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Encyclopedia > Terminal Services
Terminal Services
Image:Remote desktop connection icon.PNG
Developer: Microsoft
OS: Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X
License: MS-EULA
Website: www.microsoft.com

Terminal Services is a component of Microsoft Windows (both server and client versions) that allows a user to access applications and data stored on a remote computer over a network. Terminal Services is Microsoft's implementation of thin-client terminal server computing, where Windows applications, or even the entire desktop of the computer running terminal services, is made accessible from a remote client machine. The client can either be a full fledged computer, running any Operating System as long as the client application supports the terminal services protocol, or a bare-bones machine that is powerful enough to support the protocol (such as Windows FLP). With terminal services, only the User Interface of an application is presented at the client system. Any input to it is redirected over the network to the server, which is where all the processing the application requires happens.[1] This is in contrast to appstreaming systems, like Microsoft Softgrid, in which the applications, while still stored on a centralized server, are streamed to the client on-demand and then processed by the client machine. Image File history File links Remote_desktop_connection_icon. ... “Software development” redirects here. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... An operating system (OS) is the software that manages the sharing of the resources of a computer and provides programmers with an interface used to access those resources. ... “Windows” redirects here. ... Mac OS X (IPA: ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... A software license is a legal agreement which may take the form of a proprietary or gratuitous license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software. ... A software license is a type of proprietary or gratiuitious license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software — sometimes called an End User License Agreement (EULA) — that specifies the perimeters of the permission granted by the owner to the... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... “Windows” redirects here. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... A HP T5700 thin client, with flash memory A Neoware m100 thin client. ... A terminal server is a device to connect multiple, possibly remote, input/output devices to a central processing unit. ... Windows Fundamentals for Legacy PCs (WinFLP) is an operating system from Microsoft, based on Windows XP, but optimized for older, less powerful hardware. ... Application streaming is a relatively new form of software distribution method using application virtualization. ... Microsoft SoftGrid is an application virtualization and appstreaming solution from Microsoft. ...

Contents

Overview

Terminal Services was first introduced in Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server Edition. It was significantly improved for Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003. Both the underlying protocol as well as the service was again significantly overhauled for Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008, adding features like the ability to access remote resources like the Clipboard, in addition to resources like discs and audio. Windows includes two client applications which utilize terminal services: Remote Assistance and Remote Desktop. While the former, available in all versions of Windows, allow one user to assist another user, the latter, which is available in Windows XP Professional or Media Center Edition and Windows Vista Business, Enterprise or Ultimate, allows a user to login to a remote system and access the desktop, applications and data on the system as well as control it remotely. In the client versions of Windows Operating Systems, Terminal Services supports only one logged in user at a time, whereas in the server OSs, concurrent remote sessions are allowed. Windows NT 4. ... Windows 2000 (also referred to as Win2K) is a preemptive, interruptible, graphical and business-oriented operating system that was designed to work with either uniprocessor or symmetric multi-processor 32-bit Intel x86 computers. ... Windows Server 2003 is a server operating system produced by Microsoft. ... Windows Vista is a line of graphical operating systems used on personal computers, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ... Windows Server 2008 is the name of the next server operating system from Microsoft. ... The clipboard is a software program that is used for short-term storage of data as it is transferred between documents or applications, via copy and paste operations. ... Remote Assistance is a feature of Windows XP that allows a user to temporarily take over a remote Windows XP computer over a network or the internet to resolve issues. ...


