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Encyclopedia > Territorial Army
British Army

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The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal and Volunteer reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces branch of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at a similar rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. This is in contrast to the Regular Army Reserve, which currently comprises people who have a mobilization obligation for six years after their former full-time service in the regular army. The TA forms about a quarter of the overall manpower strength of the Army. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... This is a current and updated list of regiments of the British Army, changing as new regiments are formed following the defence review Delivering Security in a Changing World. ... The structure of the British Army is broadly similar to that of the Royal Navy and Royal Air Force, being divided into two Commands as top-level budget holders; Land Command and the Adjutant-General. ... Land Command (or HQ Land) is a military command and part of the structure of the modern British Army. ... The Adjutant-General to the Forces, commonly just referred to as the Adjutant-General (AG), is one of the most senior officers in the British Army. ... HQ Northern Ireland is the command formation responsible for the administration of all British Armed Forces stationed in and around Northern Ireland. ... The British Forces Germany (BFG) is the successor of the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR) and Royal Air Force Germany (RAFG), which were disbanded in 1994 after the end of the Cold War. ... UK Sovereign Base Areas (red) British Forces Cyprus is the name given to the British armed forces stationed in the UK sovereign base areas of Dhekelia and Akrotiri on the island of Cyprus. ... British Forces Gibraltar is the name given to the British Armed Forces stationed in the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. ... The British Military Garrison Brunei (BGB) is the name given to the British armed forces presence in Brunei. ... The origins of the modern British military rifles are within its predecessor the Brown Bess musket. ... This is a list of some of the equipment currently in use by the British Army. ... The history of the British Army spans three centuries and numerous European, colonial and world wars. ... // 1600-1699 1633 - The Royal Regiment of Foot (later the Royal Scots) is placed on the Scottish Establishment, later becoming the oldest infantry regiment in continious service in the British Army. ... This is a list of senior officers of the British Army. ... In the 17th and 18th centuries, rank was generally denoted by the quantity of lace and through other decoration used on uniforms. ... The term used to refer to all ranks below officers is Other Ranks (ORs). ... A military reserve force is a military organization composed of part-time military personnel, and sometimes civilians, who are available to fight when a nation mobilizes for total war or to defend against invasion. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ...


Its original purpose was home defense although the establishment of the Territorial and Army Volunteer Reserve in 1867 involved a restructuring and revised doctrine leading to provision of routine support for the Regular army overseas. They also served as constables or bailiffs, even holding positions of civic duty, even as overseer of their parish. The more modern yeomen of the 18th century were calvary based units, which were often used to suppress riots, such as the infamous Peterloo Massacre. Print of the Peterloo Massacre published by Richard Carlile The Peterloo Massacre of August 16, 1819 was the result of a cavalry charge into the crowd at a public meeting at St Peters Fields, Manchester, England. ...


Territorial soldiers, or Territorials, are volunteers who undergo military training in their spare time either as part of a formed local unit or as specialists in a professional field. TA members have a minimum commitment to serve 27 training days per annum, with specialists only required to serve 19 days, which normally includes a two-week annual camp. As a volunteer military reserve raised from local civilians, the TA may be considered a militia [1] and several units bear the title "militia" [2], although historically, the British official term Militia designated a specific force, distinct from the Volunteers and the Yeomanry.


Territorials normally have a full-time job or career, which in some cases provides skills and expertise that are directly transferable to a specialist military role, such as NHS employees serving in TA Army Medical Services units. All Territorial personnel have their civilian jobs protected to a limited extent by law should they be compulsorily mobilised. There is however no legal protection against discrimination in employment for membership of the TA in the normal course of events (i.e. when not mobilised). There are currently approximately 34,000 serving members in the TA, although it has a target established strength of 42,000. The Regular Army Reserve has approximately 32,060 members. The current highest ranking Territorial is Major General Simon Lalor TD (late HAC) who succeded Major General The Duke of Westminster TD (late Queen's Own Yeomanry) as Assistant Chief of the Defence Staff (Reserves and Cadets). The annual budget of the Territorial Army is approximately £350 million – around 1.3% of the total defence budget [3]. NHS redirects here. ... The Army Medical Services is an umbrella organisation responsible for administering the four separate units responsible for supplying medical and nursing services in the British Army. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Territorial Decoration (TD) was a United Kingdom military medal, also known as the Territorial Efficiency Decoration, which was given to officers for long service in the Territorial Army. ... Armorial bearings of the HAC, granted in 1821 The Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) is the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior[2] in the Territorial Army [3] . // The HAC can trace its history as far back as 1296, but it received a Royal Charter... Major-General Gerald Cavendish Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster, KG, OBE, TD, DL (born 22 December 1951 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland), is the son of Robert George Grosvenor, 5th Duke of Westminster, and his wife Hon. ... The Queens Own Yeomanry is an armoured regiment of the British Territorial Army consisting of five squadrons, and which bears the running fox cap badge of the old East Riding Yeomanry: A (Ayrshire (Earl of Carricks Own) Yeomanry) Squadron B (North Irish Horse) Squadron C (Fife and Forfar... The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) is the professional head of the British Armed Forces. ... Military spending in 2005 Military spending This is a list of countries by military expenditures using the latest information available. ...


The Territorial Army was created in 1908 by the Secretary of State for War, Richard Haldane, when the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 combined the previously civilian-administered Volunteer Force, with the Militia and Yeomanry. Most Volunteer infantry units had unique identities, but lost these in the reorganisation, becoming Territorial battalions of Regular Army infantry regiments. Some, notably the London Regiment, Glasgow Highlanders and Liverpool Scottish maintained a separate identity. The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... Lord Haldane The Labour Lord Chancellor. ... The Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 (7 Edw. ... The Volunteer Force was a citizen army of part-time rifle, artillery and engineer corps, created as a popular movement in 1859. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... In the 1790s, the threat of invasion of England was high, with the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. ... The London Regiment is a Territorial Army regiment in the British Army. ... The Glasgow Highlanders were a former Territorial Army battalion in the British Army, it eventually became part of The Highland Light Infantry regiment, which later became the The Royal Highland Fusiliers in 1959. ... The Liverpool Scottish, known diminutively as the Scottish, is a unit of the British Territorial Army formed in 1900 as an infantry battalion of the Kings (Liverpool Regiment). ...

Contents

Formation to World War I

Main article: Territorial Force

The Territorial Force was originally formed by the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane, following the enactment of the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 which combined and re-organised the old Volunteer Army with the remaining units of militia and yeomanry. The TF was formed on April 1, 1908 and contained 14 infantry divisions, and 14 mounted yeomanry brigades. It had an overall strength of approximately 269,000. In the United Kingdom the Territorial Army is a part of the British Army composed of reserve units, or part-time soldiers. ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... Richard Burdon Sanderson Haldane, 1st Viscount Haldane, (July 30, 1856 - August 19, 1928), was an important British Liberal politician, lawyer, and philosopher. ... The Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 (7 Edw. ... The Volunteer Army was a citizen army of part-time rifle corps, created as a popular movement in the 19th. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... In the 1790s, the threat of invasion of England was high, with the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... In the 1790s, the threat of invasion of England was high, with the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ...


