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Encyclopedia > Terre Haute, Indiana
City of Terre Haute, Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Coordinates: 39°28′11″N 87°23′23″W / 39.46972, -87.38972
Country United States
State Indiana
County Vigo
Government
 - Mayor Duke A. Bennett (R)
Area
 - Total 32.1 sq mi (83.1 km²)
 - Land 31.2 sq mi (80.9 km²)
 - Water 0.9 sq mi (2.2 km²)
Elevation 499 ft (152 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 59,614
 - Density 1,908.3/sq mi (736.8/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 812
FIPS code 18-75428[1]
GNIS feature ID 0444648[2]
Website: City of Terre Haute

Terre Haute (pronounced /ˌtɛrəˈhoʊt/) is a city in Vigo County, Indiana near the state's western border with Illinois. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 59,614 and a metropolitan population of 170,943. The city is the county seat of Vigo County[3] and the self-proclaimed capital of the Wabash Valley. The federal death row is in Terre Haute at the Terre Haute Federal Correctional Complex. For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Listed are the 92 counties of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Vigo County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... GOP redirects here. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... North American area code 812 includes cities and regions in southern Indiana (Bedford, Bloomington, Columbus, Evansville, Jasper, Jeffersonville, Madison, Mount Vernon, New Albany, Princeton, Seymour, Terre Haute, and Vincennes, among others). ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Vigo County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The United States Census of year 2000, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Vigo County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... The Wabash Valley is a region with parts in both Illinois and Indiana. ... Capital punishment is a controversial issue in the United States and, indeed, in most of the world, with many prominent organizations and individuals participating in the debate. ... The Federal Correctional Complex, Terre Haute, is a federal prison for adult males located at the intersection of State Road 63 and Springhill Drive, two miles southwest of Terre Haute, Indiana, United States. ...

Contents

Geography

Terre Haute is at 39°28′11″N, 87°23′23″W (39.469586, -87.389762),[4] alongside the eastern bank of the Wabash River in western Indiana. The city lies about 75 miles west of Indianapolis. The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 32.1 square miles (83.1 km²), of which, 31.2 square miles (80.9 km²) of it is land and 0.9 square miles (2.2 km²) of it (2.68%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...

Terre Haute downtown area, looking southwest

The physical geography of the city is dominated by the Wabash River, which forms the western border of the city. The city itself lies on a high, flat plain that rarely floods. Small bluffs on the east side of city mark the edge of the historic flood plain. Lost Creek and Honey Creek drain the northern and southern sections of the city, respectively. In the late 1800s (particularly during the Terre Haute Oil Craze of 1889), several oil and mineral wells were productive in and near the center of the city. Those have not been tapped for many years. Image File history File links TerreHaute-Downtown-lookingsouth. ... Image File history File links TerreHaute-Downtown-lookingsouth. ... The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ...


Terre Haute is located at the intersection of two major roadways: the National Road from California to Maryland, and U.S. 41 from Michigan to Florida (locally named "3rd Street"). Terre Haute is located 77 miles southwest of Indianapolis and within 185 miles of Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, and Cincinnati. Map showing the route of the National Road at its greatest completion in 1839, with historical state boundaries. ... U.S. Highway 41 is a north-south United States Highway that runs from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Miami, Florida. ...


When Interstate 70 was built in the early 1970s, the community's major shopping area became centered near the interchange south of the city. U.S. 40 still runs through the downtown area as of 2005. The Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) plans to transfer the route number to State Road 46 and Interstate 70 through the Terre Haute area once the new State Road 641 bypass is completed. The old US 40, known as Wabash Avenue, will be transferred to to city and county control.[citation needed] Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... United States Highway 40 is an east-west United States highway. ... The Indiana Department of Transportation is the agency of the state of Indiana charged with maintaining and regulating transportation and transportation related infrastructure such as state owned airports, state highways and state owned canals or railroads, as well as state routes, US highways and Interstates that lie within the state. ... State Road 46 in the U.S. State of Indiana is an east-west state highway in the southern portion of Indiana. ...


Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there are 60,614 people, 30,870 households, and 20,035 families residing in the city. The population density is 1,908.4 people per square mile (736.8/km²). There are 25,636 housing units at an average density of 820.7/sq mi (316.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city is 86.26% White, 9.77% African American, 5.34% Native American, 1.17% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.51% from other races, and 5.91% from two or more races. 10.58% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There are 22,870 households out of which 27.2% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.0% are married couples living together, 14.0% have a female householder with no husband present, and 43.0% are non-families. 34.9% of all households are made up of individuals and 14.1% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.28 and the average family size is 2.95. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population is spread out with 21.3% under the age of 18, 18.7% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 18.5% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 32 years. For every 100 females there are 97.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 95.4 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $28,018, and the median income for a family is $37,618. Males have a median income of $29,375 versus $21,374 for females. The per capita income for the city is $15,728. About 14.8% of families and 19.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.4% of those under the age of 18 and 11.4% of those 65 and older. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


History

Clabber Girl factory complex
Clabber Girl factory complex

The name of the city is derived from the French phrase terre haute (pronounced [tɛʁot] in French), meaning "high land". It was named by French explorers in the area in the early 18th century to describe the plateau-like rise of land next to the Wabash River (see French colonization of the Americas). When the area was claimed by the French and English, these highlands were considered the border between Canada and Louisiana.[5] Image File history File links Terrehaute-Clabbergirl. ... Image File history File links Terrehaute-Clabbergirl. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Flag In 1803, the United States concluded the Louisiana Purchase (green area) with France. ...