Microsoft provides the client software Remote Desktop Connection (formerly called Terminal Services Client), available for most 32-bit versions of their Windows operating systems including Windows Mobile and Apple's Mac OS X, that allows a user to connect to a server running Terminal Services. On Windows, both Terminal Services client and Remote Desktop Protocol use TCP port 3389 by default, which is editable in the Windows registry. It also includes an ActiveX control to embed the functionality in other applications or even a web page.[2] A Windows CE version of the client software is also available.[1] Server versions of Windows OSs also include the Remote Desktop for Administration client (a special mode of the Remote Desktop Connection client), which allows remote connection to the session 0 console of the server, where all command line applications can be run.[1] The server functionality is provided by the Terminal Server component, which is able to handle Remote Assistance, Remote Desktop as well as the Remote Administration clients.[1] Third-party developers have created client software for other platforms, including the open source rdesktop client for common Unix platforms. In computing, a client is a system that accesses a (remote) service on another computer by some kind of network. ... 32-bit is a term applied to processors, and computer architectures which manipulate the address and data in 32-bit chunks. ... Windows Mobile is a compact operating system combined with a suite of basic applications for mobile devices based on the Microsoft Win32 API. Devices which run Windows Mobile include Pocket PCs, Smartphones, and Portable Media Centers. ... Apple Inc. ... Mac OS X (IPA: ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a multi-channel protocol that allows a user to connect to a computer running Microsoft Terminal Services. ... Port 3389 is the port used by Microsofts Remote Desktop Protocol and Terminal Services. ... The Windows registry is a directory which stores settings and options for the operating system for Microsoft Windows 32-bit versions, 64-bit versions and Windows Mobile. ... ActiveX is Microsoft technology used for developing reusable object oriented software components. ... Windows CE (sometimes abbreviated WinCE) is a variation of Microsofts Windows operating system for minimalistic computers and embedded systems. ... Console may be: An organ term for the area of an organ including the keys, stops, and foot pedals manipulated by the organist. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ... rdesktop is a RDP client for most Unix-like systems such as BSD and Linux. ... Filiation of Unix and Unix-like systems Unix (officially trademarked as UNIX®, sometimes also written as or ® with small caps) is a computer operating system originally developed in 1969 by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and Douglas McIlroy. ...


For an enterprise, Terminal Services allow the IT departments to install the applications on a central server. For example, instead of deploying database or accounting software on all desktops, it can simply be put on a server and remote users can log on and use it across the Internet. This centralization makes upgrading, troubleshooting, and software management much easier. As long as the employees have the Remote Desktop software, they will be able to use it. Terminal Services can also integrate with Windows authentication systems to prevent unauthorized users from accessing the applications or data. Troubleshooting is a form of problem solving. ...


Microsoft has a longstanding agreement with Citrix to facilitate sharing of technologies and patent licensing between Microsoft Terminal Services and Citrix Presentation Server (formerly Citrix MetaFrame). In this arrangement, Citrix has access to key source code for the Windows platform enabling their developers to improve the security and performance of the Terminal Services platform. In late December, 2004 the two companies announced a five-year renewal of this arrangement to cover Windows Vista. Citrix Systems (NASDAQ: CTXS) is a U.S. high technology software company, based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with subsidiary operations in the UK and Australia. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ... Citrix Presentation Server (formerly Citrix MetaFrame) is a remote access/application publishing product built on the Independent Computing Architecture (ICA), Citrix Systems thin client protocol. ... Source code (commonly just source or code) is any series of statements written in some human-readable computer programming language. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Windows Vista is a line of graphical operating systems used on personal computers, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ...


Architecture

The server component of Terminal Services (Terminal Server) listens on TCP port 3389 (termdd.sys. When an RDP client connects to this port, it is tagged with a unique SessionID and associated with a freshly spawned console session (Session 0, keyboard, mouse and character mode UI only). The login subsystem (winlogon.exe) and the GDI graphics subsystem is then initiated, which handles the job of authenticating the user and presenting the GUI. These executables are loaded in a new session, rather than the console session. When creating the new session, the graphics and keyboard/mouse device drivers are replaced with RDP-specific drivers: RdpDD.sys and RdpWD.sys. The RdpDD.sys is the device driver and it captures the UI rendering calls into a format that is transmittable over RDP. RdpWD.sys acts as keyboard and mouse driver; it receives keyboard and mouse input over the TCP connection and present them as keyboard or mouse inputs. It also allows creation of virtual channels, which allow other devices, such as disc, audio, printers, and COM ports to be redirected, i.e., the channels act as replacement for these devices. The channels connect to the client over the TCP connection; as the channels are accessed for data, the client is informed of the request, which is then transferred over the TCP connection to the application. This entire procedure is done by the terminal server and the client, with the RDP protocol mediating the correct transfer, and is entirely transparent to the applications.[3] RDP communications are encrypted using 128-bit RC4 encryption. Windows Server 2003 onwards, it can use a FIPS 140 compliant encryption scheme.[1] Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a multi-channel protocol that allows a user to connect to a computer running Microsoft Terminal Services. ... GDI is short for Graphics Device Interface or Graphical Device Interface, and is one of the three core components or subsystems of Microsoft Windows. ... In cryptography, RC4 (also known as ARC4 or ARCFOUR) is the most widely-used software stream cipher and is used in popular protocols such as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) (to protect Internet traffic) and WEP (to secure wireless networks). ... FIPS 140 (Federal Information Processing Standards Publication 140) is a United States federal standard that specifies security requirements for cryptography modules. ...


