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Encyclopedia > Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama
Tenzin Gyatso
14th Dalai Lama of Tibet
Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama
Reign 17 November 1950–Present
Coronation 17 November 1950
Full name Jetsun Jamphel Ngawang Lobsang Yeshe Tenzin Gyatso
Tibetan བསྟན་འཛིན་རྒྱ་མཚོ་
Wylie translit. bstan ’dzin rgya mtsho
Pronunciation tɛ̃tsĩ catsʰo (IPA)
Transcription (PRC) Dainzin Gyaco
THDL Tenzin Gyatso
Chinese 丹增嘉措
Pinyin Chinese Dānzēng Jiācuò
Born 6 July 1935 (1935-07-06) (age 72)
Qinghai, China [1]
Predecessor Thubten Gyatso
Royal House Dalai Lama
Father Choekyong Tsering
Mother Diki Tsering

Jetsun Jamphel Ngawang Lobsang Yeshe Tenzin Gyatso (born Llhamo Döndrub (Tibetan: Wylie: Lha-mo Don-'grub) 6 July 1935 in Qinghai [1]), is the fourteenth and current Dalai Lama.[2] He is the political and spiritual leader of Tibetans worldwide and exerts a powerful influence over the the Gelug School of Tibetan Buddhism in which he was trained. He is influential as a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, the world's most well-known Buddhist monk, and leader of the Tibetan government-in-exile in Dharamsala, India. Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Wylie transliteration scheme is a method for transliterating the Tibetan script using the keys on a typical English language typewriter. ... The Peoples Republic of Chinas Tibetan Pinyin (Chinese: ; pinyin: Zàngwén PÄ«nyÄ«n; Tibetan: བོད་ཡིག་གི་སྒྲ་སྦྱོར་) is the official transcription system for the Tibetan language in China. ... The THDL Simplified Phonetic Transcription of Standard Tibetan (or THDL Phonetic Transcription for short) is a system for the phonetic rendering of the Tibetan language. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Qinghai (Chinese: 青海; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ching-hai; Postal System Pinyin: Tsinghai; Tibetan: མཚོ་སྔོན་ mtsho-sngon; Mongolian: Köke Naγur; Manchu: Huhu Noor) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, named after the enormous Qinghai Lake. ... Thubten Gyatso (1876-1933), sometimes spelled Thupten Gyatso, was the 13th Dalai Lama of Tibet. ... This article is about the Dalai Lama lineage. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Wylie transliteration scheme is a method for transliterating the Tibetan script using the keys on a typical English language typewriter. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Qinghai (Chinese: 青海; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ching-hai; Postal System Pinyin: Tsinghai; Tibetan: མཚོ་སྔོན་ mtsho-sngon; Mongolian: Köke Naγur; Manchu: Huhu Noor) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, named after the enormous Qinghai Lake. ... This article is about the Dalai Lama lineage. ... The Geluk (dge lugs) School was founded by Tsongkhapa (1357-1419), Tibets best known religious reformer and arguably its greatest philosopher. ... Tibetan Buddhism is the body of religious Buddhist doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet, the Himalayan region (including northern Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim and Ladakh), Mongolia, Buryatia, Tuva and Kalmykia (Russia), and northeastern China (Manchuria: Heilongjiang, Jilin). ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Categories: Buddhism-related stubs | Buddhist terms ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... Official language Tibetan Headquarters Dharamsala, India Head of State Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama Head of Government Professor Venerable Samdhong Rinpoche National Anthem Tibetan National Anthem, (Link) The Central Tibetan Administration (CTA), officially the Central Tibetan Administration of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, is a government in exile headed by... Dharamshala redirects here. ...


Gyatso was the fifth of 16 children born to a farming family in the village of Taktser, Qinghai province (then under the control of Ma Lin, a Muslim warlord allied with Chiang Kai-shek)[1] where he learned the Amdo dialect of Tibetan as his first language.[3][4] He was proclaimed the tulku (rebirth) of the thirteenth Dalai Lama two years after he was born. On 17 November 1950, at the age of fifteen, he was enthroned as Tibet's Dalai Lama, thus becoming Tibet's most important political ruler. This occurred only one month after the People's Liberation Army's invasion of Tibet. The village of Taktser in Amdo Taktser (Tibetan: roaring tiger) is the Tibetan name of the village of Hongya (红崖村 Hongya cun, Hongaizi in the local dialect), together with 13 other villages forming the Shihuiyao Hui-nationality township (石灰窑回族乡). Shihuiyao is situated in the County of Pingan (平安县), which belongs to the... Qinghai (Chinese: 青海; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ching-hai; Postal System Pinyin: Tsinghai; Tibetan: མཚོ་སྔོན་ mtsho-sngon; Mongolian: Köke Naγur; Manchu: Huhu Noor) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, named after the enormous Qinghai Lake. ... Ma Lin (1873 - d. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... Situation of the east Tibetan region of Amdo Amdo (Tibetan: ཨ༌མདོ, Chinese: 安多, Pinyin: Ānduō) is one of the three former provinces of Tibet, the other two being Ü-Tsang and Kham; it is also the place from which Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama, comes from. ... For dialects of programming languages, see Programming language dialect. ... In Tibetan Buddhism, a tulku is the reincarnation of a lama or other spiritually significant figure. ... Look up rebirth in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The 13th Dalai Lama Thubten Gyatso (1876 – December 17, 1933), also spelled Thupten Gyatso, was the 13th Dalai Lama of Tibet. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peoples Liberation Army redirects here. ...


In 1951, the Tibetan delegate, appointed by Dalai Lama, signed the Seventeen Point Agreement which was ratified by the Dalai Lama a few months later.[5] However, he would later repudiate the agreement. In September 1954, he and Panchen Lama traveled to Beijing to meet with Mao Zedong and other senior leaders of China. He was subsequently elected as vice chairman of the first. National People's Congress, the People's Republic of China's highest state body and only legislative house. In 1956, the Dalai Lama became the chair of the Preparatory Committee for the Tibet Autonomous Region (PCART).[6] Seventeen Point Agreement for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet, the official name of a document in which delegates of the Dalai Lama reached an agreement with the new Peoples Republic of China, which regarded Tibet as part of its territory. ... Lobsang Trinley Lhündrub Chökyi Gyaltsen (February 19, 1938 – January 28, 1989) was the 10th Panchen Lama of Gelug Buddhism. ... Mao redirects here. ... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest legislative body in the Peoples Republic of China. ... This article is about the administrative region of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


After a failed uprising and the collapse of the Tibetan resistance movement in 1959, the Dalai Lama left for India, where he was active in establishing the Central Tibetan Administration (the Tibetan Government in Exile) and in seeking to preserve Tibetan culture and education among the thousands of refugees who accompanied him.[7] The initial Peoples Republic of Chinas military invasion of Tibet in 1950 met with high resistance in the heart of the country. ... Official language Tibetan Headquarters Dharamsala, India Head of State Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama Head of Government Professor Venerable Samdhong Rinpoche National Anthem Tibetan National Anthem, (Link) The Central Tibetan Administration (CTA), officially the Central Tibetan Administration of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, is a government in exile headed by... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ...


Tenzin Gyatso is described as a "charismatic" figure[3][8] and noted public speaker. He is the first Dalai Lama to travel to the West. There, he has helped to spread Tibetan Buddhism and to promote the concepts of universal responsibility, secular ethics, and religious harmony. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989,[3][9] honorary Canadian citizenship in 2006, and the United States Congressional Gold Medal on 17 October 2007.[10] Occident redirects here. ... The Indo-Greek king Menander (155-130 BCE) is the first Western historical figure documented to have converted to Buddhism. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Raoul Wallenberg, the first honorary citizen of Canada. ... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Contents

Early life and background

Birthplace in Taktser, Tibet
Birthplace in Taktser, Tibet
Tenzin Gyatso as a boy

Tenzin Gyatso was born to a farming family as Lhamo Döndrub or Lhamo Thondup in Taktser[11] a small and poor settlement that stands on a hill overlooking a broad valley. His parents, Choekyong and Diki Tsering, were relatively wealthy farmers among about twenty other families, all making a precarious living growing barley, buckwheat and potatoes.[citation needed] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Dalai_Lama_boy. ... Image File history File links Dalai_Lama_boy. ... The village of Taktser in Amdo Taktser (Tibetan: roaring tiger) is the Tibetan name of the village of Hongya (红崖村 Hongya cun, Hongaizi in the local dialect), together with 13 other villages forming the Shihuiyao Hui-nationality township (石灰窑回族乡). Shihuiyao is situated in the County of Pingan (平安县), which belongs to the... For other uses, see Barley (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Fagopyrum esculentum Moench Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a plant in the genus Fagopyrum (sometimes merged into genus Polygonum) in the family Polygonaceae. ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ...


