 7.02%. Will Hutton, in his role as chief executive of The Work Foundation recently praised Tesco for leading the debate on corporate responsibility.[34] However Intelligent Giving has criticised the company for directing all "staff giving" support to the company's Charity of the Year.[35] Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a concept whereby organizations consider the interests of society by taking responsibility for the impact of their activities on customers, employees, shareholders, communities and the environment in all aspects of their operations. ... Marks & Spencer (also M&S, Marks and Sparks and Marks) is a British retailer, with 760 stores in more than 30 countries around the world. ... This article is about the supermarket business. ... Craig is a British writer, weekly columnist (and former editor-in-chief) for The Observer in London and currently Chief Executive of The Work Foundation (formerly the Industrial Society). ... Intelligent Giving is a website for charity donors run by a small, not-for-profit company based in Bethnal Green, London. ...


In 1992 Tesco started a "computers for schools scheme", offering computers in return for schools and hospitals getting vouchers from people who shopped at Tesco. Till 2004, £92m of equipment went to these organisations. The scheme has been also implemented in Poland.BITC - Tesco Computers for Schools. Retrieved on 2006-01-19. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


UK operations

Stores

Tesco's UK stores are divided into five formats, differentiated by size and the range of products sold. these are shown below

Tesco Extra, Southport, England
Tesco Extra, Southport, England

The first Extra opened in 1997. The 100th store opened in the 2004/05 financial year (specifically opening 29 November 2004, located on the Newport Road in Stafford, Staffordshire). The number of these is now being increased by about 20 a year, mainly by conversions from the second category. For other uses, see Southport (disambiguation). ... In commerce, a hypermarket (from the French hypermarché) is a store which combines a supermarket and a department store. ... St. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ... , Wigan is a town in Greater Manchester, England. ... For other uses, see Grimsby (disambiguation). ... Bank Street Gardens, Galashiels ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Slough (pronounced ) is a town and unitary authority (Borough of Slough) in England. ... , Yeovil (pronounced ) is a town in south Somerset, England, on the A30 and A37. ... Baldock is a town in Hertfordshire, England where the River Ivel rises. ... For other meanings see Burnley (disambiguation) , Burnley is a large town in the borough of Burnley in Lancashire, England, with a population of about 73,021. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The largest store in England by floor space is Tesco Extra in Pitsea, near Basildon with floorspace of 11,600 m² (125,000 sq ft) and the largest in Scotland is the Port Glasgow store, which opened in July 2007 with a floorspace of 10,200 m² (110,000 sq ft).[36]. The largest in Wales is the Tesco Extra in Culverhouse Cross, Cardiff, 9,800 m² (105,000 sq ft) constructed in 2007.[37] Basildon (IPA, ) is a New Town located in south Essex, England at . It was designated as a New Town after World War II in 1948 to accommodate the London population overspill. ... Port Glasgow is a burgh in Inverclyde, Scotland on the River Clyde. ... Culverhouse Cross Culverhouse Cross (Welsh: Croes Cwrlwys) is suburban district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ...


Other large stores include Bar Hill Extra, Cleethorpes Extra, Newcastle upon Tyne Extra, Milton Keynes Extra and Stockton-on-Tees Extra which are all in the 11,000 m² (120,000 sq ft) range. Newer Tesco Extra stores are usually on two floors, with the ground floor for mainly food and the first floor for clothing, electronics and entertainment. Most Tesco Extra stores have a café. Bar Hill is a purpose-built village with a population of 4000 about 7 km northwest of Cambridge on the A14 road. ... For other uses, see Cleethorpes (disambiguation). ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... , Milton Keynes ( ; IPA ) is a large town in South East England, about 45 miles (75 km) north-west of London. ... Stockton-on-Tees is an industrial town and port on the River Tees in north-eastern England. ... Cafe redirects here. ...

  • Tesco superstores are standard large supermarkets, stocking groceries and a much smaller range of non-food goods than Extra stores. They are referred to as "superstores" for convenience, but this word does not appear on the shops. It is the "standard" Tesco format. Most are located in suburbs of cities or on the edges of large and medium-sized towns. The typical size is 2,900 m² (31,000 sq ft).[citation needed]
  • Tesco Metro stores are sized between Tesco superstores and Tesco Express stores. They are mainly located in city centres, the inner city and on the high streets of small towns such as Rowlands Gill and Nelson. Typical size is 1,100 m² (12,000 sq ft).[citation needed] The first Tesco Metro was opened in Covent Garden, London in 1992.
    Tesco Metro, Manchester, England on New Years Eve 2007
    Since then all Tesco branches that have a high street format including those which opened before the Covent Garden branch have been subsequently rebranded from Tesco to Tesco Metro probably to give an identity to the Tesco high street sub brand. The Tesco store in Devizes was the last store to finish rebranding, in September 2006. The store had not been renovated for over 20 years.
  • Tesco Express stores are neighbourhood convenience shops, stocking mainly food with an emphasis on higher-margin products (due to lack of economies of scale) alongside everyday essentials. They are found in busy city centre districts, small shopping precincts in residential areas, small towns and on Esso petrol station forecourts. There were 654 stores at 25 February 2006 year end, with a typical size of 190 m² (2,100 sq ft).[citation needed]
  • One Stop are the only category which does not include the word Tesco in its name. These are the very smallest stores. They were part of the T&S Stores business but, unlike many which have been converted to Tesco Express, these will keep their old name. However, some have Tesco Personal Finance branded cash machines. There are more than 500 of them. One Stop Stores also work on a different pricing and offers system to the other Tesco stores, and generally have later opening hours than all except the 24-hour Tesco stores. Typical size 125 m² (1,350 ft²).[citation needed]

In May 2005 Tesco announced a trial non-food only format in Manchester and Aberdeen,[38] and the first store opened in October 2005: Location within the British Isles Nelson is a town in Lancashire in north-west England with a population of around 30,000. ... Covent Garden is a district in London, located on the easternmost parts of the City of Westminster and the southwest corner of the London Borough of Camden. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... , Devizes is a town and civil parish in the English county of Wiltshire. ... This article is about the trade name. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Historic The first self service Tesco, which is in in St Albans Tesco PLC is a United Kingdom based international supermarket chain. ... Cash machine redirects here. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ...

  • Tesco Homeplus stores offer all of Tesco's ranges except food in warehouse-style units in retail parks. Tesco is trying this format because only 20% of its customers have access to a Tesco Extra, and the company is restricted in how many of its superstores it can convert into Extras and how quickly it can do so. Large units for non-food retailing are much more readily available. It plans to open at least three more Homeplus stores in 2006.[39] As of 2 October 2006 Homeplus remains a "trial" format and no decision has been taken on expansion beyond the three stores already open and two that will open shortly.[40] The Staines branch opened on 27 November 2006. The newest Homeplus branch opened in Bromborough on 26 March 2007.

This is not Tesco's first non-food only venture in the UK. Until the late 1990s/early 2000s there were several non-food Tesco stores around the country including Scarborough and Yate. Although not in a warehouse style format, the stores were located on high streets and shopping centres, they did stock similar items to Homeplus stores. In both cases this was because in another part of the shopping centre was a Tesco Superstore which stocked food items only. Home plus (홈플러스) is a South Korean/British discount store retail chain jointly operated by Samsung and Tesco with 57 branches throughout the country. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the French commune, see Stains. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


As of 24 February 2007, at the end of its 2006/07 financial year, Tesco's UK store portfolio was as follows. is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Format Number Total area (m²) Total area (sq ft) Mean area (m²) Mean area (sq ft) Percentage of space
Tesco Extra 147 952,441 10,252,000 6,479 69,741 36.89%
Tesco 433 1,227,434 13,212,000 2,834 30,512 47.55%
Tesco Metro 162 177,073 1,906,000 1,093 11,765 6.85%
Tesco Express 735 145,114 1,562,000 197 2,125 5.62%
One Stop 506 62,988 678,000 124 1,339 2.44%
Tesco Homeplus 5 16,258 175,000 3,251 35,000 0.62%
Total 1,988 2,581,310 27,785,000 1,298 13,976 100%

This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

Distribution

In common with most other large retailers, Tesco draws goods from suppliers into regional distribution centres, for preparation and onward delivery to stores. Tesco is extending this logistic practice to cover collection from suppliers (factory gate pricing) and the input to suppliers, in a drive to reduce costs and improve reliability.[41] RFID technology is taking an increasing role in the distribution process.[42] An EPC RFID tag used for Wal-Mart Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. ...