At the client side, once a client initiates a connection and is informed of a successful invocation of the terminal services stack at the server, it loads up the device as well as the keyboard/mouse drivers. The UI data received over RDP is decoded and rendered as UI, whereas the keyboard and mouse inputs to the Window hosting the UI is intercepted by the drivers, and transmitted over RDP to the server. It also creates the other virtual channels and sets up the redirection. RDP communication can be encrypted; using either low, medium or high encryption. With low encryption, only the channels transferring sensitive information like passwords are encrypted. With medium encryption, UI packets are encrypted as well. And with high encryption, keyboard/mouse inputs are also scrambled.[3]


Terminal Server

Terminal Server is the server component of Terminal services. It handles the job of authenticating clients, as well as making the applications available remotely. It is also entrusted with the job of restricting the clients according to the level of access they have. The Terminal Server respects the configured software restriction policies, so as to restrict the availability of certain software to only a certain group of users. The remote session information is stored in specialized directories, called Session Directory which is stored at the server. Session directories are used to store state information about a session, and can be used to resume interrupted sessions. The terminal server also has to manage these directories. Terminal Servers can be used in a cluster as well.[1] Linux Cluster at Purdue University A computer cluster is a group of locally connected computers that work together as a unit. ...


In Windows Server 2008, it has been significantly overhauled. While logging in, if the user logged on to the local system using an Windows Server Domain account, the credentials from the same sign-on can be used to authenticate the remote session. However, this requires Windows Server 2008 to be the terminal server OS, while the client OS is limited to either Windows Server 2008 or Windows Vista. In addition, the terminal server can provide access to only a single program, rather than the entire desktop, by means of a feature named RemoteApp. Terminal Services Web Access (TS Web Access) makes a RemoteApp session invocable from the web browser. It includes the TS Web Access Web Part control which maintains the list of RemoteApps deployed on the server and keeps the list up to date. A Terminal server session can also be tunneled through a gateway via the TS Gateway service. It makes the server available over the Internet by tunneling the RDP data over a HTTPS channel. Both Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2003, including Windows Home Server can act as TS Gateway servers. Terminal Server can also integrate with Windows System Resource Manager to throttle resource usage of remote applications.[4] Windows Server 2008 is the name of the next server operating system from Microsoft. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Active Directory. ... Windows Server 2008 is the name of the next server operating system from Microsoft. ... Windows Server 2008 is the name of the next server operating system from Microsoft. ... Windows Vista is a line of graphical operating systems used on personal computers, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ... An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gateway (telecommunications). ... A tunneling protocol is a network protocol which encapsulates one protocol or session inside another. ... Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a multi-channel protocol that allows a user to connect to a computer running Microsoft Terminal Services. ... https is a URI scheme used to indicate a secure HTTP connection. ... Windows Server 2008 is the name of the next server operating system from Microsoft. ... Windows Server 2003 is a server operating system produced by Microsoft. ... Windows Home Server is a home server operating system from Microsoft. ... Windows System Resource Manager (WSRM) is a component of Microsofts Windows Server 2008 operating systems that provides resource management and enables the allocation of resources, including processor and memory resources, among multiple applications based on business priorities. ...