During "Tecumseh's War" in 1811, the construction of Fort Harrison during an expedition led by William Henry Harrison marked the known beginning of a permanent population of European-Americans. A Wea village called Weautano (also known as "Rising Sun" and "Old Orchard Town") already existed near the fort. The fort was defended from a British–inspired attack by an estimated 600 Native Americans during the Battle of Fort Harrison on September 4, 1812 by Captain Zachary Taylor. The orchards and meadows kept by the local Wea populations became the site of present–day Terre Haute, a few miles south of Fort Harrison. Before 1830, the few remaining Wea had departed under pressure from white settlement. At Vincennes in 1810, Tecumseh loses his temper when William Henry Harrison refuses to rescind the Treaty of Fort Wayne. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... Fort Harrison was an important component of the Confederate defenses of Richmond during the American Civil War. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... A European American (Euro-American) is a person who resides in the United States and is either the descendant of European immigrants or from Europe him/herself. ... WEA may refer to: Warner Music Group, previously known as Warner-Elektra-Atlantic Werner Erhard and Associates, a successor organisation to Erhard Seminars Training and precursor to Landmark Education Washington Education Association White Eagle Aviation, airline based in Poland Workers Educational Association World Energy Assessment, Energy and the Challenge of... The Battle of Fort Harrison was a decisive victory for the United States against an Indian force which greatly outnumbered their own. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ...


The village of Terre Haute, then a part of Knox County, Indiana, was platted in 1816. Its early identity was as an agricultural and pork-packing center and as a port on the then-navigable Wabash River for steamboats and other river-craft. Between 1835 and late 1839, Terre Haute served as the headquarters for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers under Major Cornelius A. Ogden during the construction of the National Road. As a result, a number of West Point graduates and other highly educated people located in the town. Wealthy Terre Haute entrepreneur Chauncey Rose built The Prairie House, a fancy hotel, in 1838 primarily to accommodate those families. In 1855, the name of The Prairie House was changed to the Terre Haute House. Knox County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ... Map showing the route of the National Road at its greatest completion in 1839, with historical state boundaries. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Demolition of the north wing; December 2005 The Terre Haute House was a historic former hotel located in downtown Terre Haute, Indiana that was demolished despite numerous efforts to preserve it. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Snow does nothing to delay the demolition of the north wing; December 2005 The Terre Haute House was a historic former hotel located in downtown Terre Haute, Indiana that was demolished despite numerous efforts to preserve it. ...


Development in anticipation of completion of the Wabash and Erie Canal, the longest manmade body of water in the western hemisphere, also brought prosperity to the community. The canal finally reached Terre Haute in October 1849. Founded by Chauncey Rose, the Terre Haute and Richmond Railroad began operations between Terre Haute and Indianapolis in February 1852 and its traffic soon surpassed that on the canal. The name of the Terre Haute and Richmond Railroad (West of Indianapolis) soon was changed to the Terre Haute and Indianapolis Railroad. It became the operating company of the Vandalia Railroad System. The community quickly gained the reputation as a transportation hub. The Wabash and Erie Canal was a shipping canal in Indiana that linked the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River via a man-made waterway. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1832, Terre Haute became a town and, in May 1853, elected to become a city. After the American Civil War, it developed into an industrial and mining center, with iron and steel mills, hominy plants and, late in the 19th Century, distilleries, breweries, coal mines and coal operating companies. Business boomed. Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Terre Haute's Famous "Four-Cornered" Race Track was the site of more than 20 world harness racing records and helped trigger the city's reputation as a sporting center. The bustling economy also led to establishing several institutes of higher education: Saint Mary-of-the Woods Institute (now Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College), John Covert's Terre Haute Female College, Indiana State Normal School (now Indiana State University), Terre Haute School of Industrial Science (now Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology) and Coates College for Women. The city developed culture and a reputation in the arts. As a base of industry, it also developed a strong tradition of union activity, which resulted in hosting a two-day conclave beginning on August 3, 1881 of the National Trade Union Congress, renamed the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions of the U.S. and Canada. In 1886, the Federation was renamed the American Federation of Labor. The city also produced labor leader Eugene V. Debs. Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College is a Catholic, four-year liberal arts womens college located northeast of West Terre Haute, Indiana, between the Wabash River and the Illinois state line. ... JOHN COVERT, (1882 – 1960), was an American painter was born in Pittsburgh, USA. He was one of the founders of the Society of Independent Artists and was at the forefront of American Modernism. ... Indiana State University (ISU) is a public university that is located in Terre Haute, Indiana. ... Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (abbreviated RHIT), formerly Rose Polytechnic Institute, is a small, private, non-sectarian college specializing in teaching engineering, mathematics, and science. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The NTUC Logo: In use since 1971, the NTUC logo is made up of eight cogs of a wheel. ... The Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions represented a transition stage of Labor unions in the United States; it was the immediate predecessor of the American Federation of Labor. ... The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was one of the first federations of labor unions in the United States. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ...


The city's river traffic contributed to its reputation for being "wide open", with gambling and a well-developed "red light district". The latter was not fully eliminated until urban renewal of the riverfront in the 1960s. During the second decade of the 20th century, Terre Haute was rocked by political scandal and that reputation persisted for several decades. In 1955, Terre Haute was labeled Sin City by the monthly magazine Stag. For the 2004 album by American rapper Ludacris, see The Red Light District. ... For other uses, see Sin City (disambiguation). ...


Prohibition had a major adverse impact on the city's economy. It forced the closure of several distilleries and all but one brewery, which reduced its payroll by 70% and converted to produce root beer. Four large glass manufacturing firms drastically reduced production, and two eventually closed. The Root Glass Company survived, primarily because it had secured the patent for the Coca-Cola bottle in 1915. Two of the distilleries were sold to Commercial Solvents Corporation, which acquired the rights to produce acetone from Chaim Weizmann in exchange for royalties. The root Glass Company in Terre Haute, Indiana was the one of the bottle supliers for Coca-Cola. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... The chemical compound acetone (also known as propanone, dimethyl ketone, 2-propanone, propan-2-one and β-ketopropane) is the simplest representative of the ketones. ... Chaim Azriel Weizmann (Hebrew: חיים עזריאל ויצמן) November 27, 1874 – November 9, 1952) was a chemist, statesman, President of the World Zionist Organization, first President of Israel (elected February 1, 1949, served 1949 - 1952) and founder of a research institute in Israel that eventually became the Weizmann Institute of Science. ...


