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Encyclopedia > Terry Waite
Terry Waite at April 1993 Allentown College speech
Terry Waite at April 1993 Allentown College speech

Terry Waite CBE (born May 31, 1939 in Styal, Cheshire, England) is a British humanitarian and author. In the 1980s he was the Archbishop of Canterbury's Assistant for Anglican Communion Affairs under Robert Runcie, and an envoy for the Church of England, he travelled to Lebanon to try and secure the release of four hostages including journalist John McCarthy. He was himself held captive between 1987 and 1991. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... DeSales University is a private catholic university for men and women, located in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... May 31 is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... Styal is a village in Cheshire, England, on the River Bollin and near to the town of Wilmslow. ... The Cheshire Plain - photo taken adjacent to Beeston Castle The Cheshire Plain - photo taken towards Merseyside The Cheshire Plain panorama - photo taken from Mid-Cheshire Ridge Cattle farming in the county Black-and-white timbered buildings on Nantwich High Street Cheshire (or, archaically, the County of Chester)[1] is a... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Grave of Lord Runcie at St Albans Cathedral Robert Alexander Kennedy Runcie, Baron Runcie (October 2, 1921 – July 11, 2000) was the 102nd Archbishop of Canterbury from 1980 to 1991. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... John Patrick McCarthy CBE (born November 26, 1956) is a British journalist who was kidnapped by terrorists in Lebanon in April 1986, and held hostage for more than five years. ...

Contents

Early Life

Waite's father was a village policeman, and he was educated at the local Stockton Heath Secondary Modern school, where he became Head Boy. Although his parents were only nominally religious, he showed a committment to Christianity from an early age. Secondary modern schools are a type of school in British educational systems, part of the Tripartite System. ... Head Boy and Head Girl are terms commonly used in the British education system. ...


Early Career

As a young man, Waite joined the Grenadier Guards, but an allergy to a dye in the uniform obliged his departure after a few months. He then considered the monastic life, but he rejected this idea and instead joined the Church Army, the evangelistic arm of the Anglican church, and underwent training and studies in London. Whilst he was held captive in the 1980s many Church Army Officers wore a simple badge with the letter H upon it, to remind people that he was still a hostage, and was being supported in prayer daily. The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... Church Army, an English religious organization, founded in 1882 by the Rev. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


In 1963 Waite was appointed as Education Advisor to the Anglican Bishop of Bristol, Oliver Tomkins, and he assisted with Tomkins's implementation of the SALT (Stewardship and Laity Training) programme in the diocese, along with Canon Basil Moss. The position required him to master psychological T-group methods, with the aim of promoting increased active involvement from the laity of the Church. During this time he married Helen Frances Watters. The Bishop of Bristol heads the Church of England Diocese of Bristol in the Province of Canterbury, in England. ... In mathematics, in the field of group theory, a T group is a group in which the property of normality is transitive, that is, every subnormal subgroup is normal. ...


In 1969 he moved to Uganda, where he worked as Provincial Training Adviser to Erica Sabiti, the first African Anglican Archbishop of Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi, and in that capacity travelled extensively throughout East Africa. Together with his wife Frances and their four children he witnessed the Amin coup in Uganda and both he and his wife narrowly escaped death on several occasions. From his office in Kampala he founded the Southern Sudan Project and was responsible for developing programmes of aid and development for this war-torn region. Amin may refer to different people. ... Kampala is the capital city of Uganda. ...


His next post was in Rome, where from 1972 he worked as an International Consultant to the Medical Mission Sisters, a Roman Catholic order that was seeking to adapt to the leadership reforms of Vatican II. From this base he travelled extensively throughout Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe both conducting and advising on programmes concerned with institutional change and development, inter-cultural relations, group and inter-group dynamics and a broad range of development issues connected with both health and education. The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere historically considered to consist of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ...