His parents had sixteen children, and Tenzin Gyatso is the fifth eldest of the nine who survived childhood. The eldest child was his sister Tsering Dolma, who was eighteen years older than he. His eldest brother, Thupten Jigme Norbu, has been recognised as the rebirth of the high Lama, Taktser Rinpoche. His sister Jetsun Pema went on to depict their mother in the 1997 film Seven Years in Tibet. His other elder brothers are Gyalo Thondup and Lobsang Samden. Norbu with brother Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama Thupten Jigme Norbu on the cover of his book Tibet is My Country: Autobiography of Thubten Jigme Norbu, Brother of the Dalai Lama in the 1960s Thupten Jigme Norbu (1922 - the reincarnation of Takser Rinpoche) is a Tibetan lama, writer, civil... Not to be confused with Llama. ... Jetsun Pema is the living sister of the fourteenth holy Dalai Lama of Tibet, born in the Tibetan village of Amdo. ... Seven Years in Tibet is the 1997 film adaptation of the adventure story written by Austrian mountaineer Heinrich Harrer based on his real life experiences in Tibet between 1944 and 1951 during the onset of the Second World War and the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army Invasion. ...


When Tenzin Gyatso was about two years old a search party was sent out to find the new incarnation of the Dalai Lama.[3] Among other omens, the head on the embalmed body of the thirteenth Dalai Lama (originally facing south) had mysteriously turned to face the northeast, indicating the direction in which the next Dalai Lama would be found. Shortly afterwards, the Regent Reting Rinpoche had a vision at the sacred lake of Lhamo La-tso indicating Amdo (as the place to search) and a one-story house with distinctive guttering and tiling. After extensive searching, they found that Thondup's house resembled that in Reting's vision. They presented Thondup with various relics and toys—some had belonged to the previous Dalai Lama while others had not. It was reported that Thondup correctly identified all items owned by the previous Dalai Lama, exclaiming "That's mine! That's mine!"[12][13] Look up incarnation, incarnate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The 13th Dalai Lama Thubten Gyatso (1876 – December 17, 1933), also spelled Thupten Gyatso, was the 13th Dalai Lama of Tibet. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... Reting Rinpoche is the title held by abbots of Reting Monastery, a Buddhist monastery in central Tibet. ... In religion, visions comprise inspirational renderings, generally of a future state and/or of a mythical being, and are believed (by followers of the religion) to come from a deity, directly or indirectly via prophets, and serve to inspire or prod believers as part of a revelation or an epiphany. ...


Thondup was recognised as the reincarnated Dalai Lama and renamed Jetsun Jamphel Ngawang Lobsang Yeshe Tenzin Gyatso ("Holy Lord, Gentle Glory, Compassionate, Defender of the Faith, Ocean of Wisdom"). Tibetan Buddhists normally refer to him as Yishin Norbu ("Wish-Fulfilling Gem"), Kyabgon ("Savior"), or just Kundun ("Presence"). In the West, his followers often call him "His Holiness the Dalai Lama," which is the style that he uses himself on his website. // Fidei defensor is the Latin original of the English and French titles. ... Tibetan Buddhism is the body of religious Buddhist doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet, the Himalayan region (including northern Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim and Ladakh), Mongolia, Buryatia, Tuva and Kalmykia (Russia), and northeastern China (Manchuria: Heilongjiang, Jilin). ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ...


The Dalai Lama began his monastic education at the age of six, his main Teachers being Yongdzin Ling Rinpoche (Senior Tutor) and Yongdzin Trijang Rinpoche (Junior Tutor). At age eleven he met Austrian mountaineer Heinrich Harrer, after spying him in Lhasa through his telescope. Harrer effectively became one of the young Dalai Lama's tutors, teaching him about the outside world. The two remained friends until Harrer's death in 2006. In 1959, at age 25 he sat for his final examination in Lhasa's Jokhang Temple during the annual Monlam (prayer) Festival. He passed with honors and was awarded the Lharampa degree, the highest-level geshe degree (roughly equivalent to a doctorate in Buddhist philosophy).[3][14] Kyabje Trjang Rinpoche Gelug Lama of the 20th Century (b. ... Heinrich Harrer Heinrich Harrer (July 6, 1912 – January 7, 2006) was an Austrian mountaineer, sportsman, geographer, and author. ... For other uses, see Lhasa (disambiguation). ... The Jokhang Temple, home of the most venerated statue in Tibet a golden roof cylinder The Jokhang, also called the Jokhang Temple or the Jokhang Monastery, is a famous Buddhist temple in Lhasa, Tibet. ... Geshe is a Buddhist academic degree for scholars. ... Buddhist Teachings deals extensively with problems in metaphysics, phenomenology, ethics, and epistemology. ...


Buddhist monk, humanitarian, spiritual teacher and exiled leader of Tibet for his example of compassion and forgiveness following the massacre of his people and culture by the occupying army of China[citation needed]. He was awarded the Courage of Conscience award March 24, 1991.[15]


Life as the Dalai Lama

As well as being one of the most influential spiritual leaders of Tibetan Buddhism, the Dalai Lama by tradition is also Tibet's absolute political ruler. In 1939 at the age of four he was taken by lamas in a procession to Lhasa, where an official ceremony recognized him as the reborn spiritual leader of Tibet. His childhood was spent between the Potala and Norbulingka, his summer residence. For other uses, see Lhasa (disambiguation). ... The Potala Palace, located in Lhasa, Tibet, was the chief residence of the Dalai Lama until the 14th Dalai Lama fled to Dharamsala after a failed uprising in 1959. ... Norbulingka (Wylie: Nor-bu-gling-ka) is a palace and surrounding park in Lhasa, Tibet which served as the traditional summer residence of the successive Dalai Lamas from the 1780s up until the PRC takeover in the late 1950s. ...

The Dalai Lama's former quarters at the Potala, Lhasa
The Dalai Lama's former quarters at the Potala, Lhasa

On 17 November 1950, at the age of fifteen, with the country facing possible conflict with the People's Republic of China, Tenzin Gyatso was enthroned as the temporal leader of Tibet. His governorship, however, was short. In October of that year the army of the People's Republic of China entered the territory controlled by the Tibetan administration, easily breaking through the Tibetan defenders. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1333 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1333 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Potala Palace, located in Lhasa, Tibet, was the chief residence of the Dalai Lama until the 14th Dalai Lama fled to Dharamsala after a failed uprising in 1959. ... For other uses, see Lhasa (disambiguation). ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Dalai Lama sent a delegation to Beijing and, although under PLA military pressure, ratified[16][17] the subsequent Seventeen Point Agreement for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet and tried to work with Beijing. In September 1954, the Dalai Lama and the 10th Panchen Lama went to Beijing to attend the first session of the first National People's Congress, meeting Mao Zedong.[18] However, during 1959, there was a major uprising among the Tibetan population. In the tense political environment that ensued, the Dalai Lama and his entourage began to suspect that China was planning to kill him. Consequently, he fled to Tawang, India, on 17 March of that year, entering India on 31 March during the Tibetan uprising. Peking redirects here. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Khedrup Je, the 1st Panchen Lama The Panchen Lama (often transliterated as Pänchen Lama) or the Panchen Erdeni, is the one of the two highest ranking lamas (together with the Dalai Lama) in the Gelugpa (Dge-lugs-pa) sect of Tibetan Buddhism (the sect which controlled Tibet from the... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest legislative body in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Mao redirects here. ... The Tawang district is located at the north-west of the state of Arunachal Pradesh in India. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Exile to India

The Dalai Lama met with the Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru, to urge India to pressure China into giving Tibet an autonomous government, as relations with China were not proving successful. Nehru did not want to increase tensions between China and India, so he encouraged the Dalai Lama to work on the Seventeen Point Agreement Tibet had with China. Eventually, after the failed uprising in 1959, the Dalai Lama fled Tibet and set up the Government of Tibet in Exile in Dharamsala, India, which is often referred to as "Little Lhasa". The Prime Minister of India is, in practice, the most powerful person in the Government of India. ... Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru (Hindi: , IPA: (November 14, 1889 – May 27, 1964) was a major political leader of the Congress Party, a pivotal figure in the Indian independence movement and the first Prime Minister of independent India. ... Seventeen Point Agreement for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet, the official name of a document in which delegates of the Dalai Lama reached an agreement with the new Peoples Republic of China, which regarded Tibet as part of its territory. ... Official language Tibetan Headquarters Dharamsala Head of State (Dalai Lama) Tenzin Gyatso National Anthem Tibetan National Anthem, (Link) The Government of Tibet in Exile, officially named the Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, is a theocratic government-like entity headed by Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai... Dharamshala redirects here. ...


After the founding of the exiled government he reestablished the ~80,000 Tibetan refugees who followed him into exile in agricultural settlements.[3] He created a Tibetan educational system in order to teach the Tibetan children what he believed to be traditional language, history, religion, and culture. The Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts was established[3] in 1959 and the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies[3] became the primary university for Tibetans in India. He supported the refounding of 200 monasteries and nunneries in an attempt to preserve Tibetan Buddhist teachings and the Tibetan way of life. Tibetan plateau Tibet is situated between the two ancient civilizations of China and India, but the tangled mountain ranges of the Tibetan Plateau and the towering Himalayas serve to distance it from both. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... The Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts was founded by Tenzin Gyatso on reaching Dharamsala, India in exile from Tibet in August 1959. ... The Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies (CIHTS) is a university institute founded in Dharamsala, India in 1967. ...