Road

In 2007 Tesco was facing national disruption to its distribution network after a dispute with drivers at its distribution depot in Livingston, Scotland.[43] In response to fears over increasing road congestion, fuel prices, and concern over its carbon footprint, Tesco is switching some of its supply chain to alternative modes, detailed below. , Livingston is the fourth post-war new town to be built in Scotland, designated in 1962. ...


Rail

Tesco has been transporting goods by rail since 2006 using its distribution partner Eddie Stobart Group.[44] Volumes are set to increase in 2007 with new routes.[45]


Canal

In October 2007 Tesco started using the Manchester Ship Canal to transport wine from Liverpool to a Manchester distribution facility. Combined with sea transport from the south coast where the wine was previously offloaded, this new mode replaces road journeys from the south coast to Manchester.[46] The canal at its Manchester end, looking towards Old Trafford. ...


Other Businesses

Garden Centres

Tesco announced its intention to purchase Dobbies Garden Centres for £155.6 million on 8 June 2007. Dobbies operates 21 garden centres, mainly in Scotland.[47] The deal was confirmed as successful by the board of directors of Tesco on 17 August 2007 when the board announced that they had received 53.1% of shares (or 5,410,457 shares) which confirmed conditions set out in the offer made on 20 June 2007. Although the deal had been confirmed by Tesco the offer remained open to Dobbies shareholders until 20 August 2007.[48] is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Tesco acquired Dobbies Garden Centres in September.[49]


Personal Finance

Tesco has a banking arm called Tesco Personal Finance, a 50:50 joint venture with the Royal Bank of Scotland. Products on offer include credit cards, loans, mortgages, savings accounts and several types of insurance, including car, home, life and travel. They are promoted by leaflets in Tesco's stores and through its website. The business made a profit of £130 million for the 52 weeks to 24 February 2007, of which Tesco's share was £66 million. Historic The first self service Tesco, which is in in St Albans Tesco PLC is a United Kingdom based international supermarket chain. ... A joint venture (often abbreviated JV) is an entity formed between two or more parties to undertake economic activity together. ... The Royal Bank of Scotland Plc (Scottish Gaelic: [1]) is one of the retail banking subsidiaries of Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc, which together with NatWest, provides branch banking facilities in the United Kingdom. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


This move towards the financial sector has diversified the Tesco brand and provides opportunities for growth outside of the retailing sector. For other uses, see Brand (disambiguation). ...


Tesco personal finance offers loans, car loans, instant access saving accounts, business credit card, bonus credit card (the credit card that pays you interest back), Clubcard credit card (where you can earn 1 point for every £4.00 spent on it) and mortgages. Tesco also offer insurance including travel insurance, pet insurance, car insurance, life insurance, home insurance and car breakdown cover in association with Green Flag. A key marketing strategy is Tesco offering Clubcard points or free petrol when you buy Tesco Car Insurance. The flagman waves the green flag at the start of the Aarons 499 at Talladega Superspeedway on April 6, 2003. ...


The company is currently trialling a finance centre in the Glasgow Silverburn Extra store providing free financial advice and quotes for insurance and loans, this service is staffed by trained Royal Bank of Scotland staff. The centre also has a Euro cash machine providing commission free Euros and a Bureau de Change run by Travelex. If successful this trial will roll out to a number of other key and flagship stores. The Silverburn centre is a new out of town shopping mall in Glasgow, Scotland. ... A bureau de change is an organisation or facility which allows customers to exchange one currency for another. ... Travelex plc is the worlds biggest foreign exchange company. ...


Telecoms

Tesco operates ISP, mobile phone, home phone and VoIP businesses. These are available to UK residential consumers and marketed via the Tesco website and through Tesco stores. IP Telephony, also called Internet telephony, is the technology that makes it possible to have a telephone conversation over the Internet or a dedicated Internet Protocol (IP) network instead of dedicated voice transmission lines. ...


Though it launched its ISP service in 1998, the firm did not get serious about telecoms until 2003. It has not purchased or built a telecoms network, but instead has pursued a strategy of pairing its marketing strength with the expertise of existing telcoms. In autumn 2003 Tesco Mobile was launched as a joint venture with O2, and Tesco Home Phone created in partnership with Cable & Wireless. In August 2004 Tesco broadband, an ADSL-based service delivered via BT phone lines, was launched in partnership with NTL. In January 2006, Tesco Internet Phone, a Voice over Internet Protocol, VoIP, service was launched in conjunction with Freshtel of Australia.[50] The O2 plc logo. ... Cable and Wireless (LSE: CW.) is a British telecommunications company. ... Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) is a form of DSL, a data communications technology that enables faster data transmission over copper telephone lines than a conventional modem can provide. ... BT Group plc (also known as British Telecommunications plc) which trades as BT (and previously as British Telecom) is the privatised UK state telecommunications operator. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Virgin Media, Telewest and Virgin. ... ...


Tesco announced in December 2004 that it has signed up 500,000 customers to its mobile service in the 12 months since launch. In December 2005, it announced it had one million customers using its mobile service. In April 2006 it announced that it had over one and a half million telecom accounts in total, including mobile, fixed line and broadband accounts. [3]PDF (374 KiB) “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...


On 19 December 2006 Tesco Ireland announced that it would enter into a joint venture with O2 Ireland to offer mobile telecommunications services.[51] The service, which will be Ireland's first MVNO, will use the O2 network but operate separately. It will be allocated the STD code 089. As with Tesco's similar service in the UK, it will be branded Tesco Mobile.[51] The network is due to start operating in Ireland on October 29, 2007. is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Fuel

Tesco supermarket petrol pump at night
Tesco supermarket petrol pump at night
See also: 2007 UK petrol contamination

Tesco first started selling petrol in 1974. Tesco sells 95, 97 and 99 RON (a fuel developed by Greenergy of which Tesco is a shareholder) petrol on a retail basis from forecourts at most superstore and Express locations. Tesco have recently diversified into biofuels, offering petrol-bioethanol and diesel-biodiesel blends instead of pure petrol and diesel at their petrol stations, and now offering Greenergy 100% biodiesel at many stores in the southeast of the United Kingdom. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 481 × 599 pixels Full resolution (1616 × 2014 pixel, file size: 419 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Night photograph of a petrol pump island at a filling station at a Tesco supermarket in Southport, England taken in February 2007 File history Legend... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 481 × 599 pixels Full resolution (1616 × 2014 pixel, file size: 419 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Night photograph of a petrol pump island at a filling station at a Tesco supermarket in Southport, England taken in February 2007 File history Legend... The 2007 UK petrol contamination problem arose on 28 February 2007 when motorists in South East England reported that their cars were breaking down. ... Gasoline, as it is known in North America, or petrol, in many Commonwealth countries (sometimes also called motor spirit) is a petroleum-derived liquid mixture consisting primarily of hydrocarbons, used as fuel in internal combustion engines. ... A gas station pump offering five different octane ratings. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Biofuel is any fuel that derives from biomass _ recently living organisms or their metabolic byproducts, such as manure from cows. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Tesco's own 99 Octane branded petrol as supplied by Greenergy has been the control fuel used by all the cars in the British Rally Championship since 2006. This partership will continue in 2008. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The British Rally Championship is a yearly rallying series based in Great Britain. ...