The individual units that made up each division or brigade were administered by County Associations, with the county's lord lieutenant as president. The other members of the association consisted of military members (chosen from the commanding officers of the units), representative members (nominated by the county councils and county boroughs in the lieutenancy county) and co-opted members (often retired military officers). Associations took over any property vested in the volunteers or yeomanry under their administration. Each regiment or battalion had a regular army officer attached as full-time adjutant. Flag of a Lord-Lieutenant The title Lord-Lieutenant is given to the British monarchs personal representatives around the United Kingdom. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ...


The use of the word territorial signified that the volunteers who served with the force were under no obligation to serve overseas — in 1910, when asked to nominate for Imperial Service overseas in the event of mobilisation, less than 10% of the Force chose to do so. In August 1914, after the outbreak of World War I, Territorial units were given the option of serving in France and by August 25 in excess of 70 battalions had volunteered. This question over the availability of Territorial divisions for overseas service was one of Lord Kitchener's motivations for raising the New Army separately. Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum PC, KBE, KCB, ADC ( June 24, 1850 - June 5, 1916) was a British Field Marshal and statesman. ... Following the outbreak of hostilities in the Great War the then British Secretary of State for War Horatio Kitchener, Lord Kitchener of Khartoum, advised forming a volunteer army of a million men. ...


Territorial formations initially saw service in Egypt and India and other Empire garrisons such as Gibraltar, thereby releasing regular units for service in France and enabling the formation of an additional five regular army divisions (for a total of eleven) by early 1915. Several reserve units were also deployed with regular formations and the first Territorial unit to see action on the Western Front was the Glasgow Territorial Signallers Group, Royal Engineers at the First Battle of Ypres on 11 October 1914. The first fully Territorial division to join the fighting on the Western Front was the 46th Division in March 1915, with divisions later serving in Gallipoli and elsewhere. As the war progressed and casualties mounted, the distinctive character of Territorial units was diluted by the inclusion of conscript and New Army drafts. Following the Armistice all units of the Territorial Force were gradually disbanded. Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The 32nd (Scottish) Signal Regiment is a British Territorial Army Regiment of the Royal Corps of Signals. ... Combatants United Kingdom France German Empire Commanders John French Ferdinand Foch Erich von Falkenhayn Strength UK: 7 infantry divisions, 3 cavalry divisions France: ? Fourth and Sixth Armies Casualties UK: 58,000 France: 50,000 130,000 The First Battle of Ypres, also called the Battle of Flanders, was the last... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ... // The British 46th (North Midland) Division was a 1st Line Territorial Army division. ... A white flag is traditionally used to represent a truce. ...


Interwar re-establishment and World War II

New recruiting started in early 1920, and the Territorial Force was reconstituted 7 February 1920. On 1 October 1920 the Territorial Force was renamed the Territorial Army. The 1st Line divisions (that were created in 1907 or 1908) were reconstituted in that year. However, the composition of the divisions was altered with a reduction in the number of infantry battalions required. There was also a reduced need for cavalry, and of the fifty-five yeomanry regiments, only the fourteen senior regiments retained their horses. The remaining yeomanry were converted to artillery or armoured car units or disbanded.[4] [5] The amalgamation of forty pairs of infantry battalions was announced in October, 1921.[6] [7] As part of the post-war "Geddes Axe" financial cuts the TA was further reduced in size in 1922: artillery batteries lost two of their six guns, the established size of infantry battalions was cut and ancillary medical, veterinary, signals and Royal Army Service Corps units were either reduced in size or abolished.[8] An innovation in 1922 was the creation of two Air Defence Brigades to provide anti-aircraft defence for London.[9] [10] Sir Eric Campbell Geddes (26 September 1875-22 June 1937) was a Conservative British politician. ... The Royal Logistic Corps is a British Army corps that provides the logistical support for the Army. ...


On March 29, 1939 it was announced that the size of the TA was to be doubled by the reforming of the 2nd line units. The total strength of the TA was to be 440,000: the field force of the Territorial Army was to rise from 130,000 to 340,000, organised in 26 divisions while an additional 100,000 all ranks would form the anti-aircraft section.[11] [12] When the 2nd Line was reformed they were a little different from their WWI predecessors. They had slightly different names and the regiments assigned were different. After VJ Day in August 1945, the Territorial Army was significantly downsized with all 2nd Line and several 1st Line Divisions once again disbanded. is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Victory over Japan Day (V-J Day) is the celebration of the Surrender of Japan, which took place on August 15, 1945, ending the Second World War. ...


List of TA Divisions, World War II

The Territorial Army armoured and infantry divisions during World War II were:

The 1st Cavalry Division was a British Army First World War and Second World War unit formed in 1939 from Yeomanry Regiments. ... The 10th Armoured Divisionwas a British Army Second World War armoured division. ... The British 42nd (East Lancashire) Division was a Territorial Army division. ... The 43rd (Wessex) Infantry Division was a British Territorial Army division first formed in 1908. ... The 44rd (Home Counties) Infantry Division was a British division which formed part of the British Expeditionary Force. ... This article should belong in one or more categories. ... This military division was formed on April 1, 1908 as the West Riding Division in the Territorial Force of the British Army. ... // British 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division History This formation was sent to France in 1940 as a Territorial Army division, and was involved in the evacuation at Dunkirk. ... For the First World War unit, see British 51st (Highland) Division (World War I). ... The British 52nd (Lowland) Division was a Territorial Army division. ... The British 53rd (Welsh) Division was a Territorial Army division. ... The British 54th (East Anglian) Division was a Territorial Army division. ... The British 55th (West Lancashire) Division was a Territorial Force division which served on the Western Front during the First World War. ... The British 56th (London) Division was a Territorial Army division of the Second World War. ... The 9th (Highland) Infantry Division was a second line Territorial Army formation at the beginning of the Second World War. ... The 12th (Eastern) Division, was one of the Kitcheners Army divisions raised from volunteers by Lord Kitchener. ... The British 15th (Scottish) Division was a New Army division formed in September 1914 as part of the K2 Army Group. ... The 18th Infantry Division was a Division of the British Army in World War 2. ... The 23rd (Northumbrian) Division was a 2nd Line Territorial Army duplicate of the British 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division during the Second World War. ... The British 38th (Welsh) Division was a New Army division formed in December 1914 comprising battalions from Wales raised by public subscription and private patronage. ... The 45th (Wessex) Infantry Division was a 2nd Line Territorial Army division during the Second World War . ... The 46th (North Midland) Infantry Division was a 2nd Line Territorial Army Infantry Division during the Second World War. ... It has been suggested that 47th (1/2nd London) Division be merged into this article or section. ... The 59th (Staffordshire) Infanty Division was a 2nd Line Territorial Army unit of the British Army during the Second World War. ... The 61st (South Midland) Infantry Division was a Territorial Army unit of the British Army during the Second World War . ... The 66th (East Lancashire)Infantry Division was a formation of the British Army during the Second World War. ...