With some aspects of the economy booming in the mid-1920s, the owners of the Terre Haute House decided to demolish their older building and erect a grand edifice befitting such a modern city as Terre Haute. In 1928, the new Terre Haute House opened, attracting the wealthy – famous and infamous alike – to its luxurious splendor. Al Capone is rumored to have been a guest in the new hotel's early years.[citation needed] After closing in 1970, the hotel was sold to a local developer. He demolished it and sold the property to Dora Brothers Hospitality for development of a Hilton Garden Inn. Snow does nothing to delay the demolition of the north wing; December 2005 The Terre Haute House was a historic former hotel located in downtown Terre Haute, Indiana that was demolished despite numerous efforts to preserve it. ... Snow does nothing to delay the demolition of the north wing; December 2005 The Terre Haute House was a historic former hotel located in downtown Terre Haute, Indiana that was demolished despite numerous efforts to preserve it. ... “Capone” redirects here. ... Hilton Hotels Corporation NYSE: HLT operates one of the worlds largest chains of hotels. ...


Government

Vigo County Courthouse
Vigo County Courthouse

The current Mayor is Duke Bennett.[6] During the second decade of the 20th Century, Terre Haute was rocked by political scandal and that reputation persisted for several decades. Businessman Kevin Burke was elected the city’s mayor in 2003 and vowed to make cleaning up the city’s image and notorious smell one of his administration’s top priorities. The offensive odors are primarily emitted from a coal tar creosote railroad tie manufacturing facility, a waste water treatment facility, and a paper plant. To date, only limited progress has been made in reducing these odors. Duke Bennett was elected in late 2007.[citation needed] Image File history File links VigoCountyCourthouse. ... Image File history File links VigoCountyCourthouse. ...


The City Council has six members each representing a district and three members-at-large. The National Arbor Day Foundation has designated Terre Haute a "Tree City." The city is also home to a federally-sponsored AmeriCorps program called the Sycamore Service Corps. AmeriCorps is an American network of more than 3,000 non-profit organizations, public agencies, and faith-based organizations. ... Sycamore Service Corps is a local program of AmeriCorps in Terra Haute, Indiana. ...


Terre Haute Federal Correctional Complex

Terre Haute is the location of the federal death row. Inmates are held at the Terre Haute Federal Correctional Complex. Located on Highway 63, two miles south of the City of Terre Haute, the complex includes the medium security Federal Correctional Institution and the high security United States Penitentiary.[7] The Penitentiary houses the Special Confinement Unit for inmates serving federal death sentences.[7] Capital punishment is a controversial issue in the United States and, indeed, in most of the world, with many prominent organizations and individuals participating in the debate. ... The Federal Correctional Complex, Terre Haute, is a federal prison for adult males located at the intersection of State Road 63 and Springhill Drive, two miles southwest of Terre Haute, Indiana, United States. ...


Terre Haute received attention for the June 11, 2001, execution of Timothy McVeigh at the Federal Correctional Complex for his role in the Oklahoma City bombing. For the Navy sailor, see Timothy R. McVeigh. ... The Oklahoma City bombing was an attack on April 19, 1995 aimed at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, a U.S. government office complex in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ...


Economy

Downtown Terre Haute.
Downtown Terre Haute.

Terre Haute entered a period of economic decline once the coal mines were spent and the importance of the railroads diminished. The town was labeled a "bad labor town" following the Terre Haute General Strike of 1935 and the city center began a decline from which it has never fully recovered. Although some remnants of its glory days remain and Terre Haute is home to some national events, The Indianapolis Star recently called it "A Model of Stagnation." Local residents sometimes refer to Terre Haute as the "meth capital of the world" because of the disproportionate number of methamphetamine arrests in the town and surrounding area. Image File history File links TerreHaute-Downtown-lookingeast. ... Image File history File links TerreHaute-Downtown-lookingeast. ...


In addition to the downtown business district and the south side, there are several smaller business districts in the city. The first suburban shopping area was Twelve Points, on the northeast side of town; later, Idaho Station developed near Seventh Street and Lockport Road. In the post-World War II era, auto-centered shopping developed on the east side at Meadows. Plaza North is another important shopping area in the northern city neighborhoods.


The original curved Coca-Cola bottle was designed and first produced by the Root Glass Company, which was based in Terre Haute. In the mid-1990s, Coca-Cola honored this part of its past by introducing a short-lived Coke bottle-shaped can that was sold only in Terre Haute and one other city. Terre Haute was also one of the primary test markets for Pringles Potato Chips. The city is a familiar address to many, as it is home to the Columbia House mail-order club. It also is the home of the largest disc production facility in the United States, Sony DADC. Sony DADC is the first facility in the United States to manufacture the Compact Disc. The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... Columbia House operates a music club and DVD club, and as such is a direct seller of DVD movies and box sets, offering its selections through “club membership” agreements. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... CD redirects here. ...


Education

The campus of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.
The campus of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.

Terre Haute is served by the Vigo County School Corporation. Image File history File links IndianaStateUniveristyCampus. ... Image File history File links IndianaStateUniveristyCampus. ... Indiana State University (ISU) is a public university that is located in Terre Haute, Indiana. ... Download high resolution version (2848x2136, 1078 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2848x2136, 1078 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (abbreviated RHIT), formerly Rose Polytechnic Institute, is a small, private, non-sectarian college specializing in teaching engineering, mathematics, and science. ... Vigo County School Corporation (VCSC) is a school corporation that services Terre Haute, Indiana along with the rest of Vigo County, Indiana. ...