Tibetan Parliament in Exile in Dharamsala

The Dalai Lama appealed to the United Nations on the question of Tibet. This appeal resulted in three resolutions adopted by the General Assembly in 1959, 1961, and 1965.[3] These resolutions required China to respect the human rights of Tibetans and their desire for self-determination. In 1963, he promulgated a democratic constitution which is based upon the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. A Tibetan parliament-in-exile is elected by the Tibetan refugees scattered all over the world, and the Tibetan Government-in-Exile is likewise elected by the Tibetan parliament. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (962x741, 468 KB) Tibetan Government in Exile parliament in Dharamshala, India. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (962x741, 468 KB) Tibetan Government in Exile parliament in Dharamshala, India. ... Dharamshala redirects here. ... UN redirects here. ... The Tibetan people are a people indigenous to Tibet and surrounding areas stretching from Central Asia in the West to Myanmar and China in the East. ... Self-determination is a principle in international law that a people ought to be able to determine their own governmental forms and structure free from outside influence. ... The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (abbreviated UDHR) is an advisory declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly (A/RES/217, 10 December 1948 at Palais de Chaillot, Paris). ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ... Official language Tibetan Headquarters Dharamsala, India Head of State Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama Head of Government Professor Venerable Samdhong Rinpoche National Anthem Tibetan National Anthem, (Link) The Central Tibetan Administration (CTA), officially the Central Tibetan Administration of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, is a government in exile headed by...


At the Congressional Human Rights Caucus in 1987 in Washington, D.C., he proposed a Five-Point Peace Plan regarding the future status of Tibet. The plan called for Tibet to become a "zone of peace" and for the end of movement by ethnic Han Chinese into Tibet. It also called for "respect for fundamental human rights and democratic freedoms" and "the end of China's use of Tibet for nuclear weapons production, testing, and disposal." Finally, it urged "earnest negotiations" on the future of Tibet. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The democratic peace theory, liberal peace theory,[1] or simply the democratic peace is a theory and related empirical research in international relations, political science, and philosophy which holds that democracies—usually, liberal democracies—never or almost never go to war with one another. ... Language(s) Chinese languages Religion(s) Predominantly Mahayana Buddhism and Taoism. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ...

The main teaching room of the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, India
The main teaching room of the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, India

He proposed a similar plan at Strasbourg on 15 June 1988. He expanded on the Five-Point Peace Plan and proposed the creation of a self-governing democratic Tibet, "in association with the People's Republic of China." This plan was rejected by the Tibetan Government-in-Exile in 1991. In October 1991, he expressed his wish to return to Tibet to try to make a mutual assessment on the situation with the Chinese local government. At this time he feared that a violent uprising would take place and wished to avoid it. The Dalai Lama has indicated that he wishes to return to Tibet only if the People's Republic of China sets no preconditions for his return, which they have so far refused to do.[19][20] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Dharamshala redirects here. ... For other uses, see Strasburg. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Democracy (disambiguation) and Democratic Party. ...


Tenzin Gyatso celebrated his seventieth birthday on 6 July 2005. About 10,000 Tibetan refugees, monks and foreign tourists gathered outside his home. Patriarch Alexius II of the Russian Orthodox Church said, "I confess that the Russian Orthodox Church highly appreciates the good relations it has with the followers of Buddhism and hopes for their further development." Taiwan's President, Chen Shui-bian, attended an evening celebrating the Dalai Lama's birthday that was entitled "Traveling with Love and Wisdom for 70 Years" at the Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall in Taipei. The President invited him to return to Taiwan for a third trip in 2005. His previous trips were in 2001, and 1997.[21] is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Patriarch Alexius II Patriarch Alexius II (February 23, 1929) is the 16th and current Patriarch of Moscow and the spiritual leader of the Russian Orthodox Church. ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The Memorial Hall The National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: ) is a monument erected in memory of Chiang Kai-shek, former President of the Republic of China, in Taipei, Taiwan. ... This article is about the city. ...


Teaching activity

The Dalai Lama is a Dzogchen practitioner and he gives teachings on this issue, and has expounded many teachings in his numerous publications. He has also given many public initiations in the Kalachakra. This article refers to the primordial state as considered in Tibetan Buddhism and Bon. ... Kālacakra (Sanskrit कालचक्र; Tibetan དུས་ཀྱི་འཁོར་ལོ་ dus kyi khor lo) is a term used in Tantric Buddhism that means time-wheel or time-cycles. It refers both to a Tantric deity (Tib. ...


In February 2007, the Dalai Lama was named Presidential Distinguished Professor at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, United States,[22] the first time that the leader of the Tibetan exile community has accepted a university appointment. The appointment is in part an expansion of a program begun in 1998 called the Emory–Tibet Partnership. As Presidential Distinguished Professor, he will:[22] At many universities the honorary title of Distinguished Professor is given to a small number of members of the faculty who are recognized by colleagues throughout the world as leaders in their fields. ... Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... Atlanta redirects here. ...

  • provide opportunities for university community members to attend his annual teachings,
  • make periodic visits to Emory to participate in programs, and
  • continue the Emory–Tibet Partnership practice of providing private teaching sessions with students and faculty during Emory's study-abroad program in Dharamsala.

The Dalai Lama has strong ties with University of Wisconsin-Madison in Madison, Wisconsin, United States, and is a frequent visitor there. He visited the university in 1981 and again in 1989, the year in which he won the Nobel Peace Prize. In May 1998, he addressed a large audience at the Kohl Center and received an honorary degree from the university. In May 2001, he met with a group of neuroscientists who conduct research on the effects of meditation on brain function, emotions and physical health. His most recent visit to the U.S. was in April 2008, when he gave lectures on engaging wisdom and compassion, and sustainability, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and at Colgate University in Hamilton, N.Y.[23] University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... The Kohl Center opened in 1998 in Madison, Wisconsin. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ...


Foreign relations

The Dalai Lama & Archbishop Desmond Tutu, 2004. Photo by Carey Linde.
The Dalai Lama & Archbishop Desmond Tutu, 2004. Photo by Carey Linde.
The Dalai Lama at an interfaith gathering in Berlin, 2003
Tenzin Gyatso in Dharamsala, 1993
Tenzin Gyatso in Dharamsala, 1993

Since 1967, the Dalai Lama has initiated a series of tours in 46 nations. He has frequently engaged on religious dialogue. He met with Pope Paul VI at the Vatican in 1973. He met with Pope John Paul II in 1980 and also later in 1982, 1986, 1988, 1990, and 2003. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1035x749, 87 KB) [edit] Summary This picture was taken by my good friend Carey Linde in Vancouver in April 2004. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1035x749, 87 KB) [edit] Summary This picture was taken by my good friend Carey Linde in Vancouver in April 2004. ... Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x747, 199 KB) Description: Der Dalai Lama auf dem Ökumenischen Kirchentag in Berlin 2003 Photographer: ASK Date: May 30, 2003 License: GFDL File links The following pages link to this file: Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x747, 199 KB) Description: Der Dalai Lama auf dem Ökumenischen Kirchentag in Berlin 2003 Photographer: ASK Date: May 30, 2003 License: GFDL File links The following pages link to this file: Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama ... Subject: 14th Dalai Lama Source: http://www. ... Subject: 14th Dalai Lama Source: http://www. ... Dharamshala redirects here. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of...


In 1990, he met in Dharamsala with a delegation of Jewish teachers for an extensive interfaith dialogue.[24] He has since visited Israel three times and met in 2006 with the Chief Rabbi of Israel. In 2006, he met privately with Pope Benedict XVI. He has also met the late Archbishop of Canterbury Dr. Robert Runcie, and other leaders of the Anglican Church in London, Gordon B. Hinckley, late President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), as well as senior Eastern Orthodox Church, Muslim, Hindu, Jewish, and Sikh officials. Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Robert Alexander Kennedy Runcie, Baron Runcie of Cuddesdon PC MC (October 2, 1921 – July 11, 2000) was the 102nd Archbishop of Canterbury from 1980 to 1991. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ...


During the runup to the Beijing Olympics of 2008, the Dalai Lama visited, on April 10, 2008, Japan on his way to the United States, amid protests around the world over China's handling of the 2008 Tibetan unrest. The Dalai Lama, whom Beijing claimed fomented the unrest, called for calm, but the protests showed little sign of abating. The Dalai Lama said he does not support a boycott of the 2008 Summer Games outright.[25] Japan's government had been relatively quiet about the violence in Tibet and, out of deference to Beijing, does not deal officially with the Dalai Lama. Tokyo does, however, grant visas to the spiritual leader, who has visited Japan fairly frequently.[26] The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be held in Beijing in the Peoples Republic of China from August 8, 2008 to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony to take place at 8 p. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Peking redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ...