Postwar reforms and Cold War to Present Day

In 1947, the TA was restructured and expanded, through the reactivation of some of the 1st Line divisions that were initially disbanded after the war, keeping its former role of supplying complete divisions to the regular Army until 1967. For the first time, TA units were formed in Northern Ireland. The manoeuvre divisions established or re-established in 1947 were:[13] Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...

The Territorials also provided much of the anti-aircraft cover for the United Kingdom until 1956. In that year Anti-Aircraft Command and 15 anti-aircraft regiments of the Royal Artillery were disbanded, with nine others passing into "suspended animation" as new Surface to Air Missile units replaced them.[14] The territorial units of the Royal Armoured Corps were also reduced in number to nine armoured regiments and eleven reconnaissance regiments. This was effected by amalgamation of pairs of regiments, and the conversion of four RAC units to an infantry role. At the same time, the 16th Airborne Division was reduced to in size to become the 44th Independent Parachute Brigade Group.[15] The 44rd (Home Counties) Infantry Division was a British division which formed part of the British Expeditionary Force. ... This military division was formed on April 1, 1908 as the West Riding Division in the Territorial Force of the British Army. ... The British 56th (London) Division was a Territorial Army division of the Second World War. ... “Flak” redirects here. ... Thunderbird in displayed in Finnish Anti-aircraft museum (Ilmatorjuntamuseo) in Tuusula. ... The Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) is currently a collection of ten regular regiments, mostly converted from old horse cavalry regiments, and four Yeomanry regiments of the Territorial Army. ...


British forces contracted dramatically as the end of conscription in 1960 came in sight as announced in the 1957 Defence White Paper. On July 20, 1960 a reorganisation of the TA was announced in the House of Commons. The Territorials were to be reduced from 266 fighting units to 195. There was to be a reduction of 46 regiments of the Royal Artillery, 18 battalions of infantry, 12 regiments of the Royal Engineers and 2 regiments of the Royal Corps of Signals.[16] The reductions were carried out in 1961, mainly by amalgamation of units. National service is a common name for compulsory or voluntary military service programs. ... The 1957 White Paper on Defence was a British white paper setting forth the future as seen of the British military. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


This was followed by complete reorganisation announced in the 1966 Defence White Paper from April 1, 1967 when the title Territorial Army and Volunteer Reserve (TAVR) was adopted which abolished the former regimental and divisional structure of the TA. Units in the new TAVR were divided into four categories: A major British defence policy brought by the Labour Party government under Prime Minister Harold Wilson the main author was the then Secretary of Defense Denis Healey. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...

  • TAVR I: Units available for all purposes
  • TAVR II: Units with a NATO role, specifically support for the British Army of the Rhine
  • TAVR III: Home Defence units
  • TAVR IV: Consisting of bands and the University-based Officer Training Corps

TAVR I and II units were known as "Volunteers", and those in TAVR III as "Territorials". These terms were often incorporated into the unit titles. This article is about the military alliance. ... There have been two formations named British Army on the Rhine (BAOR). ...


The TAVR III was disbanded in 1969, with the units being reduced to eight-man "cadres". The cadres became part of a "sponsoring" TAVR II unit, although continuing to wear the badges and perpetuating the traditions of their forebears. An increase in the size of the TAVR in 1971 lead to the formation of a number of battalions based on these cadres.[17][18]


In 1979 the Territorial Army title was restored, and in the following years its size was somewhat increased, with the regimental system being progressively reinstated. Although due to its decreased established size, Brigades rather than Divisions were used at a manouvre formation level.


The TA was thus re-roled into its modern form. Instead of supplying complete combat divisions, its function was to round out regular formations by supplying units of up to battalion size (including infantry, light artillery and formation reconnaissance), and to supply extra support functions such as engineers, medical units and military police. The Formation Reconnaissance Regiment is one of two organisations currently used by cavalry regiments of the British Army. ...


After the Strategic Defence Review of 1998, the TA's size of around 56,200 was further reduced. The Infantry suffered most, with 87 companies in 33 battalions reducing to 67 companies in 15 battalions. As of 2006 the Territorial Army has an authorised strength of 42,000 though recruiting difficulties put the actual strength of the TA below that figure (manning is currently at approx 82% which equates to 34,000). Units also have attached Regular Army personnel from their affiliated Corps or Regiment who assist with training and administration and tend to fill the roles of Adjutant and Regimental Sergeant Major, as well as Permanent Staff Instructors in every Squadron or Company. The Strategic Defence Review (or SDR) was a policy document produced by the Labour Government that came to power in 1997. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Adjutant is a military rank or appointment. ... Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 (WO1) in the British Army, Royal Marines and many Commonwealth armies including the Australian Army and New Zealand Army, and by Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) in the Canadian Forces. ... A Permanent Staff Instructor is a senior member of the full time British Army, selected to teach the Reserve and Territorial Army soldiers. ...


TA soldiers have seen service in a number of conflicts that the UK has been involved with since 1945. However, they served in particularly large numbers in two conflicts. The Korean War and Suez Crisis, which were during the 1950s when the entire TA was called up. Throughout the Cold War however, the Territorial Army was never regarded as a particularly usable force overseas, either by the Government of the day or by the Regular Army. This was due to the fact that the entire Territorial Army had to be mobilised by Royal Prerogative in a wartime scenario, as occurred in the World Wars, with no flexibility to use smaller formations or specialists if required and as a result relied purely on Territorials willing to volunteer their services. Therefore, its role was, at least unofficially, seen as home defence and as a result the TA was not used in conflicts such as the 1982 Falklands War and 1991 Gulf War [19] (205 SCottish General Hospital were mobilised as a unit based in Riyadh, Saudia Arabia, during the 1991 Gulf War). However, the Government passed the Reserve Forces Act 1996 [20], which enables individual TA personnel to be compulsorily called up for deployment, with certain caveats exempting those in full-time education and other compassionate reasons, as well as providing protection by employment law for members' civilian jobs should they be mobilised, which has led to the TA increasingly providing routine support for the Regular army overseas. Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden Communist: Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Peoples Republic of China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee... Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1... The Royal Prerogative is a body of customary authority, privilege, and immunity, recognised in common law jurisdictions possessing a monarchy as belonging to the Crown alone. ... Belligerents Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties and losses 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Caveat, the third-person singular present subjunctive of the Latin cavere, means warning (or more literally, let him beware); it can be shorthand for Latin phrases such as Caveat lector Caveat emptor Caveat venditor More narrowly, caveat can also refer to CAVEAT, a Canadian lobby group; The Paulette Caveat about...