Archbishop's Special Envoy

Waite returned to the UK in 1978, where he took a largely-desk job with the British Council of Churches. In 1980 he was appointed as the Archbishop of Canterbury's Assistant for Anglican Communion Affairs, having been recommended by Bishop John Howe and Tomkins. Based at Lambeth Palace, he again travelled extensively throughout the world and had a responsibility for the Archbishop’s diplomatic and ecclesiastical exchanges. He arranged and travelled with the Archbishop on the first ever visit of an Archbishop of Canterbury to China and has responsibility for travels to Australia, New Zealand, Burma, USA, Canada, The Caribbean, South Africa, East and West Africa to name but a few places. Churches Together in Britain and Ireland (CTBI) is an ecumenical organisation. ... John Howe 2003 John Howe (born August 21, 1957 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) is a book illustrator, living in Neuchatel, Switzerland. ... Lambeth Palaces gatehouse. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ...


Hostage Negotiator

In 1980 Waite first became famous when he successfully negotiated the release of several hostages in Iran: Jean Waddell (who was secretary to the Iranian Anglican Bishop Hassan Dehqani-Tafti), John Coleman, and Coleman's wife. In 1984 he negotiated with Colonel Gaddafi for the release of British hostages held in Libya and again was successful. In January 1987 while negotiating for the release of Western hostages in Lebanon he himself was taken captive and remained in captivity for 1,763 days, the first four years of which were spent in total solitary confinement. John Coleman David John Coleman (November 28, 1928 - April 5, 1973) was a player (1949 to 1954) and coach (1961 to 1967) for Essendon in the Victorian Football League (now the AFL). ... Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar al-Gaddafi1 (Arabic:   ) (born c. ... A hostage is an entity which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act or refrain from acting in a particular way. ...


From 1985 Waite became involved in hostage negotiation in Lebanon, and he assisted in successful negotiations that secured the release of Lawrence Jenco and David Jacobsen. However, his use of an American heliocopter to travel secretly between Cyprus and the Lebanon and his appearance with Oliver North meant that he was compromised when the Irangate scandal broke. Against advice, Waite felt a need to demonstrate his continuing trust and integrity and his commitment to the remaining hostages. He arrived in the capital, Beirut, on 12 January 1987 with the intention of negotiating with the Islamic Jihad who were holding the men. On 20 January 1987 he agreed to meet with the captors of the hostages as he was promised safe conduct to visit hostages, who, he was told, were ill. The group broke trust and took him hostage. He was imprisoned by them on 2 February 1987 and it was not until 17 November 1991 that he was released. The late Servite Father Lawrence Martin Jenco, a native of Joliet, Illinois, was taken hostage in Beirut by five armed men in January 1985, while serving as director of Catholic Relief Services there. ... Oliver Laurence North (born October 7, 1943) is most well known for his involvement in the Iran-Contra Affair. ... In the Iran-Contra Affair, United States President Ronald Reagans administration secretly sold arms to Iran, which was engaged in a bloody war with its neighbor Iraq from 1980 to 1988 (see Iran-Iraq War), and diverted the proceeds to the Contra rebels fighting to overthrow the leftist and... For other uses, see Beirut (disambiguation). ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Islamic Jihad (Arabic: ‎, Harakat al-Jihad al-Islami) is a terrorist Islamist group based in the Syrian capital, Damascus. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Release and After

Following his release he was elected a Fellow Commoner at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, England where he wrote his first book Taken on Trust. This quickly became an international best-seller and headed the lists in the UK and elsewhere. He also decided to make a career change and determined to give himself to study, writing, lecturing and humanitarian activities. His second book Footfalls in Memory was published in the UK in 1995 and again was also a best-seller. His latest book published in October 2000 Travels with a Primate is a humorous account of his journeys with Archbishop Runcie. He has contributed articles to many journals and periodicals ranging from the Reader's Digest to the Kipling Journal and has also contributed articles and forewords to many books. He has been elected Visiting Fellow to Magdalen College, Oxford for the Trinity term 2006. Full name College of Scholars of the Holy Trinity of Norwich Motto - Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names - Established 1350 Sister College University College All Souls College Master Prof. ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... College name Magdalen College Latin name Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister college Magdalene College, Cambridge President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Jessica Jones Undergraduates 395 MCR President Eloise Scotford Graduates 230 Location of Magdalen College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced... Trinity Term is the name of the third and final term of Oxford Universitys academic year. ...