Social and political stances

Tibetan independence movement

The Dalai Lama accepted the 1951 Seventeen Point Agreement for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet with the People's Republic of China. However, his brothers moved to Kalimpong in India and, with the help of the Indian and American governments, organized pro-independence literature and the smuggling of weapons into Tibet. Armed struggles broke out in Amdo and Kham in 1956 and later spread to Central Tibet. The movement was a failure and was forced to retreat to Nepal or go underground. Following normalisation of relations between the United States and the People's Republic of China, American support was cut off in the early 1970s. The Dalai Lama then began to formulate his policy towards a peaceful solution in which a democratic autonomous Tibet would be established[citation needed]. This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... , Kalimpong (Nepali: कालिम्पोङ) is a hill station (a hill town) nestled in the Shiwalik Hills (or Lower Himalaya) in the Indian state of West Bengal. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... An autonomous (subnational) entity is a subnational entity that has a certain amount of autonomy. ...


In October 1998, the Dalai Lama's administration acknowledged that it received US$1.7 million a year in the 1960s from the U.S. Government through the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and had also trained a guerrilla army in Colorado, (USA). [27][28] CIA redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...


The Dalai Lama has on occasion been denounced by the Chinese government as a supporter of Tibetan independence. Over time, he has developed a public position stating that he is not in favour of Tibetan independence[29] and would not object to a status in which Tibet has internal autonomy while the PRC manages some aspects of Tibet's defense and foreign affairs.[30] In his 'Middle Way Approach', he laid down that the Chinese government can take care of foreign affairs and defense, and that Tibet should be managed by an elected body.[31]


The Dalai Lama on March 16, 2008 called for an international probe of China's treatment of Tibet, which he said is causing "cultural genocide" of his people.[32] He has stated that he will step down as leader of Tibet's government-in-exile if violence by protesters in the region worsens, the exiled spiritual leader said March 18, 2008 after China's premier Wen Jiabao blamed his supporters for the growing unrest.[33] On March 20, 2008, he claimed he was powerless to stop anti-Chinese violence.[34] The Dalai Lama March 28, 2008 rejected a series of allegations from the Chinese government, saying he does not seek the separation of Tibet and has no desire to "sabotage" the 2008 Summer Olympics.[35] This article is about the Dalai Lama lineage. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Wen Jiabao (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Wen Chia-pao) (born September 1942) is the Premier of the State Council of the Peoples Republic of China. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in...


There has been criticism that feudal Tibet was not as benevolent as the Dalai Lama had portrayed. Critics have suggested that in addition to serfdom there were conditions that effectively constituted slavery.[27] Also, the penal code included forms of corporal punishment, in addition to capital punishment. In response, the Dalai Lama has since condemned many of Tibet's feudal practices and has added that he, as a young teenager, was willing to institute reforms before the Chinese invaded in 1951.[30] Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... Serf redirects here. ... Slave redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Criminal Code. ... Corporal punishment is the deliberate infliction of pain and suffering intended to change a persons behavior or to punish them. ... Death penalty, death sentence, and execution redirect here. ...


Social stances

The Dalai Lama endorsed the founding of the Dalai Lama Foundation in order to promote peace and ethics worldwide. The Dalai Lama is not operationally involved with this foundation, though he suggests some overall direction and his office is routinely briefed on its activities.[36] He has also stated his belief that modern scientific findings take precedence over ancient religions.[37][38]


Sexuality

In his view, oral, manual and anal sex (both homosexual and heterosexual) is not acceptable in Buddhism or for Buddhists, but society otherwise should tolerate gays and lesbians.[39] He explains in his book Beyond Dogma: "homosexuality, whether it is between men or between women, is not improper in itself. What is improper is the use of organs already defined as inappropriate for sexual contact." In 1997 he explained that the basis of that teaching was unknown to him and that he at least had some "willingness to consider the possibility that some of the teachings may be specific to a particular cultural and historic context."[40] In a 1994 interview with OUT Magazine, the Dalai Lama explained, "If someone comes to me and asks whether [homosexuality] is okay or not, I will ask...'What is your companion's opinion?' If you both agree, then I think I would say, if two males or two females voluntarily agree to have mutual satisfaction without further implication of harming others, then it is okay."[41]


Gay rights activists have criticized his comments in regards to "sexual misconduct."[42] The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also...


Abortion

The Dalai Lama is generally opposed to abortion,[43] although he has taken a nuanced position, as he explained to the New York Times: The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

Of course, abortion, from a Buddhist viewpoint, is an act of killing and is negative, generally speaking. But it depends on the circumstances. If the birth will create serious problems for the parent, these are cases where there can be an exception. I think abortion should be approved or disapproved according to each circumstance.[44]

Environment

He has also expressed his concern for environmental problems:

On the global level, I think the ecology problem is very serious. I hear about some states taking it very seriously. That's wonderful! So this blue planet is our only home, if something goes wrong at the present generation, then the future generations really face a lot of problems, and those problems will be beyond human control; so that's very serious. Ecology should be part of our daily life.

In recent years, he has been campaigning for wildlife conservation, including a religious ruling against wearing tiger and leopard skins as garments.[46][47] State University of New York at Buffalo, commonly known as University at Buffalo (UB) is a coeducational public research university, which has multiple campuses located in Buffalo and Amherst, New York, USA. Offering 84 bachelors, 184 masters and 78 doctoral degrees, it is one of the four comprehensive... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... cheese ...


Economics

In 1996, he described himself as half-Marxist, half-Buddhist: Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ...

Of all the modern economic theories, the economic system of Marxism is founded on moral principles, while capitalism is concerned only with gain and profitability. Marxism is concerned with the distribution of wealth on an equal basis and the equitable utilization of the means of production. It is also concerned with the fate of the working classes—that is the majority—as well as with the fate of those who are underprivileged and in need, and Marxism cares about the victims of minority-imposed exploitation. For those reasons the system appeals to me, and it seems fair… The failure of the regime in the Soviet Union was, for me not the failure of Marxism but the failure of totalitarianism. For this reason I think of myself as half-Marxist, half-Buddhist.

The Dalai Lama, Friendly Feudalism: The Tibet Myth[48] and Dalai Lama's answer on various topics[49]

Firearms

In 2001, he discussed firearms and self-defense:

One girl wanted to know how to react to a shooter who takes aim at a classmate. The Dalai Lama said acts of violence should be remembered, and then forgiveness should be extended to the perpetrators. But if someone has a gun and is trying to kill you, he said, it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun. Not at the head, where a fatal wound might result. But at some other body part, such as a leg.

Seattle Times,  Portland, Oregon May 15, 2001[50]

Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

Religious Controversy

Laird (2006: p.23) in a published transcription of a conversation with Tenzin Gyatso, the Dalai Lama identifies the karmic "connections" or mindstream affinities he has: This article needs cleanup. ...

"If someone asks me whether I am the reincarnation of the Dalai Lama," he said, "then I answer, without hesitation, yes. This does not mean that I am the same being as the previous Dalai Lama. Some Dalai Lamas are a manifestation of Manjusri. Some are a manifestation of Chenrizi. Chenrizi is the manifestation of compassion. Manjusri is the manifestation of wisdom. I have a special connection with the Thirteenth Dalai Lama and the Fifth Dalai Lama. I have felt some kind of karmic relations or connections even with the Buddha. I feel I can say I have some kind of connection with the previous Dalai Lamas, some of the previous masters, with Chenrizi, even with the Buddha."[51] Statue of Manjusri (Monju) at Senkoji in Onomichi, Japan Mañjuśrī (Ch: 文殊 Wenshu or 文殊師利 Wenshushili; Jp: Monju; Tib: Jampelyang), also written Manjushri, is the bodhisattva of keen awareness in Buddhism. ... Avalokiteśvara holding a lotus flower. ...

There are actual two religious controversies the Dalai Lama is faced to and involved in:

Dorje Shugden (also known as Losang Drakpa or Dhogyal)) is a disembodied entity whose precise nature is disputed among adherents of Tibetan Buddhism, especially its Gelugpa sect. ... The Karmapa lineage is the most ancient tulku lineage in Tibetan Buddhism, pre-dating the Dalai Lama lineage by more than two centuries. ...

Reception

Wikinews has related news:
Dalai Lama's representative talks about China, Tibet, Shugden and the next Dalai Lama
The Dalai Lama receiving a Congressional Gold Medal in 2007. George W. Bush, Robert Byrd, and Nancy Pelosi are on his left.
The Dalai Lama receiving a Congressional Gold Medal in 2007. George W. Bush, Robert Byrd, and Nancy Pelosi are on his left.

The Dalai Lama has been successful in gaining Western sympathy for Tibetan self-determination, including vocal support from numerous Hollywood celebrities, most notably the actors Richard Gere and Steven Seagal, as well as lawmakers from several major countries.[52] Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is currently the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Richard Tiffany Gere[1] (born August 31, 1949) is a Golden Globe- and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American actor. ... Steven Seagal (born April 10, 1951) is an American action movie actor, producer, writer, director, martial artist, singer-songwriter, spiritualist and activist. ...


On 18 April 2005, TIME Magazine placed the Dalai Lama on its list of the world's 100 most influential people.[53] is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ...