In 2003, 9,500 reservists, the vast majority of them from the TA, were mobilised to take part in Operation Telic, the invasion of Iraq, in contrast only some 420 Regular Reservists were called-up. Approximately 1,200 members of the TA continue to deploy annually on tours of duty in Iraq, Operation Herrick in Afghanistan and elsewhere, normally on 6 month-long Roulements. They cannot be used in operations for more than 12 months in any three-year period - making most of those who have already served ineligible for call up for two years afterwards. However given the relatively-small size of the Regular British Army, coupled with the current high rate of operational deployments, it is inconceivable that the TA will not see further extensive overseas service during the remainder of the early part of the 21st century. Operation (or Op) TELIC is the codename under which all British operations of the 2003 Invasion of Iraq and after are being conducted. ... In the military, a tour of duty is a period of time spent at sea or assigned to service in a foreign country. ... Operation Herrick is the codename under which all British operations in the war in Afghanistan have been conducted since 2002. ... Roulement is a term used by the British Army to signify major combat units (usually battalion strength) that are deployed on short tours of duty, normally for 6-months duration. ...


Regional Brigades

Territorial Army units are widely dispersed across the country – much more so than the Regular units, and in many areas they are the only visible face of the Armed Forces. They help to keep society informed about the Armed Forces, and of the importance of defence to the nation, and have an active role supporting the Army Cadet Force and events such as Ten Tors. They provide a means by which the community as a whole can contribute to Britain’s defence. The Army Cadet Force (ACF) is a British youth organisation that offers progressive training in a multitude of the subjects from military training to adventurous training and first aid, at the same time as promoting achievement, discipline, and good citizenship, to boys and girls aged 12 to 18 years and... Ten Tors is an annual weekend hike organised and run in early May for 2,400 young people by the British Army on Dartmoor. ...


Most units of the Territorial Army are organised into Regional Brigades for administrative and training purposes, dependent upon their geographic location within the United Kingdom. Exceptions include the Army Medical Services and UKSF(R). The Brigades also co-ordinate Civil Contingency Reaction Forces (CCRF) in their respective regions, which are organised to provide support to the emergency services if required [21]: In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... SRR Cap Badge SAS Cap Badge Logo of the UKSF Reserve The United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) is a blanket term for the elite units of the British Armed Forces. ... Military Aid to the Civil Community (MACC) is a phrase referring to the armed forces providing a service to the civilian community. ... Emergency services are public services that deal with emergencies and other aspects of Public Safety. ...

// History This Second World War British Army brigade was part of the regular British 5th Infantry Division . ... The British Armys 42nd Infantry Brigade was originally a brigade of the 14th (Light) Division in World War I. It was re-formed during the Second World War as a security force to protect Lines of Communication in North Africa. ... The British 51st Infantry Brigade is currently known as 51 (Scottish) Brigade and as part of the 2nd Division, it is the regional administrative formation responsible for all the units of the Territorial Army based in Scotland. ... The 2nd Infantry Brigade is a British Army unit active since the First World War. ... The British Armys 49th Infantry Brigade started its existence as part of the British 16th (Irish) Division, part of Kitcheners Army in the First World War. ... 145 Brigade is a brigade of the British Army. ... The British Armys 43rd Infantry Brigade was originally created during World War I as part of the 14th (Light) Division. ... The British Armys 143rd Infantry Brigade was originally formed in World War I as a part of the Territorial Armys 48th (South Midland) Division, and served with that Division in both world wars. ... 160 (Wales) Brigade is not a formation that would be deployed as other brigades like 12th (Mechanised) Brigade would, but is a regional command responsible for all of Wales. ... The 38th (Irish) Infantry Brigade was formed on 13 January 1942 by converting The 210th Independent Infantry Brigade (Home), a Home defense static brigade. ... London District is the name given by the British Army to the area of operations encompassing the Greater London area. ...

Current units

British Army Arms and Services

Combat Arms
Royal Armoured Corps
Infantry
Guards Division
Scottish Division
King's Division
Queen's Division
Prince of Wales' Division
Royal Irish Regiment
Parachute Regiment
Brigade of Gurkhas
The Rifles
Army Air Corps
Special Air Service Regiment
Combat Support Arms
Royal Regiment of Artillery
Corps of Royal Engineers
Royal Corps of Signals
Intelligence Corps
Combat Services
Royal Army Chaplains Department
Royal Logistic Corps
Army Medical Services
Royal Army Medical Corps
Royal Army Dental Corps
Royal Army Veterinary Corps
Queen Alexandra's Royal
Army Nursing Corps
Corps of Royal Electrical and
Mechanical Engineers
Adjutant General's Corps
Army Legal Services Branch
Royal Military Police
Military Provost Staff Corps
Small Arms School Corps
Army Physical Training Corps
General Service Corps
Corps of Army Music

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) is currently a collection of ten regular regiments, mostly converted from old horse cavalry regiments, and four Yeomanry regiments of the Territorial Army. ... The British Armys Infantry is comprised of 55 battalions of Infantry, from 32 Regiments. ... The Guards Division is an administrative unit of the British Army responsible for the administration of the regiments of Foot Guards. ... The Scottish Division is a British Army Infantry command, training and administrative apparatus designated for all Scottish infantry units. ... The Kings Division is a British Army command, training and administrative apparatus designated for all land force units in the North of England. ... The Queens Division is a British Army command, training and administrative apparatus designated for has the regiments from the east of England and the remaining regiment of Fusiliers. ... The Prince of Waless Division is a British Army command, training and administrative apparatus designated for all land force units in the West of England and Wales. ... The Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling) 83rd and 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment), commonly just called the Royal Irish Regiment (R IRISH), is an infantry unit of the British Army and is the only remaining Irish regiment of the line. ... The Parachute Regiment redirects here, for the Indian regiment, see The Parachute Regiment (India) The Parachute Regiment is the Airborne Infantry element of the British Army. ... Gurkha Soldiers (1896) The Brigade of Gurkhas is the collective term for British Army units that are composed of Nepalese soldiers. ... For the band The Rifles, see The Rifles (band). ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... See also Australian Special Air Service Regiment and New Zealand Special Air Service: The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Artillery The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Signals The Royal Corps of Signals (sometimes referred to incorrectly as the Royal Signal Corps and often known simply as the Royal Signals or R SIGNALS) is one of the arms (combat support corps) of the British Army. ... The Intelligence Corps (also known as Int Corps) is one of the corps of the British Army. ... The Royal Army Chaplains Department (RAChD) is an all-officer corps that provides ordained clergy to minister to the British Army. ... The Royal Logistic Corps is the British Army corps that provides the logistic support for the Army. ... The Army Medical Services is an umbrella organisation responsible for administering the four separate units responsible for supplying medical and nursing services in the British Army. ... The Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) is a specialist corps in the British Army which provides medical services to all British Army personnel and their families in war and in peace. ... Cap badge of the Royal Army Dental Corps The Royal Army Dental Corps (RADC) is a specialist corps in the British Army that provides dental care services to British Army personnel and their families in war and in peace. ... Cap badge of the Royal Army Veterinary Corps The Royal Army Veterinary Corps (RAVC) is an administrative and operational branch of the British Army responsible for the provision, training and care of animals. ... Cap Badge of the Queen Alexandras Royal Army Nursing Corps The Queen Alexandras Royal Army Nursing Corps (QARANC) is part of the Army Medical Services in the British Army. ... The Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME; pronounced phonetically as Reemee) is a corps of the British Army that has responsibility for the maintenance, servicing and inspection of almost every electrical and mechanical piece of equipment within the British Army from Challenger II main battle tanks and AH64... The Adjutant Generals Corps is a corps in the British Army responsible for many of its general administrative services. ... The Army Legal Services Branch (ALS) is a branch of the Adjutant-Generals Corps (AGC) in the British Army. ... The Royal Military Police (RMP) is the branch of the British Army responsible for the policing of service personnel and providing a military police presence on service property, operations and exercises. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Adjutant Generals Corps. ... The Small Arms School Corps is a small corps of the British Army responsible for maintaining the proficiency of the army in the use of small arms and support weapons. ... Bold textLink title Headline text Insert non-formatted text here ... Cap Badge of the General Service Corps The General Service Corps (GSC) is a corps of the British Army. ... The Corps of Army Music is a corps of the British Army. ...

Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers (Militia)

The Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers (Militia) (R MON RE(M)) is the most senior regiment in the British Territorial Army, having given continuous loyal service to the crown since 1539. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ...

Honourable Artillery Company

Armorial bearings of the HAC, granted in 1821 The Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) is the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior[2] in the Territorial Army [3] . // The HAC can trace its history as far back as 1296, but it received a Royal Charter...

Royal Armoured Corps

The Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) is currently a collection of ten regular regiments, mostly converted from old horse cavalry regiments, and four Yeomanry regiments of the Territorial Army. ... The Royal Yeomanry (RY) is an armoured regiment of the Territorial Army consisting of five squadrons and a military band: A (Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry) Squadron (Swindon) B (Leicestershire and Derbyshire Yeomanry) Squadron (Leicester) C (Kent and Sharpshooters Yeomanry) Squadron (Croydon) S (Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry) Squadron (Nottingham) W (Westminster Dragoons) Squadron... The Royal Mercian and Lancastrian Yeomanry is an armoured regiment of the Territorial Army consisting of five squadrons, four of which bear the cap badge of an old yeomanry regiment: HQ Squadron A (Staffordshire, Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry) Squadron B (Shropshire Yeomanry) Squadron C (Cheshire Yeomanry) Squadron D (Duke of... The Royal Wessex Yeomanry is an armoured regiment of the Territorial Army consisting of four squadrons, each of which bears the cap badge of an old yeomanry regiment: A (Dorset Yeomanry) Squadron B (Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry) Squadron C (Royal Gloucestershire Hussars) Squadron D (Royal Devon Yeomanry) Squadron The Royal Wessex... The Queens Own Yeomanry is an armoured regiment of the British Territorial Army consisting of five squadrons, and which bears the running fox cap badge of the old East Riding Yeomanry: A (Ayrshire (Earl of Carricks Own) Yeomanry) Squadron B (North Irish Horse) Squadron C (Fife and Forfar...

Royal Artillery

Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Artillery The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... 101st (Northumbrian) Regiment Royal Artillery (Volunteers) are a Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) and Surveillance and Target Acquisition (STA) regiment of the Territorial Army (TA) with sub units throughout Northumbria. ... 103 (Lancastrian Artillery Volunteers) Regiment, Royal Artillery. ... 104 Regiment, Royal Artillery. ... 105 Regiment, Royal Artillery. ... 106th (Yeomanry) Regiment, RA (Volunteers) A Territorial Army (TA) Air Defense Artillery Regiment the 106 is a unit with mixed equipment. ...

Royal Engineers

  • 71 Engineer Regiment
  • 72 Engineer Regiment
  • 73 Engineer Regiment
  • 75 Engineer Regiment
  • 101 (City of London) Engineer Regiment
  • 131 Independent Commando Squadron Royal Engineers (Volunteers) to form 24 Commando Regiment Royal Engineers in early 2007
  • 135 Geographic Squadron Royal Engineers (Volunteers)
  • 412 Amphibious Engineer Troop

The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... 24 Commando Regiment Royal Engineers is a Regiment of the British Armys Corps of Royal Engineers which will be formed in early 2007 around existing Commando trained elements of the Corps; 59 Independent Commando Squadron and 131 Independent Commando Squadron (Volunteers). ...

Royal Corps of Signals

11 Signal Brigade Units: Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Signals The Royal Corps of Signals (sometimes referred to incorrectly as the Royal Signal Corps and often known simply as the Royal Signals or R SIGNALS) is one of the arms (combat support corps) of the British Army. ... See also Australian Special Air Service Regiment and New Zealand Special Air Service: The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... 97 (BRITFOR) Signal Squadron (Volunteers) is a Territorial Army squadron in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ...

2 (National Communications) Signal Brigade Units: The 33rd (Lancashire and Chesire) Signal Regiment is a British Territorial Army regiment of the Royal Corps of Signals. ... 34 (Northern) Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ... The 35th (South Midlands) Signal Regiment is a British Territorial Army regiment of the Royal Corps of Signals. ... 2 (National Communications) Signal Brigade is a Brigade of the Royal Corps of Signals. ...

31 (City of London) Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ... The 32nd (Scottish) Signal Regiment is a British Territorial Army Regiment of the Royal Corps of Signals. ... 36 (Eastern) Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ... 37 Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ... 38 Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ... 39 (Skinners) Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ... 40 (Ulster) Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ... 71 (Yeomanry) Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ... Centenary Logo of FANY (PRVC) The First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (Princess Royals Volunteer Corps) (FANY(PRVC) - pronounced Fanny) is a British independent all-female unit and registered charity affiliated to, but not part of, the Territorial Army. ... The Land Information Assurance Group (Volunteers) - LIAG(V) - is a specialist Territorial Army (TA) unit, formed as a result of the Strategic Defence Review (SDR) of 1998: On Information Warfare. ...

Infantry

The British Armys Infantry is comprised of 55 battalions of Infantry, from 32 Regiments. ... The 52nd Lowland Regiment now forms the 6th Battalion of The Royal Regiment of Scotland, also known as 6 SCOTS. It is the senior Territorial line infantry battalion in the British Army. ... The Royal Regiment of Scotland is the senior and only Scottish line infantry regiment of the British Army Infantry. ... The 51st Highland Regiment is an infantry regiment of the British Territorial Army or reserve force. ... The Royal Regiment of Scotland is the senior and only Scottish line infantry regiment of the British Army Infantry. ... PWRR redirects here. ... Battalions of the London Regiment early 1900s by Richard Caton Woodville (1856-1927) The London Regiment is a Territorial Army regiment in the British Army. ... The Lancastrian and Cumbrian Volunteers is a Territorial Army unit of the British Army. ... The Duke of Lancasters Regiment (Kings, Lancashire and Border) is one of the new large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... The Tyne-Tees Regiment was a regiment of the British Territorial Army. ... Official name The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers Colonel-in-Chief HRH The Duke of Kent Nicknames Motto Anniversaries St Georges Day (23 April) Minden (1 August) Marches Quick: The British Grenadiers Slow: Rule Britnnia Mascot Indian Black Buck named Bobby Description Infantry regiment Creation date 1968 Reason for creation... The 3rd battalion Royal Anglian Regiment is the Territorial Army unit of the Royal Anglian Regiment and is made up of volunteers who train in their spare time as soldiers. ... The East and West Riding Regiment was a regiment of the British Territorial Army. ... The Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) is one of the large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... The West Midlands Regiment is a British Territorial Army Regiment that is composed of six companies. ... The Mercian Regiment is one of the new large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... The Royal Welsh Regiment is an infantry regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ... The Royal Welsh is one of the new large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... The Royal Irish Rangers 27th (Inniskilling), 83rd and 87th was an infantry regiment of the British Army. ... The Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling) 83rd and 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment), commonly just called the Royal Irish Regiment (R IRISH), is an infantry unit of the British Army and is the only remaining Irish regiment of the line. ... The 4th (Volunteer) Battalion, The Parachute Regiment (4 PARA) is a Territorial Army (TA) unit based throughout the UK. Originally the Battalion covered the North of England with its Headquarters located in Pudsey, West Yorkshire. ... The Rifle Volunteers is a regiment of the British Territorial Army. ... For the band The Rifles, see The Rifles (band). ... The Royal Rifle Volunteers is a former regiment of the British Territorial Army. ... For the band The Rifles, see The Rifles (band). ...