On 28 February 2007 motorists in South East England reported that their cars were breaking down. This was due to petrol sold by Tesco and others being contaminated with silicon,[52] the fuel coming from the Vopak terminal in the Thames Estuary, where fuel is supplied by Harvest Energy and Greenergy.[53][54] Then on 2 March 2007 Tesco announced that they were emptying and refilling tanks at 150 petrol stations but were not suspending sales.[55] is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Petrol redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Silicone. ... Royal Vopak is a Dutch company, that stores and handles various oil and natural gas-related products. ... The Thames Estuary is a large estuary where the River Thames flows into the North Sea. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Tesco has been criticised with claims that they had been alerted to the problem as early as 12 February 2007. Affected motorists are facing bills of several hundred pounds to repair their cars and, with up to 10,000 cars needing repair, the suppliers could be liable for compensation claims of up to £10 million.[56] However, on 6 March, Tesco offered to pay for any damage caused by the faulty petrol, after printing full page apologies in many national newspapers.[57] is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Tesco Clubcard

Main article: Tesco Clubcard

Of the major supermarkets in the UK, only Tesco and Sainsbury's offer a loyalty card-scheme to customers. Tesco's Clubcard scheme has been operating since 1995 and has now become the largest loyalty card in the UK, with around 13 million active Clubcard holders.[citation needed] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Customers can collect one Clubcard point for every £1 (or €1 in Ireland) they spend in a Tesco store, Tesco Petrol or Tesco.com. Customers can also collect points by paying with a Tesco Credit Card, or by using Tesco Mobile, Tesco Homephone, Tesco Broadband, selected Tesco Personal Finance products or through Clubcard partners, Powergen and Avis. Each point equates to 1p in store when redeemed or 4p when used with clubcard deals (offers for holidays, day trips, etc). Clubcard points can also be converted to Airmiles. Powergen was an electric generating company in the United Kingdom. ... Avis Rent A Car System, LLC is a car rental company headquartered in Parsippany, New Jersey USA. Avis, Budget Rent a Car and Budget Truck Rental are all units of Avis Budget Group. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with loyalty program. ...


Holders receive quarterly Clubcard statements offering discount coupons which can be spent in-store, online or on various Clubcard deals.


Tesco was cited in a Wall Street Journal article[58] as using the intelligence from the Clubcard to thwart Wal-Mart's initiatives in the UK.


Internet operations

Main article: Tesco.com

Tesco operates the world's largest grocery homeshopping service[citation needed], as well as providing consumer goods, telecommunications and financial services online. Tesco. ...


Tesco has operated on the internet since 1994 and was the first retailer in the world to offer a robust home shopping service in 1996. Tesco.com was formally launched in 2000. It also has online operations in the Republic of Ireland and South Korea. Grocery sales are available within delivery range of selected stores, goods being hand-picked within each store, in contrast to the warehouse model followed by Ocado. This model, which is now used by Sainsbury's, allows rapid expansion with limited investment, but has been criticised for a high level of substitutions[citation needed]. Nevertheless, it has been popular and is the largest online grocery service in the world. In 2003, tesco.com's CEO at the time, John Browett, received the Wharton Infosys Business Transformation Award for the innovative processes he used to support this online grocery service. An Ocado delivery in progress Ocado is the first new brand in grocery retailing in the UK for a generation. ... This article is about the supermarket business. ... In 2002, the Wharton Business School of the University of Pennsylvania and Infosys started the Wharton Infosys Business Transformation Award. ...


On 1 October 2006, Tesco announced that it will be selling six own-brand budget software packages for under £20 each, including office and security suites, in a partnership with software firm Formjet.[59] As Formjet is exclusive distributor for Panda Software and Ability Plus Software, packages from these companies are likely to feature. is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Formjet plc is a UK software vendor, specialising in exclusively distributing and marketing software that is alternative to the mainstream. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ability Plus Software is a global software company, the producer of several low-cost yet full-featured applications. ...


High-tech services

Tesco offers broadband services.


The company also has a digital photo shop that offers products such as, mugs, shirts, celebration cakes and table mats. The service is powered by Pixology.


Tesco offer an internet-based DVD rental service, which is operated by LOVEFiLM . Music downloads are also available. Front of a LOVEFiLM envelope Back of a LOVEFiLM envelope LOVEFiLM is a British DVD rental company which provides the worst service for online DVD rentals, console game rental and film downloads in the UK, Germany and Scandinavia. ...


International operations

Tesco's international expansion strategy has responded to the need to be sensitive to local expectations in other countries by entering into joint ventures with local partners, such as Samsung Group in South Korea (Samsung-Tesco Home plus), and Charoen Pokphand in Thailand (Tesco Lotus), appointing a very high proportion of local personnel to management positions. It also makes small acquisitions as part of its strategy for example, in its 2005/2006 financial year it made acquisitions in South Korea, one in Poland and one in Japan.[60] The Samsung Group (Korean: 삼성그룹, Samseong Geurup) is South Koreas largest conglomerate (chaebol) and one of the largest super-multinationals in the world leading several major global industries. ... Home plus (홈플러스) is a South Korean discount store retail chain jointly operated by Samsung and Tesco with 57 branches throughout the country. ... Home plus (홈플러스) is a South Korean discount store retail chain jointly operated by Samsung and Tesco with 57 branches throughout the country. ... Charoen Pokphand is a huge business group based in Thailand. ... Tesco Lotus logo Tesco Lotus is a hypermarket chain in Thailand. ...


In late 2004 the amount of floorspace Tesco operated outside the United Kingdom surpassed the amount it had in its home market for the first time, although the United Kingdom still accounted for more than 75% of group revenue due to lower sales per unit area outside the UK. Tesco regularly makes small acquisitions to expand its international businesses.


In September 2005 Tesco announced that it was selling its operations in Taiwan to Carrefour and purchasing Carrefour's stores in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Both companies stated that they were concentrating their efforts in countries where they had strong market positions.


China

Tesco entered China by acquiring a 50% stake in the Hymall chain from Ting Hsin of Taiwan in September 2004. In December 2006 it raised its stake to 90% in a £180 million deal.[61] Most of Tesco China's stores are based around Shanghai, but according to Tesco it plans to equip the business to expand more quickly and in different areas. Tesco has been increasing its own brand products into the Chinese market as well as introducing the Tesco Express format.[62]


Czech Republic

A Tesco store in Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
A Tesco store in Hradec Králové, Czech Republic

Tesco opened its first store in the Czech Republic in 1996 and now has over 84 stores, with further planned.[63] Tesco opened its first stores in the Czech Republic by buying US corporation Kmart's operations in the country and converting them into Tesco stores. Tesco is also keen to expand non-food items and has already opened petrol stations and offers personal finance services in the Czech Republic.[64] Hradec Králové (help· info) (German: Königgrätz) is a city of the Czech Republic, in the Hradec Králové Region of Bohemia. ...


Hungary

Tesco launched in Hungary in 1994 after purchasing KMart's operations in the area. It also opened it's first hypermarket in Hungary in the same year. Tesco operates through 101 stores in Hungary with further openings planned.[65] Tesco offers its value, standard, healthy living and finest range in it's stores. Tesco Hungary also offers a clothing line and personal finance services.[66]


Ireland

Tesco entered the Irish market in 1997 after the purchase of Power Supermarkets Ltd. It now operates from 101 stores across Ireland. It, like Tesco UK offers a home delivery shopping service available to 80% of the Irish population as well as petrol, mobile telephone, personal finance, flower delivery service and a weight-loss programme.[67] Also available is Tesco's loyalty programme, the Clubcard.


Tesco is now the grocery market leader in the Republic of Ireland, with a reported November 2005 share of 26.3%.[68] Tesco Ireland also claims to be the largest purchaser of Irish food with an estimated €1.5 billion annually.[69]


Japan

Tesco Japan first began operations in 2003. It was bought about by a buy-out of C Two stores for £139 million in July 2003 and later Fre'c in April 2004.[70] Tesco has adopted an approach which focuses on small corner shops operating similarly to its Express format rather than opening hypermarkets. It has also launched its range of software in Japan.[71]


Malaysia

Tesco opened its first store in Malaysia in May 2002. Tesco partnered with local conglomerate Sime Darby Berhad which holds 30% of the shares.[72] Tesco also acquired Makro, a local wholesaler which was rebranded Tesco Extra and provides products for local retailers. Tesco Malaysia offers a value range, own branded range, electronic goods, the loyalty clubcard and clothing.