On 22 June 2006, the Parliament of Canada voted unanimously to make The Dalai Lama an honorary citizen of Canada.[54][55] This marks the third of four times in history that the Government of Canada has bestowed this honour, the others being Raoul Wallenberg posthumously in 1985, Nelson Mandela in 2001 and Aung San Suu Kyi in 2007. is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... Raoul Wallenberg, the first honorary citizen of Canada. ... The Government of Canada is the federal government of Canada. ... Raoul Gustav Wallenberg (August 4, 1912 – July 16, 1947?)[1][2][3] was a Swedish humanitarian sent to Budapest, Hungary under diplomatic cover to rescue Jews from the Holocaust. ... For other people named Mandela, or other uses, see Mandela. ... Aung San Suu Kyi (Burmese: ; MLCTS: ; IPA: ); born 19 June 1945 in Rangoon, is a pro-democracy activist and leader of the National League for Democracy in Burma, and a noted prisoner of conscience and advocate of nonviolent resistance. ...


In September 2006, the United States Congress voted to award the Dalai Lama the Congressional Gold Medal,[56] the highest award which may be bestowed by the Legislative Branch of the United States government. The actual ceremony and awarding of the medal took place on 17 October 2007. The Chinese Government has reacted angrily to the award, which it merely refers to as "the extremely wrong arrangements." Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi said: "It seriously violates the norm of international relations and seriously wounded the feelings of the Chinese people and interfered with China's internal affairs."[57] Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Yang Jiechi and Condoleezza Rice. ...


In June 2007, the Dalai Lama made an Australian tour, delivering public talks in Perth, Bendigo, Melbourne, Geelong, Sydney, Canberra and Brisbane.


Despite protest from China, German Chancellor Angela Merkel met with the Dalai Lama in the Berlin Chancellery on 25 September 2007. The meeting was characterized as "private and informal talks" in order to avert potential retaliation by China such as the severance of trade ties. In response to the meeting, China cancelled meetings with German officials including Justice Minister Brigitte Zypries.[58] For other uses, see Chancellor (disambiguation). ...   (IPA: ) (born Angela Dorothea Kasner, 17 July 1954, in Hamburg, Germany), is the Chancellor of Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Chancellery is the office of the chancellor, sometimes also reffered to as the chancery. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about economic exchange. ... An official is, in the primary sense, someone who holds an office in an organisation, of any kind. ... Federal Minister of Justice Brigitte Zypries at the Wikipedia booth at LinuxTag 2006 Brigitte Zypries (born November 16, 1953, in Kassel, Germany) is a German politician. ...


In October 1998, The Dalai Lama's administration acknowledged that it received $1.7 million a year in the 1960s from the U.S. Government through the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and also trained a resistance movement in Colorado (USA).[28] When asked by CIA officer John Kenneth Knaus in 1995 whether the organization did a good or bad thing in providing its support, the Dalai Lama replied that though it helped the morale of those resisting the Chinese, "thousands of lives were lost in the resistance" and further, that "the U.S. Government had involved itself in his country's affairs not to help Tibet but only as a Cold War tactic to challenge the Chinese." [59] CIA redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...


British journalist Christopher Hitchens criticised Dalai Lama in 1998, questioned his alleged support for India's nuclear weapons testing, his statements about sexual misconduct, his suppression of Shugden worship, as well as his meeting Shoko Asahara, whose cult Aum Shinrikyo released sarin nerve gas in the Tokyo subway system.[60][61] Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Dorje Shugden is a deity of Tibetan Buddhism whose precise nature — enlightened tutelary deity (Yidam) or bound protector (Dharmapala) or an evil and malevolent force[1] (Rakshasa) — is disputed among adherents of Tibetan Buddhism, especially its Gelug sect. ... Shoko Asahara (麻原 彰晃 Asahara Shōkō) (born Chizuo Matsumoto (松本智津夫 Matsumoto Chizuo) on March 2, 1955) is the founder of Japans controversial Buddhist religious group Aum Shinrikyo (now known as Aleph). ... Aum Shinrikyo, now known as Aleph, is a Japanese religious group founded by Shoko Asahara. ... For other uses, see Sarin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ...


Retirement

Tenzin Gyatso during his visit to Italy in 2007.
Tenzin Gyatso during his visit to Italy in 2007.

In May 2007, Chhime Rigzing, a senior spokesman for the Tibetan spiritual leader's office, stated that the Dalai Lama wants to reduce his political burden as he moves into "retirement".[62] Chhime Rigzing is a Tibetan government official and senior spokesman for Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama. ...


Rigzing stated "The political leadership will be transferred over a period of time but he will inevitably continue to be the spiritual leader because as the Dalai Lama, the issue of relinquishing the post does not arise."


The Dalai Lama announced he would like the elected Tibetan parliament-in-exile to have more responsibility over administration.


On 1 September 2007, China issued new rules controlling the selection of the next Dalai Lama, declaring that any reincarnation must bear the seal of approval by China's cabinet. These regulations could potentially result in one Dalai Lama approved by the Chinese government, and another chosen outside of Tibet.[63] This would be similar to the present situation with the Panchen Lamas and Karmapas. In November 2007, Tashi Wangdi said the new rules mean nothing. "It will have no effect" said Wangdi. You can't impose a Pope. You can't impose an imam, an archbishop, saints, any religion… you can't politically impose these things on people. It has to be a decision of the followers of that tradition. The Chinese can use their political power: force. Again, it's meaningless."[64] is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... PRC is a common abbreviation for: Peoples Republic of China Palestinian Red Crescent Popular Resistance Committees This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the Dalai Lama lineage. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... Khedrup Je, the 1st Panchen Lama The Panchen Lama (often transliterated as Pänchen Lama) or the Panchen Erdeni, is the one of the two highest ranking lamas (together with the Dalai Lama) in the Gelugpa (Dge-lugs-pa) sect of Tibetan Buddhism (the sect which controlled Tibet from the... The 16th Karmapa, Rangjung Rigpe Dorje (1924 - 1981) The Karmapa (officially His Holiness the Gyalwa Karmapa) is the head of the Karma Kagyu, the largest sub-school of the Kagyupa (Tib. ... Tashi Wangdi Wikinews has related news: Dalai Lamas representative talks about China, Tibet, Shugden and the next Dalai Lama Tashi Wangdi is the Representative to the Americas for His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... General definition of saint In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ...


During the 2008 unrest in Tibet, Gyatso called for calm[65] and concurrently condemned Chinese violence[66]. His call was met with Tibetan frustration at his methodology[67] and goals[68] and Chinese allegations that he himself incited the violence[69] in order to ruin the 2008 Summer Olympics[70]. In response to the continued violence perpetrated by Chinese as well as Tibetans[71], on March 18, 2008, Gyatso threatened to step down[72], a move unprecedented[73] in the history of the office of the Dalai Lama[74]. Aides later clarified that this threat was predicated on a further escalation of violence, and that he did not presently have the intention of leaving his political or spiritual offices[75]. Many Tibetan exiles expressed their support for the Dalai Lama, and the People's Republic of China intensified their propaganda campaign against him. [76][77] The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 1967 Chinese propaganda poster from the Cultural Revolution. ...


Bibliography

  • The Art of Happiness, co-authored with Howard C. Cutler, M.D. ISBN 0-9656682-9-0
  • The Art of Happiness at Work, coauthored with Howard C. Cutler, M.D. ISBN 1-59448-054-0
  • Mind in Comfort and Ease, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-493-8
  • The World of Tibetan Buddhism, translated by Geshe Thupten Jinpa, foreword by Richard Gere, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-097-5
  • The Compassionate Life,Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-378-8
  • Ethics for the New Millennium, Riverhead Books, 1999, ISBN 1-57322-883-4
  • A Simple Path, ISBN 0-00-713887-3
  • Essence of the Heart Sutra, edited by Geshe Thupten Jinpa, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-284-6
  • The Meaning of Life: Buddhist Perspectives on Cause and Effect, Translated by Jeffrey Hopkins, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-173-4
  • How to Practice: The Way to a Meaningful Life, Translated and edited by Jeffrey Hopkins,

ISBN 0-7434-5336-0 The Art of Happiness (Riverhead, 1998, ISBN 1573221112) is a book written by the Dalai Lama and co-authored with Howard Cutler, a psychiatrist who posed deeply probing questions to the Dalai Lama. ... Richard Tiffany Gere[1] (born August 31, 1949) is a Golden Globe- and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American actor. ... Jeffrey Hopkins (born 1940) is a distinguished [1] American Tibetologist. ... Jeffrey Hopkins (born 1940) is a distinguished [1] American Tibetologist. ...