Terminal Server is managed by the Terminal Server Manager MMC snap-in. It can be used to configure the sign in requirements, ,as well as to enforce a single instance of remote session. It can also be configured by using Group Policy or WMI. It is, however, not available in client versions of Windows OS, where the server is pre-configured to allow only one sessions and enforce the rights of the user account on the remote session, without any customization.[1] MMC on Windows Server 2003, running Computer Management snap-in The Microsoft Management Console (MMC) is a component of modern Microsoft Windows operating systems that provides system administrators and advanced users with a flexible interface through which they may configure and monitor the system. ... Local Group Policy Editor in Windows XP Media Center Edition Group policy is a feature of Microsoft Windows NT family of operating systems that provides centralized management and configuration of computers and remote users in an Active Directory environment. ... Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) is a set of extensions to the Windows Driver Model that provides an operating system interface through which instrumented components provide information and notification. ...


Remote Desktop Connection

Remote Desktop Connection 6.0 client in Windows XP.

Remote Desktop Connection (RDC, also called Remote Desktop) is the client application for Terminal Services. It allows a user to remotely log in to a networked computer running the terminal services server. RDC presents the desktop interface of the remote system, as if it were accessed locally.[1] With the latest version (version 6.0), if the Desktop Experience component is plugged into the remote server, the chrome of the applications will resemble the local applications, rather than the remote one. In this scenario, the remote applications will support the Aero theme if Windows Vista is used for remoting into the server (provided the local system is running Aero).[4] The RDC client also supports rendering the UI in full 24 bit color, as well as resource redirection for printers, COM ports, disc drives, mice and keyboards. With resource redirection, remote applications are able to use the resources of the local computer. Audio is also redirected, so that any sounds generated by a remote application are played back at the client system.[1][4] In addition to regular username/password for authorizing for the remote session, RDC also supports using smart cards for authorization[1] With RDC 6.0, the resolution of a remote session can be set independently of the settings at the remote computer. In addition, a remote session can also span multiple monitors at the client system, independent of the multi-monitor settings at the server. It also prioritizes UI data as well as keyboard and mouse inputs over print jobs or file transfers so as to make the applications more responsive. It also redirects plug and play devices such as cameras, portable music players, and scanners, so that input from these devices can be used by the remote applications as well.[4] Clipboard is also redirected in the latest version, so that both remote as well as local applications share the same local clipboard, thus enabling data to be copy-and-pasted between local and remote applications.[4] RDC can also be used to connect to WMC remote sessions; however, since WMC streams does not stream video using Remote Desktop Protocol, only the applications can be viewed this way, not any media. RDC can also be used to connect to computers, which are exposed via Windows Home Server RDP Gateway over the Internet. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Windows XP is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on general-purpose computer systems, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, and media centers. ... Windows Aero is the graphical user interface for Windows Vista, an operating system released by Microsoft in November 2006. ... Windows Vista is a line of graphical operating systems used on personal computers, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ... Windows Media Center is an application designed to serve as a home-entertainment hub. ... Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a multi-channel protocol that allows a user to connect to a computer running Microsoft Terminal Services. ... Windows Home Server is a home server operating system from Microsoft. ... Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a multi-channel protocol that allows a user to connect to a computer running Microsoft Terminal Services. ...


RemoteApp

RemoteApp (or TS RemoteApp) is a special mode of Terminal Services, available only in Remote Desktop Connection 6.0 (with Windows Server 2008 being the RemoteApp server), where a remote session connects to a specific application only rather than the entire Windows desktop. The UI for the RemoteApp is rendered in a windows over the local desktop, and is managed like any other window for local applications. The end result of this is that remote applications behave largely like local applications. The task of establishing the remote session, as well as redirecting local resources to the remote application, is transparent to the end user.[5] Multiple applications can be started in a single RemoteApp session, each with their own windows.[6] Windows Server 2008 is the name of the next server operating system from Microsoft. ...


