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Encyclopedia > Terrain park
This terrain park begins with three jumps.
This terrain park begins with three jumps.
S-rail at the bottom of the same terrain park at Timberline Lodge ski area
S-rail at the bottom of the same terrain park at Timberline Lodge ski area

A terrain park is an outdoor area that contains terrain that allows snowboarders and skiers to do tricks. Terrain parks have their roots in skateboard parks and many of the features are common to both. One of the first in-bounds terrain parks was the "Snowboard Park" built in 1990 at the Vail resort[1]. The park was copied soon in other resorts. Today most resorts have terrain parks, with many having multiple parks of varying difficulty. Some resorts are almost exclusively terrain parks such as Echo Mountain Park in Idaho Springs, Colorado, USA. In Colorado there has been a recent trend for defunct resorts such as Squaw Pass (now Echo Mountain Park) and St. Mary's Glacier (now Eclipse Snow Park) to be reopened, catering to terrain park users. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2925 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Skiing Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2925 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Skiing Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2920 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Skiing Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2920 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Skiing Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Timberline Lodge ski area is the ski and snowboarding area of Timberline Lodge National Historic Landmark. ... Snowboarder dropping a cornice. ... Skiing is the activity of gliding over snow using skis (originally wooden planks, now usually made from fiberglass or related composites) strapped to the feet with ski bindings. ...

Contents

Difficulty

Terrain parks (in the United States) have designations with respect to safety similar to standard alpine slopes. They differ in their designation and degrees of difficulty. They are identified with orange ovals to differentiate them from standard slopes, and are further distinguished by Large, Medium, or Small features. While features vary between resorts, commonly Small features will be short jumps and rails that are even with the slopes surface, Medium will be 0 - 10 foot jumps along with jibs requiring small jumps to get on top of, and Large will include 5 - 90 foot jumps along with complex jibs and large vertical pipes.


Jibs

Jibs are any type of fixture which can be ridden with the board/skis either parallel or perpendicular to (ground), ridden while spinning around on (buttered), or ridden and jumped or tricked from. Many jib features resemble outdoor items used when snowboarding in urban areas (stair rails, benches, tables, etc.). In the park these consist of:

  • Rail: A metal bar, either rounded or with a small flat surface, which a skier or snowboarder can slide across (called "jibbing").
  • Funbox: Similar to a rail, but wider with an ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) surface. May or may not have metal edges. Compare Funbox, for skateboarding.
  • Trees: used as natural surfaces and can be found either on or off the trails.

Rails and boxes have many different shapes and sizes: straight, sloped, curved (often called a "Rainbow"), or kinked. Rails, especially rainbow, will also be seen curving over obstacles or vehicles. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), also known as high modulus polyethylene (HMPE) or high performance polyethylene (HPPE), is a thermoplastic made from oil. ... The funbox is a contraption composed of one to two or more ramps (usually made of wood or metal) leading to a level plane. ...

  • Park Bench and Picnic Table: A funbox type feature that resembles a park bench or picnic table. The edges are made of metal rails and the surfaces of UHMWPE. These features provide multiple riding surfaces.
  • Mail Box: A large diameter metal pipe of varying lengths with a cross-section resembling a mail box.
  • Wall ride: A vertical, or near-vertical, wall-like surface made of UHMWPE. Most wall rides have another similar surface at the top that is angled down towards the wall, but more perpendicular to the ground (like a sideways funbox attached to the top of the wall ride)
  • Bonks: A more recent addition to terrain parks, bonks are features usually shaped like garbage cans or vertical cylinders with a small jump leading up to it. This feature is ridden by going off the jump and tapping it in various ways with your snowboard. Variations include spinning to and from the bonk, tapping with different parts of the snowboard or stalling on top of the bonk.

Jumps

Jumps in terrain parks can range from five feet to ninety feet and will vary park to park and resort to resort. In contrast to jibs, typically being manufactured off-site of steel and plastic, jumps are most commonly constructed entirely of snow or snow with a base of dirt. Tricks such as grabs and twists or spins are often performed while in the air from a jump. Types of jumps in a park may consist of:

  • Tabletop: A jump that looks somewhat like a table or trapezoid in which one takes off from an incline (the lip), clear a flat part (the table), and lands on a downslope (the landing)
  • Step-down: A jump in which the landing is lower than the takeoff
  • Step-up: A jump in which the landing is higher than the takeoff
  • Gap: A jump that has a large gap in between the take off and landing, instead of a table
  • Hip: A jump with one landing, which is perpendicular to the take off
  • Spine: A jump with two landings, which are perpendicular to the take off. Similar to a hip, but with a landing on both sides

Vertical

  • Half-pipe: A downhill trough with vertical lips on each side, resembling half of a cylinder. See also: Superpipe
  • Quarter-pipe: A vertical lip with the intention that the user launch straight into the air, then land on the same lip.

Halfpipe A halfpipe is a structure used in gravity extreme sports such as snowboarding, skateboarding, freestyle BMX, or inline skating. ... A superpipe is a large halfpipe. ...

See also

Skatepark in Davis, California. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Snowboard History Timeline Part 3(1990's)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Deseret News | Terrain Parks: They're magnets for adventure seekers (771 words)
PARK CITY — There were some who wondered if altering the surface of the snow, to make bumps and jumps and narrow rails only inches wide, would survive the test of the paying customer.
Terrain parks built within the boundaries of ski areas have become magnets to both skiers and snowboarders looking for something that isn't perfectly flat.
So popular are the parks these days, ski schools, as Pettigrew pointed out, are expanding their curriculum to include lessons on feeling comfortable with the features.
Terrain parks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (133 words)
A terrain park is an outdoor area that contains jumps and half-pipes that allow snowboarders and skiers to do tricks.
Jumps in terrain parks can range from five feet to ninety feet, but not all resorts would have those size jumps.
Terrain parks also have rails and boxes to slide, also called jibbing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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