Poland

A Tesco Hypermarket in Prokocim, Poland
A Tesco Hypermarket in Prokocim, Poland

Tesco entered the Polish market in 1995. It currently operates from 280 stores and has plans to open even more.[73] Tesco Poland offers the value, healthy living and own branded line of products as well as regional produce, petrol, personal finance services and on-line photo processing. Tesco Poland is keen to promote it's green credentials.[74] A photograph (often just called a photo) is an image (or a representation of that on e. ...


Slovakia

Tesco Slovakia opened in 1996 as part of Tesco's international expansion aims. It now operates from 48 stores and has plans to introduce Tesco Express like local stores.[75] Tesco Slovakia has recently put great emphasis on organic products. However, Tesco Slovakia caused controversy amongst the Slovak government when it was found to have come foul of food safety laws in 2006.[76]


South Korea

Tesco launched its South Korean operations in 1999 and partnered with Samsung, Tesco holds 81% of the shares in the venture.[77] It operates both hypermarkets and its express format as well as a home delivery shopping service. It is the largest foreign food retailer in South Korea, although significantly behind its local rivals such as Lotte, and Shinsegae Group.[78] For Korea as a whole, see Korea. ... Samsung Group is one of the largest South Korean business groupings. ... Lotte Group is a large international conglomerate (see jaebeol) founded in June 1948 in Tokyo, Japan by Shin Kyuk-Ho (신격호, 辛格浩), a South Korean national living in South Korea (odd months) and Japan (even months) who is alternatively known by his Japanese name Shigemitsu Takeo (重光 武雄). After the normalization of diplomatic relations... Shinsegae(신세계) is a South Korean department store franchise, along with several other businesses, headquartering in Seoul, South Korea. ...


Thailand

A Tesco Lotus store in Nakhon Sakon, Thailand
A Tesco Lotus store in Nakhon Sakon, Thailand
Main article: Tesco Lotus

Tesco entered Thailand in 1998 and operates through 380 stores as part of a joint venture with Charoen Pokphand and named the operation Tesco Lotus. This partnership was dissolved in 2003 when Charoen Pokphand sold its shares to Tesco. Tesco Lotus sells a diverse range of products from value food products to electronics to personal finance services. The company is keen to promote its green values and has partnered with the UNEP. Tesco Lotus claims to serve 20 million customers every month and that 97% of its goods are sourced from Thailand.[79] Tesco Lotus logo Tesco Lotus is a hypermarket chain in Thailand. ... Tesco Lotus logo Tesco Lotus is a hypermarket chain in Thailand. ... Charoen Pokphand is a huge business group based in Thailand. ... Klaus Töpfer, former UNEP Exec. ...


Turkey

Tesco entered Turkey in 2003 and uses the trading name "Kipa". Tesco remains focused on building infrastructure in Turkey to complete its expansion plans and has already introduced the Tesco Express format into Turkey. There are plans to increase the rate of expansion as basic infrastructure is built.[80]


United States

Main article: Fresh & Easy

In February 2006, Tesco announced its intention to move into the United States market, opening a chain of convenience stores on the West Coast (Arizona, California and Nevada) in 2007 named Fresh & Easy.[81] The company established its U.S. headquarters in El Segundo, California at 2120 Park Place. The first store opened in November 2007 with 100 more expected in the first year. They plan to open a new one every two-and-a-half days in America, to mimic the successful expansion of pharmacy chains such as Walgreens in the U.S. fresh&easy or fresh & easy Neighborhood Market is a chain of grocery stores on the US West Coast. ... Summerlin is a 23,400 acre (94. ... fresh&easy or fresh & easy Neighborhood Market is a chain of grocery stores on the US West Coast. ... fresh&easy or fresh & easy Neighborhood Market is a chain of grocery stores on the US West Coast. ... Walgreen Co. ...


The first Tesco Fresh & Easy Neighbourhood Markets opened in Hemet (Riverside County), Anaheim (Orange County), Arcadia (Los Angeles County), West Covina (Los Angeles County) and Upland (San Bernardino County), California in 2007. Hemet is a city in Riverside County, California, United States. ... Riverside County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of California, stretching from Orange County to the Colorado River, which is the border with Arizona. ... Anaheim redirects here. ... Cities in Orange County Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. ... Arcadia is a U.S. city in Los Angeles County, California that is located about 13 miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles in the San Gabriel Valley, at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains. ... Los Angeles County is a county in California and is by far the most populous county in the United States. ... Location of West Covina in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated February 17, 1923 Government  - Mayor Pro Tem Sherri Lane Area  - City  16. ... Los Angeles County is a county in California and is by far the most populous county in the United States. ... Nickname: Location within San Bernardino County in the state of California Coordinates: , State California County San Bernardino County Government  - Mayor John V. Pomierski Area  - City 39. ... San Bernardino County is the largest county in the contiguous United States by area, containing more land than each of nine states. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Non-UK store summary

The following table shows the number of stores, total store size in area and sales for Tesco's international operations. The store numbers and floor area figures are as at 24 February 2007 but the turnover figures are for the year ended 31 December 2005, except for the Republic of Ireland data, which is at 24 February 2007, like the UK figures. This information is taken from the 2007 final broker packPDF (94.2 KiB). is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...

Country Entered Stores Area (m²) Area (sq ft) Turnover (£ million)
Flag of the People's Republic of China People's Republic of China 2004 47 392,422 4,224,000 552
Flag of the Czech Republic Czech Republic 1996 84 381,459 4,106,000 807
Flag of France France 1992 1 1,400 16,000 Note 2
Flag of Hungary Hungary 1994 101 448,164 4,824,000 1,180
Flag of Ireland Republic of Ireland 1997 95 205,780 2,215,000 1,683
Flag of Japan Japan 2003 109 29,078 313,000 287
Flag of Malaysia Malaysia 2002 19 174,750 1,881,000 247
Flag of Poland Poland 1995 280 606,935 6,533,000 1,135
Flag of Slovakia Slovakia 1996 48 225,475 2,427,000 498
Flag of South Korea South Korea 1999 81 473,340 5,095,000 2,557
Flag of Thailand Thailand 1998 370 698,166 7,515,000 1,326
Flag of Turkey Turkey 2003 30 102,936 1,108,000 256 Note 4
Flag of the United States United States of America 2007 60 18,288 (est.) 60,000 (est.) Unknown
Total 1325 3,759,576 40,317,000 10,528 (exc USA)

Note 1: The business in China was a joint venture at February 2006 (now a 90% owned subsidiary; see above) and its turnover is not reported in Tesco's 2006 brokers' pack. This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malaysia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized...


Note 2: Tesco owned a French chain called Catteau between 1992 and 1997. Its existing single store in France is a wine warehouse in Calais, which opened in 1995 and is targeted at British day trippers. Wine is much cheaper in France than in the UK because the duty is far lower. Turnover is not reported separately. Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ...


Note 3: Tesco Stores (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd was incepted on 29 November 2001, as a strategic alliance with local conglomerate, Sime Darby Bhd of which the latter holds 30% of total shares. On 31 January 2007, Tesco Stores (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd's CEO Chris Bush announced in a letter published on Makro Cash & Carry (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd's website that it was purchasing Makro and converting and refurbishing all its stores to a new format called Tesco 'Extra'. [4] It is not known whether the format will be similar to Tesco UK's format. is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... In 1910, William Middleton Sime, a Scottish gentleman, and Henry Darby, an English gentleman, teamed up to form a company to manage 500 acres (2 km²) of rubber estates in the state of Malacca. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... A typical Makro warehouse in the UK Makro is a chain of self-service wholesale stores, so called cash and carrys. ...