Terre Haute is home to Indiana State University, a public university with a student population just over 11,000. The Princeton Review has named ISU one of the nation’s “best value” undergraduate institutions. The Princeton Review has also placed ISU on its “Best in the Midwest” list of colleges and universities. ISU's biggest claim to fame, however, is that Larry Bird attended there. The private engineering school Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology is located just east of the city, and is consistently rated one of the top undergraduate engineering schools in the nation. The vocational schools Ivy Tech State College and Indiana Business College are also located in the city. Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College, a four-year, private Catholic primarily women's college, is north of West Terre Haute, Indiana. Indiana State University (ISU) is a public university that is located in Terre Haute, Indiana. ... Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (abbreviated RHIT), formerly Rose Polytechnic Institute, is a small, private, non-sectarian college specializing in teaching engineering, mathematics, and science. ... Ivy Tech State College is the state of Indianas second-largest post-secondary school. ... Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College is a Catholic, four-year liberal arts womens college located northeast of West Terre Haute, Indiana, between the Wabash River and the Illinois state line. ... West Terre Haute is a town located in Vigo County, Indiana, on the western side of the Wabash River near Terre Haute, Indiana. ...


Transportation

Airports

  • Terre Haute International Airport - Hulman Field (HUF) serves Terre Haute and Vigo County. However, there is currently no scheduled airline or charter service flying out of Hulman Field. Most flights are from pilot school students from Ivy Tech and Indiana State and the F-16 fighter jets of the Indiana Air National Guard's 181st Fighter Wing, which has been recommended for realignment to non-flying status. A local unit of the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary, the Civil Air Patrol, also conducts operations out of Hulman Field.
  • Sky King Airport - public use airport situated about two miles north of Terre Haute on U.S. Highway 41. Most flights into and out of the airport are training flights from Indiana State University.

Terre Haute International Airport - Hulman Field (IATA: HUF, ICAO: KHUF) is a public airport located east of Terre Haute, Indiana. ... Vigo County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... Civil Air Patrol Corporate seal The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is the civilian auxiliary of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... U.S. Highway 41 is a north-south United States Highway that runs from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Miami, Florida. ...

Highways

  • Terre Haute is served by two exits on I-70. The easternmost connects with State Road 46 and is a few stoplights south of Rose-Hulman; the other one (Exit 7) connects with U.S. 41 (which goes both north and south of the city) on the south-central part of town. A third exit serves West Terre Haute, Indiana and provides easy access to western Terre Haute.

In addition, U.S. Highway 40 provides east-west access. I-70 looking westbound near Mile 326, Wabaunsee County, Kansas Interstate 70 is a long interstate highway in the United States. ... State Road 46 in the U.S. State of Indiana is an east-west state highway in the southern portion of Indiana. ... U.S. Highway 41 is a north-south United States Highway that runs from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Miami, Florida. ... West Terre Haute is a town located in Vigo County, Indiana, on the western side of the Wabash River near Terre Haute, Indiana. ... United States Highway 40 is an east-west United States highway. ...


Transit

  • The Terre Haute City Bus service is mostly limited between 1st and 25th Streets.

Culture

Museums

Terre Haute is home to the CANDLES Holocaust Museum. CANDLES stands for "Children of Auschwitz Nazi Deadly Lab Experiment Survivors" and is the creation of a survivor from that deadly period of history – Eva Mozes Kor of Terre Haute.[8] Her museum attracts visitors from around the world as well as the local community. The museum allows Ms. Kor to share her memories in pursuit of her life's mission never to allow the world to forget what happened in that evil place during those dark years. In 2003 the CANDLES museum was burned down in an arson attack by a young neo-Nazi. The museum has been rebuilt with the help of fundraising drives by a number of organizations and charities as well as individual support. Despite the overwhelming success of the efforts, which replaced the physical structure, several pieces of irreplaceable art and artifacts were destroyed or otherwise damaged in the fire and thus have been lost to history.[citation needed] There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


The Vigo County Historical Society Museum, at the intersection of Washington Avenue and South Sixth Street, boasts an extraordinary collection of artifacts maintained in a 150+-year old former residence and the Children's Museum in downtown Terre Haute are other community assets. Swope Art Gallery Museum and Turman Art Gallery also are community assets.


Sister City

Terre Haute has had a strong sister-city relationship with Tajimi, Japan since the 1960s.[9] Tajimi (多治見市; -shi) is a city located in Gifu, Japan. ...


In the Media

The satire newspaper The Onion published an article on the local music scene in 2001 entitled "Garage Band Actually Believes there is a 'Terre Haute Sound.'"[10] The Onion is a United States-based parody newspaper published weekly in print and daily online. ...


Terre Haute was the target of the dastardly plot by Nazi stooges in the 1982 spoof noir movie Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid. Terre Haute's "role" in the movie was the contribution of actor/comedian Steve Martin, the star and co-writer of Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid. Steve Martin had visited Terre Haute and performed his stand-up routine in the city a few years prior to making the movie. Dead Men Dont Wear Plaid was a movie first released in 1982. ... For other uses, see Steve Martin (disambiguation). ...


Terre Haute was the original home of Cissy, Jody, and Buffy Davis in the CBS sitcom Family Affair. The characters mispronounced the city's name "Terry Hott." // Family Affair Family Affair was a situation comedy television series that aired on CBS from September 12, 1966 to September 9, 1971. ...


In the closing minutes of the Pilot episode of Mr. Belvedere, when the family decides they don't need his services, the youngest child Wesley asks what he will do now. Mr. Belvedere replies "I've always wanted to see Terre Haute, don't ask me why." Mr. ...


Terre Haute was mentioned in the Peter Yates film Breaking Away when the characters were deciding what to do and one asked if they "wanted to go to Terre Haute." Breaking Away is a 1979 film which tells the story of a group of local boys from Bloomington, Indiana who put together a bicycle racing team to compete against teams from Indiana University. ...