  • Kalachakra Tantra: Rite of Initiation, Edited by Jeffrey Hopkins, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-151-3
  • A Good Heart: A Buddhist Perspective on the Teachings of Jesus, Translated by Geshe Thupten Jinpa, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-138-6
  • Opening the Eye of New Awareness, Translated by Donald S. Lopez, Jr., Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-155-6
  • Freedom in Exile: The Autobiography of the Dalai Lama, London: Little, Brown and Co, 1990 ISBN 0-349-10462-X
  • Imagine All the People: A Conversation with the Dalai Lama on Money, Politics, and Life as it Could Be, Coauthored with Fabien Ouaki, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-150-5
  • An Open Heart, edited by Nicholas Vreeland. ISBN 0-316-98979-7
  • The Gelug/Kagyü Tradition of Mahamudra, coauthored with Alexander Berzin. Ithaca, NY: Snow Lion Publications, 1997, ISBN 1-55939-072-7
  • Practicing Wisdom: The Perfection of Shantideva's Bodhisattva Way, translated by Geshe Thupten Jinpa, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-182-3
  • The Wisdom of Forgiveness: Intimate Conversations and Journeys, coauthored with Victor Chan, Riverbed Books, 2004, ISBN 1-57322-277-1
  • Tibetan Portrait: The Power of Compassion, photographs by Phil Borges with sayings by Tenzin Gyatso. ISBN 0-8478-1957-4
  • The Heart of Compassion: A Practical Approach to a Meaningful Life, Twin Lakes, Wisconsin: Lotus Press, ISBN 0-940985-36-5
  • Ancient Wisdom, Modern World: Ethics for the new millennium, Abacus Press, 2000, ISBN 0-349-11443-9
  • My Tibet, coauthoured with Galen Rowell, ISBN 0-520-08948-0
  • Sleeping, Dreaming, and Dying, edited by Francisco Varela, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-123-8
  • The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality, Morgan Road Books, 2005, ISBN 0-7679-2066-X
  • How to Expand Love: Widening the Circle of Loving Relationships, translated and edited by Jeffrey Hopkins, Ph.D., Atria Books, 2005, ISBN 0-7432-6968-3
  • Der Weg des Herzens. Gewaltlosigkeit und Dialog zwischen den Religionen (The Path of the Heart: Non-violence and the Dialogue among Religions), coauthored with Eugen Drewermann, Ph.D., Patmos Verlag, 2003, ISBN 3-4916-9078-1
  • How to See Yourself As You Really Are, Translated and edited by Jeffrey Hopkins, Ph.D. ISBN 0-7432-9045-3
  • MindScience: An East-West Dialogue, with contributions by Herbert Benson, Daniel Goleman, Robert Thurman, and Howard Gardner, Wisdom Publications, ISBN 0-86171-066-5
  • The New Physics and Cosmology: Dialogues with the Dalai Lama, edited by Arthur Zajonc, with contributions by David Finkelstein, George Greenstein, Piet Hut, Tu Wei-ming, Anton Zeilinger, B. Alan Wallace and Thupten Jinpa, Oxford University Press, 2004, ISBN 0-195-15994-2
  • The Power of Buddhism, co-authored with Jean-Claude Carriere ISBN 0717128032
  • Dzogchen: Heart Essence of the Great Perfection, translated by Geshe Thupten Jinpa and Richard Barron, Snow Lion Publications, 2000, ISBN 1559392193
  • Orphans of the Cold War, America and the Tibetan Struggle for Survival, John Kenneth Knaus, Public Affairs, New York. ISBN 1-891620-18-5 1999

Jeffrey Hopkins (born 1940) is a distinguished [1] American Tibetologist. ... Freedom in Exile is an autobiography of the Dalai Lama. ... An Open Heart is a book written by his Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama. ... Phil Borges (born 1942) Humanitarian Photographer Biographical Information Borges has been a humanitarian photographer since the 1970s with his notable works being photographs of Tibetans who fled to Nepal including the Dalai Lama. ... Francisco Varela (Santiago, September 7, 1946 – May 28, 2001, Paris) was a Chilean biologist and philosopher who, together with his teacher Humberto Maturana, is best known for introducing the concept of autopoiesis to biology. ... Eugen Drewermann (born June 20, 1940 in Bergkamen near Dortmund) is a German Catholic theologian, psychotherapist and writer. ... Herbert Benson (born 1935) is an American cardiologist and founder of the Mind/Body Medical Institute near Boston, Massachusetts. ... Daniel Goleman (born March 7, 1946) is an internationally renouned author, psychologist, science journalist and corporate consultant. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that Naturalist Intelligence be merged into this article or section. ... David Finkelstein (born July 19, 1929, New York City) is currently professor of physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology. ... Tu Wei-ming (杜維明 Pinyin: D ng) is an ethicist and a Boston Confucian. ... Anton Zeilinger Anton Zeilinger (born on 20 May 1945 in Ried im Innkreis, Austria) is a professor of physics at the University of Vienna, previously University of Innsbruck. ... B. Alan Wallace is an author, translator, teacher, researcher, interpreter and Buddhist practitioner interested in the intersections of consciousness studies and scientific disciplines such as psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and physics. ...

Awards and honors

The Congressional Gold Medal awarded to Tenzin Gyatso in 2006

The Dalai Lama has received numerous awards over his spiritual and political career.[78] On 22 June 2006, he became one of only four people ever to be recognized with Honorary Citizenship by the Governor General of Canada. On 28 May 2005, he received the Christmas Humphreys Award from the Buddhist Society in the United Kingdom. Perhaps his most notable award was the Nobel Peace Prize, presented to him in Oslo on 10 December 1989 (see below). Some other notable awards and honors he has received: Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Honorary Canadian Citizenship is an honor bestowed by the Parliament of Canada to foreigners of exceptional merit. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Justice Christmas Humphreys Q.C. (1901 - April 1983) lawyer, High Court judge, and founder of the Buddhist Society, London. ... The Buddhist Society, London was created in London as an offshoot of a Theosophical Lodge by Christmas Humphreys, a British judge and convert to Buddhism, along with his wife. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...

This article is about the capital of France. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... An Honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum) is a degree awarded to someone by an institution that he or she may have never attended, it may be a bachelors, masters or doctorate degree - however, the latter is most common. ... The University of Münster (German Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, WWU) is a public university located in the city of Münster, North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 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University at Buffalo The University at Buffalo, formerly known as the State University of New York at Buffalo, is located in Buffalo, New York, USA, and is one of the four university centers operated by the State University of New York. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... 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Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Hadassah (disambiguation). ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... The Four Freedoms Award is an annual liberal inclined award presented to those men and women who have demonstrated an achievement to the principles lined out in the Four freedoms speech president Franklin Delano Roosevelt gave to the US Congress on 6 January 1941. ... The Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute (FERI), located in Hyde Park, New York, is as the non-profit funding arm of the nations first presidential library, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Freedom of the City is an award made by towns and cities, to esteemed members of its community; such people may then be termed Freemen or Freewomen of the City. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Tom Bradley is a common name shared by a number of individuals: Tom Bradley, American author Tom Bradley, Former Mayor of Los Angeles, California Tom Bradley, British Member of Parliament and trade union leader (Transport Salaried Staffs Association). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein (born June 22, 1933) is the senior U.S. Senator from California, having held office as a senator since 1992. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...

Nobel Peace Prize

On 10 December 1989 the Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize,[84] the chairman of the Nobel committee said that the award was "in part a tribute to the memory of Mahatma Gandhi." The committee recognized his efforts in "the struggle of the liberation of Tibet and the efforts for a peaceful resolution instead of using violence."[85] In his acceptance speech he criticized China for using force against student protesters during the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. He stated however that their effort was not in vain. His speech focused on the importance of the continued use of non-violence and his desire to maintain a dialogue with China to try to resolve the situation.[86] is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... alternative Chinese name Traditional Chinese: Simplified Chinese: Literal meaning: Tiananmen Incident The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, widely known as the Tiananmen Square Massacre, in China referred to as the June Fourth Incident to avoid confusion with the two other Tiananmen Square protests and as an act of official censorship...


Filmography

Examples of films recently made about Tenzin Gyatso:

Dalai Lama Renaissance is a 2-hour feature documentary film, narrated by actor Harrison Ford and produced and directed by Khashyar Darvich, to be released in the Fall of 2006, about the Dalai Lamas meeting with Western renaissance thinkers at his home in Dharamsala, India, about changing the world... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Seven Years in Tibet is the 1997 film adaptation of the adventure story written by Austrian mountaineer Heinrich Harrer based on his real life experiences in Tibet between 1944 and 1951 during the onset of the Second World War and the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army Invasion. ... Jean-Jacques Annaud Jean-Jacques Annaud (born October 1, 1943) is a French film director. ... Kundun is a 1997 film written by Melissa Mathison and directed by Martin Scorsese, both of whom (along with several other members of the production) were banned by the Chinese Government from ever entering Tibet as a result of making the film. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ...