Note 4: Tesco Stores in Turkey are known as Kipa.


Financial performance

Tesco is listed on the London Stock Exchange under the symbol TSCO. It also has a secondary listing on the Irish Stock Exchange with the name TESCO PLC. The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... The Irish Stock Exchange (ISE) is Irelands stock exchange and can trace its history to 1793. ...


All figures below are for the Tesco's financial years, which run for 52 or 53 week periods to late February. Up to the 27 February 2007 period end the numbers include non-UK and Ireland results for the calendar year ended on 31 December 2006 in the accounting year. The figures in the table below include 52 weeks/12 months of turnover for both sides of the business as this provides the best comparative. Including 60 weeks of non-UK and Ireland sales the figures to 24 February 2007 were: revenue £46,600 million; profit before tax £2,653 million; profit for year £2,478 million; basic earnings per share 22.36 pence.[82] is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Group revenue for the 26 weeks to 26 August 2006 was £20,735 million, compared to £17,170 million in the 24 week interin period reported in 2005. On a comparable 26 week basis group sales increased by 12.7% and group profit increased by 10.3%.[83] is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

52/3 weeks ended Turnover (£m) Profit before tax (£m) Profit for year (£m) Basic earnings per share (p)
24 February 2007 46,600 2,653 1,899 22.36
25 February 2006 38,300 2,210 1,576 19.70
26 February 2005 33,974 1,962 1,366 17.44
28 February 2004 30,814 1,600 1,100 15.05
22 February 2003 26,337 1,361 946 13.54
23 February 2002 23,653 1,201 830 12.05
24 February 2001 20,988 1,054 767 11.29
26 February 2000 18,796 933 674 10.07
27 February 1999 17,158 842 606 9.14
28 February 1998 16,452 760 532 8.12

As of its 2006 year end Tesco was the fourth largest retailer in the world behind Wal-Mart, Carrefour and Home Depot. Tesco moved ahead of Home Depot during 2007, following the sale of Home Depot's professional supply division and a decline in the value of the U.S. dollar against the British Pound. METRO was only just behind and might move ahead again if the euro strengthens against the pound, but METRO's sales include many billions of wholesale turnover, and its retail turnover is much less than Tesco's. Earnings per share (EPS) are the earnings returned on the initial investment amount. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... METRO AG Logo METRO AG is a diversified retail and wholesale/cash and carry group based in Germany. ... Wholesaling consists of the sale of goods/merchandise to retailers, to industrial, commercial, institutional, or other professional business users or to other wholesalers and related subordinated services. ...


At 24 February 2007 Tesco operated 1,988 stores in the UK (2.581 million m², 27.7 million square feet) and 1,275 outside the UK (3.75 million m², 40.4 million square feet). is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


The company has a total market value of about £36,761.71m (April 2007).[84] Tesco is the largest private sector employer in the UK and second to the NHS overall.[85]


UK market share

Graph Showing Market Share of Tesco
Graph Showing Market Share of Tesco

According to TNS Worldpanel, Tesco's share of the UK grocery market in the 12 weeks to 20 May 2007 was 31.32%, down 0.03% on 12 weeks to 22 April 2007. Across all categories, over £1 in every £7 (14.3%) of UK retail sales is spent at Tesco. Tesco also operates overseas, and non-UK revenue for the year to 24 February 2007 was up 18% on 25 February 2006 Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... TNS Worldpanel is a division of the United Kingdom based global market information group TNS, which analyses the British grocery sector. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Tesco litigation

Tesco has been involved in the following cases, in the areas of employment law, personal injury, intellectual property disputes, taxation and more. Employment law is the branch of the law that deals with employment related issues. ... A personal injury occurs when a person has suffered some form of injury, either physical or psychological, as the result of an accident. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ...