Special Air Service

See also Australian Special Air Service Regiment and New Zealand Special Air Service: The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... The 21st Special Air Service Regiment (Artists) (Volunteers) is a special forces regiment of the British Territorial Army. ... 23 SAS (23 Special Air Service regiment) is one of the Territorial Armys special forces regiments. ...

Army Air Corps

  • 6 (Volunteer) Regiment AAC
  • 7 (Volunteer) Regiment AAC

The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ...

Royal Logistic Corps

The Royal Logistic Corps is the British Army corps that provides the logistic support for the Army. ... The Scottish Transport Regiment, Royal Logistic Corps, is a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ... 150th (Yorkshire) Transport Regiment, Royal Corps of Transport and Royal Logistics Corps, is a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ... 151st (Greater London) Logistic Support Regiment, Royal Corps of Transport and Royal Logistics Corps, is a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ... 152nd (Ulster) Transport Regiment, Royal Corps of Transport and Royal Logistics Corps, is a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ... 155th (Wessex) Transport Regiment, Royal Corps of Transport and Royal Logistics Corps, was a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom from 1967 to 1993 and again from 2006 to date. ... 157th (Wales and Midlands) Transport Regiment, Royal Corps of Transport and Royal Logistics Corps, is a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ... 158th (Royal Anglian) Transport Regiment, Royal Logistic Corps, is a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ... 159th Support Regiment, Royal Logistic Corps, is a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ... 168 Pioneer Regiment was formed following the rationalisation of Army logistics instigated by the Logistic Support Review in 1990 which advocated that all logistic support matters should be the responsibility of a new corps, The Royal Logistic Corps (RLC). ... 88th Postal and Courier Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps, is a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ... The Catering Support Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps, is a regiment of the Territorial Army in the United Kingdom. ...

Army Medical Services

  • 254 (City of Cambridge) General Support Medical Regiment
  • 225 (Scottish) General Support Medical Regiment
  • 253 (North Irish) General Support Medical Regiment
  • 250 Medical Squadron
  • 144 Parachute Medical Squadron

2 Medical Brigade Units: The Army Medical Services is an umbrella organisation responsible for administering the four separate units responsible for supplying medical and nursing services in the British Army. ...

  • 201 (Northern) Field Hospital
  • 202 (Midlands) Field Hospital
  • 203 (Welsh) Field Hospital
  • 204 (North Irish) Field Hospital
  • 205 (Scottish) Field Hospital
  • 207 (Manchester) Field Hospital
  • 208 (Liverpool) Field Hospital
  • 212 (Yorkshire) Field Hospital
  • 222 Field Hospital
  • 243 (Wessex) Field Hospital
  • 256 (City of London) Field Hospital
  • 34 Field Hospital

47th Combat Support Hospital, 2000 A field hospital is a large mobile medical unit that temporarily takes care of casualties on-site before they can be safely transported to more permanent hospital facilities. ...

Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

The Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME; pronounced phonetically as Reemee) is a corps of the British Army that has responsibility for the maintenance, servicing and inspection of almost every electrical and mechanical piece of equipment within the British Army from Challenger II main battle tanks and AH64... The Headquarters Combat Service Support Group (Germany) was established in Gütersloh in January 1993. ... The 101 Logistic Brigade came into being during 1999. ...

Adjutant General's Corps

The Adjutant Generals Corps is a corps in the British Army responsible for many of its general administrative services. ... The Royal Military Police (RMP) is the branch of the British Army responsible for the policing of service personnel and providing a military police presence on service property, operations and exercises. ...

Intelligence Corps

  • 3 (Volunteer) Military Intelligence Battalion
  • 5 (Volunteer) Military Intelligence Battalion

The Intelligence Corps (also known as Int Corps) is one of the corps of the British Army. ...

Corps of Army Music

Pipes and Drums The Corps of Army Music is a corps of the British Army. ... Armorial bearings of the HAC, granted in 1821 The Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) is the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior[2] in the Territorial Army [3] . // The HAC can trace its history as far back as 1296, but it received a Royal Charter... PWRR redirects here. ... Official name The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers Colonel-in-Chief HRH The Duke of Kent Nicknames Motto Anniversaries St Georges Day (23 April) Minden (1 August) Marches Quick: The British Grenadiers Slow: Rule Britnnia Mascot Indian Black Buck named Bobby Description Infantry regiment Creation date 1968 Reason for creation... The Royal Anglian Regiment (R ANGLIAN) is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Queens Division. ... Cap Badge of the Royal Gibraltar Regiment The Royal Gibraltar Regiment is the home defence unit for the British Colony of Gibraltar. ... The Bermuda Regiment Band A Command Centre during IS training. ... The Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling) 83rd and 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment), commonly just called the Royal Irish Regiment (R IRISH), is an infantry unit of the British Army and is the only remaining Irish regiment of the line. ... The Royal Logistic Corps is the British Army corps that provides the logistic support for the Army. ... The Royal Welsh is one of the new large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... The Duke of Lancasters Regiment (Kings, Lancashire and Border) is one of the new large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... The Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) is one of the large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... The British 51st Infantry Brigade is currently known as 51 (Scottish) Brigade and as part of the 2nd Division, it is the regional administrative formation responsible for all the units of the Territorial Army based in Scotland. ... The Royal Regiment of Scotland is the senior and only Scottish line infantry regiment of the British Army Infantry. ... History The Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales) or Staffords was formed in 1959 by the amalgamation of The South Staffordshire Regiment and the North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales). The Staffords can trace their history back to 1705 when a regiment known as the 38th Foot was raised at Lichfield... For the band The Rifles, see The Rifles (band). ... For the band The Rifles, see The Rifles (band). ... The Inns of Court and City Yeomanry (ICCY) is a yeomanry regiment of the Territorial Army. ... The Royal Yeomanry (RY) is an armoured regiment of the Territorial Army consisting of five squadrons and a military band: A (Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry) Squadron (Swindon) B (Leicestershire and Derbyshire Yeomanry) Squadron (Leicester) C (Kent and Sharpshooters Yeomanry) Squadron (Croydon) S (Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry) Squadron (Nottingham) W (Westminster Dragoons) Squadron... 103rd (Lancastrian Artillery Volunteers) Regiment Royal Artillery provide reinforcements for units using the 105 mm L118 Light Gun and the AS90. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ...

Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... The 52nd Lowland Regiment now forms the 6th Battalion of The Royal Regiment of Scotland, also known as 6 SCOTS. It is the senior Territorial line infantry battalion in the British Army. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... The 51st Highland Regiment is an infantry regiment of the British Territorial Army or reserve force. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... For other uses, see London Scottish. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... 103rd (Lancastrian Artillery Volunteers) Regiment Royal Artillery provide reinforcements for units using the 105 mm L118 Light Gun and the AS90. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Signals The Royal Corps of Signals (sometimes referred to incorrectly as the Royal Signal Corps and often known simply as the Royal Signals or R SIGNALS) is one of the arms (combat support corps) of the British Army. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... The Officer Training Corps (OTC) is a part of the British Army that provides military leadership training to students at UK universities. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ...

Officer Training Corps

Many British Universities also have Officer Training Corps units, which allow students to experience military life. University Officer Training Corps (UOTCs) still officially form part of the TA. However, they fall into reserve category "B" meaning they cannot be called up for service unless there is a national emergency. The Officers Training Corps (OTC) is a part of the British Army that provides military training to students at British universities. ... The Officer Training Corps (OTC) is a part of the British Army that provides military leadership training to students at UK universities. ...

  • Aberdeen UOTC
  • Birmingham UOTC
  • Bristol UOTC
  • Cambridge UOTC
  • East Midlands UOTC
  • Edinburgh UOTC
  • Exeter UOTC
  • Glasgow and Strathclyde UOTC
  • Leeds UOTC
  • Liverpool UOTC
  • Manchester UOTC
  • Northumbrian UOTC
  • Oxford UOTC
  • Queen's UOTC
  • Sheffield UOTC
  • Southampton UOTC
  • Tayforth UOTC
  • Wales UOTC
  • University of London OTC

Overseas territories

Throughout the British Empire, home defence units, like the Royal Hong Kong Regiment, were raised in various British colonies with the intention of allowing Regular Army units tied-up on garrison duty to be deployed elsewhere. These have generally been organised along Territorial Army lines. There are three units, today, in the remaining British Overseas Territories (BOT): the Bermuda Regiment, the Royal Gibraltar Regiment, and the Falkland Islands Defence Force. Although the British Government, as national government, is responsible for the defence of the territories, and holds direct control of military units raised within them, the local forces are raised and funded by the local governments of the territories. These units must meet British Army standards in organisation and efficiency. Their officers are commissioned by Sandhurst, and their sergeants attend the Platoon Sergeants course at Brecon (itself having been begun as a course for Parachute Regiment NCOs, created by a Bermudian officer, Major-General Glyn Charles Anglim Gilbert). Although OT units may have no tasking under the Ministry of Defence, and members may not be compelled to serve outside their territory, many serve voluntarily on attachment to Regular Army units. In the 1980s, a cadre of officers and NCOs from the Bermuda Regiment was briefly attached to a battalion of the affiliated Royal Anglian Regiment deployed to Belize, guarding against a threatened invasion by Guatemala. The Royal Gibraltar Regiment is moving towards full integration with the British Army, having been added to the Army List, and with two of its three rifle companies having become full-time, following the withdrawal of the Regular Army garrison in 1991. The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... See The Royal Hong Kong Regiment (Volunteers) ... Location of the British Overseas Territories The British Overseas Territories are fourteen[1] territories which the United Kingdom considers to be under its sovereignty, but not as part of the United Kingdom itself. ... The Bermuda Regiment Band A Command Centre during IS training. ... Cap Badge of the Royal Gibraltar Regiment The Royal Gibraltar Regiment is the home defence unit for the British Colony of Gibraltar. ... The Falkland Islands are an overseas territory of the United Kingdom and, as such, rely on the UK for guarantee of their security. ... Major-General Glyn Charles Anglim Gilbert, CB, MC was the highest-ranking Bermudian soldier. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal Anglian Regiment (R ANGLIAN) is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Queens Division. ...


Basic training

For TA Soldiers, recruit training is structured into two phases. In Phase 1, recruits initially undergo a series of 8 training weekends at Regional Training Centres (RTCs) that culminates in the Common Military Syllabus (Recruit) (CMS(R)) Course, which for TA Soldiers lasts two weeks (as opposed to fourteen weeks for regular army recruits), normally held at an Army Training Regiment. This is followed by Phase 2, a further period of specialist training specific to the type of unit the recruit is joining, for example the two week Combat Infantryman's Course (CIC) held at the Infantry Training Centre, Catterick. Regional Training Centres were created from the previously existing Specialist Training Teams to provide training for the United Kingdom Territorial Army (TA). ... An Army Training Regiment (ATR) is a unit of the British Army which conducts basic training for new recruits. ... The Infantry Training Centre (ITC) is a unit of the British Army administered by HQ School of Infantry. ... Map sources for Catterick Garrison at grid reference SE2497 Catterick Garrison is a major Army base located in North Yorkshire in England. ...


Many TA officers initially serve in the ranks. For the minority that enter direct under the Direct Entry TA Potenial Officer (DETAPO) system training is structured into five modules, which together form the Territorial Army Officer Commissioning Course (TAOCC), those who intially serve in the ranks undertake only the latter four modules.


Module 1 is the same as the Common Military Syllabus (Recruit) course, with many Officers initially serving a period of time as Soldiers.


Module 2 covers lessons in Tactics, Leadership, Doctrine and Navigation are taught and a further series of selection and aptitude tests are undertaken, usually spread over 10 weekends, this also includes passing The Army Officer Selection Board. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Army Officer Selection Board [1] at Leighton House, Westbury in Wiltshire, England, runs selection courses which must be passed before being offered a place at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. ...


Module 3 applies the theory taught in Module 2 into a 9 day Battle Camp. Modules 1 to 3 are run by Regional Training Centres. Field craft is a term used especially in British military circles to describe the basic military skills required to operate stealthily at day or night regardless of weather or terrain. ... Regional Training Centres were created from the previously existing Specialist Training Teams to provide training for the United Kingdom Territorial Army (TA). ...


Module 4. Passing the AOSB and Module 3 then enables Potential Officers to attend an intensive 3 week Assessment at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, which forms Module 4. New College, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst New Colours are presented to RMAS, June 2005. ...


Module 5 again run at an RTC, over 3 weekends (4 weekends for ex-UOTC cadidates) covers post commissioning training.


Special To Arm training is specific to the type of unit the Subaltern is joining, for example, the 2 week Platoon Commander's Battle Course held at the Infantry Battle School in Brecon. A subaltern is a military term for a junior officer. ... Platoon is a term from military science. ... The Infantry Training Centre (ITC) is a unit of the British Army administered by HQ School of Infantry. ... The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ...