Terre Haute was mentioned in the classic favorite Christmas movie A Christmas Story, 1983, when the line at the shopping mall to see Santa "stretched all the way to Terre Haute." A Christmas Story takes place in Hammond, Lake County, Indiana where the author, Jean Shepherd, of the books on which the movie are based was from. Terre Haute is approximately 150 miles due south of Hammond and US 41 connects the two cities. For the Christian Christmas story, see Nativity of Jesus A Christmas Story is a 1983 film based on the short stories and semi-fictional anecdotes of author and raconteur Jean Shepherd, including material from his books In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash and Wanda Hickeys Night of...


In Stephen King's post-apocalyptic horror novel The Stand, Donald Merwin Elbert (aka The Trashcan Man), after committing several arsons due to his pyromania, was sent to a mental institution in Terre Haute before being incarcerated in a separate institution for teenage delinquents. In King's Wizard and Glass, the main protagonists stumble into a parallel universe version of the post-apocalypse world of The Stand in which all of Terre Haute was burned down. For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... The Stand is a post-apocalyptic Horror/Science Fiction novel by Stephen King originally published in 1978. ... Wizard and Glass is the fourth book in the Dark Tower series by Stephen King. ...


Terre Haute's history is the subject of a weekly public radio program based in Bloomington, Indiana, called Hometown with Tom Roznowski, which describes various aspects of Terre Haute in the summer of 1926. Terre Haute: Queen City of the Wabash, by Vigo County Historian Mike McCormick, is a concise history of the city published in November 2005 by Arcadia Publishing Company. Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Monroe Mayor Mark Kruzan Area    - City 51. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vigo County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... Mike McCormick can refer to different people: Mike McCormick (third baseman) Mike McCormick (outfielder) Mike McCormick (pitcher) Mike McCormick (lawyer, author) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


On Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, the character of teacher Mrs. Quick identifies Terre Haute as her hometown.


America's Next Top Model: Cycle 4 contestant Michelle Deighton is from Terre Haute.


Urban Legends

A well-known horror story is based on this city: South of Terre Haute there is an abandoned road near a covered bridge that was the favorite parking spot of many young couples. For a time young people reported being approached in their cars by a woman in a purple velvet dress holding a dead baby. She would ask the couples to take the dead child and, if they refused, she would then place it under the wheels of the car so they would drive over it. This same event happened to several couples on several different occasions.[citation needed]


Another well known Terre Haute legend is the story of Stiffy Green, a stuffed bulldog which, at one time, guarded the mausoleum of florist John G. Heinl, the brother-in-law of Eugene V. Debs and the father of esteemed journalist Robert Debs Heinl.[11] For many years Stiffy stood watch over his master's mausoleum - actually sat inside the mausoleum (center, rear, between the crypts) in Highland Lawn Cemetery on the east side of town. While popular legend says Stiffy was given green glass eyes, at least at the time this writer viewed him they were actually yellow. He was placed to "guard his master for eternity", and as a result (predictably) Heinl's mausoleum became a popular rendezvous for teenagers. They would shine flashlights through the mausoleum's glass doors - he was somewhat difficult to see - to witness the glow of Stiffy's eyes. The legend drew believers to Highland Lawn Cemetery regularly. It is said that he remained there until one visitor aimed a gun instead of a flashlight, shooting out one of Stiffy's glass eyes. Apparently due to this attack and the continuing threat to this unique and arguably treasured part of Terre Haute history the animal that had captured the imaginations of so many was removed and placed inside a life-sized replica of Heinl's vault in the Vigo County Historical Museum. Stiffy still draws fans who buy Stiffy Green sweatshirts in the gift shop. Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ...


Famous residents

Historical figures who called Terre Haute their birthplace or home (including university students) include:

Bubba the Love Sponge Clem (born Todd Clem in Warsaw, Indiana on April 23, 1966) is a Tampa, Florida radio talk show host who has had a colorful past. ... You may be looking for the fictional Stargate character, Steven Caldwell Steven Caldwell, (born September 12, 1980), is a professional footballer. ... Benjamin Sherman Scatman Crothers (May 23, 1910 – November 22, 1986) was an African-American actor, singer, dancer and musician. ... Ross Ford is a professinal rugby player. ... Jess Hahn (real name Jesse Beryle) (born October 29, 1921 in Terre Haute, Indiana; died June 29, 1998 in Saint-Malo) was an American French actor who mostly starred in French films. ... Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives (14 June 1909 –14 April 1995) was an Academy Award winning American actor and acclaimed folk music singer and author. ... Chubby Johnson (August 13, 1903 - October 31, 1974) was an American movie and television supporting character actor with a genial demeanor and warm country-accented voice perfect for westerns. ... Joe Keaton (July 6, 1867 – January 13, 1946) was an American silent film and film actor, was also the father of actor Buster Keaton. ... Joseph Francis Kieran Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American silent film comic actor and filmmaker. ... Dave Madden (born on 17 December 1931 in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian–American actor most famous for his role as Reuben Kincaid on The Partridge Family. ... The Partridge Family was an American television sitcom about a widowed mother and her five children living in San Pueblo, a small fictional town in Northern California, originally broadcast on ABC from 1970 to 1974. ... Alvy Moore (December 5, 1921–May 4, 1997), born Jack Alvin Moore in Vincennes, Indiana, was an American light comic actor best known for his role as scatterbrained county agricultural agent Hank Kimball on the television series Green Acres. ... This article is about the television series. ... Edward Roseman, sometimes identified as Edward F. Roseman -- (May 14, 1875 - September 16, 1957) -- was an American actor, primarily during the silent film era. ... Valeska Suratt (June 22, 1882-July 2, 1962) was a stage and silent film performer from Terre Haute, Indiana. ... Bill Thompson (July 8, 1913 – July 15, 1971) was an American radio actor and voice actor whose career stretched from the 1930s until his death. ... Jim and Marian Jordan were featured in 1947 NBC promotional art by Sam Berman. ... Jerry Van Dyke (born July 27, 1931, in Danville, Illinois) is an American comedian and actor. ... ... A pornographic actor or a porn star is somebody who appears in pornographic movies, live sex shows or peep shows. ... H. G. Hosmer: Beatrice Cenci Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (October 9, 1830 - February 21, 1908), American sculptor, was born at Watertown, Massachusetts. ... Janet [Netta Deweze Frazee] Scudder, born on October 27, 1869 (Terre Haute, Indiana); died June 9, 1940 (Rockport, Massachusetts) was an American sculptor. ... William Wolfe, Convenor of the Scottish National Party William Wolfe (more commonly referred to as Billy Wolfe) is a former leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... Victor Eddington Vic Aldridge (October 25, 1893, Indian Springs, IN - April 17, 1973, Terre Haute, IN) was a professional baseball player for the Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, and New York Giants. ... Bruce Baumgartner (born August 31, 1962, in Haledon, New Jersey) is a retired American amateur wrestler and current Director of Athletics for the Edinboro University of Pennsylvania. ... The AAU James E. Sullivan Award is awarded annually by the Amateur Athletic Union to the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States. ... Greg Bell (born November 7, 1930 in Terre Haute, Indiana) is a fomer track and field athlete who won the Gold Medal in the Long Jump at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Mordecai Brown of the Chicago Cubs at the West Side Grounds in 1903. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... Wilburn Rue (Bill) Butland (March 22, 1918 - September 19, 1997) was a pitcher who played in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox (1940, 1942, 1946-1947). ... Malcolm Cam Cameron (born February 6, 1961 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina) is currently head coach of the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League. ... Max Carey baseball card, 1912 Max George Carey (January 11, 1890 - May 30, 1976) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball who starred for the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... Terry Gilbert Dischinger (born November 14, 1940 in Terre Haute, Indiana) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA. Dischinger was made the first pick of the second round of the NBA Draft in 1962 out of Purdue University by the Chicago Zephyrs. ... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: lacks notability, dead links, imprisoned hacker?Inks002 08:14, 31 July 2007 (UTC) If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. ... John Linwood Fox, or Tiger Jack Fox (b. ... Frank Hamblen is a former NBA coach and scout, and a college basketball player at Syracuse University. ... Edgar S. Eddie Hickey (b. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Mark Anthony Jackson (born July 23, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), is a former American professional football player who was selected by the Denver Broncos in the sixth round of the 1986 NFL Draft. ... Tommy John (1960s) Thomas Edward John Jr. ... Neil Johnston (born February 4, 1929 Chillicothe, OH - died September 28, 1978 Chillicothe, OH) was a center with an 8 year career from 1952 to 1959. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... William Robert Slick Leonard (born July 17, 1932 in Terre Haute, Indiana) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Clyde Lovellette (born September 7, 1929 in Petersburg, Indiana) is a former professional basketbal player, the first basketball player in history to play on an NCAA, Olympics and NBA championship squad. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Anthony Eugene McGee (born January 18, 1949 in Battle Creek, MI) is a former American professional football player who played fourteen seasons in the National Football League. ... Dave McGinnis is a former head coach of the Arizona Cardinals. ... Arthur Neukom Nehf (July 31, 1892 - December 18, 1960) was a mostly starting pitcher in Major League Baseball in the 1910s and 20s. ... Orlando Carl Nicks (born October 6, 1958, in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American American NBA player. ... Gregory Wayne Oden Jr. ... Sean Payton (born December 29, 1963 in San Mateo, California) is the head coach of the New Orleans Saints. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jerry Sturm (born December 31, 1936 in English, Indiana) is a former American college and professional football player. ... Harry Taylor may refer to: Harry Taylor (engineer), a US Army Chief of Engineers and general Harry Taylor (swimmer), a Canadian Olympic swimmer The person who asked President Bush a controversial question during a North Carolina town hall meeting on April 6 2006 [1] [2] [3]. This human name article... Kurt Thomas, born March 29, 1956, is an American Olympic gymnast. ... The AAU James E. Sullivan Award is awarded annually by the Amateur Athletic Union to the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States. ... Anthony Thompson (born April 8, 1967 in Terre Haute, Indiana) is a former American football running back. ... Lyle Forrest Bud Tinning (March 12, 1906--January 17, 1961) was a major league pitcher for the Chicago Cubs and the St. ... Paul Howard Dizzy Trout (June 29, 1915 – February 28, 1972) was a Major League Baseball pitcher primarily for the Detroit Tigers. ... Steve Weatherford (born December 17, 1982) is an American football punter who currently plays for the New Orleans Saints. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Paul Dresser (born April 22, 1859; died January 31, 1906) was an important American songwriter in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... Edwin Franko Goldman (January 1, 1878–February 21, 1956) is one of Americas prominent band composers of the early 20th Century. ... Mick Mars (born Robert Alan Deal,[1] May 4, 1951,[2] in Terre Haute, Indiana[1]) is the lead guitarist for heavy metal/glam metal band Mötley Crüe. ... Claude Thornhill (*August 10, 1909 at Terre Haute, Indiana † July 1, 1965, New York City) was an American pianist, arranger and bandleader. ... Simon Bamberger (born Feb. ... List of Utah Governors Heber M. Wells Republican 1896-1905 John C. Cutler Republican 1905-1909 William Spry Republican 1909-1917 Simon Bamberger Democrat 1917-1921 Charles R. Mabey Republican 1921-1925 George H. Dern Democrat 1925-1933 Henry H. Blood Democrat 1933-1941 Herbert B. Maw Democrat 1941-1949... Birch Evans Bayh II (born January 22, 1928) was a U.S. Senator from Indiana between 1963 and 1981. ... Birch Evans Bayh III (commonly known as Evan Bayh) (pronounced like bye; IPA pronunciation: ) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ... Senator Newton Booth Newton Booth (December 30, 1825 – July 14, 1892) was an American politician. ... Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (left) and Governor Gray Davis (right) with President George W. Bush in 2003 The Governor of California is the highest executive authority in the state government, whose responsibilities include making yearly State of the State addresses to the California State Legislature, submitting the budget, and ensuring that... Joseph Cannon at the 1904 Republican Convention Joseph Gurney Cannon (May 7, 1836 – November 12, 1926) was a United States politician from Illinois and leader of the Republican party; historians consider him one of the most powerful Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1903 through 1911. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... P. Pete Chalos P. Pete Chalos (b. ... John Wesley Davis John Wesley Davis (April 16, 1799–August 22, 1859) was a prominent U.S. politician during the 1840s. ... Seal of the Oregon Territory. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 - October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader and five-time Socialist Party candidate for President of the United States. ... Abram A. Hammond (March 21, 1814-August 27, 1874) was twelfth Governor of Indiana. ... List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ... Edward Allen Hannegan (June 25, 1807 - February 25, 1859) was a United States Representative and Senator from Indiana. ... Virginia Ellis Jenckes (November 6, 1877 - January 9, 1975) was a U.S. Representative from Indiana. ... Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback (May 10, 1837 - December 21, 1921) was the first African-American to become governor of a U.S. State. ... List of Governors of Louisiana First French Era Sieur Sauvole de la Villantry 1699-1701 Jean Baptiste de la Moyne, Sieur de Bienville 1701-1713 Antonine de la Mothe Cadillac 1713-1716 Jean Baptiste de la Moyne 1716-1717 De lEpinay 1717-1718 Jean Baptiste de la Moyne 1718... Edward James Roye (February 3, 1815 - 1872) was a American-Liberian political figure. ... Everett Sanders (March 8, 1882 - May 12, 1950) was an American political figure. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... John Gould Stephenson (March 1, 1828-November 12, 1882) was the fifth United States Librarian of Congress, serving from 1861 to 1864. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is one of four official national libraries of the United States (along with the National Library of Medicine, National Agricultural Library, and National Archives and Records Administration). ... Richard Wigginton Thompson (8 June 1809 - 9 February 1900) was an American politician. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... Ralph Tucker (Sept. ... John Palmer Usher (1816 - 1889) was a U.S. administrator. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Senator Daniel W. Voorhees Daniel Wolsey Voorhees (September 26, 1827 - April 10, 1897) was a lawyer and United States Senator from Indiana. ... James Whitcomb (December 1, 1795–October 4, 1852) was a Democrat governor of Indiana from December 6, 1843 to December 26, 1848. ... Lyman Abbott Lyman Abbott (December 18, 1835 - October 22, 1922) was an American divine and author. ... Claude Bowers was an American Civil War historian of the 19th and 20th centuries. ... George Washington Cutter (1801-65) was an American poet. ... Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser (August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945) was an American author of the naturalist school, known for dealing with the gritty reality of life. ... An American Tragedy is a famous American novel, by Theodore Dreiser. ... 1976 edition of The Desiderata of Happiness, poetry collection Max Ehrmann (September 26, 1872 - September 9, 1945), an attorney from Indiana, was best known for writing the poem Desiderata (Latin: something desired as essential) in 1927. ... 1976 edition of The Desiderata of Happiness poetry collection This article is about the poem. ... Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... Ida Husted Harper (born Ida Husted in Indiana on February 18th 1851 and died March 14th 1931 in Washington, D.C.) was a prominant figure in the American womens suffrage movement. ... John Jakes (born on March 31, 1932) is a writer of fiction. ... Dr. Ray Neff is an American chemist at Indiana State University and the leading proponent of an alternative history theory about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and his killer John Wilkes Booth. ... Virginia Sorenson, also creditted as Virginia Sorensen, was the author of the 1957 Newbery Medal winning Miracles on Maple Hill. ... Virginia Sorenson is the author of the 1957 Newbery Medal winning Miracles on Maple Hill. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... Will Weng (25 February 1907 – May 2, 1993) was an American journalist and crossword puzzle constructor who served as crossword puzzle editor for New York Times from 1969-1977. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Ernie Pyle on board the U.S.S. Cabot. ... Charles Gene Abrell (August 31, 1931-June 10, 1951) was a Corporal in the United States Marine Corps who served with Company E, 2nd Battalion 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division, during the Korean War. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Ray Arcel was a boxing trainer who was active from the 1920s through the 1980s. ... The modern International Boxing Hall of Fame (IBHOF) is located in Canastota, New York, United States, within driving distance from the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown and the National Soccer Hall of Fame in Oneonta. ... Harry Barnes (born July 2, 1936) is an English politician, and member of Parliament for North East Derbyshire. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Horace Greeley Burt (Jan 1849 -May 19, 1913 was President of The Union Pacific From 1898 until 1904 He was born in Terre Haute, Indiana He began his Railway service in1868 He started with Chicago and North Western Railway as a resident engineer from 1873 until 1881. ... Union Pacific redirects here. ... Ellen Church (September 22, 1904 - August 22, 1965) was the first airline stewardess. ... Herald Rea Cox (1907 -1986), was an American bacteriologist. ... Charles Cruft (January 12, 1826 – March 23, 1883) was a teacher, lawyer, railroad executive, and a Union general during the American Civil War. ... Ernest R. Davidson (Born October 12, 1936 in Terre Haute, Indiana, USA) is Professor of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. He has been awarded many honours, including:- Member of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science (1981). ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... Hubert Dreyfus (born 1929) is a professor of philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. ... Lee Alvin DuBridge (1901 – 1994) was a U.S. educator and physicist. ... Mari Hulman George, born Mary Antonia Hulman on December 26, 1934, in Terre Haute, Indiana, is the daughter of the late Anton Tony Hulman and Mary Fendrich Hulman, prominent Indiana philanthropists and business owners. ... Tony George, born Anton Hulman George on December 30, 1959, is the owner of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... Robert Hayes Gore (1886—1972) was a Florida politician and newspaper publisher who also served as the 11th civilian Governor of Puerto Rico from July 1933 to January 1934. ... The Governor of Puerto Rico is the Head of Government of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. ... For Thomas Gray the classical scholar, see Thomas Gray For Thomas Gray, recipient of the Victoria Cross, see Thomas Gray (VC) Thomas Lomar Gray, of the British Imperial College of Engineering, helped John Milne and James Alfred Ewing develop the first modern seismometers in Japan from 1880-1895. ... Robert K. Greenleaf (1904-1990) was the founder of the modern Servant leadership movement. ... Blessed Mother Theodore Guerin was born October 2, 1798, in the village of Etables-sur-Mer in Brittany, France. ... Dr. Samuel F. Hulbert is the former president of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and is recognized as a leader in Ceramics Science and Biomaterials. ... Anton Tony Hulman, Jr. ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... Mary Fendrich Hulman (March 13, 1905 - April 10, 1998) was the wife of the late Indiana industrialist Anton Tony Hulman, Jr. ... Robert Hunter may refer to: In politics: General Robert Hunter (1664/1666–1734), Lieutenant Governor of Virginia Colony, Governor of New York, New Jersey, Jamaica Robert C. Hunter (born 1944), U.S. judge, North Carolina Court of Appeals Robert E. Hunter, U.S. Ambassador to NATO Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Frank Kramer may refer to: Frank Kramer (artist) (1909-1993), American artist and illustrator Frank Kramer (cyclist) (1880-1952), American cyclist and United States Bicycling Hall of Fame inductee Frank Kramer (born 1970), American radio personality of Frosty, Heidi & Frank Category: ... The Frosty, Heidi & Frank Show is a talk radio show hosted by Frosty Stilwell, Heidi Hamilton, and Frank Kramer. ... Abraham Markle (October 26, 1770-March 6, 1826) was a businessman and political figure in Upper Canada and co-proprietor of Terre Haute, Indiana. ... Thomas Corwin Mendenhall (October 4, 1841 – March 23, 1924) was an autodidact US physicist and meteorologist. ... William A. Noyes (1857-1941) was an American analytical and organic chemist. ... The Priestley Medal is awarded by the American Chemical Society (ACS) for distinguished service in the field of chemistry. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... For the brand of popcorn, see Orville Redenbachers. ... Brazil is a city in Clay County, Indiana, United States. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Abe Silverstein (1908 - 2001 ) was an American engineer who played an important part in the United States space program. ... Frosty Stilwell is a American radio personality based in the Los Angeles area, part of the popular Frosty, Heidi & Frank Show [1] currently on 97. ... Edward P. Tryon is a professor of physics at Hunter College in Manhattan. ... Samantha Johnson (born November 9, 1984) is a beauty queen from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania who will compete in the Miss USA pageant in 2007. ... Leroy August Wilson (February 21, 1901 - June 28, 1951) was a U.S. telephone businessman. ... William Maxwell Wood (c. ... Surgeon General can have several different meanings. ...