Employment
  • Tesco Stores Ltd v Othman-Khalid (Unreported, 10 September 2001), Mr Othman-Khalid was dismissed from a Tesco petrol station. CCTV camera had shown him serving himself, playing video games on shift and taking a pack of ten cigarettes that was damaged stock and meant to be returned to the manufacturer. At a disciplinary he lied saying that he had sold the cigarettes to a customer. He claimed that the dismissal was unfair, and the tribunal agreed, because it said too much weight was given to the little pinching of the cigarettes over other factors of his job performance. The tribunal allowed the claim, but reduced his damages by 10% for contributory fault. But on appeal, Underhill QC found for Tesco that dismissal for theft, however small, was within the "reasonable range of responses" of an employer, under s.98(4) of the Employment Rights Act 1996.
  • Tesco Stores Ltd v Wilson (No.2) (aka, Abrahams v Wilson) (Unreported, 12 January 2000), Mr Wilson was an Afro-Caribbean rastafarian who worked for Barkland Cleaning Ltd, as a cleaner contracted to Tesco's site in Mereway, Northampton. Mr Abrahams, one of Tesco' security guards, was on duty in plain clothes. When Mr Wilson drove into the carpark, Mr Abrahams knocked on his window and told him to get out so he could search the car. When Mr Wilson refused, he said "you lot think you can get away with anything" and went and filed a report. Then Mr Wilson was dismissed. He claimed this was unfair, because it was discrimination under the Race Relations Act 1976. He won £5000 damages. Tesco appealed, but lost again. Judge Peter Clark held that "you lot" was certainly intended to refer to race, and that the whole defence of Tesco was meant to depict Mr Wilson as violent and dishonest. This justified an aggravated damages award.
  • Tesco Group of Companies (Holdings) v Hill [1977] I.R.L.R. 63, a checkout lady did not ring up 18 items worth £7 in one customer's purchase. Tesco started an investigation. She said she felt ill. Tesco called the police. They dismissed her. The Employment Appeal Tribunal held that the dismissal was unfair because she was given no opportunity to state her case when she was in a fit state.
  • Johnson v Tesco Stores [1976] I.R.L.R. 103, an old case under old law, the employment tribunal found Tesco to have unfairly dismissed Mr Johnson. He had wrongly stated on his application that he had a certain job between 1967 and 1973, when he had not. 18 months later Tesco found out, and they said this was the reason for dismissal. Under the Trade Union and Labour Relations Act 1974 Sch.1, para.6, which refers to conduct during and not prior to employment, conduct prior to the start of the contract could not make the contract itself void. So Tesco was found to have dismissed Mr Johnson unfairly.
Personal injury and safety
  • Amanda Hardy v Tesco Stores Plc [2006] EWHC 3091, Judge Seymour QC dismissed a claim by Mrs Hardy that she got a back injury while trying to lift some heavy bottles from the conveyor belt at the checkout. It was found her evidence was unreliable.
  • Tesco Stores Ltd v Pollard [2006] EWCA Civ 393, a 13 month old child fell ill when it ate some washing powder from a product that had a faulty child resistant cap. It was bought from Tesco, but manufactured by another company. When bringing proceedings against Tesco and the manufacturer, Tesco joined the mother for negligence in not properly looking after the child. The Court of Appeal found Tesco and the manufacturer alone liable under the Consumer Protection Act 1987.
  • W (A Child) v Tesco Stores Ltd [2005] C.L.Y. 3097, in the St Albans County Court, a 10 year old girl won £1600 worth of damages for a nasty injury to her ear five years before. She had slipped in the supermarket.
  • Tesco Stores Ltd v Harrow LBC [2003] EWHC 2919, in the Harrow store, a customer found a piece of wire in a bap. The local council was found to be entitled to fine Tesco under the Food Safety Act 1990 s.8.
  • Collins v Tesco Stores Ltd [2003] EWCA Civ 1308, the Court of Appeal (Pill LJ giving the lead judgment) agreed that Mrs Jan Collins' claim for some £24,000 for a workplace injury was statute barred. Because she had not brought the claim within 3 years of knowing the injury to be significant she was too late.
  • Sutton v Tesco Stores Plc (Unreported, 30 July 2002) Mrs Sutton, who was a nurse and was pregnant, slipped on a squashed tomato at the store. She won £7500 in general damages for her anxiety about the baby (who was born prematurely) and painful injury to her wrist.
  • Harvey v Tesco Plc [2002] 6 Q.R. 11, Mrs Harvey at age 73 slipped on the floor in Tesco and fell, injuring her hand. She had to have a plaster cast, and because of swelling her wedding ring needed to be cut off. She received £4000 in damages.
  • K (A Child) v Tesco Stores Ltd [2000] C.L.Y. 1670, in the Uxbridge Crown Court a seven year old won £500 damages for minor injuries at the Tesco store. An automatic door had failed to open and the child got bruising for a week, and felt quite ill the next day with a bad bump to the head.
  • Jacob v Tesco Stores Plc (Unreported, 19 November 1998), the Court of Appeal (Henry LJ and Clarke J) held that Mrs Jacob, a Tesco employee, was entitled to damages after a heavy fall probably from a water puddle in the store. Mrs Jacob had hurried to answer a colleague's query, and stepped in a water puddle. She quickly told someone that they should get a cleaner, hurried on 25 paces and fell. Tesco argued that the judge had not applied the leading case, Ward v Tesco Stores Ltd [1976] 1 W.L.R. 810 properly, which uses the res ipsa loquitur doctrine (i.e. if it was not the puddle, how else could it have happened). Tesco argued that there was no way the puddle could have made her slip 25 paces later, but their argument was dismissed because they could not come up with a better explanation.
  • Peach v Tesco Stores Plc [1998] C.L.Y. 1665, Mrs Peach, 65, slipped on a mangetout (a pea pod) in the store and really hurt her hip badly. She had to have surgery. She recovered after 3 months but she developed deep vein thrombosis. She got £10,000 in compensation.
  • Watford (A Minor) v Tesco Stores Ltd [1998] C.L.Y. 1672, in the Uxbridge County Court, a little boy, aged 2 at the time of the accident, won £3850 after he slipped on some crisps. He fractured bones in his leg, and it took him three months before he fully recovered.
  • Kitching v Tesco Stores [1995] C.L.Y. 1731, Miss Kitching was a checkout lady, aged 22. She injured her wrist badly when she tried to stop some soft drinks falling on her. She won £5500 for this injury in the course of employment, because experienced, possibly permanently, pain up her arm and she was hindered in her hobbies of swimming and writing to pen-pals.
Commercial cases
  • Tesco Stores Ltd v Elogicom Ltd [2006] EWHC 403, Tesco won a passing off action against misuse of its internet domain name
  • Weight Watchers UK Ltd v Tesco Stores Ltd [2003] EWHC 1109, Tesco fended off an action from Weight Watchers, that it using the word "points" for the fat and calorie content in its products was passing off Weight Watcher's name for its own scheme.
  • Tesco Plc v Customs and Excise Commissioners [2003] EWCA Civ 1367, the Court of Appeal dismissed the claim by Tesco that it did not have to pay any VAT for transactions through its loyalty card scheme.
  • Tesco Stores Ltd v Pook [2003] EWHC 823; [2004] I.R.L.R. 618, Mr Pook was a senior employee who got a computer company called Delta to pay his own company a "consultancy fee" (i.e. a bribe) to make sure Delta did not lose a supply contract with Tesco. Mr Pook was already serving 3 years jail for theft, and this action was for Tesco to get back that bribe money. It succeeded, because it was held that Mr Pook was in breach of trust through his conflict of interest. Moreover there was an implied term that Mr Pook would not be allowed to exercise his rights under the company ESOP, until he had paid all he owed.
  • Tesco Supermarkets Ltd v Nattrass [1972] A.C. 153; [1971] 2 W.L.R. 1166; [1971] 2 All E.R. 127, an important case on corporate liability Tesco was found to not be in breach of the Trade Descriptions Act 1968 s.24. This requires that advertisements cannot be misleading, which is a criminal offence. A Tesco store manager (they had 800 odd stores at this time) failed to take down a poster advertising special offers on washing powder. A customer was charged a higher price than on the poster. But it was held that Tesco itself was not guilty of an offence, because the store manager did not represent the "controlling mind" of the corporation. The company's directors had used all diligence necessary to comply with its duties under the Act.
  • Tesco Stores Ltd v Secretary of State for the Environment [1995] 1 W.L.R. 759; [1995] 2 All E.R. 636, deals with the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, where Tesco wanted to build a superstore outside Oxford.
  • Kayser Bondor v Tesco Stores (Times, January 25, 1962) Tesco's first reported case, it won an injunction against a retailer to whom it sold goods. Tesco required that the prices sold would not be lower than a certain minimum (resale price maintenance). Granting the injunction, Cross J held that no matter how much Kayser disliked the terms, it was not compelled to enter the contract. If it did it would have to abide by the terms, unless it could convince Parliament to legislate against the practice (see now, Competition Act 1998)

is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Unfair dismissal is the term used to describe an employers action when terminating an employees contract unfairly. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Rasta hairstyle Rastafarianism is a religious movement that believes in the divinity of ex Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie. ... Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in the English East Midlands region. ... The Race Relations Act 1976 was established by the British Parliament to prevent discrimination on the grounds of race. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For other places with the same name, see Uxbridge (disambiguation). ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Res ipsa loquitur is a legal term from the Latin meaning literally, The thing itself speaks but is more often translated The thing speaks for itself. The doctrine is applied to tort claims which, as a matter of law, do not have to be explained beyond the obvious facts. ... Binomial name Pisum sativum A pea (Pisum sativum) is the small, edible round green seed which grows in a pod on a leguminous vine, hence why it is called a legume. ... This article is about Deep-vein thrombosis. ... For other places with the same name, see Uxbridge (disambiguation). ... Passing off is a common law tort which can be used to enforce unregistered trademark rights. ... Passing off is a common law tort which can be used to enforce unregistered trademark rights. ... Employee-owned corporations are generally a model of ownership of a corporation where the corporation is owned in part or whole by the employees who work for it. ... Tesco Supermarkets v Nattrass [1972] AC 153 is a leading decision of the House of Lords on the directing mind theory of corporate liability. ... In the criminal law, corporate liability determines the extent to which a corporation as a fictitious person can be liable for the acts and omissions of the natural persons it employs. ... The Trade Descriptions Act 1968 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which prevents manufacturers, retailers or service industry providers from misleading consumers as to what they are spending their money on. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Resale price maintenance is the practice whereby a manufacturer requires distributors of their product to sell at certain prices, or set a minimum price. ... The Competition Act 1998 banned public schools from fee-fixing in the United Kingdom, which they had previously been allowed to do. ...

Criticism

Main article: Criticism of Tesco

In Thailand, Tesco has been criticised for aggressively pursuing critics of the company. Writer and former MP [Jit Siratranont] is facing up to two years in jail and a £16.4m libel damages claim for saying that Tesco was expanding aggressively at the expense of small local retailers. Tesco served him with writs for criminal defamation and civil libel.[86] Criticism of Tesco includes disapproval of the effects supermarket chains can have on farmers, suppliers and smaller competitors. ...


Criticism of Tesco includes allegations of stifling competition due to its undeveloped "land bank",[87] pugilistically aggressive new store development without real consideration of the wishes, needs and consequences to local communities,[88] using cheap and/or child labour,[89][90] opposition to its move into the convenience sector[91] and breaching planning laws.[92]


A recent criticism from 2007 occurred when Tesco failed to deliver groceries via online shopping to a university campus in Sussex, offering no refund or apology. This sparked a local backlash from many customers who had similar dissatisfying experiences with Tesco's online delivery service.[93]


In Thailand Alexander Winstone was arrested for threatening to inject HIV infected blood into Tesco beef steaks because Tesco refused to stop poisoning stray dogs that ventured into its carparks in Thailand.[94]


In 2003 a major controversy erupted when a Tesco worker was arrested for using industrial floor cleaner to poison Twix products in a Bangkok branch of Tesco. A British national was one of the victims.[95]


Despite practising a 'One in front' policy, in December 2006 The Grocer magazine published a study which named Tesco as having the slowest checkouts of the six major supermarkets. Somerfield had the shortest queues with an average wait of 4 min 23 seconds. In order of least time spent at the checkout, the other major supermarkets were Waitrose, Sainsbury's, Asda, Morrisons and Tesco.[96] The Grocer is a British magazine devoted to grocery sales. ...