See also

Official language Tibetan Headquarters Dharamsala, India Head of State Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama Head of Government Professor Venerable Samdhong Rinpoche National Anthem Tibetan National Anthem, (Link) The Central Tibetan Administration (CTA), officially the Central Tibetan Administration of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, is a government in exile headed by... Tibetan Buddhism is the body of religious Buddhist doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet, the Himalayan region (including northern Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim and Ladakh), Mongolia, Buryatia, Tuva and Kalmykia (Russia), and northeastern China (Manchuria: Heilongjiang, Jilin). ... Tashi Wangdi Wikinews has related news: Dalai Lamas representative talks about China, Tibet, Shugden and the next Dalai Lama Tashi Wangdi is the Representative to the Americas for His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c At the time of Tenzin Gyatso's birth, Qinghai was under the control of Ma Lin, a warlord allied with Chiang Kai-shek and appointed governor of Qinghai by the Kuomintang. See Li, T.T. "Historical Status of Tibet", Columbia University Press, p179 ; Bell, Charles, "Portrait of the Dalai Lama", p399; Goldstein, Melvyn C. Goldstein, A history of modern Tibet, pp315-317
  2. ^ "The Institution of the Dalai Lama" by R. N. Rahul Sheel in The Tibet Journal, Vol. XIV No. 3. Autumn 1989, pp. 19-32 says on pp. 31-32, n. 1: "The word Dalai is Mongolian for "ocean", used mainly by the Chinese, the Mongols, and foreigners. Rgya mtsho, the corresponding Tibetan word, always has formed the last part of the religious name of the Dalai Lama since Dalai Lama II [sic – should read Dalai Lama III]. The expression Lama (Bla ma) means the "superior one". Western usage has taken it to mean the "priest" of the Buddhism of Tibet. The term Dalai Lama, therefore, means the Lama whose wisdom is as deep, as vast and as embracing as the ocean."
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Profile: The Dalai Lama from a BBC News website
  4. ^ Tibet Is My Country: Autobiography of Thubten Jigme Norbu, Brother of the Dalai Lama as told to Heinrich Harrer, pp. 103, 171. First published in German in 1960. English translation by Edward Fitzgerald, published 1960. Reprint, with updated new chapter (1986): Wisdom Publications, London. ISBN 0-86171-045-2.
  5. ^ Goldstein, Melvyn C., A History of Modern Tibet, pp812-813
  6. ^ Grunfeld, A.T., The Making of Modern Tibet, p118
  7. ^ Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama (1990). Freedom in Exile: The Autobiography of the Dalai Lama. HarperCollins. 
  8. ^ Humanity, Not Nationalism from The Tech website
  9. ^ Craig, Mary (1997). Kundun: A Biography of the Family of the Dalai Lama. Counterpoint. 
  10. ^ Dalai Lama Receives Congressional Gold Medal
  11. ^ "China keeps tight lid on riot-hit areas", Agence France-Presse, Philippine Daily Inquirer, 2008-03-24. Retrieved on 2008-03-24. 
  12. ^ Dalai Lama - Speech to the U.N and Images of Tibet. Retrieved on 2006-08-06.
  13. ^ Cosmic Harmony. Dalai Lama Address to the United Nations.
  14. ^ Marcello, Patricia Cronin (2003). The Dalai Lama: A Biography. Greenwood Press. ISBN 0313322074. 
  15. ^ http://www.peaceabbey.org/awards/cocrecipientlist.html
  16. ^ Gyatso, Tenzin, Dalai Lama XIV, interview, 25 July 1981.
  17. ^ Goldstein, Melvyn C., A History of Modern Tibet, 1913-1951, University of California Press, 1989, pp812-813
  18. ^ Ngapoi recalls the founding of the TAR, Ngapoi Ngawang Jigmei, China View, 30 August 2005.
  19. ^ Global Village News. Dalai Lama Considers Ending Exile & Return To Tibet.
  20. ^ Interview with The Guardian, September 5, 2003
  21. ^ CNN.com. China keeps up attacks on Dalai Lama.
  22. ^ a b Dalai Lama named Emory distinguished professor
  23. ^ Dalai Lama Visits Colgate. The Office of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Retrieved on 2008-04-23.
  24. ^ Kamenetz,Rodger (1994)The Jew in the Lotus Harper Collins: 1994.
  25. ^ Reuters Dalai Lama does not support Olympics Boycott
  26. ^ CNN Dalai Lama arrives in Japan
  27. ^ a b Parenti, M. (2003). "Friendly feudalism: The Tibet myth". New Political Science 25: 579-590. Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group. 
  28. ^ a b "World News Briefs; Dalai Lama Group Says It Got Money From C.I.A.", The New York Times, October 2, 1998. 
  29. ^ Dalai Lama speaks "middle way" approach for Tibet's future
  30. ^ a b Johann Hari. "Dalai Lama interview", The Independent, 7 June, 2004. 
  31. ^ Introduction to the Middle-Way Policy and its History
  32. ^ CNN.com, Dalai Lama: China causing 'cultural genocide'
  33. ^ "Dalai Lama 'to resign' if violence worsens", CNN, 2008-03-18. Retrieved on 2008-03-18. 
  34. ^ "China admits Tibet riots spread", CNN, 2008-03-20. Retrieved on 2008-03-20. 
  35. ^ "Dalai Lama pleads for peaceful dialogue on Tibet", CNN, 2008-03-28. Retrieved on 2008-03-28. 
  36. ^ The Dalai Lama Foundation. Missions and Programs.
  37. ^ Boston.com. The Buddha of suburbia.
  38. ^ The Dalai Lama's views on science and religion in an op-ed for The New York Times
  39. ^ The Buddhist religion and homosexuality at Religioustolerance.org
  40. ^ Dalai Lama Urges 'Respect, Compassion, and Full Human Rights for All,' Including Gays. Conkin, Dennis. Bay Area Reporter, June 19th, 1997
  41. ^ OUT Magazine February/March 1994
  42. ^ Shambhala Sun - "According to Buddhist Tradition". Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  43. ^ Dalai Lama meets Idaho’s religious leaders by Gary Stivers, www.sunvalleyonline.com, 15 September 2005
  44. ^ "The Dalai Lama: Tibet's leader-in-exile talks about the C.I.A., Saddam Hussein, Chinese terrorism, sex and his own violent impulses," by Claudia Dreifus. New York Times, Nov 28, 1993. p. SM52 [1] by
  45. ^ His Holiness the Dalai Lama's Address to the University at Buffalo
  46. ^ "Dalai Lama Campaigns to End Wildlife Trade", ENS, 8 April 2005. 
  47. ^ Justin Huggler. "Reports Fur Flies Over Tiger Plight", New Zealand Herald, 18 February 2006. 
  48. ^ Dissident Voice. Friendly Feudalism: The Tibet Myth.
  49. ^ Tibet and China, Marxism, Nonviolence
  50. ^ Dalai Lama urges students to shape the world
  51. ^ Laird, Thomas (2006). The Story of Tibet: Conversations with the Dalai Lama. Grove Press. Source: [2] (accessed: January 31, 2008)
  52. ^ Interview with CBC News, 16 April 2004
  53. ^ Gere, Richard. "The 2005 TIME 100: The Dalai Lama", TIME Magazine, 18 April 2005. Retrieved on 2007-02-11. 
  54. ^ "Dalai Lama becomes honorary citizen", Victoria Times-Colonist, 10 September 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-11. 
  55. ^ Grudnikov, Karina. Dalai Lama joins Wallenberg as Honorary citizen of Canada. International Raoul Wallenberg Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-02-11.
  56. ^ "Highest US civilian honour for Dalai Lama", The Times of India, 14 September 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-11. 
  57. ^ Associated Press, China warns that Dalai Lama's congressional award, Bush meeting could damage U.S.-Chinese ties, International Herald Tribune, 16 October 2007
  58. ^ Merkel meets with the Dalai Lama. Euronews.net.
  59. ^ Rogue State: A Guide to the World's Only Superpower
  60. ^ His material highness Salon.com article by Christopher Hitchens
  61. ^ World Tibet Network News. His Holiness the Dalai Lama's view on India's Nuclear Tests.
  62. ^ "Dalai Lama: political retirement", Google (yahoo). Retrieved on 2007-05-13. 
  63. ^ BBC NEWS, New Chinese rules on Dalai Lama
  64. ^ Dalai Lama's representative talks about China, Tibet, Shugden and the next Dalai Lama, David Shankbone, Wikinews, November 14, 2007.
  65. ^ Dalai Lama calls for calm amid Tibet violence
  66. ^ Monks march as Dalai Lama condemns Beijing
  67. ^ Tibet's young exiles sick of passive approach
  68. ^ Tibetans criticise Dalai Lama's 'middle way'
  69. ^ China accuses Dalai Lama of 'inciting' Tibet riots to 'sabotage' Olympics
  70. ^ China says Dalai Lama trying to ruin Olympics
  71. ^ Uprising Spurns Dalai Lama's Way
  72. ^ Dalai Lama Threatens to Resign
  73. ^ Dalai Lama's threat shakes Buddhism
  74. ^ Can the Dalai Lama Resign?
  75. ^ Dalai Lama Threatens to Resign - TIME
  76. ^ China steps up verbal attacks on Dalai Lama over Tibet
  77. ^ Drew, Jill. "A Day After Offer to Meet, China Assails Dalai Lama", Washington Post, April 27, 2008. Retrieved on 2008-04-27. 
  78. ^ List of awards
  79. ^ Paris makes Dalai Lama honorary citizen
  80. ^ Paris makes Dalai Lama, Chinese dissident honorary citizens
  81. ^ [3]
  82. ^ Public Law 109-287
  83. ^ [4]
  84. ^ Presentation Speech by Egil Aarvik, Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee
  85. ^ The Nobel Prize. Dalai Lama (Tenzin Gyatso).
  86. ^ The Government of Tibet in Exile. His Holiness the Dalai Lama's Nobel Prize acceptance speech University Aula, Oslo, 10 December 1989.