References

  1. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  2. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ Find a County. National Association of Counties. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ The Road from Detroit to the Illinois 1774. In Michigan Pioneer and History Collections, V10 p 248. Available online at the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology website.
  6. ^ Mayor's Office. "Duke Bennett for Terre Haute Mayor". 
  7. ^ a b Federal Bureau of Prisons. "FCC Terre Haute". 
  8. ^ CANDLES Holocaust Museum Website. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  9. ^ Sister Cities International - Indiana State Chapter
  10. ^ The Onion. "Garage Band Actually Believes there is a 'Terre Haute Sound'", 2001-08-08. 
  11. ^ John G. Heinl Profile. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.

Profile of Robert Debs Heinl http://web.indstate.edu/community/vchs/wvp/heinl-robert.pdf The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Glenn Albert Black was an influential archaeologist of the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links

Indiana Portal 

Image File history File links Flag_of_Indiana. ...

The city

The history

  • History of Terre Haute: An excerpt from Indiana: A New Historical Guide
  • Beautiful historic postcards of Terre Haute, IN
  • Hometown: A Journey Through Terre Haute, IN: A documentary about Terre Haute in the 1920s.
  • TerrorHaute.com: Local legends and Halloween events in Terre Haute.
  • Rod and Gun Steakhouse: A gangster hangout in mid-1900s Terre Haute.
  • McCormick, Mike (2005). Terre Haute: Queen City of the Wabash. ISBN 0-7385-2406-9. 

Media

College pages

Maps and aerial photos


  Results from FactBites:
 
Terre Haute, Indiana (753 words)
Terre Haute, the county seat of Vigo County, earned the nickname "The Crossroads of America" due to its extensive rail and road network.
The name "Terre Haute" is a French phrase meaning “highland.” The name was coined by French explorers of the mid 18th century, who found a plateau-like area that adjoined the Wabash River.
Terre Haute was incorporated as a town in 1832 and as a city in 1853.
Terre Haute Economic Development Corporation | Terre Haute, Indiana | Incentives (1896 words)
The City of Terre Haute and Vigo County, in partnership with the State of Indiana, offer a wide variety of incentive programs to businesses that are expanding their operations or those establishing new operations in our community.
The Terre Haute Economic Development Corporation works closely with local and state officials to develop customized packages that meet the needs of business and the interests of the community.
Indiana's sales tax is based on the sales of tangible personal property; no sales tax is paid on equipment and utility services used for manufacturing purposes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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