The Grocer also named ASDA as the cheapest UK supermarket (based on 33 items). Tesco was second and Sainsbury's and Morrisons joint third.[96] Tesco price check tends to differ saying out of 7134 (compared to ASDA) products, (Survey carried out between 09 July 2007 and 11 July 2007) Tesco is cheaper:1835 (compared to 1251 the previous week), Tesco is more expensive:975 (compared to 984 the previous week) and Tesco is the same price: 4324 (compared to 4996 the previous week).[97] July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Tesco received criticism for bureaucratic and inflexible parking systems in its Bloomfield store in Dublin, Ireland. [98] For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Tesco in popular culture

  • Tesco is mentioned on Lily Allen's 2006 song "LDN" - 'She Was Struggling With Bags From Tesco'
  • The 1990s UK indie band Senseless Things entitled one of their songs Fishing at Tesco's.
  • The six episode television mockumentary Time Trumpet, which was set as a look back at the past thirty years from the year 2031, included a section about Tesco's invasion of Denmark, turning it into the world's first 'retail country'.
  • Tesco is mentioned in The Pogues song "Rain Street" - 'There's a Tesco on the sacred ground/Where I pulled her knickers down'

Aisle of Plenty is the final song on the 1973 Genesis album Selling England by the Pound. It is not so much its own song as a reprise of the eight-minute opening number Dancing with the Moonlit Knight. The acoustic line that opens the song is repeated several times... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... Alternate covers L. Wells cover The Fallen and L. Wells are songs by Scottish alternative rock band Franz Ferdinand. ... You Could Have It So Much Better is the second album by Scottish indie rock band Franz Ferdinand, released 3 October 2005 in the United Kingdom (see 2005 in British music). ... Franz Ferdinand are an award winning rock band, from Glasgow, Scotland. ... Lily Rose Beatrice Allen (born May 2, 1985) is a British singer-songwriter best known for songs such as Smile and LDN. She is the daughter of actor/musician Keith Allen and film producer Alison Owen. ... Alternate covers Original Vinyl Cover LDN is a single by Lily Allen which was released in the UK on 25 September 2006. ... The Senseless Things were a successful indie punk band who were popular in the UK in the early 1990s. ... Mockumentary (also known as a pseudo-documentary)[1], a portmanteau of mock and documentary, is a film and TV genre, or a single work of the genre. ... Time Trumpet is an announced upcoming television comedy series to air on BBC2 in Spring 2006. ... An invasion is a military action consisting of armed forces of one geopolitical entity entering territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of conquering territory, or altering the established government. ... The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company, better known as A&P, is a United States and Canada. ... The Spice Girls are a girl pop group formed in 1994, consisting of Geri Halliwell, Victoria Beckham, Melanie Brown, Emma Bunton and Melanie Chisholm. ... The Waitresses were an experimental New Wave band from Kent, Ohio,[1] United States. ... Christmas Wrapping (sometimes misspelled as Christmas Wrappings) is a Christmas song performed in 1981 by The Waitresses and later covered by the Spice Girls. ... The Pogues are a band of mixed Irish and English background, playing traditional Irish folk with influences from the English punk rock movement. ...

Further reading

  1. Simms, Andrew (2007). Tescopoly: how one shop came out on top and why it matters. London: Constable. ISBN 1845295110. 
  2. Humby, Clive; Hunt, Terry & Phillips, Tim (2006). Scoring points : how Tesco continues to win customer loyalty. London & Philadelphia: Kogan Page. ISBN 9780749447526. 
  3. Nash, Bethany (2006). Fair-Trade and the growth of ethical consumerism within the mainstream : an investigation into the Tesco consumer. Leeds: University of Leeds. ISBN 75272130. 

See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... TNS Worldpanel is a division of the United Kingdom based global market information group TNS, which analyses the British grocery sector. ... Tescopoly (a portmanteau term derived from the name of the supermarket Tesco and the term monopoly) is a campaign run by United Kingdom environmental campaign groups, aimed at tackling the environmental and social impacts of the power of British supermarket chains. ...