A RemoteApp can be packaged either as a .rdp file or distributed via an .msi Windows Installer package. When packaged as an .rdp file (which contains the address of the RemoteApp server, authentication schemes to be used, and other settings), a RemoteApp can be launched by double clicking the file. It will invoke the Remote Desktop Connection client, which will connect to the server and render the UI. The RemoteApp can also be packaged in an Windows Installer database, installing which can register the RemoteApp in the Start Menu as well as create shortcuts to launch it. A RemoteApp can also be registered as handlers for filetypes or URIs. Opening a file registered with RemoteApp will first invoke Remote Desktop Connection, which will connect to the terminal server and the open the file. Any application, which can be accessed over Remote Desktop, can be served as a RemoteApp.[5] Nero software setup is using Windows Installer program The Windows Installer (previously known as Microsoft Installer, codename Darwin) is an engine for the installation, maintenance, and removal of software on modern Microsoft Windows systems. ... Nero software setup is using Windows Installer program The Windows Installer (previously known as Microsoft Installer, codename Darwin) is an engine for the installation, maintenance, and removal of software on modern Microsoft Windows systems. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Windows Desktop Sharing

Windows Vista onwards, Terminal Services also includes a multi-party desktop sharing capabiity known as Windows Desktop Sharing. Unlike Terminal Services, which creates a new user session for every RDP connection, Windows Desktop Sharing can host the remote session in the context of the currently logged in user without, creating a new session, and make the Desktop, or a subset of it, available over Remote Desktop Protocol.[7] Windows Desktop Sharing can be used to share the entire desktop, a specific region, or a particular application.[8] Windows Desktop Sharing can also be used to share multi-monitor desktops. When sharing applications individually (rather than the entire desktop), the windows are managed (whether they are minimized or maximized) independently at the server and the client side.[8] Windows Vista is a line of graphical operating systems used on personal computers, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ... Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a multi-channel protocol that allows a user to connect to a computer running Microsoft Terminal Services. ... Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a multi-channel protocol that allows a user to connect to a computer running Microsoft Terminal Services. ...


The functionality is only provided via a public API, which can be used by any application to provide screen sharing functionality. Windows Desktop Sharing API exposes two objects: RDPSession for the sharing session and RDPViewer for the viewer. Multiple viewer objects can be instantiated for one Session object. A viewer can either be a passive viewer, who is just able to watch the application like a screencast, or an interactive viewer, who is able to interact in real time with the remote application.[7] The RDPSession object contains all the shared applications, represented as Application objects, each with Windowobjects representing their on-screen windows. Per-application filters capture the application Windows and package them as Window objects.[9] A viewer must authenticate itself before it can connect to a sharing session. This is done by generating an Invitation using the RDPSession. It contains an authentication ticket and password. The object is serialized and sent to the viewers, who need to present the Invitation when connecting.[7][9] API may refer to: In computing, application programming interface In petroleum industry, American Petroleum Institute In education, Academic Performance Index This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A screencast is a digital recording of computer screen output, often containing audio narration. ... A serialized work is one that has been printed or reproduced to publish a larger literary work (e. ...


Windows Desktop Sharing API is used by Windows Meeting Space for providing application sharing functionality among peers; however, the application does not expose all the features supported by the API.[8] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ...


See also

A computer terminal is an electronic or electromechanical hardware device that is used for entering data into, and displaying data from, a computer or a computing system. ... A HP T5700 thin client, with flash memory A Neoware m100 thin client. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Technical Overview of Terminal Services in Windows Server 2003. Retrieved on 2007-07-23.
  2. ^ Frequently Asked Questions about Remote Desktop. Retrieved on 2007-07-23.
  3. ^ a b How Terminal Services Works. Retrieved on 2007-07-23.
  4. ^ a b c d e Whats new in Terminal Services in Windows Server Codename "Longhorn". Retrieved on 2007-07-23.
  5. ^ a b Terminal Services RemoteApp (TS RemoteApp). Retrieved on 2007-07-23.
  6. ^ Terminal Services RemoteApp™ Session Termination Logic. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  7. ^ a b c Windows Desktop Sharing. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  8. ^ a b c Windows Desktop Sharing API. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  9. ^ a b About Windows Desktop Sharing. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Terminal Services (1284 words)
Terminal services may be provided by Windows 2000 server computers.
Terminal services can allow remote computers to run desktops and applications on a server as though it is running locally.
It is used on the terminal server or on a client during a session.
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