Ma Lin (1873 - d. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China (ROC), now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in terms of seats in the Legislative Yuan, and the oldest political party in the... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Front page of The Tech, issue of January 18, 2006 The Tech, first published in 1881, is the oldest and largest campus newspaper at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... AFP logo Paris headquarters of AFP Charles Havas Agence France-Presse (AFP) is the oldest news agency in the world, and one of the three largest with Associated Press and Reuters. ... The Philippine Daily Inquirer logo. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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  • The Website of The Office of His Holiness the Dalai Lama (Official site)
  • Audio teachings of the Dalai Lama on many different topics
  • Collection of teachings, speeches, and letters
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  • Dalai Lama Teachings
  • Home of the 14th Dalai Lama in India
  • The Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy(TCHRD)
  • Tenzin Gyatso Charlie Rose interview, 16 November 2005
  • The shadow of Dalai Lama
Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama
Born: 6 July 1935
Buddhist titles
Preceded by
Thubten Gyatso
Reincarnation of the Dalai Lama
1950 – present
Incumbent
Titles in pretence
Preceded by
Thubten Gyatso
— TITULAR —
Dalai Lama
1950 – present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Zhang Jingwu
Chief of the Tibet Region, PRC
1956 – 1959
Succeeded by
Choekyi Gyaltsen
Persondata
NAME Gyatso, Tenzin
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Dalai Lama (honorific); བསྟན་འཛིན་རྒྱ་མཚོ་ (Tibetan); Rgya-mtsho, Bstan-'dzin (Wylie)
SHORT DESCRIPTION Dalai Lama
DATE OF BIRTH July 6, 1935
PLACE OF BIRTH Takster, Amdo, Tibet
DATE OF DEATH living
PLACE OF DEATH

Buddhism is a variety of teachings described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Several Buddhist terms and concepts lack direct translations into English that cover the breadth of the original term. ... Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z The following is a List of Buddhist topics: A Abhidharma Ahimsa Ajahn Ajahn Chah Ajanta Aksobhya Alexandra David-Néel... The History of Buddhism spans from the 6th century BCE to the present, starting with the birth of the Buddha Siddhartha Gautama. ... 563 BCE: Siddhārtha Gautama, Buddha-to-be, is born in Lumbini, Ancient India. ... There are many divisions and subdivisions of the schools of Buddhism. ... Chinese Song Period Maha-prajna-paramita Sutra Page The texts can be categorized in a number of ways, but the most fundamental division is that between canonical and non-canonical texts. ... Buddhism - Percentage by country The percentage of Buddhist population of each country was taken from the US State Departments International Religious Freedom Report 2004 [1]. Other sources used were CIA Factbook [2] and adherents. ... The cultural elements of Buddhism vary by region and include: Buddhist cuisine Buddhist art Buddharupa Art and architecture of Japan Greco-Buddhism Tibetan Buddhist sacred art Buddhist music Buddhist chant Shomyo Categories: Buddhism-related stubs ... Mahabodhi Temple Complex at Bodh Gaya Buddhist temples, monasteries, stupas, and pagodas sorted by location. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar (Marathi: डा. भीमराव रामजी आंबेडकर) (April 14, 1891 — December 6, 1956) was an Indian jurist, scholar, Bahujan political leader and a Buddhist revivalist, who is the chief architect of the Indian Constitution. ... Lokesh Chandra is an eminent contemporary scholar of Buddhism and the Indian arts. ... Chögyam Trungpa (1940 - April 4, 1987) was a Buddhist meditation master, scholar, teacher and artist. ... Eberhart (Edward) Julius Dietrich Conze (1904 - 1979) was born in London of mixed German, French, and NetherlandsDutch ancestry. ... Alexandra David-Néel (October 24, 1868 - September 8, 1969) was a French explorer, anarchist, spiritualist, Buddhist and writer. ... For the article about the seventh Dalai Lama, see Kelsang Gyatso, 7th Dalai Lama. ... Ninth Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche Thrangu Rinpoche (/trɔŋgu rinpotʃe/) was born in 1933 in Kham, Tibet. ... The venerable Prof Walpola Sri Rahula Maha Thera (1907-1997) was a Buddhist monk, scholar and writer. ... Caroline Augusta Foley Rhys Davids (1857–1942) was a Pāli language scholar and translator, and from 1922-1942 president of the Pali Text Society which was founded by her husband T.W. Rhys Davids whom she married in 1894. ... Thomas William Rhys Davids (May 12, 1843 - December 27, 1922) was an British scholar of the Pāli language and founder of the Pali Text Society. ... Seongcheol (or Seong Cheol) is the dharma name of a Korean Seon Master. ... Sogyal Rinpoche (Tibetan: བསོད་རྒྱལ་; Wylie: Bsod-rgyal) is a Tibetan Dzogchen lama of the Nyingma tradition. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Richard Francis Gombrich (born 17 July 1937) is a British Indologist and scholar of Sanskrit, Pāli, and Buddhist Studies. ... Venerable Ajahn Chah Subhatto (Chao Khun Bodhinyanathera) (Thai:ชา สุภัทโท , alternatively spelled Achaan Chah, occasionally with honorific titles Luang Por and Phra) (17 June 1918, Thailand – 16 January 1992), was one of the greatest meditation masters of the twentieth century. ... Thanissaro Bhikkhu (Geoffrey DeGraff) (1949 - ) is an American Buddhist monk of the Thai forest kammatthana tradition. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Nyanaponika Thera (July 21, 1901, Hanau – 19 October 1994, Forest Hermitage, Kandy, Ceylon) was a German-born Sri-Lanka-ordained Theravada monk, co-founder of the Buddhist Publication Society[1], contemporary author of numerous seminal Theravada books, and teacher of contemporary Western Buddhist leaders such as Bhikkhu Bodhi. ... Jack Kornfield (b. ... Gil Fronsdal is a Buddhist who has practiced Zen and Vipassana since the 1970s, and is currently a Buddhist teacher who lives in the San Fransisco Bay area. ... Seung Sahn Soen-sa (1927-2004) was a Korean Zen Buddhist monk, and the 78th patriarch in his lineage of Korean Zen (or Korean Sŏn) Buddhism. ... Nishida Kitaro Nishida Kitaro (西田 幾多郎 Nishida Kitarō; 1870, Ishikawa Prefecture – 1945) was a prominent Japanese philosopher, founder of what has been called the Kyoto School of philosophy. ... Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (October 18, 1870, Kanazawa, Japan – July 22, 1966; standard transliteration: Suzuki Daisetsu, 鈴木大拙) was a famous author of books and essays on Buddhism, Zen and Shin that were instrumental in spreading interest in both Zen and Shin (and Far Eastern philosophy in general) to the West. ... Paul Reps is an American poet and author. ... From The Essential Alan Watts Alan Wilson Watts (January 6, 1915 – November 16, 1973) was a philosopher, writer, speaker, and expert in comparative religion. ... Nhat Hanh (Vietnamese: Nhất Hạnh; IPA:   is an expatriate Vietnamese Zen Buddhist monk. ... Venerable Master Yin Shun (印順導師, Yìnshùn DÇŽoshÄ«) (12 March 1906–4 June 2005) was a well known Buddhist monk and scholar in the tradition of Chinese Mahayana Buddhism. ... Statue of the Venerable Master Hsing Yun. ... Shunryu Suzuki (鈴木 俊隆 Suzuki ShunryÅ«, dharma name Shogaku Shunryu) (May 18, 1904 - December 4, 1971) was a Japanese Zen master of the Soto school, who played a major role in establishing Buddhism in America. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Sri Aurobindo (Bangla: শ্রী অরবিন্দ Sri Ôrobindo, Sanskrit: श्री अरविन्द SrÄ« Aravinda) (August 15, 1872–December 5, 1950) was an Indian/Hindu nationalist, scholar, poet, mystic, evolutionary philosopher, yogi and guru [1]. After a short political career in which he became one of the leaders of the early movement for the freedom of India... Satsvarupa dasa Goswami is a disciple of A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, who founded the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON), better known in the west as the Hare Krishna movement. ... Dr. A.K. Coomaraswamy // Life of Dr. A.K. 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Ken Wilber Kenneth Earl Wilber Jr. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Situation of the east Tibetan region of Amdo Amdo (Tibetan: ཨ༌མདོ, Chinese: 安多, Pinyin: Ä€nduō) is one of the three former provinces of Tibet, the other two being Ãœ-Tsang and Kham; it is also the place from which Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama, comes from. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
TibetNet - His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet (1041 words)
His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, is the head of state and spiritual leader of the Tibetan people.
Dalai Lama is a Mongolian title meaning "Ocean of Wisdom" and the Dalai Lamas are manifestations of the Bodhisattva of Compassion, Chenrezig.
His Holiness the Dalai Lama is a man of peace.
Dalai Lama - MSN Encarta (250 words)
Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhism and formerly the ruler of Tibet.
The Dalai Lama is believed to be a reincarnation of the Buddha.
The first to bear the title of Dalai Lama was Sonam Gyatso, grand lama of the Drepung monastery and leader of the Gelugpa (Yellow Hat) sect, who received it in 1578 from the Mongol chief Altan Khan; it was then applied retroactively to the previous leaders of the sect.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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