References

  1. ^ tescocorporate.comPDF (898 KiB)
  2. ^ 2008 Global Powers of Retail report. Deloitte. Retrieved on 2008-03-10.
  3. ^ Tesco DVD Rental. Tesco. Retrieved on 2006-07-27.
  4. ^ Our history. Tesco plc. Retrieved on 2006-11-10. “The name comes from the initials of TE Stockwell, who was a partner in the firm of tea suppliers, and CO from Jack's surname”
  5. ^ a b Tesco: Our History. www.tescocorporate.com. Tesco plc. Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
  6. ^ Tesco Plc: Overview. Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  7. ^ TESCO in 2003. ICFAI. Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
  8. ^ Seminar Papers 2004 (PDF). LSE. Retrieved on 2006-12-23.
  9. ^ a b Hoggan, Karen. "Tesco Tycoon: Interview with Tesco's fortunes chairman Ian MacLaurin", Marketing, Haymarket Publishing Services, 1998-11-17. Retrieved on 2007-03-27. 
  10. ^ Pagano, Margareta. "Shocked Hillards attacks greed of Prudential: Hartley disgusted with institutions after Tesco wins takeover battle", The Guardian, the sun, 1987-05-16. Retrieved on 2007-03-27. 
  11. ^ "Tesco accused of 'near monopoly'", BBC, January 17, 2006. 
  12. ^ Inverness: Tescotown. Retrieved on 2006-03-13.
  13. ^ Lorna Martin. "The supermarket that ate a town", The Observer, 2006-01-01. 
  14. ^ Walker, Gaelle. "Online failing todeliver", The Grocer, William Reed Publications, 2006-11-11, p. 6. Retrieved on 2007-01-27. 
  15. ^ "Business as usual for Sir Terry after 10 years in charge", Birmingham Post, Midland Independent Newspapers, 2007-02-22, p. 24. Retrieved on 2007-03-30. 
  16. ^ Buckley, Neil. "People: Leahy rings Tesco's tills", Financial Times, The Financial Times, 1995-11-22, p. 40. Retrieved on 2007-03-30. 
  17. ^ Cunningham, Sarah. "Tesco pays £630m for ABF's Irish business", The Times, Times Newspapers, 1997-03-22. Retrieved on 2007-03-30. 
  18. ^ "Tesco's Irish move approved", Financial Times, The Financial Times, 1997-05-07. Retrieved on 2007-03-30. 
  19. ^ "Convenience boost for Tesco - Tesco PLC acquires One Stop, Day and Nite convenience stores from T. and S. Stores PLC", Eurofood, 7 November 2002. 
  20. ^ "Tesco buys Japanese retailer", BBC News, June 10, 2003. 
  21. ^ "Tesco snaps up Cullens and Europa", BBC News, 22 January 2004. 
  22. ^ BBC NEWS | UK | Tesco stores shut after threats
  23. ^ "Suspect package blown up at Tesco", BBC News, 16 July 2007. 
  24. ^ Hannah Liptrot. "Tesco: Supermarket superpower", BBC, 2005-06-03. 
  25. ^ Humby, Clive (October 2003). Scoring Points: How Tesco is Winning Customer Loyalty. ISBN 0-7494-3578-X. 
  26. ^ "Tesco's 'Steering Wheel' Strategy", ICMR, 2005. 
  27. ^ Human Resources - Tesco Careers
  28. ^ Ian MacKinnon and David Leigh, Tesco sues critic of its expansion in Thailand for £16.4m damages, The Guardian, Tuesday April 8, 2008
  29. ^ a b Andrew Foxwell and Lauren Mills. "'Green' Tesco's Swiss tax dodge", Mail on Sunday, 2007-05-13. 
  30. ^ "Tesco's £1bn tax avoiding plan - move to the Cayman Islands", The Guardian, 2008-02-27. 
  31. ^ Template error: argument title is required. 
  32. ^ a b "Tesco and tax: a complex web of companies, trusts and partnerships", The Guardian, 2008-05-03. 
  33. ^ PDF of The 2006 Giving List. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  34. ^ The Work Foundation praises Tesco. The Work Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  35. ^ Intelligent Giving criticises Tesco's staff giving policies. Intelligent Giving. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  36. ^ Evening Times Archive. SMG Evening Times.
  37. ^ http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk/news/wales-news/2008/04/11/tesco-triple-sized-store-plan-to-create-300-jobs-91466-20749107/
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  40. ^ Tesco Interim Results 2006/07, Page 9PDF (234 KiB)
  41. ^ [1]Food Manufacture article 1 April 2007
  42. ^ Tesco to roll out RFID Food Manufacture article 2 April 2007
  43. ^ Tesco 24-hour strike called off BBC News 4 June 2007
  44. ^ Stobarts Launch Rail Freight Service Eddie Stobart press release September 2006
  45. ^ All aboard the Tesco Express Food Manufacture Article 1 October 2007
  46. ^ Cheers: Eco-friendly Tesco transports wine by canal Daily Mail 18 October 2007
  47. ^ Jordan, Dearbail. "Tesco swoops on Dobbies Garden Centres", The Times, Times Newspapers, 2007-06-08. Retrieved on 2007-06-08. 
  48. ^ "Offer Declared Unconditional in all Respects", Dobbies, Dobbies, 2007-08-17, pp. 1. Retrieved on 2007-08-19. (en) 
  49. ^ BBC NEWS | Business | Tesco sees UK sales growth slow
  50. ^ "Tesco launches net calls service", BBC News, January 19, 2006. 
  51. ^ a b O2 signs 136,000 contract customers. Mobile Today. Noble House. Retrieved on 2006-03-18.
  52. ^ "Silicon found to be rogue element in petrol", Barrie Clement, The Independent, 3 March 2007
  53. ^ "Thousands of drivers 'sold suspect petrol'", David Millward, Daily Telegraph, 1 March 2007
  54. ^ "The great petrol mystery splutters on", David Derbyshire, Daily Telegraph, 2 March 2007
  55. ^ "Firms curb supplies in fuel scare", BBC News, 2 March 2007
  56. ^ "Rogue fuel 'cover up' could cost stores up to £10m", Evening Standard, 2 March 2007
  57. ^ "Retailers offer car repair refund", BBC News, 6 March 2007
  58. ^ Cecilie Rohwedder. "Retailer in Britain Uses 'Clubcard' to Thwart Wal-Mart", Wall Street Journal Online, 2006-06-06. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. (Abstract only is online)
  59. ^ Tesco moves into software market, BBC News, 1 October 2006
  60. ^ [2]PDF (374 KiB)
  61. ^ TESCO EXTENDS PARTNERSHIP IN CHINA, London Stock Exchange's Regulatory News Service, 12 December 2006.
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  78. ^ "Tesco builds Korean business", Food & Drink Europe, January 19, 2005. "Tesco is the largest foreign grocery retailer in the country, Gregory said, and is third overall behind local players Lotte and Shinsegae. "Both these groups have sales more than double Tesco's, so while this acquisition is unlikely to close the gap significantly, it will help Tesco move away further from the chasing pack - such as Carrefour and Wal-Mart."" 
  79. ^ Key facts about Tesco Lotus. Tesco Lotus (April 21, 2008).
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  81. ^ Tesco to enter United States. Retrieved on 2006-03-13.
  82. ^ Tesco Plc 2006/07 resultsPDF (898 KiB)
  83. ^ Tesco Plc Interim Results 2006/07, pages 2 and 14PDF (234 KiB)
  84. ^ Times Online Business. TimesOnline. Retrieved on 2006-10-29.
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  88. ^ "Stop Tesco St Albans", Example aggrieved local community, April 2007. 
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  93. ^ The Argus Newspaper[specify], May 25, page 27.
  94. ^ Inquiry into British Supermarket Terror Cell.
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  98. ^ "The Irish Times" (subscription required), 2008-03-31. Retrieved on 2008-03-31. 
  99. ^ Insert footnote text here

“PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Channel 4 News logo after the headline stab. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tesco

Official

  • Tesco UK
  • Talking Tesco Tesco website arguing its ethical case.
  • Tesco Direct Tesco Home Shopping Website
  • Tesco Property Market Tesco Property Market Website
  • Tesco UK Opening Hours Tesco store opening times

Official (outside the United Kingdom)

  • Tesco America (Fresh and Easy)
  • Tesco China (Tesco Legou)
  • Tesco Czech
  • Tesco Slovakia
  • Tesco Hungary
  • Tesco France (Tesco Vin Plus)
  • Tesco Ireland
  • Tesco Japan
  • Tesco Korea (Homeplus)
  • Tesco Malaysia
  • Tesco Poland
  • Tesco Thailand (Tesco Lotus)

Press coverage

  • Retail star hit by tall poppy syndrome - free market argument from The Times 11 November 2005.
  • The 'Tesco-isation' of the high street- small retailers revolt. Independent, 19 October 2005
  • Opposition to fourth Tesco plan, BBC News,30 August 2006
  • Wal-Mart calls for probe into market domination by Tesco, The Sunday Times, 28 August 2005
  • Railway tunnel collapse will cost Tesco millions, The Times, 2 July 2005
  • Environmentalists target Tesco, BBC News, 17 June 2004
  • Tesco Juggernaut to storm America, The Times, 9 February 2006
  • Tesco turns up electricals' drive, The Sunday Telegraph, 18 June 2006
  • BBC Radio 4 "Face The Facts" programme on "Tesco and the way it bends and on occasion even plans breaking the law to get what it wants"
  • Tesco condemned for selling pole dancing toy, The Daily Mail, 24 October 2006
  • Accident of Krzysztof Major at Tesco, Brent (page 28)PDF (12.4 MiB), Goniec (The Polish Times), 30 March 2007

Critical sites The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... MiB redirects here. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

  • Tescopoly Nerve, 7 April 2006
  • Supermarket Sweep Up Independent Blog.
  • Tesco-Complaint Consumer complaint site.
  • TescoRipOff Price Check critique site.
  • Tescopoly.org, Coalition of campaign groups criticizing Tesco.
  • Example of local community objecting to a proposed Tesco store development
  • Tesco profile on Clean Up Fashion
  • Channel 4's Dispatches Documentary on The Supermarket that's eating Britain (Referring to Tesco)
  • Tesco's green posturing is just a marketing gimmick Article about how Tesco doesn't make the changes that really matter, just the ones that are good PR.
For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
BBC NEWS | Business | Tesco profits break through £2bn (567 words)
Tesco said it was expecting a "more normal year" in the UK in 2005, on the back of rising business costs and an "unclear" consumer outlook.
Shares in Tesco, which have risen by about 25% in the last 12 months, were down 0.25p, or 1%, at 318.5 pence at the close of trade on Tuesday.
While Tesco has maintained rapid growth in sales and profits in recent years, its success has led to critics arguing the firm is having an adverse impact on other businesses and is squeezing prices paid to farmers.
Tesco - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5591 words)
Tesco's revenue for the 52 weeks to 25 February 2006 was £38.259 billion.
Tesco has responded to the need to be sensitive to local expectations in foreign countries by entering into joint ventures with local partners, such as Samsung Group in South Korea (Samsung-Tesco Home Plus), and Charoen Pokphand in Thailand (Tesco Lotus), appointing a very high proportion of local personnel to management positions.
Tesco is the grocery market leader in the Republic of Ireland, with a reported November 2005 share of 26.3%.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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