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Encyclopedia > Tepaneca

The Tepanec are a Mesoamerican people who arrived in the Valley of Mexico in the late 12th or early 13th centuries.[1] The Tepanec were a sister culture of the Aztecs (or Mexica) as well as the Acolhua and others -- these tribes spoke the Nahuatl language and shared the same general pantheon, with local and tribal variations. The cultural areas of Mesoamerica The term Mesoamérica is used to refer to a geographical region that extends roughly from the Tropic of Cancer in central Mexico down through Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua to northwestern Costa Rica, and which is characterized by the particular cultural homogeneity... The Valley of Mexico is a highlands plateau in central Mexico roughly coterminous with the present-day Distrito Federal and the eastern half of Estado de Mexico. ... The word Aztec is usually used as a historical term, although some contemporary Nahuatl speakers would consider themselves Aztecs. ... Nahuatl (pronounced in two syllables, NA-watl ) is a term applied to some members of the Aztecan or Nahuan sub-branch of the Uto-Aztecan language family, indigenous to central Mexico. ...


Welcomed to the Valley of Mexico by Xolotl, the Tepanecs settled on the west shores of Lake Texcoco. Under their tlatoani, Acolnahuacatl, the Tepanec took over Azcapotzalco from the indigenous inhabitants. The Valley of Mexico is a highlands plateau in central Mexico roughly coterminous with the present-day Distrito Federal and the eastern half of Estado de Mexico. ... Lake Texcoco is a lake in Mexico. ... A tlatoani was a member of the Aztec nobility. ... Azcapotzalco (Place of the ants in Nahuatl) is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ...


In the early 15th century, Tezozomoc brought the Tepanec to their height of power; at that point they controlled nearly all of the Valley of Mexico as well parts of the Toluca and Morelos valleys. Native sources say that Tezozomoc lived to the age of over 100 and was legendary for his generalship and statesmanship. Tezozomoc was a Tepanec leader who ruled the city-state of Azcapotzalco from 1371 to 1426. ... Toluca is a city in México State in central Mexico, at 19. ... Morelos is one of the constituent states of Mexico. ...


The death of Tezozomoc in 1426 brought his sons Tayauh and Maxtla to the throne, with Maxtla most likely poisoning Tayauh. Maxtla was a Tepanec ruler of Azcapotzalco from 1426 to his death in 1428. ...


In 1428, Maxtla was overthrown by the nascent Aztec Triple Alliance, which included the Aztecs of Tenochtitlan and the Acolhua of Texcoco, as well as Maxtla's fellow Tepanecs of Tlacopan. Aztec Triple Alliance was an alliance of three city-states: Tenochtitlán, Tlacopán, and Texcoco. ... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Texcoco is a city in México State, Mexico, located to the east of Mexico City at 19. ... Tlacopan means florid plant on flat ground or also named Tacuba was one of the mesoamericans kingdoms of the prehispanic age Triple Alianza (together with Tenochtitlan and Texcoco). ...


With the rise of the Aztec empire, Tlacopan became the predominant Tepanec city, although both Tenochtitlan and Texcoco eclipsed Tlacopan’s size and prestige.

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Footnotes

  1. ^ The dates vary by source, including 1152 CE in Anales de Tlatelolco, 1210 from Chimalpahin, and 1226 from Ixtlilxochitl (as interpreted by Smith, p. 169).
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CE is an abbreviation which can have the following meanings: Capillary electrophoresis the CE mark is a stylized CE placed on products to signify conformance with European Union regulations. ... Fernando de Alva Cortés Ixtlilxochitl (1568?-1648). ...

References

  • Smith, Michael E. (1984); "The Aztlan Migrations of Nahuatl Chronicles: Myth or History?", in Ethnohistory 31(3): 153 - 186.

 
 

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