He has also been in constant demand as a lecturer, writer and broadcaster and has appeared in North and South America, Australia and New Zealand, South Africa and throughout Europe. There has been a particular interest in the lectures he has delivered relating his experiences as a negotiator and as a hostage to the pressures faced by executives and managers. Stress, loneliness and negotiating under acute pressure are but some of the issues with which he has a unique experience and his ability to communicate clearly and with good humour has meant that he is in constant demand as a speaker not only to the Business Community but also to professionals in social work, education and medical field as well as to religious groups.


He is also a co-founder of Y.Care, a development agency linked to the YMCA movement. Recently he helped found Hostage UK, an organisation designed to give support to hostage families. He is also patron of the Romany Society. He currently holds the position of Visiting Fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford. This article is about the association. ... The Rev. ... College name Magdalen College Latin name Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister college Magdalene College, Cambridge President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Jessica Jones Undergraduates 395 MCR President Eloise Scotford Graduates 230 Location of Magdalen College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced...


On March 31, 2007, Waite offered to travel to Iran to negotiate with those holding British sailors and marines seized by Iran in disputed waters on March 23 2007.[1] March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Faith Perspective

Waite has a particular regard for Eastern Orthodoxy, and for the writings of C.G. Jung. ... Carl Gustav Jung Carl Gustav Jung (July 26, 1875 – June 6, 1961) was a Swiss psychiatrist and founder of the neopsychoanalytic school of psychology. ...


Waite in Popular Culture

  • Waite was the subject of a song by the British experimental rock group The Fall in 1986, entitled "Terry Waite Sez".
  • For a while in the 1980's Terry Waite was known for his catchphrase, "Hello, I'm Terry Waite."
  • Before he was taken hostage, Spitting Image featured a puppet of Waite returning from his foreign trips laden with Duty Free which he would bring surreptitiously to an eagerly waiting Robert Runcie.
  • The term "Terry" is synonymous with the method of cutting a straight line into the back on someones hair on the nape of the neck. This is due to the rhyming slang Terry Waite - Straight.

Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Fall are a British rock music group, formed in Manchester in 1976, and named after Albert Camuss novel. ... Spitting Image was a satirical puppet show that ran on the United Kingdoms ITV television network from 1984 to 1996. ...

Bibliography

  • Barnes, Trevor (1987). Terry Waite: Man with a Mission. London: Collins Fontana. 

External links

  • 1987: Peace envoy imprisoned in Beirut On This Day, BBC
  • Taken Hostage On This Day, BBC
  • It's Over — Terry Waite Returns Home On This Day, BBC
  • 1991: Church envoy Waite freed in Beirut On This Day, BBC
  • The Romany Society

  Results from FactBites:
 
Terry Waite - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (439 words)
Terry Waite CBE (born May 31, 1939 in Styal, Cheshire, England) is a British humanitarian and author.
Waite was the Archbishop of Canterbury's Assistant for Anglican Communion Affairs under Robert Runcie.
Waite was the subject of a song by the British experimental rock group The Fall in 1986, entitled "Terry Waite Sez".
Terry Waite Summary (1367 words)
Terry Waite, whose entry in Who's Who ironically records one of his hobbies as "travel, especially in remote parts of the world," was born on May 31, 1939, the son of a village policeman, and spent his early life in Styal, Cheshire.
Waite himself described the trip that led to his capture and incarceration as "a walk into a minefield." But he insisted he had to go ahead because he was the one person who had met the kidnappers face to face.
Waite was the subject of a song by the British rock music group The Fall in 1986, entitled "Terry Waite Sez".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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