Restructuring

On December 16, 2004, Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon announced a major restructuring of the infantry in the Delivering Security in a Changing World Review of the Armed Forces. The 40 battalions of the regular army will be reduced to 36, with the majority of those remaining being amalgamated into larger regiments, leaving a total of 18 infantry regiments. The 14 TA infantry battalions will be included in this structure, with each regiment having at least one TA battalion (the Royal Regiment of Scotland and The Rifles will have two); the Guards Division will also have an affiliated TA battalion, the London Regiment. is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Geoffrey William Hoon (born December 6, 1953) is a British politician. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... The 2003 Defence White Paper, entitled Delivering Security in a Changing World sets out the future of the British military, and builds on the 1998 Strategic Defence Review (SDR) and the 2002 SDR New Chapter which responded to the challenges raised by the War on Terror. ... The Royal Regiment of Scotland is the senior and only Scottish line infantry regiment of the British Army Infantry. ... For the band The Rifles, see The Rifles (band). ... Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ... The London Regiment is a Territorial Army regiment in the British Army. ...


See also

British Army Portal

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Royal Auxiliary Air Force (RAuxAF) is the volunteer reserve part of the Royal Air Force. ... “RNR” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Home Service Force was a Home Guard type force established in the United Kingdom in 1982. ... The Auxiliary Units (or Auxunits) were specially trained highly secret units created with the aim of resisting the expected invasion of the British Isles by Nazi Germany during World War II. Britain was the only country during the war to create such a resistance movement in advance of an invasion. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Territorial Decoration (TD) was a United Kingdom military medal, also known as the Territorial Efficiency Decoration, which was given to officers for long service in the Territorial Army. ... The Volunteer Reserves Service Medal (VRSM) is a medal awarded to all members of the reserves of all of the branches of the British Armed Forces - the Royal Naval Reserve, the Royal Marines Reserve, the Territorial Army and the Royal Auxiliary Air Force. ... Exercise Cambrian Patrol is an annual patrolling competition that takes place throughout the Cambrian Mountains of mid-Wales. ... 70048 The Territorial Army 1908-1958 was a British Railways BR standard class 7 (also known as Britannia class) steam locomotive, named after the Territorial Army, a part of the British Army. ... Edward Richard Holmes CBE TD JP (born March 29, 1946), known as Richard Holmes, is a British soldier and noted military historian, particularly well-known through his many television appearances. ... The Territorial Army in India (commonly referred to as TA in India) is based on the British Territorial Army. ...

References

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary online: "a military force raised from the civilian population of a country or region, esp. to supplement a regular army in an emergency", "military units and forces, raised locally (and usually for the purpose of local defence) from the civilian population of an area, and distinguished from professional standing armies as the latter developed"
  2. ^ e.g. Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers (Militia), The Jersey Field Squadron (Militia), The Royal Militia of The Island of Jersey, 4th (Volunteer) Battalion The Royal Irish Rangers (27th (Inniskilling) 83rd and 87th) (North Irish Militia) (until 1993)
  3. ^ Armed Forces Website - TA Overview
  4. ^ New Territorial Army – The Government Scheme, The Times, January 31, 1920
  5. ^ New Citizen Army – 2nd Line Defence Scheme, The Times, January 31, 1920
  6. ^ Territorial Army Reduction, The Times, July 15, 1921
  7. ^ Territorial Army Amalgamations – 40 Battalions Affected The Times, October 5, 1921
  8. ^ Territorial Army Reductions - £1,650,000 to be saved, The Times, March 4, 1922
  9. ^ The Territorial Army and Air Defence of Great Britain, (United Kingdom Reserve Forces Association), accessed August 28, 2007
  10. ^ Air Defence of London – Two Brigades of Ground Troops, The Times, July 12, 1922
  11. ^ Territorial Army - Establishment doubled, The Times, March 30, 1939
  12. ^ 13 Additional Divisions - Method of Expansion, The Times, March 30, 1939
  13. ^ Charles Messenger, A History of the British Infantry: Volume Two 1915-94, Leo Cooper, London, 1996, p.157
  14. ^ Napoleonic war links to go, The Times, August 30, 1955
  15. ^ TA replanning complete, The Times, May 6, 1956
  16. ^ Reorganizing Territorials, the Times, July 21, 1960
  17. ^ [1] Regiments of the British Territorial & Army Volunteer Reserve 1967 (regiments.org)
  18. ^ Lineage of British Army Regiments 1967 - 2000 by Wienand Drieth [2]
  19. ^ [3]
  20. ^ [4]
  21. ^ BBC report on 2006 CCRF exercise

THE TERRITORIAL ARMY - 1999 - An archive document of The TA in 1999 before the implementation of The Strategic Defence Review. M A Heyman

External links

  • Territorial Army
  • Territorial Army Near You Unofficial website showing the locations of currently-serving TA units and subunits
  • The All Party Parliamentary Reserve Forces Group - see their most recent report on the TA
  • Royal Engineers Museum - RE Militia, Volunteers and Territorials (1757-1979)
  • The Army Rumour Service - THE unofficial site for members of the British Army
  • The Army Rumour Service Wiki Page
  • The Royal Gazette: Regiment to join forces with army from ‘The Rock'
  • Regiment gets fired up during training
  • World War II Order of Battle Data Base
  • http://www.orbat.com/site/history/index.html - Look on this page for an article on the TA's Order of Battle 1947
  • Regiments of the British Territorial Force 1908 (Regiments.org)
  • Regiments of the British Territorial Army 1939 (Regiments.org)
  • Regiments of the British Territorial and Army Volunteer Reserve 1967 (Regiments.org)
  • Regiments of the British Territorial Army 1995 (Regiments.org)
  • Regiments of the British Territorial Army 1999 (Regiments.org)
  • Regiments of the British Territorial Army 2008 (Regiments.org)
The Armed Forces of the Republic of Macedonia (Macedonian: Армија на Република Македонија) were formed in 1992 after withdrawal of the Yugoslav Peoples Army which left behind only a small number of infantry weapons and four broken World War 2-era T-34 tanks to equip the new army. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Territorial Army - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1218 words)
The Territorial Army is a part of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom.
The Territorial Force was originally formed by the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane, following the passage of the "Territorial and Reserve Forces Bill" on August 2, 1907 and contained 14 infantry divisions, each administered by a County Association.
Territorial units initially saw service in Egypt and India and other Empire garrisons such as Gibraltar, thereby releasing regular units for service in France and enabling the formation of an additional five regular army divisions (for a total of eleven) by early 1915.
British Army - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2536 words)
Today the Army is one of the most technologically advanced land forces in the world, and is deployed in many of the world's war zones as part of a fighting force, and in United Nations peacekeeping forces.
The British Army were deployed to Sierra Leone, a former British colony, in 1999 to aid the government in quelling violent uprisings by militiamen, under United Nations resolutions.
The official flag of the Army as a whole is the Union Flag, flown at ratio 3:5.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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